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Carole Copeland Thomas

Motivational speaker and business consultant Carole Copeland Thomas was born on August 21, 1953 in Detroit, Michigan. Thomas graduated from Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan, and went on to earn her B.A. degree in music, with honors, from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1975. Thomas enrolled at Northeastern University, in Boston, Massachusetts, on a Martin Luther King, Jr. academic fellowship, earning her M.B.A. degree in 1985.

Thomas began her career working in sales for Mary Kay Cosmetics, eventually becoming an independent sales director in 1975. Thomas moved to Boston with her then husband and family, working for the Bank of New England and The Gillette Company as an assistant product manager. Thomas founded Temporary Solutions, a temporary employment agency, in 1987. By 1989, the agency had grown into a full service speaking, training, and facilitation company called C. Thomas and Associates, specializing in diversity, multicultural, leadership, and empowerment issues. Thomas served as a town coordinator for Governor Deval Patrick’s 2006 campaign. In 2008, Thomas started The Multicultural Symposium Series (MSS), a face to face, online, and on the air initiative designed to advance the cause of multiculturalism. She hosted the weekly radio talk show “Focus on Empowerment” on Boston’s WILD 1090 AM radio, and subsequently on WBNW 1120 AM and Internet radio, from 2003 to 2009. Thomas has spoken at the Federal Highway Administration, SHRM, Hewlett Packard, Verizon, and Cargill, and Monster.com.

Thomas authored several books, including 21 Ways To Bring Multiculturalism To Your Job Your Home and Your Community and Real Women, Real Issues: Positive Collaborations for Business Success. She also served as the executive coach for the Essence Magazine Leadership Summit. Thomas became a life member of the National Black MBA Association in 1986, serving as president of the Boston Chapter, national vice chair, and a co-founder of the Leaders of Tomorrow program. She served as the Tri State coordinator for Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and as the chair of the Multicultural Committee for the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau. Thomas also served as an adjunct professor at Bentley University.

Thomas has three children: Lorna, Michelle, and the late Mickarl, as well as two grandchildren, Julianna and Gabrielle.

Carole Copeland Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 18, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.104

Interview Date

10/18/2016 |and| 11/15/2018

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Schools

Emory University

Northeastern University

Cass Technical High School

Beaubien Middle School

Vandenberg Elementary School

George N. Brady Elementary School

First Name

Carole Copeland

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

THO25

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mombasa, Kenya

Favorite Quote

Those Who Cannot Learn From History Are Doomed To Repeat It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/21/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Motivational speaker and business consultant Carole Copeland Thomas (1953 – ) founded the temporary employment agency Temporary Solutions in 1987, which grew into C. Thomas and Associates, a full service speaking, training, and facilitation company.

Employment

C Thomas & Associates

Mary Kay Inc

Gillette

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carole Copeland Thomas' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her mother's upbringing in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her father's education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her father experiences as a Tuskegee Airman

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her parent's careers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her father's relocation to Ghana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her schooling in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers the riots in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the emergence of gangs in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes the arts program at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her friends from Cass Technical High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls the prevalence of racial terrorism in Georgia during the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers Juanita Jones Abernathy

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences as a saleswoman for Mary Kay Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers moving to Norristown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her husband's transfer to Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls buying a home in Middleton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls her M.B.A. degree from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the community support for her graduate education

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences at The Gillette Company

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the benefits of an M.B.A. degree

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

4$5

DATitle
Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 2
Carole Thomas Copeland recalls her M.B.A. degree from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts
Transcript
My mother's mother's [Nora Charleston] side of the family, that is the Branch [ph.] family. I don't know as much about them and I'll go back and give you some information about the Gaines side of the family, but the Branch side of the family also from Georgia, including the Savannah, Georgia area, other parts of, of Georgia. My grandmother, my great-grandmother who I did not know because she had passed away on my mother's side was biracial and grew up in Hamilton, Georgia. Her father was the plantation owner and her mother was a slave woman and this man had two sets of families from what I have been told and my grandmother was the black side of the family and he probably had white children also, so that's the lineage I know. I don't know much about that side of the family, but that's the Branch side of the family. One of the Branch members though, the Batchelor-Branch family, one of my distant cousins on the same side of that family who now lives in Detroit [Michigan], was the first African American admitted into the Daughters of the American Revolution because her mother's side of the family, she is related to me on her father's side, her mother's could trace their roots back to the Revolutionary time and the Pilgrims time and that constituted her being allowed to be part of the DAR. She was the first black member probably in the late '70s [1970s], early '80s [1980s].$$So she had roots that (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) Karen, Karen Batchelor [Karen Batchelor Farmer] is her name.$$Okay.$$Her name is Karen Batchelor, so--$$Karen Batchelor had roots that went all the way back to--$$To the--$$--to the settlement of Massachusetts--$$Correct.$$--to the Pilgrims or Puritans--$$Correct.$$--of the 1600s?$$Correct, yes, yeah.$$So here we are in Massachusetts, here we are full circle--$$(Laughter) Right.$$--too.$$Yes, in a way, yeah you can say that.$$Okay, so--$$So she, that's the Batchelor side of the family and that was her mother's mother's side of the family, this is my grandmother, my again, maternal.$$This is all of your father's of your father's side.$$No, this is all on my mother's [Gwendolyn Charleston Copeland] side of the family.$$Your--okay, okay.$$All on my mother's side.$$The maternal side of your mother's side of the family?$$Now I'm talking about the maternal side of my mother's side. The paternal side is the, the family that had the six hundred acres of land--$$Oh, okay.$$--the Gaines family, G-A-I-N-E-S.$$Okay, understood.$$Right.$$That's the paternal side, okay.$$Right. One aspect of the Gaines family, there are lots of things, with the Gaines family were sort of connected to the Thurgood Marshall family because we have roots in Baltimore [Maryland], that's another story. We, our family owned a bank in Baltimore that just closed about five years ago, five or six years ago, one of those little small community banks, Ideal Savings Bank [Ideal Federal Savings Bank], I believe that was the name of it and in 1865, I believe that's the year, January, 1865 as Sherman [William Tecumseh Sherman] was burning down Georgia and he decided not to burn Savannah, my, one of my ancestors, Reverend William Gaines was actually in a meeting that was recorded with other leading black people in Savannah and they met with General Sherman to discuss the outcome of blacks once they were going to be freed. I can pull that up online and show it to you, so it's, it's, it's Google searchable. But there were about nineteen leaders and he was one of them, he represented the ministerial community, the minister in the community, in Savannah and that was--$$Was he A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal] as well or--?$$He was not--he was part of the Methodist church because the A.M.E. church didn't get to the South until after the Civil War, for obvious reasons. So it started--the A.M.E. church was started in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] by freed blacks and did not and then affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal churches in the South after the Civil War.$$The southern Methodists--$$Right.$$--because they had split off because of slavery, yeah.$$Right, right. So that group lined up with the A.M.E. church after the Civil War, so Reverend Gaines was part of the Methodist Episcopal church I believe which ultimately became the, the A.M.E. church.$Now you pursued an M.B.A. from Northeastern [Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts] and you entered the program in 1983, what prompted that--?$$I was still in Mary Kay [Mary Kay Inc.], but I was looking beyond Mary Kay. I didn't have the kind of success that some of my colleagues had had, certainly didn't have the success that Juanita Abernathy [Juanita Jones Abernathy] had had or Lenny Woods [ph.], or some of the other great black directors and then national sales directors, and, and I wanted to go back to school and business was an area that I wanted to pursue. I just didn't have the money to go back to school. Dr. Virgil Wood [Virgil A. Wood], I don't know if you've interviewed him, another great civil rights leader, minister, Baptist preacher, still living, was a friend of my husband's [Copeland Thomas' ex-husband, Mickarl Thomas, Sr.] at that time and was also the dean of the African American Institute [John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute] at Northeastern, I talked with him and, and said I'd love to go back to school, Northeastern is a school I would certainly like to look at, I don't have the money (laughter) tuition wise to go to school and he said, "You, you know there are opportunities to get a scholarship, so apply," which I did. I did not do well on my GMAT [Graduate Management Admission Test] exams and they recommended I take them over again. I did not take them over again, but I was accepted to Northeastern and I won a full scholarship, so I won a Martin Luther King scholarship [Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Graduate Fellowship Program] to pay for everything except my books at Northeastern and that's how I was able to go back to school in 1983.$$Okay and at, at this juncture you're, you've really switched gears, you've gone into business right and not pursuing voice any longer--$$No.$$--singing career?$$No, no, I'm, I'm fully engaged in the business world (laughter).$$Okay, all right, well who were some of your professors at Northeastern and what did you learn there?$$It was a two year rigorous program and I guess one professor who comes to mind is Jonathan Pond who was one of my accounting professors I believe, very colorful person, but a very enthusiastic person, one-- somebody I could relate to. He also did a little bit of TV work. He does TV work now if he's still--I'm sure he's still in the area, he would do little segments about saving money or you know, building your wealth, or those kinds of things and that I think as a result of the work he did at Northeastern, but he was just a very encouraging person and I, I had some tough classes. I had, I, I, I failed two classes. My first year, my first semester, I failed a statistics class and an accounting class, failed them flat and remember I'd been a very good student. I'd never failed anything before, this was the first time I had ever failed in life and that drew me closer to the black students who were on that campus, other graduate students in the program; Willie Shellman who is a friend to this day, he is president of the Tuskegee Airmen New England Chapter [New England Chapter Tuskegee Airmen, Inc.] and others who took me under their wing and they said, "You're doing it wrong," (laughter). "First you all have to collaborate, you need to take this teacher, don't take that one, he's racist, take this one." So they schooled me in terms of who to take. There was a loose affiliation of the black students and they didn't really have an association per se, but it was like the forerunner of the I guess, the student version of the National Black MBA Association of which I became a part of immediately after college, after graduate school, but these students and African students who were my classmates from Mali, I had two African students who I was in school with and I used to bring them to my house, cook for them and we'd sit at the dining room table in Middleton [Massachusetts] and study. So I learned how to collaborate and work with others so that I could move ahead. As I moved ahead they moved ahead also and I didn't have to do that in college because I was, it was more of an independent thrust and work that I did independently, but in graduate school is where I really learned how to work as a team and work in a team and realize that my success was not necessarily based on just me, it was based on me collaborating with other people. So between the African students, the Jamaican students, a Seventh-day Adventists, I remember--oh he was brilliant. He was actually one time teaching, I can't think of his name right now, but he was teaching the class and the teacher was mesmerized and said, "Wait, wait a minute, I'm teaching this class," (laughter). So I had some brilliant people, a lot of guys, who were my friends and we helped each other to get through.$$Okay.$$Also, Dr. Bill Tita [William Tiga Tita], T-I-T-A, an African American from Africa originally, he is still living and he was my advisor in grad school and so I also give him credit.

Gloria Burgess

Executive leadership professor, speaker, author, and poet, Gloria Jean Burgess was born on May 23, 1953 in Oxford, Mississippi. Her father, Earnest McEwen, Jr. received a college education thanks to funding from Nobel laureate author William Faulkner, on the condition that his gift be passed on to others, which McEwen did for Gloria and his other four daughters. Burgess grew up in Detroit, where she attended Ralph Bunche Elementary School, and Ann Arbor, where she attended Northside Elementary School, Forsythe Junior High School and graduated from Huron High School. Burgess attended the University of Michigan, studying poetry with Robert Hayden and drama. She earned her B.G.S. degree in education, anthropology, English and speech communication in 1975.

Burgess obtained her M.A. degree in speech communication and theater from the University of Michigan in 1977, earning notoriety as a Distinguished Fellow and Scholar in Direction and Performance. She attended the University of Southern California (USC) in the late 1970s, obtaining her Ph.D. in performance studies. Burgess continued studying, earning her M.B.A. degree from USC in 1986 in organizational behavior and design and information systems.

In 1988, Burgess was appointed assistant professor at the University of Washington College of Engineering, teaching leadership, management, cross cultural studies, and creativity to engineering students. In 1991, Burgess became director of multimedia development for Aldus Corporation, the organization responsible for PageMaker software. In 1994, Burgess founded Jazz, Inc., an executive coaching and consulting organization. She also founded The Lift Every Voice Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to leadership development for underserved, underrepresented youth. Burgess continued studying during this time, and in 1995 earned her M.A. degree in applied behavioral science from Bastyr University. Upon graduating, she became graduate faculty and program lead for their graduate program in leadership and applied behavioral science.

Burgess continued studying poetry as well, becoming a Fellow in the new Cave Canem organization for African American poets and writers in 1996. She became a consultant for Bastyr University's Leadership Institute the following year, consulting for faculty, undergraduate and graduate programs. Burgess spent 1997 through 1999 as a consultant for Boeing Corporation, and in 1998 was appointed to Leadership Tomorrow's Core Faculty. That same year, she published her first book of poetry, entitled Journey of the Rose. Despite all this activity, Burgess managed to remain involved in "Keepers of the Dream" with the Group Theatre Company, a celebration of African American women.

In 2000, Burgess expanded her coaching and consulting practice and became executive coach to the Dean of Libraries at the University of Washington. She also published her second book of poetry in 2001, entitled The Open Door, and wrote her first book for children entitled Hold Fast to Dreams: Pass It On!, about her father's relationship with William Faulkner.

Burgess lives with her husband, John, and daughter, Quinn in Edmonds, Washington.

Burgess was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.306

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/3/2008 |and| 10/26/2007

Last Name

Burgess

Maker Category
Schools

Huron High School

Forsythe Junior High School

Ralph Bunche Elementary School

University of Michigan

University of Southern California

Bastyr University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Oxford

HM ID

BUR18

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Pass It On.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

5/23/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pie (Sweet Potato)

Short Description

Poet and business consultant Gloria Burgess (1953 - ) founded Jazz, Inc., an executive coaching and consulting organization. She is also the author of, "Hold Fast to Dreams: Pass It On!"

Employment

Casey Family Programs

Jazz, Inc.

Aldus/Adobe Corp.

University of Washington

Honeywell

Favorite Color

Green

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Burgess' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Burgess lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Burgess describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Burgess talks about her maternal great-great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Burgess talks about her maternal family's sharecropping

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Burgess talks about her mother's childhood in Abbeville, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Burgess describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Burgess describes Oxford, Mississippi and her father's educational background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Burgess talks about her father's employment at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Burgess describes how her parents met and developed a relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Gloria Burgess talks about her father's close friendship with author William Faulkner

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Gloria Burgess talks about her father's participation in a walkout at Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College in Lorman, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess explains why her father was expelled from Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College in Lorman, Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Burgess explains why her father was expelled from Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College in Lorman, Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Burgess talks about her father's studies at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Burgess talks about her family's move north and her father's inability to find work

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Burgess considers her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Burgess describes her childhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Burgess describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Burgess describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gloria Burgess recalls spending time with her extended family in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Gloria Burgess lists the elementary schools she attended in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Gloria Burgess describes her father's jobs in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Gloria Burgess describes difficulties she experienced transitioning from Detroit to Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Gloria Burgess explains her father's decision to relocate to Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Gloria Burgess lists the schools she attended in Ann Arbor, Michigan and her favorite teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess recalls being introduced to Langston Hughes' work in the sixth grade

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Burgess talks about her family's private relationship with William Faulkner

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Burgess describes her academic interests and personality as an elementary and high school student

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Burgess remembers Gwendolyn Brooks' visit to Huron High School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Burgess talks about her decision to attend University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Burgess talks about studying under Robert Hayden and Eva Jessye at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Burgess remembers when she started to wear her hair natural

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Burgess talks about her family's discussions of the Civil Rights Movement and racism

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Burgess recalls the assassinations of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Burgess talks about her undergraduate majors

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Gloria Burgess talks about her experience with poet Robert Hayden

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Gloria Burgess remembers choral director Eva Jessye, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess remembers choral director Eva Jessye, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Burgess remembers professors that were both positive and negative influences

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Burgess talks about earning her M.A. degree in Performance Studies from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Burgess talks about earning her Ph.D. degree from the University of Southern California and describes her dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Burgess talks about transitioning from academia into technology and business

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Burgess explains why she wanted to earn an M.B.A. degree

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Burgess talks about her appointment as assistant professor at the College of Engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Burgess describes meeting and marrying her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gloria Burgess describes her experience as an assistant professor in the University of Washington's College of Engineering in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Gloria Burgess describes joining the Aldus Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Gloria Burgess describes her experience at the Aldus Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess talks about earning a third M.A. degree from Bastyr University in Kenmore, Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Burgess talks about her consulting company, Jazz, Incorporated

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Burgess describes the most common problems she addresses as a consultant

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Burgess talks about publishing her poetry

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Burgess describes her managerial style and philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Burgess talks about the significance of the Middle Passage to her poetry and the work of other poets

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Burgess talks about the Cave Canem fellowship

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Burgess considers what she might have done differently

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Burgess describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Gloria Burgess describes her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Gloria Burgess considers her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Gloria Burgess talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Gloria Burgess talks briefly about her mother's legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Gloria Burgess describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess narrates her photographs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Burgess narrates her photographs

Edward Adams

Edward Beverle Adams was born on January 31, 1939, in New York City to Clarence and Ernesta Adams. Adams attended the New York City Public Schools and in 1952 integrated the privileged Horace Mann School. Adams graduated at age sixteen and entered New York University’s College of Engineering from which he received his B.S. degree in industrial engineering in 1959. Adams did graduate work in industrial engineering at Polytechnic University Brooklyn and attended graduate school at the University of Vermont, majoring in business administration. Adams was also an alumnus of the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, from which he received the Stanford Sloan Executive Fellowship.

In 1964, Adams began his career at IBM as an assistant buyer in Burlington, Vermont, and later advanced to buying and procurement engineering manager. In 1967, he was promoted to Product Industrial Engineer Manager. Adams later became Administrative Assistant to the IBM Director of Manufacturing in Armonk, New York, a position he held for only one year before being named Information Record Division Operations Manager in Boulder, Colorado. In this new position, Adams was responsible for manufacturing and product engineering in magnetic media. Adams left this position in 1973, after receiving the Sloan Fellowship.

In 1975, Adams moved to Austin, Texas, to work in the IBM office as Product-System Manager; he held several leadership positions within IBM including Director of Site Operations, Regional Manager of Corporate Community Relations, and Public Affairs for the Western sites. Adams retired from IBM in 2000 to start his own consulting firm.

Adams was affiliated with various boards and organizations, such as the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s Higher Education Planning Committee. In 1998, he and his wife, Mary Lou Adams, Ph.D., were honored by the Austin Project for their service to children and families. Adams was awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree of Humane Letters by Houston-Tillotson College in 1989. In addition to his professional activities, Adams also held the positions of lector and Eucharistic lay minister at the St. James Episcopal Church.

Adams passed away on April 8, 2008 at age 69.

Accession Number

A2007.053

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/7/2007

Last Name

Adams

Maker Category
Middle Name

Beverle

Schools

P.S. 184

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. School,

J.H.S. 43

Horace Mann School

New York University

University of Vermont

Stanford Graduate School of Business

First Name

Edward

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

ADA09

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Northern California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

1/31/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food, Caribbean Food

Death Date

4/8/2008

Short Description

Business consultant and corporate executive Edward Adams (1939 - 2008 ) worked with IBM for over three decades, working his way up from assistant buyer to such high-ranking positions as Director of Site Operations, Regional Manager of Corporate Community Relations, and Public Affairs for the Western sites.

Employment

International Business Machines (IBM)

County Machine Company

U.S. Time Corporation

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:1458,19:1782,24:2268,31:6313,107:6637,112:7447,123:7771,128:9877,180:10687,193:11173,204:12793,229:13684,241:21234,321:21981,333:23226,359:23558,364:23973,370:29864,419:45405,577:45745,582:46085,587:46595,595:47190,603:59093,667:60303,678:63933,718:79038,855:79608,861:84305,918:86263,959:95882,1107:103321,1183:103939,1190:104351,1195:110860,1241:113220,1255:119647,1301:129500,1505:143310,1604:145775,1633:146115,1638:149515,1695:150110,1703:158717,1765:176744,1927:177146,1934:177481,1940:192338,2116:192748,2122:202963,2191:205102,2226:207470,2233:209590,2240:210552,2258:211588,2283:218768,2339:221945,2354:236310,2539$0,0:7904,78:8528,84:10340,94:10668,99:17884,276:21246,343:21738,349:26358,370:28580,382:29300,393:29840,401:30380,408:30830,414:34832,448:35474,455:45545,540:46020,546:52076,577:59396,648:65268,691:78665,833:83936,878:88344,923:92472,969:114120,1245:114468,1250:114990,1257:118171,1286:120172,1317:120868,1327:121303,1333:121825,1340:123391,1368:132732,1446:140205,1563:140630,1569:152545,1677:159175,1795:159685,1801:161045,1827:176295,1892:176707,1897:183130,1925:186588,1983:187225,1992:188590,2017:189591,2027:200590,2131:201670,2144:202300,2152:218268,2414:227630,2466:228030,2491:228730,2503:232376,2558:232943,2576:233267,2581:238835,2638:244615,2777:253588,2861:254771,2872:255499,2882:255954,2888:257592,2907:258502,2918:261340,2930:261980,2935:263911,2940:265279,2950:278138,3132:285910,3204
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Edward Adams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Edward Adams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Edward Adams describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Edward Adams describes how his parents came to the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Edward Adams describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Edward Adams talks about his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Edward Adams remembers the Harlem neighborhood of New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Edward Adams describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Edward Adams recalls his childhood friends

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Edward Adams remembers his elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Edward Adams describes the community in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Edward Adams describes his parents' occupations and education

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Edward Adams recalls his junior high school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Edward Adams remembers the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Edward Adams recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Edward Adams talks about growing up in New York City during World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Edward Adams describes his experiences of discrimination at the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Edward Adams recalls his teachers at the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Edward Adams recalls the athletics program at the Horace Mann School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Edward Adams describes his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Edward Adams recalls his first year at the New York University College of Engineering

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Edward Adams describes the nightlife in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Edward Adams remembers visiting the cultural institutions of New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Edward Adams remembers pledging to the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Edward Adams recalls his decision to study industrial engineering

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Edward Adams recalls his work as a camp counsellor at the YMCA

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Edward Adams talks about his early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Edward Adams recalls his initial rejection from IBM

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Edward Adams recalls joining the staff of IBM

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Edward Adams talks about his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Edward Adams recalls the mentorship of H. Lawrence McCrorey

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Edward Adams shares a story about his friend, Wylie Namar

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Edward Adams recalls his activism in Burlington, Vermont

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Edward Adams recalls his work to recruit black employees at IBM

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Edward Adams describes his role at the IBM facility in Burlington, Vermont

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Edward Adams recalls his position as an executive assistant at IBM

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Edward Adams recalls his business trips abroad with IBM

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Edward Adams talks about being drafted into the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Edward Adams recalls his mentorship of black students in Boulder, Colorado

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Edward Adams talks about his children

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Edward Adams recalls his nomination to the Sloan Master's Program

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Edward Adams describes the Sloan Master's Program at the Stanford Graduate School of Business

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Edward Adams recalls his roles at the IBM facility in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Edward Adams describes his civic involvement in Austin, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Edward Adams describes his civic involvement in Austin, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Edward Adams recalls his position as manager of external programs for IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Edward Adams describes his role as a corporate community relations manager

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Edward Adams describes his work for IBM in South Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Edward Adams recalls his travels

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Edward Adams recalls his appointment to the Texas Workforce Investment Council

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Edward Adams describes his education reform activism in Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Edward Adams describes his involvement with the Boule

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Edward Adams talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Edward Adams recalls suffering a house fire

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Edward Adams describes his involvement at St. James' Episcopal Church in Austin, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Edward Adams describes the congregation of St. James' Episcopal Church

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Edward Adams talks about his role as senior warden of St. James' Episcopal Church

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Edward Adams reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Edward Adams shares a message to future generations, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Edward Adams shares a message to future generations, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Edward Adams narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

17$8

DATitle
Edward Adams describes his experiences of discrimination at the Horace Mann School in the Bronx, New York
Edward Adams describes his work for IBM in South Africa
Transcript
Let's go onto your high school days at Horace Mann [Horace Mann School, Bronx, New York].$$Okay.$$Now, you were considered very bright in your school before going to Horace Mann. When you get there, are there other students now competition becomes--$$Oh yeah (laughter).$$--greater? Tell me about that?$$Well, it--it's again was a situation where I was the only black person in the--in the--in the grade. And all my friends were either very bright or--or very--either very bright or very rich (laughter), okay, mostly rich. But I made some great friends there. In fact, I just came back in October from our--October 2005 from our fiftieth anniversary. And that graduating class, I think, had 101, 102 in--in the class. And I think we had about sixty-five at the reunion. And what I can recall, some interesting things I reflect upon. We--I would study with a fella by the name of Everett Marx [ph.]. And the first time I went to study at his house, which was in Central Park West [New York, New York], the doorman told me to use--I had to use the service entrance--elevator. Well he straightened that out, but that was kind of interesting situation. But I had some--some really good friends and I did not experience any from the students, any racial harm--you know, problems. Interesting story, I played football and I was not the fastest runner in the world. And the coach came over to me one day and said, "Ed [HistoryMaker Edward Adams], what's wrong with you?" I said, "What do you mean coach?" He said, "Well most colored guys I know can run like greased lightning," (laughter). And then I had, I think I--I had some teachers, who in retrospect, who I think, particularly a biology teacher named Mr. Moody [ph.] who I think had a streak in him that was racist. But, I, I, I, I did not do well in--in there. So I was a mediocre--in Horace Mann, I was a--an average student. But it was a, I think, whe- a really great experience for me. I was exposed to how the wealthy lived. I mean, I went to a house of one of my classmates in Yonkers [New York]. It was the first time I'd ever been in a house where the couch was not against the wall (laughter). So at that--at that point, I think my aspirations became really great in terms of what I wanted to do, and what I wanted to accomplish in life. And when I--I was sixteen at the time of graduation and Horace Mann wanted me to stay another year and they would've, you know, given me a scholarship for another year because I was so young. I told them, "No thanks."$We're still in the '90s [1990s] I think.$$Um-hm.$$In 2000, I'm asked to go to South Africa to help them on their community relations programs and to bring some of the programs that IBM [International Business Machines Corporation] had in the United States to see if they were feasible to do in South Africa and to do them. So, I went over to South Africa and consulted with them. That was a really, really great experience, 'cause I got to go to places that tourists don't go.$$So tell me about the experience?$$Well, I'll tell you, I've never seen so much poverty. And see kids that--the big problem is getting them food so they can perform in school. You go into the townships and the streets aren't paved and there are no street signs to tell you where you are. A lot of h- holdovers, even though it became essentially a new country, but in 1994 there's a lot--a lot of work to be done. I got to, to meet a lot of people. I got to meet a, a Anglo guy who was telling me that--that his company is making a lot of money giving training programs to, to corporations because they lose people so fast to AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome]. Every Saturday somebody going to a funeral. So, there- there's some problems. But there's some bright spots too. There--there's a really emerging middle, middle class and upper middle class, a lot of black owned businesses, a lot of blacks doing very, very well. But in--from the business world and the corporate world, you don't see it very much of it. One of the pleasures I got in, in, in traveling to South Africa was to see a, a man who used to work at IBM, could not go home because if he got home he'd be put in jail because he's one of those student protestors back in the days of the struggle. And he has si- since returned to South Africa and I got to visit with him. The--I got to an IBM--African IBMer that I got to, to work with, Alfred Mandeo [ph.]. Really showed me the roots, showed me, you know, what was going on there. And we had some, some real successes. We put in a program where we put computers that were child, that were child--configured for children. A program called KidSmart [KidSmart Early Learning Program] and we put that in several schools in South Africa and got some, some really good results of this as a result of it. But it was--it was--I, I, I traveled over there, even after I retired, they hi- hired me as a consultant and I did that work until 2003. Took my wife [Mary Louise Adams] over on one trip and so she got to enjoy it a lot more than I did, because you know, when you're over there you're working. I subsequently got to meet Bishop Tutu [Desmond Tutu], actually I met him in New York [New York] at a--at a banquet and had dinner with him, and so I sat at the table with him. So, that was--that was a great situation. Dealt with a lot of the government people in South Africa. They, the government tends to be very much black and Indian, a lot of Indians in the--in the senior management positions in government. A lot of--I think they may still be using punch cards in some of those areas, I mean the backward technology, it's amazing. But it was--it was an interesting experience.

Donna Satchell

Donna Satchell was born on December 20, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York to Jennie and J.C Horton. The family moved to Mount Vernon, New York where she attended public school. After high school, Satchell worked for over ten years in various administrative positions for Booz Allen Hamilton, the American Stock Exchange, and Mutual of New York.

Satchell’s career began with the Bristol Myers Squibb Company-Clairol Division in 1984. While working at Bristol Myers, Satchell was promoted from administrative assistant to category development manager in 1998. She also attended Mercy College at night to receive her B.S. degree in business administration in 1989.

Her twenty-plus years of corporate experience combined with her desire to help firms develop their employees helped her build a business based on her professional and personal business ethics and experiences. In 2001, Satchell founded STARR Consulting and Training. Her workforce training programs focus on customer service, team work, time management, principles for workplace success, and public speaking. Her clients include the Coca-Cola Company, The City Atlanta, Cox Communications, the Centers for Disease Control, and the Internal Revenue Service.

The Lessons Learned in Corporate America and How to Make the Most of Your 9 to 5 are just two popular titles among her DVD lecture series. Satchell is also the co-author of The Power of Motivation and a five-part series entitled 303 Solutions. She is one of the co-founders of Women Aspiring Together to Succeed and a member of the National Speakers Association, Les Brown Speakers Network, and the American Society for Training and Development.

Satchell currently resides in Stone Mountain, Georgia.

Accession Number

A2007.014

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/18/2007

Last Name

Satchell-Kimbell

Maker Category
Schools

Mount Vernon High School

Washington Junior High School

Robert Fulton Public School

Westchester Community College

Mercy College

First Name

Donna

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SAT02

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

It Is Never Too Late To Be All That You Can Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/20/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni And Cheese

Short Description

Business consultant and motivational speaker Donna Satchell (1951 - ) founded STARR Consulting and Training, a workforce training program.

Employment

Clairol, Inc.

Booz Allen Hamilton

New York Mutual Life Insurance Company

American Stock Exchange

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3807,89:5427,112:7533,147:8019,159:8586,169:9234,179:10854,205:12798,252:13851,267:20390,339:20908,347:21500,357:21944,365:22832,380:26140,454:26460,460:26716,466:27804,488:28700,506:31386,540:32034,550:34368,569:34632,574:35622,593:36414,606:37272,634:38064,649:40044,708:40572,717:41100,726:42618,747:42882,752:43278,759:51112,814:55140,834:59423,907:60227,920:67396,1189:81532,1460:82528,1475:88396,1556:88864,1590:89176,1599:89488,1604:89956,1611:90970,1635:91282,1640:92140,1660:92608,1667:93154,1675:95260,1723:105130,1878:105760,1893:106390,1914:107090,1925:107440,1931:109120,1971:118446,2212:119066,2226:123400,2294:124840,2314:140520,2487:141795,2508:144090,2547:144430,2552:148762,2620:149650,2635:150538,2650:150834,2655:153698,2681:155231,2728:156107,2746:157275,2769:162702,2837:163104,2847:163975,2871:168062,2962:168330,2967:168732,2974:169871,3004:170139,3009:174829,3193:175298,3201:179184,3284:179519,3291:185330,3304:185816,3311:186140,3316:186869,3347:187355,3354:192944,3459:194726,3494:205940,3673:206700,3689:207156,3697:216183,3783:216876,3802:217254,3812:220782,3897:222042,3923:222420,3930:223050,3941:226100,3958:226520,3966:228270,3996:228690,4003:228970,4008:230180,4017$0,0:255,11:765,18:1615,32:3910,156:4505,168:5270,178:9860,282:15460,357:16860,367:24360,522:25160,531:36388,625:36969,633:38380,660:40704,699:44605,781:50000,863:56454,986:56972,995:57564,1004:57934,1010:59118,1028:59710,1038:60154,1045:61486,1068:62522,1086:80788,1356:86930,1463:87744,1484:90334,1527:95784,1550:99888,1632:115854,1883:122622,2008:123054,2017:124134,2035:130560,2080:133527,2142:134079,2151:139047,2249:139392,2255:139737,2261:147800,2371
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Satchell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell remembers her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell talks about her paternal aunt

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell talks about her mother's relationships

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donna Satchell recalls playing games with her sister

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell remembers Washington Junior High School in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell remembers the Mount Vernon High School Annex in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell remembers Mount Vernon High School in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell describes her mother's opinion of activism

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell remembers her early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell recalls her modeling school experiences in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donna Satchell recalls her work at the American Stock Exchange in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donna Satchell describes her professional ambitions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell remembers her decision to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell remembers leaving Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell remembers Westchester Community College in Valhalla, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls being hired at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell describes her career at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell recalls the support of her education at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls meeting the president of U.S. operations at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell recalls her promotion to marketing at Clairol, Inc., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell recalls her promotion to marketing at Clairol, Inc., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell recalls joining the sales office of Clairol, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell recalls her business, Cultural Art Works, in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls founding Women Aspiring Together To Succeed

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell recalls her decision to leave Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell remembers founding her business, Success Can Be Yours, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls her work in change management for the City of Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell describes her work with Les Brown

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell talks about her writing projects

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell describes her motivational speaking engagements

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell talks about Dennis Paul Kimbro

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell shares a message for future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

6$9

DATitle
Donna Satchell remembers founding her business, Success Can Be Yours, LLC
Donna Satchell recalls her modeling school experiences in New York City
Transcript
And so how does your business work?$$Well it started and it's, it's funny because when I started I truly had no idea what I was doing.$$What's the name of the company?$$Right now it's Starr Consulting and Training [Stone Mountain, Georgia], S-T-A-R-R, Consulting and Training, but it didn't even start as Starr Consulting and Training, it started under the name of Success Can Be Yours [Success Can Be Yours, LLC, Stone Mountain, Georgia]. That was the first name, Success Can Be Yours, everyone can be a success. And I was talking about workplace success, but I was just looking at being a motivational speaker, I didn't even know anything about training, I knew so little it's amazing. But I joined the National Speakers Association, learned some things about speaking, joined--then I--a turn, a kind of like turning point was I became associated with [HistoryMaker] Les Brown, motivational trainer, a motivational speaker, a friend ran into him at the airport, the Atlanta airport [Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia], she didn't live in Atlanta [Georgia]. And she told him about me and she was telling him how I was passionate about what I did, her name is Stephanie Townsend [ph.]. She, she called me one day--no one day I come home, you have to realize I don't know what I'm doing with my business. And I, I pick up the phone and there is this message on there, it's like, "Yes, Donna [HistoryMaker Donna Satchell], success can be yours 'cause you have--." And the voice is going on and on and on I'm trying to think who is this, I'm thinking I know who this sounds like but it wouldn't be that person because that person doesn't know me and it wouldn't make any sense for that person to call me, well it actually it ended up being Les Brown. He had run into my girlfriend Stephanie at the airport, she told him about me 'cause she said, "I know, nobody else who's as passionate about what they're doing, and they don't know what they're doing, they're not making any money." She said, "I don't know anybody else who every time I call you're excited, you don't know what you're doing, you're telling me you're not making any money, but you're excited," so she told about me. He called me and then I had a conversation with him and he had, he was starting a speakers program. So I took my hard earned money and after arguing with him for hours on the phone, I packed up everything I had on my business and sent it to him. With what, with what I thought was a huge check that was like you be out of your mind to pay this amount of money, but I sent it to him. And in the meantime I was starting to do some training and I had, I had joined Fred Pryor [Fred Pryor Seminars], their national training company, I'd done some training for them. And that's contractual work, so you do it for a couple of months and then I found that the traveling was just wearing me down I wasn't sure if they were paying enough. And that wasn't working, so you're, you're in this business but you don't--it's really kind of strange, you don't know what you're doing. You're doing this, this is working, you're get paid you know, not getting paid a lot over here, getting paid a little bit over here. You know, you, in your mind, you never thought you'd have a business but slowly some things are coming together but coming together real slow but you know you love to do this. So through the Les Brown training program, this is like you're talking about a slight turning 'cause I'm still trying to figure out my business, he, he had somebody on the--we were having a conference call, he had someone on the phone who was fulfilling a training contact for the City of Atlanta. And her name was Pam Evans [ph.] and she was trying to bring on trainers to work for I guess a couple of months for the City of Atlanta. So I met with her and she accepted me as one of the trainers, and I was doing change management training for the City of Atlanta. Then I found out, I really love training.$One of the things that happened when I was in, at Mutual of New York [Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York; The MONY Group, Inc., New York, New York], after I had graduated from high school [Mount Vernon High School, Mount Vernon, New York] was I wanted t- I got involved with taking different kind of classes. I remember taking, I, I was reading the paper and they had a school, it was Robert Powers or something school for [John Robert Powers School, New York, New York]--I'm not even sure how--it wasn't really a modeling school, but it was more on culture, or--the term escapes me right now. But I remember taking classes there for about a year and they taught you how, taught you how to walk and talk and maybe it was kind of like a modeling school. So I took classes there, then like a year later I took classes with Oph- at Ophelia DeVore modeling school [Ophelia DeVore School of Self-Development and Modeling, New York, New York] 'cause I thought--there was part of me that was thinking about being a model, or wanted to pursue modeling. And I loved learning, I loved learning about how to put on makeup. I loved learning--also a lot of modeling is how to think better. And I guess I was looking to grow my, my self-esteem, in some ways, so I, oh I remember going to Ophelia DeVore modeling school, loved it, loved it.$$What did, what, what can you remember about that?$$There were different classes we were taking, one class is about makeup, classes about how to think better, classes about attitude. The graduation was held at this hotel and you had to--I actually made the dress that I end up wearing in the graduation. I'll never forget it was a very--I guess a political statement, it was a red, white and blue dress--no not red, white and blue, my goodness, red, black and green. One side it was red, the middle black and side was green and it was this, this gown I had made. And we had a graduation ceremony it was just, it was just a lot fun it was--I remembering learning so much and trying to, to, to stretch my mind to understand who I was as a person, or who I was as a woman. And I would still, still my greatest dream I guess in a way that I thought was achievable was to be a secretary. But I was taking all these other classes and doing all these other things. So it was a kind of conflict I guess one would have, one would say.

Ralph G. Moore

Minority business consultant Ralph G. Moore was born in Evanston, Illinois on July 4, 1949. His mother, Alberta, worked in the post office, while his father, William, was a railroad worker. After graduating from Evanston Township High School in 1967, Moore attended Southern Illinois University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1971. The following year, he was awarded his CPA license.

After earning his bachelor’s degree, Moore took a position with accounting firm Arthur Andersen, where he remained until 1973. From there, he served as vice president for the Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company and was controller for the Parker House Sausage Company. In 1979, Moore founded Ralph G. Moore & Associates (RGMA). Today, RGMA is one of the premier consulting firms for helping employers to diversify their suppliers. In addition, they consult government agencies with the development and implementation of Affirmative Action programs and help entrepreneurs raise capital.

In addition to his consulting work, Moore serves on the board of directors of several firms. He has also been a contributor to the Harvard Business Review and MBE Magazine. He is also a co-founder and the president of the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs. Since 1994, Moore has served as a trustee of the City Colleges of Chicago, and he is also a trustee of the University of Chicago Hospitals & Health System.

Moore’s numerous awards over the years include “Entrepreneur of the Year” from Inc. Magazine and Enrst & Young and the Governor’s Minority Small Business Advocate of the Year Award from former Illinois Governor George Ryan.

Accession Number

A2004.121

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/9/2004

Last Name

Moore

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Evanston Township High School

Southern Illinois University

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Evanston

HM ID

MOO03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

We're All In This Together.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/4/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Business consultant and business consulting chief executive Ralph G. Moore (1949 - ) founded Ralph G. Moore & Associates (RGMA) in 1979. Over the years, RGMA became one of the premier consulting firms for helping corporations diversify their supply chain.

Employment

Arthur Andersen

Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company

Parker House Sausage Company

Ralph G. Moore & Associates

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph G. Moore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his mother's move north to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore describes his mother's life in Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the lack of family conversation about racism during his childhood visits to Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore lists his mother's jobs in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore explains his father's reasons for leaving the South

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore recalls stories about his paternal aunt and father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ralph G. Moore describes the racial dynamics of his childhood neighborhood and elementary schools in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his frustrations with his Evanston Township High School's academic expectations

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore describes his personality during the time he attended Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the impact of his teachers at Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore comments on the racial and ethnic demographics of Evanston, Illinois in the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore compares the histories of the African American community and Jewish community

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore explains his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about black student body at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his social activities and interests during his teenage years

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his older brother's influence on his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his initial experience at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore recalls challenging an accounting professor at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his activities as a member of the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore recalls organizing a black arts festival in Marion prison in Marion, Illinois with his fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about how he managed to finance his college education at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his initial experiences working at Arthur Andersen

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore explains how he was able to advance despite initial discrimination at Arthur Andersen

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore recalls leaving the Chicago Board of Trade to work for the Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company in 1947

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his experience working at Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his involvement with various community and business organizations in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about Habilitative Systems, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his trusteeship at the University of Chicago Medical Center

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore talks about black accountants in Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his business, Ralph G. Moore & Associates

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the personal significance of his company's work with baseball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter's affinity for history

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his relationship with his daughter's mother and becoming a father

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter's influences and aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore talks about Ralph G. Moore & Associates' role in promoting supplier diversity and minority business development

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the National Minority Supplier Development Council

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore gives examples of what suppliers do within the business world

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore explains the importance of supplier diversity and its implications for minority businesses

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of buying from companies that work with minority vendors

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore describes his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about racial disparities he encountered at Arthur Andersen and witnesses in corporate America

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore reflects on the importance of teaching black youth their history

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of remembering the history of African American struggle

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore reflects on opportunities he has been given and his hope for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his family's reactions to his accomplishments and his mother's struggle with Alzheimer's disease

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Ralph G. Moore talks about black accountants in Illinois
Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of buying from companies that work with minority vendors
Transcript
So, I'm involved; also, the Cosmopolitan Chamber of Commerce [Chicago, Illinois], and this is where the clock kind of swings around. In 1972, I passed the CPA [certified public accountant] exam. That's another, I'm one of those stories. It's hard to imagine and it just speaks to how we've been denied opportunity, but in 1972, I passed the CPA exam, November. I was the 68th black CPA in the state, in the history of the State of Illinois. Now, I mean you can celebrate that, but it means, to me it's a tragedy. Now there are hundreds of black CPAs, but at the time we were less than 100, and you know Lester, and [HistoryMaker] Jim [James] Hill [Jr.], they came before--[HistoryMaker] Lester McKeever, they all came before me, but in the history of the state, to be number sixty-eight tells me that there's a problem. But, what happened, and even there it speaks to the whole issue of race, again about Arthur Andersen [Chicago, Illinois], and there's another brother there, Reggie Burton [ph.], who was another black person who started the same as me, University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois], M.B.A., Roosevelt [University, Chicago, Illinois] undergraduate, very--I wouldn't call it arrogant, but very full of himself. Well, [HistoryMaker] Ralph [G. Moore], he went to SIU [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois]. That exam should be pretty tough for a year but, you know, you should do, you know, study hard, you might do okay. You might make it through. So, we took the same exam, right. Long story short, the results came out. I passed it the first time and, a matter of fact, it was one of those tests November '72 [1972] test, I look back and look at the statistics, only 12 percent of the people who took it the first time passed it. Reggie Burton, who was, needless to say he didn't pass it, not only did he not pass it that time, he took it another seven times before he passed it, so I was very, that was one of those moments. I said, we partied, but we got a couple things done.$$You said accounting is an exact science, so you know it or you don't.$$You either know it or you don't. But I think the other issue, I mean the reason I go back and tell that story is that just to be an accountant, you know, not to, to be able to use these tools for the betterment of the community really is what makes it so good for me. So, I volunteered, I've done work with the National Association of Black Accountants [NABA]. We formed a group called the National CPA Society [ph.], which were the first CPAs, and is trying to help other accounting students come through the program, accounting programs. So, it's been a number, I've done a number of things in the community.$One of the stories I tell in our training, we talk about the value proposition. We [Moore and his daughter, Avery Moore] were in a grocery store. She's nine years old. Now, your daughter is fourteen. When she was nine, when you turned into the cereal aisle of the grocery store, you lose control. Whatever is going to go in that cart, she's, she already knows what she wants. She, some Co-Co this or something she saw on TV. So, when we got to the, she reached for her favorite cereal, which was from a company that was not doing that much with supplier diversity at the time. I said, "Well Avery, let's look at this. This company doesn't do much with minority vendors. So, if we give them our money, that money's gonna go straight outside the community. None of it will ever come back into the community." Now here's the--Cap'n Crunch. I always thought it was Captain but it's Cap'n, Quaker Oats. "Cap'n Crunch--now here's a product that you love. I've seen you eat it, Quaker Oats does a lot of work in the community and when we give them our money, that money, they give money back to our community and that money floats around and some of that money ends up in my checking account, and that's the money I take you to [Walt] Disney World [Orlando, Florida] with." And she looked like wait a minute! No Disney World, Disney World??? Why didn't you tell me?? She was mad that I hadn't told her before that if we buy products from, in our house there's only good companies or bad companies. The good companies work with minority vendors, the bad companies don't. So, the good companies are the ones we support. Same thing when she goes shopping. Now, you've heard about the Tommy Hilfiger problem, true or false, Tommy Hilfiger doesn't seem to do a lot in my community. So, we don't buy Tommy Hilfiger. That was a tough lesson for her because she was, you know, it was a big thing for her. My only point to her was we have to shop with companies that have, that are members, that are national members of the national supplier, the NMSDC, the National Minority Supplier Development Council [New York, New York]. Nordstrom's is a member, Express is a member, Limited is a member, which owns Express, Bloomingdale's is a member (unclear) stores, so it turned out that all of the stores that she would like to shop at are members. So, now, what's the one that had a Ghettopoly game, Urban Outfitters, they're not a member, and they, and plus after that Ghettopoly mess, we don't give 'em any of our money. But the reality is there's enough good companies out there that we can support, and the things I tell her, if you can't buy from a black company, buy from a black salesman in a white company. And if you can't buy from a black salesman in a white company, buy from a company that at least works with black businesses and minority businesses. So, she's armed and ready. Again, if we could get more people thinking like her, we could turn this around. You have companies like SONY records [Sony Music Entertainment, Inc., New York, New York], and my lawyer told me to stop calling names, probably because it's amazing how people hear what I say, 'cause I speak a lot around the country. But, you have companies like SONY records, who don't do anything with supplier diversity. How dare you take all that money out of our community with rap music and not do anything with minority and black vendors! It's crazy. So, there's another point in my career, after I get to this plateau where everything's working fine. I get the book written, I'm going on a one-man crusade to help educate black consumers, minority consumers, so we can start buying from companies that do business with us. And that's really been, that would be the final chapter of my career; that I've done very well in creating the strategies for companies who get it to do well, but now we have to go after those companies who don't get it.

Freddie Lucas

Freddie Hill Lucas was born on January 4, 1936, in Lynchburg, Virginia. Lucas spent most of her childhood years growing up on the campus of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, where both of her parents were professors. Her father, Talmadge Hill, was the coach of Morgan's basketball team and a health instructor and her mother, Frances Hill, was a music professor. In 1952, she earned her high school diploma from Frederick Douglas High School, where she was a member of the volleyball and basketball teams and a member of the National Honor Society.

Lucas earned a bachelor's of science degree from Morgan State College in 1956. Upon graduation she was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and studied at the University of Oslo in Norway, where she earned a diploma in physical education. In 1958, she received her MS degree from Pennsylvania State University and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1964.

From 1958 to 1962, she worked as a physical education teacher at Maryland State College, now known as the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, where she met her husband, Africare co-founder, C. Payne Lucas. She also worked as an assistant professor at Southern University in 1964. From 1968 until 1976, Lucas worked for J.C. Penny Company where she began her career in the public relations department. She later went on to work in the company's urban affairs section and eventually became the company's first female and African American lobbyist.

In 1976, Lucas joined the staff of General Motors Corporation as its senior Washington representative. After working at GM for nearly twenty years, she and her husband started their own consulting firm, Lodestar, LLC. Lucas is a member of the NAACP, the Industrial Relations Research Association, American League of Lobbyists, National Association of Manufacturers, the Consumer Credit Council and the Women's Advertising Club of America.

She and her husband, C. Payne Lucas, have three grown children and one grandchild.

Accession Number

A2004.058

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/25/2004

Last Name

Lucas

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Frederick Douglass High School

First Name

Freddie

Birth City, State, Country

Lynchburg

HM ID

LUC02

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas, Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

My Point Is...

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

1/4/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Louisburg

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Business consultant and lobbyist Freddie Lucas (1936 - ) was the first African American lobbyist at J.C. Penney Corporation, and then worked as a consultant for General Motors. After working at GM for nearly twenty years, she and her husband started their own consulting firm, Lodestar, LLC.

Employment

Maryland State College

Southern University

J.C. Penny Company

General Motors

Lodestar LLC

Favorite Color

Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Freddie Lucas interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Freddie Lucas lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Freddie Lucas recalls her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Freddie Lucas remembers her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Freddie Lucas shares childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Freddie Lucas describes holidays as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Freddie Lucas describes her childhood community

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Freddie Lucas shares childhood memories of her community

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Freddie Lucas recalls her elementary school years

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Freddie Lucas remembers her church activities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Freddie Lucas recounts her middle school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Freddie Lucas discusses her high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Freddie Lucas explains how she chose Maryland Eastern Shore for college

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Freddie Lucas recalls winning a Fulbright scholarship to study in Norway

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Freddie Lucas describes her experiences in Norway

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Freddie Lucas recounts her marriage and early career at Maryland Eastern Shore

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Freddie Lucas describes leaving Maryland Eastern Shore to teach at Southern University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Freddie Lucas describes her trip to Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Freddie Lucas explains how she got into public relations at JC Penny Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Freddie Lucas describes the corporate culture at JC Penny's in the late 1960s and early 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Freddie Lucas recounts becoming the first black female corporate lobbyist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Freddie Lucas details her transition from Penny's to GM

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Freddie Lucas describes her work as a lobbyist on Capitol Hill

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Freddie Lucas discusses changes on Capitol Hill since the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Freddie Lucas recounts balancing work and family life

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Freddie Lucas shares how she'd like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Freddie Lucas discusses her husband's work with Africare

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Freddie Lucas reflects on her best accomplishments

Barbara Samuels

Founder and president of THE LION'S SHARE, INC. Barbara Samuels was born August 15, 1937, in Gary, Indiana. The daughter of Blanche and Dr. John Wilson, Samuels grew up in Chicago where she attended Burke Elementary School and graduated in 1955 from Lucy Flower Vocational High School. She then attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Chicago State University.

Her career began at Sears Roebuck and Company in 1963 as a copywriter for the Sears & Roebuck Catalog. She was the first African American to hold that position. Samuels worked as part of a design team at Sears & Roebuck that made household accessories including lighting fixtures, dinnerware and tabletop items. Samuels was then promoted to buyer of handbags and later to national buyer of casual footwear. In 1998, she was named global "Buyer of the Year," winning out over 300 other contestants. She was also one of the first African Americans to visit many of the manufacturing facilities abroad.

After an early retirement, Samuels launched THE LION'S SHARE in 1994. The firm offers practical, profit oriented advice for fledgling designers, merchants and small companies in the fashion industry. Samuels organizes fashion shows for major organizations and charities such as the Jesse Owens Foundation, the Chicago Urban League, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. As a media personality, she has participated in fashion segments on Channel 32 Fox TV, WVON Radio, and the Bertrice Berry Show. Samuels was wardrobe and set design consultant for public television's America's Family Kitchen with VertaMae Grosvenor. She has also written a fashion column for N’DIGO. Samuels serves as board member or officer of several fashion-related entities, including Fashion Group International, the Apparel Industry Board, Inc. of Illinois, GenArt, The Color of Fashion, the Leaguers of the Chicago Urban League and the Costume Committee of the Chicago Historical Society.

Samuels has two sons, Michael and Gregory. She resides on Chicago's North Side.

Accession Number

A2003.301

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/17/2003

Last Name

Samuels

Maker Category
Schools

Lucy L. Flower Technical High School

Edmund Burke Elementary School

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Chicago State University

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

SAM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Isn't That Amazing?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/15/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Japanese Food

Short Description

Business consultant and retail buyer Barbara Samuels (1937 - ) has served as a national buyer for Sears, and founded THE LION'S SHARE, to offer profit-oriented advice for the fashion industry.

Employment

Sears Roebuck & Company

Lion's Share

N'DIGO

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barbara Samuels's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's life raising three children in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels remembers a traumatic childhood injury in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barbara Samuels describes her grade school years at Burke Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Barbara Samuels describes her experience at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Barbara Samuels remembers visiting the Regal Theater and the Chicago Theater in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels remembers meeting famous actors during her teenage years

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels remembers experiences with the faculty and racial discrimination at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels shares memories from her time at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes her years at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels describes her job at the Chicago Urban League, including work with HistoryMaker Harry Belafonte

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her first years as a copywriter in the clothing business

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels recalls experiencing harassment as the first black female copywriter at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels recalls changes in culture and fashions during the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels describes her promotion from copywriter to retail buyer at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels remembers the aftermath of the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes her attempts to change the corporate culture at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels recalls winning the Buyer of the Year award while at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels explains her reasons for leaving her job at Sears, Roebuck & Co. in 1993

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her involvement in the fashion industry and founding her own company during the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels talks about her time as a fashion writer for N'DIGO

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels describes some of her favorite advancements in fashion during her lifetime

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels reflects upon on trends and technological advancements in fashion

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels comments on style trends among African American men

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes changes in corporate fashion in the late 20th century

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes the influence of hip hop on modern fashion trends

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels talks about the disconnect between high fashion and average consumers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels talks about how an individual's clothing and style can reflect their personality

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels describes global influences in the fashion world

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

11$3

DATitle
Barbara Samuels remembers visiting the Regal Theater and the Chicago Theater in Chicago, Illinois
Barbara Samuels describes her attempts to change the corporate culture at Sears, Roebuck & Co.
Transcript
At what point in your life was your mother [Blanche Daniel] working for the Regal [Theater, Chicago, Illinois]?$$When we were in grammar school [Burke Elementary School, Chicago, Illinois].$$Okay and who were some of the personalities that you met, met there (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I met James Brown, Al Green, Leslie Uggams, anyone who appeared there actually. There were some, you know, kind of weird folks my mother didn't want us around--$$Okay.$$--you know, for obvious reasons, and so we had to stay back in the office. But one of the, one of the--my mother was a real good friend of Nat [King] Cole's, you know, so that was great. But we used to wait--in high school we used to wait outside the Chicago Theater when they had live, live shows, and that was a highlight, and get autographs. That's what we did. I must have gone through four or five autograph books and of course, some of the stars that we thought were absolutely incredible turned out to be the nastiest and the ones that we didn't really care that much about turned out to be really nice, nice people. One of the highlights from waiting around for autographs was when Zachary Scott and Joan, Joan Bennett's sister, I can't--Constance Bennett, they were in town with a play called 'Bell, Book and Candle' and all five of us-there were five girls who hung together and we went over to the theater to wait for autographs and this very tall, black guy came out with these dogs, walking these dogs and he saw us and he said, "Well hi, who are you girls," and we said, "We're waiting to see Mr. Scott or Ms. Bennett to get autographs," and he said, "Well I'm Mr. Scott's personal assistant." And he said, "Have you seen the play," and we said no. In fact, we had never seen a play. We had seen stage productions but we had never seen a play per se. And so he said, "Well how would you like to come and see the play?" And we said, "What," and we were only fifteen years old at the time and he said, "Why don't you come and see it." He said, "I'll make sure you can see it." And I said, "Well we have to discuss this with our parents first, okay," and he said, "Fine," so he gave us cards and we all went home, talked to our parents. They said, "Well, okay as long as everyone's going," and they were going to pick us up. And we were--oh, did we ever have a big conference about what we were going to wear, oh it was incredible. We decided at the time pique, cotton pique jackets, flyaway jackets those were the big things so we each went out and our parents bought each one of us a different color jacket and we all wore these pique jackets over our dresses and skirts, and when we got to the theater, they took us--we went inside and most of the people were seated already and these five little black girls, teenagers came walking down the aisle. We had our heads up, we were so proud and everyone was whispering, "Who are they? What's this?" And they sat us right down in front, and then William Windom the actor was right--he was there too and he took us to see Johnny Hartman.$By '68 [1968] were there many black employees in the--at the corporate level (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) But again--but everyone was at an assistant level. There were very few blacks at full title, very few blacks at full title. And those of us who were, were constantly being questioned about our abilities and double checked, checked and double checked and just all kinds of stuff. I worked for a buyer who was extremely difficult and really anal. He was somewhat embarrassed because I was his assistant, and one of the secretaries who had a high school education went over to personnel and she said, "I want to be a copywriter," and they said, "Well you can't write or anything, you haven't been to college," and she said, "Well if she can do it, I know I can." And this woman could barely type a letter properly, you know? Lots of, lots of jealousy and you build up defenses and so--a thick skin, that's probably better, a thick skin for all of that. So it was, it was quite rough. It was quite rough.$$Did you get a chance to write about fashion at some point?$$Oh yeah, because I was in a fashion department with footwear, okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) (Unclear).$$So what happened was the buyers, when I was a copywriter, they were coming to me because of the way I dressed and I don't know where--I just started picking up this fashion know how by reading. I started subscribing to all the magazines and reading and everything. So they would come to me about colors, silhouettes, everything, who is this going to appeal to, what do you think, and their sales were going up just by listening to me. So the national merchandise manager, a very powerful position, he said, "I want you to come to my department as an associate buyer and forget this copywriting thing." And I said okay, and he said, "Because you're a rebel and that's what I want" because I used to wait for buses for ever just to get over to the West Side [Chicago, Illinois] and then the "L" [elevated train] and then walk. When we had moved downtown and it was still cold, it was even worse because you had the wind from the lake blowing. So I decided I am not going to continue wearing skirts and freezing my tail off in the winter. So I wore pants to work one day and it went all over, all over the place and they called over to the We- the office manager called over to the West Side and said, "This woman is wearing trousers to work, she's wearing pants and that's not the law. I'm going to make her go home," but I didn't work for her so she couldn't do it. I worked for the advertising department so the merchandise manager came into my office and I was sitting there and one of the other girls who was a copywriter, very political, she was white and wasn't going to make any waves because she wanted to be promoted to something else. Well she wore pants too, we were going to do this and she chickened out and put a skirt on over them so that she could remove them in case there was too much heat. So Bill Grant walked into the office and he said, "Stand up," and I stood up. He says, "Turn around." Well see now today, he'd be in all kinds of trouble. But he said, "Stand up, turn around. Okay you look great. Sit down. You don't have to go home." And after that women started wearing pants to work in droves and so they changed the dress code because I had guts enough to do that.$$Now was Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.] ahead of or behind the rest of the corporate world in terms of women wearing pants to work? 'Cause it wasn't that long ago, I guess, well long ago now but there was a time when women couldn't wear pants publicly (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I think Sears was ahead of the time, because in most of the big corporations even when that happened women were not wearing pants to work and that was in--it had to be around '68 [1968], '69 [1969], something like that. So I was getting phone calls from everybody, "Aw, thank you so much. God it's great that we can wear pants to work," you know, and then guys would call me up and say, "Hey, do you know what you've started? What would happen if we started wearing skirts to work?" You know silly stuff like that. So that was--that was, that was good. That was good.$$This is about nineteen sixty (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah about '68 [1968]--$$Sixty-eight [1968], okay.$$--sixty-nine [1969], yeah somewhere around there.$$All right.$$And you know I mean really it was Sears was not a law office. I could understand the legal department if that was what they wanted to do but with all the running around and everything we had to do, it was stupid for us to not be able to wear them. My mother [Blanche Daniel] was very proud of me; she thought that was just great that I had done that because that's the same kind of thing she would have done.