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Cheryl Johnson-Odim

Academic administrator and activist Cheryl Johnson-Odim was born on April 30, 1948 in Youngstown, Ohio to Elayne Jeffries and Robert Dawson. She graduated from Andrew Jackson High School in New York in 1966 and went on to attend the City College New York and Youngstown State University. From 1972 to 1978, she did graduate work at Northwestern University from which she received her Ph.D. in history in 1978. In 1975, Johnson-Odim was a Fulbright Scholar in Nigeria.

Johnson-Odim was a founding member of the Free South Africa Movement. She served as head of the TransAfrica Support Committee in Chicago as well as head of all TransAfrica Support Committees in the U.S. In the early 1980s, she served as co-founder and co-chair of the Coalition for Illinois Divestment from South Africa. In 1995, Johnson-Odim became the first woman and first African American to chair the history department at Loyola University Chicago, where she had taught history since 1987, and a position she held until 2000. Previously, she taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University, where she served as the assistant director of the Program of African Studies from 1980-86. In 2000, Johnson-Odim was appointed the first dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Columbia College Chicago. In 2006 she was appointed provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois.

Johnson-Odim was an associate editor for Women Building Chicago 1790-1990: A Biographical Dictionary, which was published in 2001; and the Encyclopedia of Twentieth-Century African History, which was published in 2003. She also edited Expanding the Boundaries of Women’s History: Essays on Women in the Third World, and authored the books For Women and the Nation: Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria, and Women and Gender in the History of Sub-Saharan Africa commissioned by the American Historical Association, as well as many chapters in books and articles in scholarly journals.

Johnson-Odim served as vice chair of the Illinois Humanities Council, chair of the American Historical Association’s Joan Kelly Prize Committee, member of the board of directors of the American Council of Learned Sciences, and the African Studies Association, of which she was a co-founder of the Women' Caucus. She was also a founding editorial board member of the Journal of Women’s History and chair of the Board of Trustees for the Higher Learning Commission. And she was on the central organizing committee of the Women's March Chicago in January 2017.

Cheryl Johnson-Odim was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.117

Sex

Female

Interview Date

07/16/2017 |and| 5/3/2018

Last Name

Johnson-Odim

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

JOH53

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Schathos, Greece

Favorite Quote

Little By Little The Rain Drops Swell The River.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

4/30/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Bread

Short Description

Academic administrator and activist Cheryl Johnson-Odim (1948 - ) was the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois. She was also a founding member of the Free South Africa Movement.

Favorite Color

Bluish green

Raymond J. McGuire

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire was born on January 23, 1957, in Dayton, Ohio. After graduating from the Hotchkiss School in 1975, McGuire enrolled in Harvard University. He went on to graduate from Harvard College cum laude with his A.B. degree in English in 1979. McGuire was awarded a Rotary Fellowship to attend the University of Nice in France in 1980. In 1984, McGuire graduated from Harvard Business School with his M.B.A. degree and from Harvard Law School with his J.D. degree.

McGuire began his career in the mergers and acquisitions department at First Boston Corporation. In 1988, when Joseph R. Perella and Bruce Wasserstein, top officers at First Boston Corporation, left to start their own firm, McGuire went with them. At Wasserstein Perella & Co., McGuire played a key role in many transactions, including Pitney Bowes, Inc.’s acquisition of Ameriscribe. He served as a partner and managing director at Wasserstein Perella & Co. from 1991 to 1994, and then became the managing director of mergers & acquisitions at Merrill Lynch Investment, Inc. In 2000, McGuire was appointed as the the global co-head of mergers & acquisitions at Morgan Stanley where he advised the $19.8 billion sale of Nabisco Holdings to the Philip Morris Company and Pfizer’s sale of its Schick Wilkinson Sword business to Energizer for $930 million in 2003. In 2005, McGuire left Morgan Stanley and was appointed as the co-head of investment banking at Citigroup Corporate and Investment Banking. He became the head of global banking in 2009. While there, McGuire managed more than two thousand employees and advised business mergers and acquisitions valued at more than $200 billion, such as Time Warner, Inc.’s $45 billion separation from Time Warner Cable.

McGuire was named chairman of the board of the Studio Museum in Harlem and vice chairman of the board and investment committee chairman of the Whitney Museum of American Art. He also served on the executive committee of the International Center of Photography, as a trustee of the Lincoln Center and chairman of the board of the De La Salle Academy, and as a member of the board of the Mayor’s Cultural Affairs Advisory Committee for the City of New York. In addition, he served as a trustee of New York-Presbyterian Hospital. For Harvard University, he has served as a member of the Overseers and Directors Nominating Committee.

In 2002, Black Enterprise magazine named McGuire one of the “Top 50 African Americans on Wall Street.” He has also received the Alumni Professional Achievement Award from the Harvard Business School, and was named a Distinguished Patron of the Arts by the Pratt Institute.

Raymond J. McGuire was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 24, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/12/2013

Last Name

McGuire

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jeffrey

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Harvard Business School

Harvard Law School

University of Nice

First Name

Raymond

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

MCG06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saint Barthelemy

Favorite Quote

Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Die, Life Is A Broken Winged Bird That Cannot Fly, Hold Fast To Dreams, For If Dreams Go, Life Is A Barren Field, Frozen With Snow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/23/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Turkey Burgers

Short Description

Investment banker Raymond J. McGuire (1957 - ) is an alumnus of Harvard University and Harvard Law School. He worked in mergers and acquisitions at First Boston Corporation, Merrill Lynch, and Morgan Stanley, and serves as head of Global Banking at Citigroup where he advises on deals valued at more than $200 billion.

Employment

First Boston Corporation

Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Merrill Lynch

Morgan Stanley

Citigroup

Favorite Color

Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:1321,25:3949,105:5482,149:7015,181:8694,320:9278,330:10373,349:11030,361:11687,371:12052,377:14388,442:18695,547:18987,552:19571,564:19936,570:26220,580:27496,594:28076,600:34636,719:35788,742:36148,748:39172,791:40468,820:40828,826:42484,869:49334,911:49802,918:55418,1023:59522,1058:65435,1203:73390,1301:73873,1314:80680,1368:84220,1468:84700,1477:89340,1531:90940,1538:91240,1543:92515,1591:96952,1655:98584,1700:99690,1709$0,0:228,52:12610,161:18817,189:25630,274:28318,290:28814,329:37232,449:37576,454:37920,459:38350,465:39038,475:45729,543:46134,549:46458,577:48645,659:66104,841:66489,847:67336,859:70647,915:80496,1053:81562,1066:82464,1078:82874,1084:83530,1098:83858,1103:84186,1108:84842,1118:99612,1281:103476,1323:105028,1380:105998,1392:106386,1397:111800,1421:136780,1740:137076,1746:140515,1755:145012,1819:146516,1835:170370,2110:170740,2116:175818,2177:177213,2196:178980,2226:181677,2301:193302,2407:197020,2443:198196,2456:204046,2503:207355,2549:207853,2557:213695,2630:217230,2695
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Raymond McGuire's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest childhood memories in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire describes his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about his age difference with his older brothers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about growing up in the Bethel Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire continues to describe his community in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire describes his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his earliest memories of grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Raymond McGuire talks about differences between his academic environment and home environment

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Raymond McGuire talks about attending The Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his first jobs in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire describes the student demographic at Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about people he looked up to as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about interviewing for and attending the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire describes student style at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his friendship with Michael Carroll

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about Miami Valley School in Dayton, Ohio and at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about a prank he took part in at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his high school interest in literature and basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire recalls his graduation from the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes his first year as an undergraduate student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about his experience as an undergraduate at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about the athletic community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and playing basketball for the Crimson Classics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about the private club community at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his membership to the Owl Club

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about his membership to the Owl Club at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his racial experiences in his life from Dayton, Ohio to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about experiencing racism while studying abroad in Europe

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the Owl Club and other communities at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about the African American Cultural Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying literature at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about studying abroad at The Nice Sophia Antipolis University in Nice, France

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about being admitted to Harvard University's dual degree program for law school and business school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his graduate studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and his summer internships

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire reflects on adjusting the Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts and the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking a summer internship at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about his education at the Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking two internships in one summer

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about earning his graduate degrees and receiving job offers

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about First Boston, Joseph Perella, and Bruce Wasserstein

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire recalls being interviewed for a position at First Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about working at First Boston after graduating from Harvard Law School and Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Raymond McGuire describes mergers and acquisitions work

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the creation of Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about deciding to leave First Boston to work at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his roles and duties at Wasserstein Perella & Co.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire explains why Joseph Perella left Wasserstein Perella & Co. in 1993

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire explains why he left Wasserstein Perella & Co. and joined Merrill Lynch Wealth Management

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about taking Fort Howard Paper Company private and the slowdown in mergers and acquisitions in the early 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire talks about the importance of Japanese investors to mergers and acquisitions

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about working with the Unilever Group on mergers and acquisitions deals

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about how mergers and acquisitions deals are executed

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Raymond McGuire talks about advice he gave during leadership changes at Morgan Stanley

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about the changes in leadership at Morgan Stanley in the mid-2000s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire talks about leaving Morgan Stanley for Citigroup in 2005

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about Franklin A. Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire talks about opportunities at Citigroup

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire talks about working through crises

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire talks about handling the sale of Wyeth pharmaceutical company to Pfizer Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Raymond McGuire talks about the effect of the 2007 economic crisis

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Raymond McGuire ranks international regions by market size and economic influence

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Raymond McGuire talks about his work for Citigroup and its development during his tenure

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Raymond McGuire talks about his art-collecting

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Raymond McGuire talks about creative organizations and artists he supports

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Raymond McGuire reflects over his life

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Raymond McGuire talks about his son and describes what he envisions for his future

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Raymond McGuire describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Raymond McGuire considers what he may have done differently

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Raymond McGuire considers his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$6

DATitle
Raymond McGuire talks about the political community at The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Raymond McGuire talks about managing a business deal with Nabisco and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Transcript
So the other communities that you mentioned--$$Mm-hmm.$$So what were some of the other communities? You mentioned the athletics--$$(Unclear) to the politics as an example.$$Okay.$$This is at the Kennedy School [The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. And this is one where you were introduced to some of the country's great politicians. Dutch Morial [Ernest Nathan Morial] I can remember back, the great mayor of New Orleans [Lousiana]. And when, when Dutch came, this is, remember this is a time when you're first getting a number of, of black mayors.$$That's right$$And so to get exposed to that in the world of politics was, was, we actually could see in a way that, in a world where black representation had been denied for all the reasons that we know, to see these people who had been able to, to, to get to that level, to command the respect of the voting population to get them to that level was, was, it was encouraging. It was up lifting. It was certainly inspiring. So you would see these politicians, you can, then you'd go and you go to debate but that was part of the political process. At least you are at a much junior level at that level at the, at the college you thought you were actually practicing. So it is a, it was a world of, of politics and, and governance and government. And for people who aspired to be in public service, who wanted to be in government service that was a great training ground for that. And many of them have gone on to do that. Many people who weren't part of that have gone on to become part of that as well but many of them have gone on to do that. That's, that was kind of the intro to politics.$Okay, so let me ask you, during this period of time what deals are you most proud of that you did?$$The, the Nabisco transaction was a big deal.$$And that, that deal was--$$Carl Icahn went after Nabisco.$$Mm-hmm.$$And I was the lead M&A [mergers and acquisitions] banker on that deal.$$And that deal was of, almost a $15 billion deal.$$It was probably $15 billion, something along that line.$$Yeah, right.$$It was a big deal.$$On that line. And is this your first time in a deal where Carl Icahn is involved? 'Cause he was, is it, is it the first time?$$I'm thinking through that, Carl, there had been other instances I think where I was probably something that Carl did but directly, where Carl is directly on the other side and I'm associated, this is probably the first one.$$Okay. And the person heading up of, you know, what, what I found interesting because this, you do a similar deal later than this but with, 'cause you work on another Philip Morris later, right?$$Yeah, that's, that's--$$That's much later.$$Yes.$$Okay. But, but the thing that I found interesting about this, can you just talk about the nature of what Nabisco, why the Philip Morris and Nabisco deal made sense at the time, and who was trying to do what? Can you talk a little bit about that?$$Yeah this, this goes on, if, if I remember the facts correctly, RJR [R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company] and Nabisco had been under the overall, back when the big deal was done, the, the take private deal back in the '80s [1980s] I guess it was, large leverage buy out. And we split the, the tobacco up from the food company. The reason it got to be so complex is because the heavy tax implications for selling the food business prematurely. And the reason, the way that, that the deal evolved was because there was an outsider who came in, who instigated a, a transaction in the form of Carl Icahn. The rules didn't apply to the sale of the food business. And we eventually ran an auction for the sale of the food business, for the sale of the Nabisco business. And Philip Morris bought it, great strategic deal for them. We got a great price for the Nabisco shareholders. Carl made off well, his investors made off well. And we eventually left with the, the RJR business was primarily a cash business. It had a lot of cash on its balance sheet. It was, was and was a good business, sort of backup business from a cash flow generating standpoint. And we will successfully sell the business to, to, to the Philip Morris people. And they ran it well and then it got sold or spun off.$$So was the use of an auction, had you used that before and--$$Sure.$$Okay. So there are lots of-$$Yeah, it's a public auction.

Jerry Revish

Television news anchor Jerry Revish was born in Youngstown, Ohio on March 15, 1949 to Estelle Revish, a homemaker and Dewey Revish, a steelworker. He graduated from East High School in 1967 and went on to attend Youngstown State University and Chapman College in Orange, California.

In 1972, Revish began his career in the media when he joined WBBW-Radio in Youngstown, Ohio as a board operator. Two years later, he went on to work for WBNS-AM/FM Radio in Columbus, Ohio as a general assignment reporter and assignment editor. In 1980, Revish became a newscaster for WBNS-TV. He reported from Saudi Arabia on the Persian Gulf War in 1990 and his stories entitled, “Desert Shield Diary” won a Midwest Regional Emmy Award in 1991. Revish reported from Bosnia during the Balkans War and created an award-winning half-hour long documentary from his time reporting on post-apartheid South Africa. Since 1992, he has served as co-anchor for WBNS-TV and has anchored the 5 PM, 6 PM and 11 PM news. In 1996, Revish won the NABJ’s Best International Reporting Award for his story "A Return to Haiti: Rebuilding Paradise." Also in 1996, Revish was instrumental in exonerating Columbus bodybuilder Walter Smith, who was falsely accused of rape, by shining light on Smith’s story through the testing of DNA evidence never introduced at trial. He has also reported from Barbados, Bahrain and Japan. Revish is active in his local community and the founder of The Columbus Association of Black Journalists/Jerry Revish High School Journalism Workshop for minority students in Columbus, Ohio.

Revish has garnered much recognition for his work including six Emmy awards and seventeen Emmy nominations. He has also received the Associated Press awards for best feature, best documentary and best spot news coverage. Revish is the recipient of the Blue Chip Award in Communications and the Carl Day Award for Outstanding Achievement. He was inducted into the Ohio Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 2005 and has been a member of the National Association of Black Journalists since 1985. Revish and his wife have two adult children, Nicole and Jerome.

Jerry Revish was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 3, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.089

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/3/2012

Last Name

Revish

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Craig

Schools

East High School

Youngstown State University

Chapman University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jerry

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

REV01

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Never give up.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

3/15/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbus

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Meatloaf

Short Description

Television news anchor Jerry Revish (1949 - ) has reported for WBNS-TV in Columbus, Ohio since 1980 and received numerous awards for his international news stories.

Employment

WBBW Radio

WBNS Radio

WBNS TV

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:14220,213:14829,221:28454,343:32226,392:32718,399:64196,760:64626,766:67034,800:82410,965:87842,1030:88327,1036:92437,1072:94210,1077:96036,1104:100716,1154:101000,1159:103485,1208:110069,1285:110484,1290:111065,1298:124126,1456:129638,1496:137903,1649:151810,1893:161211,2044:161616,2050:200970,2578$0,0:2356,12:11220,113:13336,176:16648,224:18212,247:23986,305:24767,321:26755,359:27820,376:31865,433:32577,443:36895,481:37270,487:37570,500:39220,533:39595,539:44332,585:44908,594:49116,639:53085,746:58401,798:60956,847:62051,870:62416,876:63292,897:65117,935:66431,960:70530,968:74310,1066:83336,1194:89990,1295:94042,1335:105544,1491:106318,1501:112350,1526:117870,1576:118502,1590:119371,1605:120003,1618:128133,1717:131526,1781:133614,1816:135180,1839:135528,1844:140296,1886:141406,1910:143034,1949:147474,2031:148066,2042:158595,2114:159162,2122:159486,2156:178542,2323:182700,2383:183085,2389:183547,2396:195603,2568:196212,2576:199873,2601:200208,2607:200610,2619:201079,2628:201548,2636:201950,2643:202553,2655:203491,2674:209052,2769:214932,2869:215576,2877:218152,2915:233958,3144:234486,3149:247070,3268:247870,3277:249690,3327
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jerry Revish's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jerry Revish lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jerry Revish describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jerry Revish talks about his mother and his family attending church

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jerry Revish talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jerry Revish talks about his father, and his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jerry Revish talks about his father's career and his family's life in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jerry Revish describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jerry Revish talks about his childhood household and his childhood memories of growing up in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jerry Revish describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jerry Revish describes the city of Youngstown, Ohio during the time of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jerry Revish talks about his experience in elementary school in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jerry Revish talks about his family's television set

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jerry Revish talks about the schools in Youngstown, and his experience in school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jerry Revish talks about his interest in radio and television while growing up in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jerry Revish talks about his involvement in his high school's marching band

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jerry Revish talks about the Civil Rights Movement while he was growing up in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jerry Revish talks about working for a year after graduating from high school in 1967 and the influence of his school principal

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jerry Revish talks about attending Youngstown State University, moving to California to live with his uncle, and attending Chapman College

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jerry Revish describes how he entered the field of radio broadcasting

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jerry Revish talks about his experience working at WBBW Radio in Youngstown, Ohio and accepting a position at BNS Radio in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jerry Revish describes his experience at WBNS Radio in Columbus, Ohio, and his decision to transition to television

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jerry Revish describes how he was hired at WBNS TV in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jerry Revish talks about the black journalists on major news networks in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jerry Revish talks about transitioning from radio to television broadcast journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jerry Revish talks about his mother's emphasis on sound language skills

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jerry Revish talks about his experience as a news anchor and general assignment reporter at WBNS-TV in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jerry Revish talks about reporting about the first Gulf War on the news-series, 'Desert Shield Diary'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jerry Revish talks about his involvement in the exoneration of Walter Smith on charges of rape

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jerry Revish talks about his decision to help Walter Smith to prove himself innocent of rape charges

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jerry Revish talks about joining Ohio-based U.S. Army reservists on a trip to Saudi Arabia during the Gulf War

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Jerry Revish talks about his involvement with the Columbus, Ohio chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ)

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jerry Revish describes his routine as an evening news anchor on WBNS-TV in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jerry Revish describes his tour through Bosnia and Herzegovina in the aftermath of the Bosnian War

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jerry Revish describes his visit to Haiti during the U.S. invasion in the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jerry Revish talks about the Somali community in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jerry Revish talks about winning the National Association of Black Journalists' Salute to Excellence Award Contest

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jerry Revish talks about his journalistic tours to Japan, South Africa, the Gulf, Iraq and Barbados in the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jerry Revish talks about Michael Coleman, the Mayor of Columbus, Ohio, and the highlights of his administration

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jerry Revish talks about the election of Michael Coleman as Mayor of Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jerry Revish reflects upon Columbus, Ohio's stable economy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jerry Revish talks about the major stories in Columbus, Ohio in the 2000s

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jerry Revish talks about his election to the Ohio Broadcasters Hall of Fame and his relationship with the community in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Jerry Revish describes his philosophy as a journalist

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jerry Revish talks about the desegregation of schools in Columbus, Ohio in 1979, and in the current school system

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jerry Revish talks about the introduction of cable television in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jerry Revish describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jerry Revish reflects upon the diminishing number of African Americans in broadcast journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jerry Revish reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jerry Revish talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jerry Revish talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jerry Revish describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

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DATitle
Jerry Revish talks about his experience working at WBBW Radio in Youngstown, Ohio and accepting a position at BNS Radio in Columbus, Ohio
Jerry Revish talks about his experience as a news anchor and general assignment reporter at WBNS-TV in Columbus, Ohio
Transcript
So, Boots Bell gets you a, a job with the--$$With WBBW, a radio station in Youngstown [Ohio], just working part-time, weekends. I was a control board operator. There was a guy who had a big band show. He was a jewelry store owner, and he bought time on the radio station, primarily to hawk his watches and, and jewelry. He was a big Seiko watch distributor. We had this big band show on Sunday mornings. And I would spin the records for him. On Saturdays I would spin records and rip and read some wire copy during the half-time for Cleveland Browns and Ohio State Buckeye football games, you know, and the seventh inning stretch for the [Cleveland] Indians.$$Okay. So did you--when did you have any inkling at all that you had the voice for radio?$$I think early on because you know I could just speak well. Boots encouraged me to do that. And I kind of rose at the, at the radio station. I started as a [control] board op [operator], but then got into news reporting there. Doing morning drive radio, and they had a three person newsroom, and I learned from some great curmudgeons who just taught you, you know, take good notes and work on your writing and, and be sharp about that. One of my first beats was the Youngstown public schools' board meeting. I would go to City Council sessions and stuff like that. Didn't get a whole lot of experience out in the field as far as interviewing people, but I got some. And worked there for two years, and got a call one day from WBNS Radio. A friend of mine who was also at BBW said you know, they called and they're looking for a guy to do radio down in Columbus [Ohio]. Would you be interested? I said yeah, sure. At that time I was engaged, and I was thinking about doing more than being in Youngstown. I worked at the radio station, go ahead.$$But, but what happened at, at the Youngstown station? You were there for two years and what was the--had the, had the--how did the job end? I mean--$$The job ended when I got the job at BNS Radio in Columbus.$$Okay so you were still working at the--$$Yeah, it was amazing how I got that job in the newsroom.$$All right.$$The guy at BBW who was the reporter in front of me, he got married and got killed in a car accident that very same weekend. It was the most awful thing. And I remember going to his funeral and looking at his widow, really it was his bride. And that following Monday they asked me at the, at BBW to--would you come in here and work full time? And so I did. Yeah, but it was odd how I got that job.$$Yeah that's a horrible way to get it.$Okay so, so news reporting for WBNS [Columbus, Ohio]. So in the beginning you, you--well what would your day be like, typical day as a news reporter?$$At the radio, at the TV station we'd come in and stop by the Assignment Desk and find out what stories are we going to pick up. The business started to change over the years. Back then the Assignment Desk sort of dictated what the stories were going to be. And reporters if you found out something, you were able to sell that story idea and get that on the air too, which I did quite often. But now the newsroom is pretty much a producer driven experience. And it's kind of amazing because these are guys that never get out. I mean they're in the room all day. They don't mix it up with people, and but they have an idea based on what the story content is of the day, how they want their newscast to look. You still have to come up with three story ideas every day. I doubt most of the reporters do because three new story ideas every day is pretty difficult to come up with. I mean decent story ideas. People throw up all kind of stuff, but you know you got to do a lot of digging, a lot of calling, working your sources, keeping your ear to the ground to, to hear about stuff that's happening. So it, it can be a little daunting that way. But at 2:00 I come in and we have a meeting, well that's now. But back then when I was just a General Assignment Reporter, we would pick up a story and go out and do it. I used to do something called Ohio Cam. It was where we would go out every single day to another county in the state and do a story from a different part of the state. And it was really pretty amazing. We'd go out real early, shoot the story and edit it for the nightly news that night. And we'd go everywhere. I mean Toledo [Ohio], southeast Ohio down in coal country, we'd go to Marietta [Ohio], even Cincinnati [Ohio], farm places that I never even knew existed, just rural areas we'd find these stories and do that sort of thing. Did that for probably a year. Got some great stories out of that. And finally got on with the morning show as an anchor, co-anchor. At that time we were starting the morning show at 6:00 a.m. We did an hour. And then over time we expanded it to 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 [a.m.]. I did mornings and the noon show.$$So you started in 1980, right.$$Mm-hmm.$$So you were about thirty years old then and, and so how long did it take for you to become a, a reporter, I mean--$$Anchor?$$Anchor for the morning show.$$Well after I'd had that experience as the weekend anchor, it took me eight years from when I left the weekend anchor desk to get back in the mix of being considered for another job. So I did general assignment for a long time.$$Okay, okay so when you started you were general assignment.$$Right.$$And then you became a weekend anchor first?$$Weekend anchor and did general assignment for three--$$About, about what year is this when you, or how long--$$Let's see, probably '82 [1982] to '85 [1985].$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$Okay, all right. Now okay so '82 [1982] to '85 [1985] was weekend anchor, and then the--$$Then I went back into general assignment.$$Okay.$$For probably eight years, thereabouts.$$So that's '85 [1985] to what--$$'85 [1985] to probably about '90 [1989] I think.$$(Unclear; Simultaneous)

The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones

Retired United States Circuit Court Judge and General Counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Nathaniel R. Jones was born on May 13, 1926 in Youngstown, Ohio. The son of Virginians, Lillian Brown Jones and Nathaniel Bacon Jones, he attended Westside School and Grant Junior High School. Black publisher J. Maynard Dickerson, owner of the activist Buckeye Review, mentored Jones, who wrote for the column, “Sports Shorts,” before graduating from South High School. Drafted in 1945, Jones served in the United States Army Air Corps in Dayton, where Dickerson introduced him to NAACP activists Mylie Williamson, James H. McGhee and F. Leon Higginbotham. After his discharge in 1947, he was introduced to Walter White, NAACP executive secretary. Jones earned an A.B. degree from Youngstown State University in 1951 and an LL.B. degree from Youngstown State University Law School in 1956.

Admitted to the bar in 1957, Jones, after four years of private practice, served as executive director of the Fair Employment Practices Commission and in 1960 was appointed by Attorney General Robert Kennedy as United States Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio in Cleveland. In 1967, Jones was appointed Assistant General Counsel to President Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (the Kerner Commission). Briefly returning to private practice, Jones was asked by NAACP executive director, Roy Wilkins, to serve as NAACP general counsel in 1969. For the next ten years, he argued several cases before the United States Supreme Court and led national efforts to end school segregation and to defend affirmative action. Jones investigated discrimination in the armed forces and successfully coordinated the NAACP’s First Amendment defense in the Mississippi Boycott Case. Jones was nominated by President Carter to the United States Court of Appeals in 1979 to which he became Senior Judge. He retired from the bench in 2002.

Currently a senior partner with Blank and Rome LLP, Jones has published widely and built a distinguished community record. He taught law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, North Carolina Central University College of Law and Harvard University Law School. In 1993, Jones served as part of a team of observers for the first democratic elections in South Africa. Recipient of scores of awards, Jones is married to the former Lillian Hawthorne and has four grown children.

Accession Number

A2006.050

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/23/2006

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Organizations
Schools

Youngstown South High School

West Side School #2

James Hillman Junior High School #2

Youngstown State University

First Name

Nathaniel

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

JON15

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

A Person Must Be A Beacon Of Light That Will Illuminate Dark Places.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

5/13/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cincinnati

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Association general counsel and federal circuit court judge The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones (1926 - ) is a retired United States Circuit Court Judge, and has served as executive director of the Fair Employment Practices Commission. He has also served as a United States Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio, and former general counsel for the NAACP.

Employment

Blank Rome LLP

U.S. Court of Appeals

National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Northern District of Ohio at Cleveland

Fair Employment Practices Commission

The Buckeye Review

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his father's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recounts how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls his parents' work during the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his parents' move to Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones talks about the history of Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls Youngstown's Third Baptist Church

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones remembers his experiences at West Side School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls racial tensions in primary school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls working at the Buckeye Review, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls black newspapers' influence on his writing

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls working at the Buckeye Review, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his sports network in Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his courses at South High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls his time in the service

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes his NAACP involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones describes Youngstown State University

DASession

1$1

DATape

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DAStory

1$1

DATitle
The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls his parents' work during the Great Depression
The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones recalls working at the Buckeye Review, pt. 1
Transcript
We were talking about your, your parents [Lillian Brown Rafe and Nathaniel Jones] and their personalities and the kind of things they had to do during the Depression [Great Depression] and--$$Well, both of my parents were very, were very energetic. They believed in, there was a strong work ethic in my family. My mother, in addition to working as a matron and selling products [for J.R. Watkins Medical Company; Watkins Incorporated], and she served as a subscription manager for the black local newspaper called, the Buckeye Review, which I later came to work for and eventually became the editor of it but in addition to doing those things, she, she took in washing, took in laundry and I would go collect the, the laundry, the washing, primarily shirts from, of business people and I'd go to their offices and collect the shirts and bring them home and on, on a Monday, and she would soak them and wash them and then she'd iron them and then on Thursday and Friday we would deliver them back to, to the customers. So she, she was always doing something to, to help sustain the family. And my father, likewise, he would always work. When the steel mills weren't up, he would be working two or three other jobs and when we got older, my brother [Wellington Jones] and I would go, we'd work with him at night when the theaters closed at eleven o'clock, we would then go and perform the janitorial services from two--twelve until five or six in the morning on weekends. We did it on weekends but my father did it every, every night.$So here you are going to these meetings?$$Yeah, and, and they would, you know, ask me, you know, "What do you want to be? What do you want to do," and so forth and I'd talk with them. Though Mr. Dickerson [J. Maynard Dickerson] was very active in this, in the YMCA [Young Men's Christian Association] forum activity, and he usually presided or he'd introduce the speaker or, and I was so impressed with this man who was, is this, you know, so important, he took an interest in me. And then my mother [Lillian Brown Rafe], of course, was working for him on the paper [Buckeye Review], and he'd always say, "Come over and see me sometimes, sonny," and I'd say, "Okay." And so when I was at the age that I kind of move around by myself, I would go over to the shop and I'd sit in the evenings and watch him work. He would come in from these, from his office and he'd put on his work clothes and he, he did, not only did he do the paper but he did commercial printing, job printing, letterheads, tickets and so forth and I'd watch him run the press. You know, he would just be putting stuff in the press, you know, printing, printing the jobs and so this went on for some time and then I would, and he would take me with him. They would hold some meetings in his home. If Thurgood Marshall was coming to town [Youngstown, Ohio] or some notable person would come in for a meeting, I would go with him and I'd just sit, go sit in the corner and listen to these, these people talk and strategize and I know one time I asked him if I could write a column for the paper. This time I was probably in the, about the eighth grade and he said, "What do you want to write about?" I said, "I want to write," 'cause I was into sports, you know, all kids are into the sports, I said, "I'd like to write about sports," and he said, "Well, okay." So, I sat at a typewriter and I was hunting and pecking, you know. I did this column called, Sports Shorts, and it was just a little aggregate, just a little culmination of little items of sports interest that I'd get out of newspapers and that I knew was going on.$$Now that was after the, that was after Jesse Owens ran in the Olympics [1936 Summer Olympics, Berlin, Germany] and all that, right?$$Yeah, yeah.$$What was the hottest thing that you were writing about in those days?$$Well it was usually the bowl games, you know, college football, high school, high school sports, putting names, he used to always say to me, "The important thing about a newspaper," you know, their paper was, "was names." People like to see their names in print and so anything I knew that was going on that my peers were doing, I would just, you know, include that and then college players, because there were so few blacks playing college ball in those days, it was always a big thing and I would always try and track who the black players were and mention them. But anyhow, the first column I did, I had it waiting for him when he came home and we sat in his breakfast nook and he had a ballpoint pen, a multi-color ballpoint pen, the first time I'd ever seen one with red, green and blue ink. So he took the red ink and he went over this column, it was the very first one I--that I did and he corrected it and it looked like, when he got through with that, it looked like chickens had had a fight on it. I mean, just red all over the thing and then he explained every correction and then he, he's a very direct person and very blunt and he said, "Now, what grade are you in?" And I told him. He said, "What do you do in school all day?" I said, "Well I," you know, I was stumbling around. He said, "But you're not learning anything." And I looked at him, he says, "Now, you should know this, you should know, you should have learned this before, you should have learned this in grade school about how to spell and how to write and your grammar." He said, "You don't have a foundation." He said you, and he just told me what, you know, just really gave me down to, in the country, and he said, now, he says, "You want to learn?" I said, "Yes sir, I do." He said, "Okay. If you want to learn, I'll work with you but you have to have a thick skin." I said, "Yeah, I, I'm ready," you know. So, from that point on he worked with me on all of my copy and he would correct and explain. He got me a dictionary for my pocket. We had a dictionary in the shop on one of these pedestals, one of these huge Webster dictionaries but he gave me one in my pocket to carry with me.

Robert Billingslea

Robert Lee Billingslea, Corporate Director of Urban Affairs for the Walt Disney Company, was born on December 20, 1937, in Youngstown, Ohio. Billingslea’s mother, Faye Stevenson Billingslea, had migrated with her family to Ohio from Georgia; his father and namesake, Robert Lee Billingslea, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, though his father’s family also had roots in Mississippi. Raised by his grandparents, Billingslea grew up on the south side of Youngstown, attending public schools and exhibiting strong musical talent. Billingslea began playing drums at the age of twelve and started playing professionally at sixteen; he was voted “most musical” in his 1956 South High School graduating class. After graduation, Billingslea went to California where he attended Vallejo Junior College and studied music while performing with West Coast regional acts.

Billingslea went back to Youngstown in 1958, but continued to tour the country playing drums with various bands; he subsequently enrolled at Kent State University in 1960. During his last year of school, Billingslea worked in juvenile court, and after graduating in 1964 with a B.A. degree in sociology, he took a job as a probation officer in Akron, Ohio’s juvenile court system. Billingslea later worked in the Office of Economic Opportunity as a community organizer. Then, in 1966, Billingslea was hired as a wage and salary compensation analyst at Martin Marietta Corporation, (now Lockheed Martin), in Orlando, Florida. In 1969, he moved into a position at Disneyland in California that quickly led to his return to Orlando. There, Billingslea played a role in the establishment of Walt Disney World. In addition to his work at Disney, Billingslea became chair of the Orlando Human Relations Board, and went on to serve through four gubernatorial appointments on the Florida State Commission on Human Relations.

In 1985, Billingslea became involved with the NAACP through his work at Disney; the NAACP was reviewing Disney’s employment practices for equal opportunities for African Americans, and he served as a liaison. Billingslea then began working with the NAACP’s youth initiative, the Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO), which was a program for African American youth to demonstrate academic, artistic and scientific abilities. Billingslea’s involvement with the NAACP included his service on the ACT-SO Industry Advisory Council as a Special Contributions Fund (SCF) Trustee, and on the NAACP Image Awards Committee.

Among Billingslea’s most cherished awards are the National Service to Youth Award, presented in 2004 by the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, in honor of his thirty years of devoted service; and the 2003 Whitney M. Young Award presented by the Metropolitan Orlando Urban League in recognition of his personal contributions to founding and supporting the local Urban League chapter.

Billingslea and his wife, Deidre ("DeeDee") made their home in Central Florida; they had one son and two grandchildren.

Billingslea passed way on September 6, 2017 at the age of 79.

Accession Number

A2005.160

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/12/2005

Last Name

Billingslea

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Youngstown South High School

Kent State University

Delason Elementary School

Princeton Junior High School

Monroe Elementary School

First Name

Bob

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

BIL02

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Carol H. Williams Advertising

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

It Is Good To Be Living.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

12/20/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Orlando

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

9/6/2017

Short Description

Corporate executive Robert Billingslea (1937 - 2017 ) was the Director of Urban Affairs for Disney Worldwide Services. Through this work, he was closely involved with the NAACP, and he became chair of the Orlando Human Relations Board.

Employment

Martin Marietta Corporation

The Walt Disney Company

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Billingslea's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Billingslea lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Billingslea describes his mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Billingslea describes his maternal family's move from Georgia to Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Billingslea talks about his maternal family's name change

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Billingslea describes Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Billingslea talks about the DeBartolo family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Billingslea describes his mother's upbringing in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Billingslea describes his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert Billingslea describes his father's time in the U.S. Armed Forces

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Robert Billingslea describes his parents' and grandparents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Robert Billingslea describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Billingslea recalls his neighbors in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Billingslea describes his childhood personality and education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Billingslea describes his time at South High School in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Billingslea describes his musical activities in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Billingslea describes his YMCA involvement and his college ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Billingslea describes his time in California after high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Billingslea describes his time at Kent State University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Billingslea describes his work at Summit County Juvenile Court in Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert Billingslea describes his work for the Office of Economic Opportunity

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert Billingslea recalls interviewing for the Martin Marietta Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Billingslea recalls his decision to move to Orlando, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Billingslea describes his work for the Martin Marietta Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Billingslea describes his civil rights involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Billingslea describes his time in Anaheim, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Billingslea describes his human relations work in Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Billingslea describes his role at The Walt Disney Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Billingslea describes his work with The Walt Disney Company for the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Billingslea describes The Walt Disney Company's relationship with the NAACP, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Robert Billingslea describes The Walt Disney Company's relationship with the NAACP, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Billingslea talks about racism in Disney movies

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Billingslea describes ACT-SO, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Billingslea describes ACT-SO, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Billingslea describes ACT-SO, pt. 3

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Billingslea describes plans for developing ACT-SO

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Billingslea describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Billingslea describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Robert Billingslea reflects upon his life and legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Robert Billingslea describes his family and how he would like to be remembered

Ernestine Brown

Gallery director, arts advocate and civic leader Ernestine Turner Brown was born October 22, 1935 in Youngstown, Ohio. She was the first of three children born to Alma Hill and Isaac Turner. She attended Madison Elementary and East/North High Schools in Youngstown, Ohio and earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Youngstown State University in 1959. Brown also completed post-baccalaureate work at Boston, Northwestern and Kent State Universities.

After graduating from Youngstown, Brown worked as a full-time business education teacher in the Cleveland Public Schools from 1960 until 1966, and then as a part-time instructor in business classes at Cuyahoga Community College until 1976. Since 1980, she has been the director and co-owner, with her husband water colorist Malcolm Brown, of the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Under Brown’s directorship, the gallery has gained national and international recognition for increasing awareness and appreciation of the visual arts by exposing new and seasoned audiences to a broader spectrum of art and artists. Among the renowned African American artists whose works have been showcased in the Malcolm Brown Gallery are Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, and Selma Burke. Articles about the gallery’s exhibits have appeared in USA Today, Black Enterprise, and Essence Magazine among others.

In addition to serving a diverse audience of private collectors, Brown has worked to enhance and develop the art collections of public institutions and private corporations, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Coca-Cola Corporation. Brown is also a much sought-after speaker, addressing such topics as “Collecting Art: The African American Artist” and “the Role of the Gallery to Artists and Art Audiences.”

Brown is active in numerous professional and civic organizations, including the Advisory Outreach Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Coalition of 100 Black Women, the NAACP and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. She is also the recipient of many awards and honors, including the “Salute to Excellence in Art” award from the National Council of Negro Women and the Cleveland Arts Prize “Special Citation for Distinguished Service to the Arts.”

Accession Number

A2004.022

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/15/2004

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

East High School

Madison Elementary School

North High School

Youngstown State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ernestine

Birth City, State, Country

Youngstown

HM ID

BRO19

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

New England, Southwestern United States

Favorite Quote

The Difference Between A Stepping Stone And A Stumbling Block Is How High You Step.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

10/22/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables, Sweet Potato Pie, Peach Cobbler

Short Description

Art gallery owner Ernestine Brown (1935 - ) was co-owner and director of the Malcolm Brown Gallery, which gained national and international recognition for increasing awareness and appreciation of the visual arts under her direction. Brown is active in numerous professional and civic organizations and has received many awards.

Employment

Cleveland Public Schools

Cuyahoga Community College

Malcolm Brown Gallery

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ernestine Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ernestine Brown lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ernestine Brown talks about her maternal family background and the role of the church in her family's life

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ernestine Brown talks about her paternal family's migration north

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ernestine Brown talks about family vacations to the South

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ernestine Brown talks about her maternal and paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ernestine Brown describes her childhood neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ernestine Brown talks about her parents' relationship, their divorce, and assuming responsibilities as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ernestine Brown describes her childhood neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ernestine Brown describes the smells and sounds of her childhood in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ernestine Brown talks about elementary school and her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ernestine Brown describes her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ernestine Brown talks about participating in oratory competitions in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ernestine Brown talks about working as a secretary for a lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ernestine Brown talks about various secretarial jobs she held while in school at Youngstown University in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ernestine Brown talks about applying for teaching positions after graduating from Youngstown University in Youngstown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ernestine Brown talks about employment opportunities for African American girls in Youngstown, Ohio during the 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ernestine Brown recalls the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision in 1954

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ernestine Brown talks about teaching in the Cleveland Public School System during the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ernestine Brown talks about attending workshops at Boston University and returning to Boston in summer 1963

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ernestine Brown describes how she met her husband, HistoryMaker Malcolm Brown

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ernestine Brown recalls the March on Washington and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ernestine Brown talks about protests and de facto school segregation in Cleveland, Ohio during the early 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ernestine Brown reflects upon the unrest and assassinations of the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ernestine Brown talks about returning to teaching in the Cleveland Public Schools in 1977 after giving birth to her three children

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ernestine Brown talks about searching for a location for an art gallery

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ernestine Brown remembers being forced to sign a restrictive covenant when she bought their first house in Shaker Heights, Ohio in 1967

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ernestine Brown talks about opening the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio in 1980

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ernestine Brown talks about exhibitions by HistoryMaker Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, and Hughie Lee-Smith at the Malcolm Brown Gallery

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ernestine Brown talks about operating the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ernestine Brown reflects upon the role of art in society

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ernestine Brown talks about institutions that collect and showcase HistoryMaker Malcolm Brown's art

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ernestine Brown talks about running the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ernestine Brown talks about developing a relationship with June Kelly, Romare Bearden's manager

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ernestine Brown describes the relationship between the Malcolm Brown Gallery and other arts organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ernestine Brown explains how the Cleveland Museum of Art acquired a painting by HistoryMaker Malcolm Brown

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ernestine Brown talks about her involvement with the Womens Council of the Cleveland Museum of Art

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ernestine Brown talks about her children and volunteer activities

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ernestine Brown describes her hopes for the future of art in America

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ernestine Brown talks about the relationship between race and American art

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
Ernestine Brown describes how she met her husband, HistoryMaker Malcolm Brown
Ernestine Brown talks about exhibitions by HistoryMaker Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, and Hughie Lee-Smith at the Malcolm Brown Gallery
Transcript
--'Cause then [HM] Malcolm [Brown] was supposed to--I met him at--I met him at the BU [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts] dorm--I met him at--no I saw him--you wanna hear this story?$$Yes.$$You got time?$$Yeah, I do.$$It's interesting. I was walking home from school one day and I was always fascinated by tall men and I came home and I said, "Linda [Wood Williams (ph.)] I saw a long, tall and fine walking down the street," (laughter), never saw him again. My mother [Alma Hill Turner] called me--I was gonna go to the Delta [Sigma Theta Sorority] Convention and my mother called me and said your sister [Alma Joyce Williams] has met this guy and she's talking about getting married to him and she just met him in the spring, she said you need to come home and talk to her. Well at that time, children listened to their parents, and I said, "Linda I don't think I'm gonna go to the convention." It was not a situation where today you have to in order to get your hotel, you have to register first, I had just--I wa--it was just a thought to go. It wasn't--I wasn't all registered to go. So I said okay, and I said, "Linda my classes are finished I'm gonna go home." She had a couple more classes, finals to take. And I said--I told her the whole story and she--and I said to her well--she said, "Why don't we go tell the dining hall goodbye." I said, "Ooh, that's a good idea; we might see him," (laughter). So, we go, silly girls and from across I span the room, pan the room is it what--what do you see in town-- say in television lingo?$$Pan.$$Pan the room? I pan the room, I said, "Ooh Linda, there he is," (laughter). She said, "You wanna sit beside him?" I said, "Yeah," well we had been seeing these African guys, my friend was a young Jewish fella, had introduced us to these African fellas, and I said well we been you know we been talking to them, so let's go sit with them. And as Linda--'cause they were waving, so Linda went to sit with them and because there were not many African Americans there at this school, you know people are far more friendly, from across a crowded room, he waved. And Linda and I waved back and then he motioned with his hands, you know come this direction. Women today would go, woman of that era, we motioned to him you come. He, after he had lunch, he walked over, you know where you from and that kind of conversation. Linda had to go to class; he said can I walk you home? And I said yeah, but you see I violated that--that thing that we had about we would not--but that's not a date, that was just a walk home, right (laughter)?$$Right.$$And I told him that--well he wanted to--he wanted to go out that evening, I couldn't go out that evening. But I said call me and then the next day he did and I said to Linda--she said, "Well now if you wait a couple more days, we can all drive home together." Well I was--I was telling everybody I met goodbye, and I had all these things, dates lined up anyway, or dinners and luncheons, the rest is history. I was supposed to meet him at the March on Washington because that's where I was going to go and that didn't pan out. But when you talk about the history of--of the period, I did go--came home and I did go with Karamu [House, Cleveland, Ohio]--you know I was--we were one of the busloads that went to the March on Washington. And I was just talking to my grandson about that last month, during Black History Month. Because I had--was saying Avery do you know about the March--I said do you know who [Reverend] Dr. Martin Luther King [Jr.] is, and he was telling me yes, and I said well grandma heard him give his I Have A Dream speech.$So we went about showcasing at its best in 1981, we opened [Malcolm Brown Gallery, Shaker Heights, Ohio] in 1980. Nineteen eighty-one [1981], we have a show of [HM] Elizabeth Catlett's work and you--and you know the world now knows how important she is. Nineteen eighty-two [1982], we bring Romare Bearden here and it blew the comm- it blew the art world and--I don't wanna--maybe I--I mean I saying it in the wrong way. But because he had never had an exhibition in a black owned gallery, and his, his gallery in New York [New York] was Cordier [&] Ekstrom, he was only known to have Ek- museum shows. And our show it came on the hills of his exhibition that traveled to four or five museums started in 1980. 1982 he was here in the flesh.$$Okay.$$Which was wonderful. We started with a lecture at the Cleveland Museum of Art [Cleveland, Ohio]. At that time, up to that time, they had never allowed an artist to lecture that they did not bring to town. And we got all kinds of--it was just wonderful. People from around the country flew in to see the work of Romare Bearden at the Malcolm Brown Gallery.$$Okay.$$And then we went on. Hughie Lee-Smith who has Cleveland [Ohio] connections but had not shown here in fifty years, we had an exhibition of his in 1984 and it just kept--it just continued on and on and on. Everybody that we brought, it was--with the exception of Hughie Lee-Smith, because of his Cleveland connection, but a half century of not being here, it was the first exhibition for the State of Ohio. And people came and I have people tell me now, say Ernestine, I remember when Romare Bearden came to your gallery. Or I remember when Elizabeth Catlett came with the exhibition that was at the museum. In 2002, she opened with us on that Friday, September 20th I believe and then the 21st she went to the museum, people were just amazed when they realized that she had been coming--we had been showing her work all along, but it hadn't clicked as to the significance of this--of this woman. And then with this recent exhibition [The Art of Romare Bearden] at the National Gallery [of Art, Washington, D.C.]--that opened at the National Gallery of his work and then that will show--will tour, it's very significant.$$Yeah.