The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Clarice Dibble Walker

Professor and commissioner of social services, Clarice Dibble Walker was born on March 31, 1936 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She is the granddaughter of Robert Robinson Taylor, and the daughter of Helen Taylor Dibble, and Dr. Eugene Heriot Dibble, Jr. Walker is the youngest of five children. Her grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor was born on June 8, 1868. He was the first African American to graduate with a degree in architecture from MIT in 1892. Taylor worked with Booker T. Washington as an architect at Tuskegee University from 1890 until 1930. He has designed several of Tuskegee’s most prominent buildings such as the science buildings, dormitories and the school's chapel. Helen Annetta Taylor was born on October 15, 1901 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She attended Fisk University and graduated with her B.A. in music. Walker’s father Dr. Eugene Heriot Dibble Jr., attended Atlanta University and Howard medical school. He was the head of John Andrew Hospital and served in World War II as Colonel.

Walker attended Chambliss Childrens School in Tuskegee, Alabama and Northfield High School in Massachusetts. She received her B.S. degree from Sarah Lawrence College in Westchester County, New York in 1957. Walker later obtained her M.A. degree from Bryn Mawr Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research. In 1992, she served as Commissioner of Social Services for the Government of the District of Columbia. Walker has worked at Howard University as professor and department chair in the Graduate School of Social Work, Program Development in the Child Development Center, Department of Pediatrics, and the College of Medicine. She has served as visiting lecturer at Bryn Mawr School of Social Work and Social Research. In addition, she has worked as a psychiatric social worker at the University of Montreal General Hospital in Montreal Canada.

Walker has served as Chair of the Distribution Committee of the Survivors Fund, the Research Committee of Prevent Child Abuse America and the Board of Safe Shores. She has also served as Trustee for the Seed Public Charter School, Sarah Lawrence College and Howard University.
Walker is married to George H. Walker, and they have four children together.

Accession Number

A2012.065

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/1/2012

Last Name

Walker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dibble

Schools

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

St. Joseph Catholic School

Sarah Lawrence College

Columbia University

Northfield Mount Hermon School

Tuskegee Institute High School

First Name

Clarice

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

WAL18

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

Let's Move It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

3/31/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Social work researcher Clarice Dibble Walker (1936 - ) was known for her research on socio-cultural factors involving children and families in urban environments.

Employment

District of Columbia

Bryn Mawr School of Social Work and Social Research

Howard University

Montreal General Hospital

United Planning Organization

University of Chicago

Capital Head Start, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:698,8:4675,106:12806,223:16469,320:16991,328:19166,360:19601,365:29026,432:34489,483:36790,493:37330,499:39308,507:39764,514:41936,529:44730,540:45378,550:45702,555:51960,595:55530,616:61210,641:63794,659:64114,665:73100,834:73548,842:73804,847:74380,858:75660,887:76044,894:82663,933:83707,946:89230,1106:92507,1161:97194,1186:97584,1192:103746,1339:105384,1425:114720,1478:115270,1493:115765,1504:116260,1514:116535,1519:116755,1524:117415,1540:118460,1576:121442,1588:123504,1606:123952,1615:125168,1643:125488,1649:128610,1670:129754,1688:131866,1712:135000,1720:139786,1766:145345,1782:145999,1789:150946,1804:151870,1811:154110,1821:154466,1826:154822,1831:155623,1842:156157,1849:156513,1854:162354,1888:162650,1893:163760,1915:164056,1920:165092,1937:167420,1968:168062,1976:168811,1984:169988,1997:176575,2035:185376,2105:188200,2125:188656,2132:189188,2140:196687,2259:198030,2281:205630,2357:206014,2365:208958,2374:209334,2379:215177,2413:217923,2449:219911,2488:221899,2529:222254,2535:229920,2576:230208,2581:230496,2586:237500,2663:242015,2741:255372,2784:255748,2789:256218,2795:257346,2807:257910,2814:261573,2835:264462,2896:265425,2907:265853,2912:271070,2939:271622,2946:272450,2965:273554,2979:278064,3014:278498,3026:279428,3053:279924,3062:280544,3073:287428,3117:291310,3152:292990,3181:293620,3191:294600,3210:298712,3250:299304,3259:299600,3264:301006,3295:305324,3393:305672,3399:306020,3404:306542,3411:307460,3417$0,0:10138,210:15303,237:17349,265:21633,276:22005,281:22656,290:24888,322:25539,330:26097,337:31305,406:31677,411:32235,418:36684,458:37776,474:38244,481:39336,497:40272,509:64684,672:65216,680:65748,688:66508,700:67420,712:71268,743:72060,755:90172,879:90964,891:91492,898:94950,909:95480,915:99830,951:101555,980:102305,992:103205,1004:111990,1039:114942,1070:118390,1079:122810,1127:123450,1137:124490,1153:127640,1169:128830,1185:130020,1201:130530,1208:138678,1319:142944,1331:150398,1418:150763,1424:153720,1440:160290,1495:173118,1600:175894,1609:176686,1621:177118,1629:182614,1653:183846,1668:187229,1691:193020,1704:194860,1717:196010,1775:202487,1849:203939,1863:204786,1871:207826,1883:214956,1924:215814,1936:228785,2034:231455,2074:232078,2083:232790,2096:233413,2105:233858,2111:234570,2120:234926,2130:235282,2135:239198,2198:248820,2293:249630,2305:250260,2314:251160,2339:252690,2362:264134,2502:265953,2544:268414,2590:268949,2685:289160,2810
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarice Dibble Walker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her maternal grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls the notable families at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her mother's education and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her maternal grandparents' grocery store

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her father's education and profession

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her paternal aunts and uncles, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her paternal aunts and uncles, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers the sense of community in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls the segregation of Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' travels with Robert Russa Moton, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' travels with Robert Russa Moton, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the John A. Andrew Clinical Society, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the John A. Andrew Clinical Society, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her parents' careers

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers Tuskegee, Alabama's notable families

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at Chambliss Children's House School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her early interest in music

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls Tuskegee Institute's entertainment series

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her teacher at St. Joseph Catholic School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her teachers at the Tuskegee Institute High School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at the Northfield School for Girls in Gill, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her chores at the Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the Tuskegee Airmen

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers singing in the choir at Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her experiences with segregation in the South

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her major at Sarah Lawrence College

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her time at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her field placements at Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers working with the City of New York Department of Welfare

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her first marriage and move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers meeting her second husband, George H. Walker III

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls protesting against Benjamin C. Willis in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her work with Capital Head Start, Inc. in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her role as director of Capital Head Start, Inc. in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers the Washington, D.C. riots of 1968

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her professorship at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her students at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her experiences at Howard University and Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the National Black Child Development Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her work with the SEED School of Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her career at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls becoming the commissioner of the Commission on Social Services

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her father's legacy at the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her children

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$7

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her field placements at Columbia University in New York City
Clarice Dibble Walker recalls becoming the commissioner of the Commission on Social Services
Transcript
So, you graduated in--from Sarah Lawrence [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York] in, what's it--$$Nineteen fifty-seven [1957].$$Fifty-seven [1957], okay.$$Um-hm.$$And so you went--did you go immediately to graduate school afterwards?$$Yes.$$Okay. All right.$$I went to Columbia [Columbia University].$$Okay. So, this is where you go to Columbia in New York City [New York, New York] and so what was your major?$$I went into psychiatric social work.$$Okay.$$And I did a field placement first year in public welfare in New York City, which was very different. I learned to go all over the Bronx [New York] and everywhere. And my field placement was the first year in the department of welfare [City of New York Department of Welfare; City of New York Department of Social Services], so that meant I was in the home visiting and working with people who were on welfare. And then my second year, I was at the Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital [Columbia Presbyterian Hospital; New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York] in the Department of Psychiatry.$$Now, were these--I mean, was it hard to adjust to New York City and, and the, the--you know, the, the real deep urban problems of New York City all at once? 'Cause you, you grew up in Tuskegee [Alabama] in a family like atmosphere, you go to New England to bucolic colleges (laughter), and then you go--you--all, all of the sudden you're in--$$In New York City.$$Yeah.$$Yeah, it was, although I had--you know, I knew a little bit about New York City because we'd go from Bronxville [New York] into New York on the train and we'd go back and forth a lot 'cause it was a short trip. But it, it was very much--it was different for me when I went to Columbia and had my field placement in public housing. And by public housing, I was really trying to work with people who didn't have jobs and, of course, being in New York making home visits is very different in the sense that you may be going to twelve, fifteen story walkup buildings. So, it was difficult but I enjoyed it. And--I shouldn't say I enjoyed it, but I, I learned a lot about the people. I became friends with some of them. And when I say friends, I don't mean I was--I was friends in the sense of they viewed me as being a person that wanted to help. Sometimes they didn't want my help because it meant they'd have to go back to work and that sometimes was problematic. But, I learned a lot. It was a totally new experience as you point out, you know, being in this big city after I'd been in small towns and so forth. But, I, I enjoyed my work very much and I learned a lot.$$Okay. So, did you have--were there any particular instructors or people you met along the way in the, the department of welfare that guided you?$$Yes and I'm--well, I had that first year in, in public welfare and then the second year--right now, I can't think of the names of my two people who were supervising me, but in the second year, I was in the Department of Psychiatry at--they've changed the name of the hospital, but it's the big Columbia University hospital. And I learned a lot and I enjoyed being in an interdisciplinary area because we worked a lot with different disciplines in the hospital.$$Okay.$$And, of course, I was familiar with hospitals since I'd (laughter) grown up in one practically [John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital, Tuskegee, Alabama], but this was a much, much bigger place.$Well, go, go ahead and tell us about that, the, the 9/11 [September 11, 2001] victims of (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, I was just gonna say that volunteer life has been a very big part of my life, and I have worked on numerous boards here in the city and I will tell you that another experience that we haven't talked about is the fact that, before I get to 9/11, is that I went on loan from Howard University [Washington, D.C.] to be the commissioner of social services in the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.].$$Okay. And what, what year is this? Do you remember?$$I'll think about it. I'll tell you in a minute. I was at Howard and there was a lawsuit brought against the District of Columbia called LaShawn v. the District of Columbia [sic.], and it was filed by the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union], and the lawsuit, the plaintiffs asked me to serve as an expert witness in their case in the courts of the district, which I did, and I testified against the District of Columbia, and the lawsuit was won. Subsequently, the mayor of the district called me and said since I had been so vehement about the problems of the system, would I accept a job of commissioner of social services?$$Now, who was the mayor at that--$$Sharon Pratt Kelly [HistoryMaker Sharon Pratt].$$Okay.$$And I did that. And I went to, to this--to the child welfare division even though I had responsibilities for other services in the commission [Commission on Social Services], and it was really worse than I imagined it would be. But, we worked on it, worked on it, and worked on it, and it's still in progress, a work in progress. But, I did do that for three years. And while I was there, I was contacted by Freddie Mac [Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation], the corporation Leland Brendsel [Leland C. Brendsel], who said that they were interested in working with us and what could they do. And we established a partnership with Freddie Mac. The agency was in total disarray. They not only contributed funding for us, but actually put staff in the commission in order to help us just find out where children were, who they were, who their parents were, and so we established a terrific partnership with Freddie Mac, the Freddie Mac Foundation. And when I left the commission, they asked me to join the board of the Freddie Mac Foundation, and I have served on that board ever since.$$Okay. So, so how long--how long have you been on the board of Freddie, Freddie Mac Foundation? Do, do you know or do you have a--$$Since I left the commission--$$Okay.$$--which must've been ten years now.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$So that's about two- 2002, I guess or so, about the time you retired from Howard, I guess, just about, yeah. Okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$What--$$So--$$Oh--$$--that has continued.

Valarie Justiss Vance

Valarie Justiss Vance was born in Mt. Pleasant, Texas in 1913, but at a young age moved with her family to Toledo, Ohio. After graduating from Waite High School in 1931, she moved to Washington, D.C., where she attended Howard University, earning her A.B. in 1935. Returning to Toledo after her graduation, Vance earned an M.A. in 1936 from the University of Toledo. She later attended the University of Chicago, and went on to earn the Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 1949. For her doctoral dissertation, Vance focused on the unmarried father, and she was the first person in America to write extensively on the subject. She also spent time studying at the University of Vienna in Austria where she studied the German language.

After earning her M.A., Vance relocated to Jackson, Tennessee, where she was hired as a professor of English at Lane College. In 1938, she moved to Chicago to take a position with the Chicago Welfare Administration as the senior social worker. Vance spent the years between 1940 and 1960 working with the Public Schools of the District of Columbia as a research assistant in social work. Also during the 1940s, Vance was a broadcaster on the program Americans All in Washington, D.C. Vance became the director of social work at the Massachusetts Association for the Adult Blind in 1960, where she remained until being hired by the City of Los Angeles in 1963. While working for the City of Los Angeles, Vance wrote the social work provisions that were included in the War on Poverty. During that time, Vance was also served as a mentor at Loma Linda University. In 1970, Vance became an assistant professor at the University of California, and in 1973 she became a psychological consultant for the Head Start program. At that same time, she went to work for the California Department of Mental Health as a psychiatric social worker. Vance left the Department of Mental Health in 1984, and in 1999 she retired from Head Start.

In addition to her extensive working career, Vance spent large amounts of time active with various organizations across the country. For more than thirty years, she was a consultant and grant writer for the Council of Affiliated Negro Organizations (CANO). She also served on the board of directors of Loma Linda University, and remained involved with the school by serving on the advisory committee to the board of directors for social work. She was featured in Who’s Who in American Universities and Colleges, the University of Toledo Alumnus and The World’s Who’s Who of Women.

Vance was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2004. Vance passed away on June 18, 2015.

Accession Number

A2004.046

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/22/2004

Last Name

Vance

Maker Category
Middle Name

Justiss

Organizations
Schools

Waite High School

Howard University

First Name

Valarie

Birth City, State, Country

Mt. Pleasant

HM ID

VAN03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

God Willing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

1/7/1913

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Death Date

6/18/2015

Short Description

Social work researcher and psychological consultant Valarie Justiss Vance (1913 - 2015 ) served as the director of social work at the Massachusetts Association for the Adult Blind, after which she began working for the City of Los Angeles, where she wrote the social work provisions that were included in the War on Poverty. She later became an assistant professor at the University of California, and a psychological consultant for the Head Start program.

Employment

Lane College

Chicago Welfare Administration

District of Columbia Public Schools

Massachusetts Association for the Adult Blind

City of Los Angeles

Loma Linda University

University of California

Head Start Program

California Department of Mental Health

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:10870,119:11720,125:27460,282:49010,600:61020,739:61340,744:64140,800:80720,967:100807,1218:131572,1631:135805,1718:153306,2033:154674,2057:159930,2167:160362,2174:171200,2310$0,0:4700,43:5300,50:8200,77:44946,483:45282,488:50658,601:53682,637:66615,758:68340,805:71040,846:72090,868:86138,999:86570,1006:95795,1111:98700,1152:99281,1160:109270,1320:109714,1332:110158,1339:110454,1344:114302,1378:131588,1632:131864,1637:135170,1655
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Valarie Justiss Vance's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the differences between her mother's and father's families

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her mother and father's meetings in Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls oppressive race relations in the South

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her experiences in Lima, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her family's house in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her brother's childhood illness and her maternal grandfather's death

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Toledo, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Toledo, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls her father's impressions of the local Baptist minister

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance shares memories of growing up in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the importance of education in her family, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the importance of education in her family, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her favorite childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the importance of education in her family, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her decision to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance lists the educational institutions she attended in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes Mordecai Wyatt Johnson and the social demographics of Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance lists notable personalities of Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her professors at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls developing her interest in social work, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls developing her interest in social work, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls developing her interest in social work, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes Seventh Day Adventism

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Valarie Justiss Vance remembers working for the Toledo Press in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the work of Edith Abbott, Grace Abbott and Sophonisba Breckinridge, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the work of Edith Abbott, Grace Abbott and Sophonisba Breckinridge, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls applying to work in the Washington, D.C. public school system, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls applying to work in the Washington, D.C. public school system, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her experiences living in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes Washington, D.C.'s African American high society

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes attending The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio in the mid-1940s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes working for the Massachusetts Association of the Adult Blind

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls her move from Massachusetts to California

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls her familiarity with HistoryMaker Edward Brooke

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes Robert C. Weaver, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes living in southern California

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes social issues in the United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes social issues in the United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance reflects upon being a social worker in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance reflects upon social issues in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Valarie Justiss Vance reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes 'Americans All,' pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the beginnings of her and Tomlinson Todd's radio program, 'Americans All,' pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes the beginnings of her and Tomlinson Todd's radio program, 'Americans All,' pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes 'Americans All,' pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Valarie Justiss Vance describes her relationship with Tomlinson Todd

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls Tomlinson Todd's involvement in District of Columbia v. John R. Thompson Co., Inc., 1953, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Valarie Justiss Vance recalls Tomlinson Todd's involvement in District of Columbia v. John R. Thompson Co., Inc., 1953, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Valarie Justiss Vance narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Valarie Justiss Vance narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Valarie Justiss Vance narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$7

DATitle
Valarie Justiss Vance describes her professors at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
Valarie Justiss Vance recalls developing her interest in social work, pt. 1
Transcript
Who were the professors that influenced you [at Howard University, Washington, D.C.]?$$Lucy Diggs Slowe, a dear woman, Kelly Miller. Now Kelly Miller made an observation; he was professor of sociology. And he was very wrong, though. Kelly Miller said that as much as he hated to think it, but if black people were to earn money and get ahead in the world, they'd choose one of two fields: entertainment or sports. He said that's a way of life for us. And when you see what has happened, and that was--And I graduated from Howard [University, Washington, D.C.] in 1931, and he had been preaching that doctrine long before that. And then of course, there was Ralph [J.] Bunche. Dr. Bunche's mother was dying of tuberculosis when they came from Detroit [Michigan] through Toledo [Ohio]. And her condition worsened, so that they just stopped right in Toledo. It was incompatible with her going forward in an open quote "buggy" car. The interesting fact here is that when her life was so tenuous, he was put into school for whatever period they would be here. And when she died and was buried here, well, he continued on to the coast. After he became, he was never the full Secretary of State; he was assistant Secretary of State. He came to Toledo and stopped off at Gunckel School [Toledo, Ohio], which he attended for a year while his mother was ill. And he's walking down the hall, and the principal, "Young man, you must stop at the office. And what is your name?" He said, "I'm Ralph Bunche." "The Ralph Bunche?" He said, "Well, I am Ralph Bunche." And he said, "And I was just coming here to look at our class picture. I was in the class of so and so." "Yes, of course." All these pictures were spread out there in the hallway. He got up there and they went through all the pictures, and his year was not there. She said, "Every picture's here." Then finally she called the janitor. He said, "There's one old beat up picture down here." Well, that turned out to be the one of Ralph Bunche. (Laughter) Of course, that became the centerpiece of all pictures, you know, because she scattered all these other pictures--"Ralph Bunche attended school here." (Laughter) The message was clear to the students--attend this school, and you could possibly be another Ralph Bunche (laughter).$What made you want to pursue a career as a social worker?$$Its potential for good. My father [Jacob Justiss], who was a great reader, had introduced us to Jane Addams, who was at the Hull House at 7th [Avenue] and Halsted [Street] in Chicago [Illinois], and he was very fond of the work that she had done. That was the heyday of settlements. We don't have too much settlements now; we don't think about settlements. But, and even when she came through Toledo [Ohio] to speak, we were down there to hear her. And then when I was at Howard [University, Washington, D.C.], she was one of the Sunday speakers. I was just fascinated by what happened at settlement houses, and its potential for change. I wanted to live in a settlement house myself, but my sister and I had to settle for my being on the board of a settlement house and being in charge of the nursery school division rather than actually living there, and enjoying the fellowship of the noon meals and all the other things that one thinks about at settlement houses. And I had been in the YWCA [YWCA USA] when they first started studying club structure at Navarre School. And in the seventh grade, beginning in the seventh grade, you could be a member of any club you wished, and we wanted to be members of the YWCA [YWCA USA]. And when we looked at some of the things that happened at YWCAs, I just decided that social workers were people who staffed YWCAs. I decided then and there that I wanted to be a social worker. So I volunteered as a director of women's--girls' activities, not women's--girls' activities (unclear) when I was at Howard for the entire four years I was there.

Paul Hill

Civic leader, social worker, social activist, and author Paul Hill, Jr. was born on November 6, 1945 to Mabel Craig Hill and Paul Hill, Sr. in Cleveland, Ohio. After graduating from Cleveland’s John Adams High School in 1964, Hill earned his B.S. degree in business education from Ohio University and master’s degrees in educational policy studies and social work from the University of Kentucky and the University of Wisconsin. He also completed training with the Gestalt Institute of Cleveland in organizational and systems development.

Hill served for thirty three years as CEO and President of one of the oldest and largest children, youth and family community based services organizations in Cleveland, Ohio. He retired in 2011. Hill is a former W. K. Kellogg Foundation Leadership Fellow (1989 – 1992), and conducted field studies on the socialization of males. In 1992, he authored Coming of Age, a book based on his research on African American boys and men. In 1993, he established The National Rites of Passage Institute, which is designed “to create a critical mass and community of adults to serve and develop youth.” Since 1993, the Institute has provided training to more than 700 men and women in twenty cities. In turn, these individuals have been responsible for mentoring and supporting more than 10,000 children and youth in neighborhood and community-based programs. He has also published several journal articles on rites of passage and human development, including “African Presence in the Americas: Rituals and Rites of Passage.”

A much sought-after speaker, Hill is also active in many community activities, including Kwanzaa cultural programs. Hill and his wife, Marquita McAllister Hill, are the parents of seven children and seven grandchildren.

Paul Hill, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 17, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.025

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/17/2004

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

John Adams High School

Charles Dickens Elementary School

Alexander Hamilton Junior High School

Charles W Eliot School

Ohio University

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Paul

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

HIL07

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $500 - $1,000

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

If You Don’t Where You’re Going, Any Road Will Take You There.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

11/6/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Beans, Corn Muffins, Coleslaw

Short Description

Social worker, social activist, and social work researcher Paul Hill (1945 - ) was president and CEO of East End Neighborhood House, a neighborhood-based nonprofit organization that serves youth and families. In 1993, he established The National Rites of Passage Institute to provide training to adults to mentor and support youth.

Employment

Murtis H. Taylor Multi-Services Center

East End Neighborhood House

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:4092,79:4356,84:5478,138:9966,223:10428,231:11418,249:13464,327:14850,395:26940,566:27500,575:32470,679:33800,705:34360,714:46044,861:48492,918:56916,1071:57348,1082:60444,1137:74135,1265:78085,1310:104320,1742:105370,1767:108690,1776:110016,1796:115086,1893:115710,1902:119064,1971:125850,2102:126162,2107:132423,2149:132934,2157:136511,2220:138628,2264:139066,2271:148848,2494:155120,2535:156170,2555:159320,2617:177120,2920:177680,2929:191750,3245:192030,3250:192450,3257:198820,3275:199294,3282:204745,3355:205535,3367:212408,3538:225458,3713:227064,3727:227575,3735:232603,3780:233681,3799:235760,3897:245077,4040:246771,4061:247233,4068:249312,4144:250467,4174:270132,4415:285423,4649:288050,4708:290038,4740:290464,4751:307890,5013:308610,5024:309762,5044:313780,5075$0,0:5370,88:39023,665:66162,1014:73748,1068:95560,1347:179945,2341:218360,2829:242940,3108:260320,3274
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Paul Hill's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Paul Hill lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Paul Hill describes his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Paul Hill describes his paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Paul Hill comments on his relatives' migration from Alabama to Cleveland, Ohio in the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Paul Hill describes his parents' high school education in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Paul Hill talks about his family's history in sharecropping and at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Paul Hill describes his three brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Paul Hill describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Paul Hill talks about John O. Holly and the Future Outlook League in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Paul Hill narrates his photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Paul Hill describes his mother, Mabel Craig Hill

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Paul Hill talks about the post office's role in livelihood of the African American community

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Paul Hill talks about his grade school years and other graduates of John Adams High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Paul Hill talks about public housing in Cleveland, Ohio, and his neighbors in Cleveland's Lee-Harvard community

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Paul Hill describes his memories of the March on Washington and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Paul Hill talks about his sheltered home as well as attending Ohio University in Athens, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Paul Hill describes his experience at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Paul Hill narrates his photographs

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Paul Hill talks about his transition to campus life at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Paul Hill talks about his early social activism, student teaching at John Hay High School in Cleveland, Ohio, and joining the Teacher Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Paul Hill describes seminal moments in Lexington, Kentucky that shaped his desire for social activism

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Paul Hill describes his experience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as a Ford Fellow

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Paul Hill remembers his younger brother's death

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Paul Hill talks about campaigning for Carl Stokes' reelection and working with Arnold Pinkney at the Cleveland Board of Education

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Paul Hill talks about desegregation in Cleveland Public Schools in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Paul Hill talks about a disagreement with the Cleveland Board of Education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Paul Hill describes his work as a regional educational specialist for the U.S. Justice Department Community Relations Services, pt.1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Paul Hill describes his work as a regional educational specialist for the U.S. Justice Department Community Relations Services, pt.2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Paul Hill describes his work in the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Paul Hill talks about positive conditions for social and cognitive development in black students prior to integration

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Paul Hill talks about his wife, Marquita McAllister Hill

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Paul Hill talks about his children and grandchildren

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Paul Hill describes the African American community in East Cleveland, Ohio, and the state of the African American family

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Paul Hill describes the black community's self-perception

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Paul Hill comments on systemic issues affecting the black community in East Cleveland and his family's experience in the city

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Paul Hill describes the history of and services at East End Neighborhood House in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Paul Hill talks about East End Neighborhood House's partnership with Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Paul Hill comments on the social services in Cleveland, Ohio and a Ford Foundation study on Cleveland's African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Paul Hill talks about the social pacification of the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Paul Hill describes the importance of knowing African American history

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Paul Hill begins to talk about the National Rites of Passage program

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Paul Hill talks about the creation of the National Rites of Passage Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Paul Hill describes his rites of passage efforts as an extension of Kwanzaa

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Paul Hill talks about the eight principles taught through the National Rites of Passage Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Paul Hill talks about published works on rites of passage and his concern for preserving the integrity of the National Rites of Passage Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Paul Hill describes the significance of his contributions and the importance of rites of passage

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Paul Hill narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Paul Hill describes the history of and services at East End Neighborhood House in Cleveland, Ohio
Paul Hill talks about the creation of the National Rites of Passage Institute
Transcript
So, there are three things that always come to mind when I think about you and your work in greater Cleveland [Ohio], both in the city of Cleveland and also in East Cleveland. The first is your family. We spent some time talking about that family foundation; both for your parents [Paul Hill, Sr. and Mabel Craig Hill], your siblings, and then for your wife [Marquita McAllister Hill] and for your children. But then, I think too, about East End Neighborhood House, and I guess if you moved to East Cleveland in '81 [1981], that's about the same time that you're becoming director of East End.$$That's right.$$So, if we can shift gears a little bit and talk about some of the social services and other programs that are offered here at the East End Neighborhood House in the City of Cleveland.$$Well, East End Neighborhood House was founded in 1907. We are located at 2749 Woodhill [Road, Cleveland, Ohio]. We're west of Shaker Square, in the southeast part of Cleveland. We've been at this location since 1917. We own the property. We're on about three acres of land. The original house itself, you know, is standing. Then we have a 1949 addition, then there's another 7500 square foot addition that we made that houses our child daycare department, our senior services staff offices, and then some senior rooms, and we have our computer lab, and then a lobby. As far as services that we provide, we provide services in the area of child daycare, from infants all the way through school ages. We have 112 children that we provide services for, from infants to before and after school program, with our toddler program and preschooler program. We are a NAECY [National Association for the Education of Young Children] accredited organization; that's the National Association for the Education of Children and Youth. We're only two neighborhood-based organizations that have that national accreditation. We just got reaccredited, so we're real proud of the excellent child day care services we're able to provide and constantly improve upon. We also have our senior day care program and that program provides, we provide services for seniors every day, fifty-five seniors, we provide them breakfast and a lunch, and different recreational services, social services, outreach, field trips, we have a nurse, registered nurse to come in and help them with their medicine and prescriptions. We have a lawyer to come in once a month for any type of legal problems they may have. We also have 200 seniors that are frail and handicapped that we provide meals for; our Meals on Wheels program, so we provide meals Monday through Saturday for them and outreach to them, and those are our two anchor programs, the child daycare and senior daycare, and to me those reflect the two most oppressed segments of the population, the very young and the very old, and if it wasn't for these two anchor programs, a lot of families would not be able to work or to go to school, continue their education. So, we provide a very caring and safe environment for children, and a lot of our seniors, if we didn't provide these services, they probably would have to be institutionalized, 'cause a lot of them live by themselves. Now the organization is open Monday through Saturday; Monday through Friday we're open from 6:30 in the morning to 6:00 at night. On Mondays and Thursdays, we have AA [Alcoholics Anonymous], and it's open 'till 8:00. And then, on Saturdays we're open till 2 o'clock. We have a nontraditional day care program with nontraditional hours. It's open on Saturdays from 6:00 to 12:00, and then we have African drumming that's offered from 12 to 3. So, we're open seven days a week. We have a budget of 2.1 million dollars, a staff of thirty-two. Most of our funding are public dollars from the federal government. Especially, the majority is from the county government. We have a contract for our child day care program and our senior day care program, with monies from Western Missouri Area Agency on Aging, and we also have foundation monies from the St. Luke's Foundation and the Cleveland Foundation, the Gunn [ph.] Foundation, the Brewing [ph.] Foundation; I think I've mentioned all of them. And then we charge some fees based on income for the different services we provide. We also get funding from United Way services; about six percent of our budget reflects United Way, so their dollars are important. And there are a total of nineteen neighborhood centers like East End in Cleveland on the East and West Side, and we're one of the oldest and the largest of the neighborhood centers. We have a real good staff, excellent board. We're approaching our 100th anniversary, which will be 2007. We have an annual, we just started last year having an annual fund campaign, which we have done very well. Some of our supporters are Hathaway Brown School [Shaker Heights, Ohio], Hanna Perkins [School, Shaker Heights, Ohio], have been very good supporters of us, and a lot of other individual supporters over the years throughout the community.$All right, Mr. Hill, I would like to talk with you now about this nationally recognized program, [National] Rites of Passage [Institute], in--that you are responsible for launching in greater Cleveland [Ohio]. It has sort of taken off.$$I'd say, yeah, myself and my wife [Marquita McAllister Hill]. Anything I do, you really can't separate, I can't separate her from, I mean, 'cause her influence is knowledge information, it's all part. So it's really been co-authored, co-facilitated through the both of us, based on our experience as husband and wife and as parents.$$So when was it founded, and what's the basic content of the program?$$Well again, rites of passage, the term rites of passage was coined in 1907, by a French anthropologist named Arnold van Gennep, based on his research of how indigenous groups socialize their--the different age sets into life passages, the crisis periods that we go through from conception to death. Usually when we think of rites of passage, we think of it relative to adolescence, but really rites of passage reflect life stages from early childhood to death and even after death becoming an ancestor. The way that I define rites of passage is it is a process. It's not a program. You really have to think of it as a life cycle development process. It's really a ritual. It's a human development ritual for dealing with life passages and crises from birth to death, and to me, the way I define it, operationally define it, is a process for regenerating community, 'cause, first of all, we're not born men and women. We're born males and females, so we have to be socially and culturally developed into manhood and womanhood. And, in the different phases of a man and woman, you know, midlife, which is really a new Western life phase that we go through midlife, and then you're talking about the onset of eldership, early eldership, and then late eldership, and then death and in transition. So, again, my purpose for doing it is dealing specifically with what is known specific for is adolescence; helping young people to make it from childhood to adulthood and not having to do it by themselves, but there is a support of adults and community. But, in order to do that, you can't do that unless adults have gone through that process. How're you gonna take children through something that you have not gone through as a ritual through ceremony, through initiation? So, it's been necessary, 'cause African term never develop your shield on the battlefield, so we have found ourselves concurrently having to regenerate the community as well as establish and create the community among adults. So, there has been two emphases; first of all, to create a critical mass and community of adults that will serve community and serve young people, facilitate the rites of passage process. And then, the young people themselves, a process for helping them to become men and women and to become adults. So, the process is--I basically used my own children; some of the socialization informally and formally in raising them, and then based on some of my field study, field research, reviewing the literature, coming up with a reinvented process for doing rites of passage through East End Neighborhood House [Cleveland, Ohio].