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Cecilia A. Conrad

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad was born on January 4, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri to Dr. Emmett James Conrad and Eleanor Nelson Conrad. She moved with her family to Dallas, Texas after her father was hired at St. Paul’s Hospital. Conrad went on to receive her B.A. degree in economics from Wellesley College in 1976 and her Ph.D. degree in economics from Stanford University in 1982.

Conrad began her career in academia in 1981 when she was hired as an assistant professor of economics at Duke University. From there, she taught at Barnard College and then Pomona College as a Stedman-Sumner professor of economics. In 2002, Conrad was named California’s Carnegie Professor of the Year. Two years later, she became associate dean of Pomona College. During her time as a college administrator, Conrad continued to publish on the issue of race and gender on economic status. After taking a two year hiatus to serve as interim vice president and dean of the faculty at Scripps College, Conrad returned to Pomona College as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college. In 2013, Conrad left Pomona to join the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation as the vice president of the MacArthur Fellows Program. After two years at the foundation, Conrad became the managing director of both the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change. In 2019, Conrad became chief executive officer of Lever for Change, an affiliate of the MacArthur Foundation focused on high impact philanthropic opportunities.

Conrad served as editor of The Review of Black Political Economy and an associate editor of Feminist Economics. She has published articles on economics, liberal arts education, and philanthropy in peer-reviewed journals and popular media. While working at Pomona College, Conrad also directed the American Economic Association’s “Pipeline Mentoring Program,” matching students enrolled in a Ph.D. program in economics with mentors in the field. In 2007, Conrad became the president of the International Association for Feminist Economics. She is on the board of trustees at Muhlenberg College, Bryn Mawr College, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Conrad has received numerous awards for her work. Her co-edited collection of essays, African Americans in the US Economy, was named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2005. Three years later, she received the National Urban League’s 2008 Woman of Power Award. She has also received honorary doctorates from Claremont Graduate University and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Conrad and her husband, Llewellyn Miller, have one child: Conrad Miller.

Cecilia Conrad was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/12/2019

Last Name

Conrad

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Ann

Schools

Wellesley College

Stanford Graduate School of Business

First Name

Cecilia

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

CON08

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/4/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad (1955 - ) served as managing director of the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change before becoming chief executive officer of Lever for Change.

Employment

Pomona College

Scripps College

American Economic Association

Barnard College, Columbia University

Duke University

The Review of Black Political Economy

Feminist Economics

MacArthur Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

William Bradford

Economist William Donald Bradford was born on June 19, 1944, in Gadsden, Alabama. Bradford was born to Ollie Mae Dobbs and George Joel Bradford, the fourth of six children. When Bradford was one year old, his family moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Bradford’s father was a Baptist minister and the owner of a barbershop. Bradford attended Cleveland’s Wooldridge Elementary School, Rawlings Junior High School and East Technical High School where he was enrolled in advanced placement courses.

Prior to attending Howard University in 1963, Bradford earned a living as a barber, saving money for college by cutting hair in his father’s barbershop. At Howard University, Bradford was a member of the football team playing linebacker and joined the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He graduated with his B.A. degree in economics in 1967. In 1968, Bradford attended Ohio State University and was one of only two African Americans in the school’s M.B.A program. After graduating with his M.B.A degree in finance in 1968, Bradford remained at Ohio State University and earned his Ph.D. in finance in 1971.

From 1972 to 1980, Bradford served as the associate professor of finance at Stanford University’s School of Business. Bradford was also a visiting economist for the Federal Home Loan Bank board and a visiting professor of finance and economics at Yale University’s School of Organization and Management. From 1989 to 1990, Bradford was a visiting professor of finance for New York University, the University of California, Los Angeles and Ohio State University. In 1992, Bradford served as Acting Dean of the University of Maryland’s College of Business and Management. From 1994 to 1999, Bradford then served as dean and professor at the University of Washington’s School of Business Administration, where he was awarded the dean emeritus honor.

Bradford, the author of numerous scholarly articles, is a professor of business and economic development and a professor of finance and business economics at Washington University’s School of Business Administration. His studies include a minority business survey for the State of Washington, a study of minority venture capital firms and a study of black family financial management.

Accession Number

A2007.302

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/25/2007 |and| 6/5/2008

Last Name

Bradford

Organizations
Schools

East Technical High School

Wooldridge Elementary School

Rawlings Junior High School

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Gadsden

HM ID

BRA09

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Keep rolling.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

6/19/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pastries

Short Description

Economist and economics professor William Bradford (1944 - ) served as dean and professor at the University of Washington’s School of Business Administration, where he later became dean emeritus.

Favorite Color

Blue

Samuel Myers

University president, education advisor and economics professor Samuel Myers was born April 18, 1919, in Baltimore, Maryland to David and Edith Myers, Jamaican immigrants. He attended the city's segregated schools, graduating from Frederick Douglass High School in 1936. He enrolled in Morgan State College, but later took a semester off in order to earn money by working on a ship. In order to address the severe poverty that he witnessed on his travels, upon his return to Morgan State, Myers decided to major in the social sciences and graduated with his A.B. degree in 1940. He then earned an M.A. from Boston University in 1942 before being drafted to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II, rising to the rank of captain. After the war, he attended Harvard University, studying under John D. Black and John Kenneth Galbraith, and earned his Ph.D. degree in economics in 1949.

Myers began his career as an economist with the Bureau of Labor Statistics at the U.S. Department of Labor in 1950. He then spent thirteen years at Morgan State College as a professor and chairman of the Social Sciences Department, where Earl Graves, Sr., the future founder of Black Enterprise, was one of his students. Myers then joined the U.S. State Department as an adviser on inter-American affairs from 1963 to 1967. As president of Bowie State University from 1967 to 1977, Myers successfully diffused a nationally-publicized 1968 student boycott, expanded the curriculum and increased student enrollment. In 1977, Myers was chosen to lead the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, where he helped persuade President Jimmy Carter to issue Executive Order 12232 in support of historically black colleges and lobbied Congress to pass Title III of the Higher Education Act.

From 1998, Myers served as chairman of Minority Access, an organization that seeks to recruit, retain and graduate minority students from predominantly white institutions. His numerous honors and awards include the Commandeur de L'Ordre National de Cote d Ivoire and the National Economic Association’s Samuel Z. Westerfield Award. Myers lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, Marion, and has three adult children, Yvette, Tama and Samuel.

Samuel Myers was interviewed by TheHistoryMakers on September 16, 2003.

Accession Number

A2003.228

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/16/2003

Last Name

Myers

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Benjamin Bannekar Junior High School

Frederick Douglass High School

Morgan State University

Boston University

Harvard University

First Name

Samuel

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

MYE01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

Set Goals And Succeed.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/18/1919

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (New Orleans)

Short Description

University president, economics professor, and education advisor Samuel Myers (1919 - ) is the former president of Bowie State University. He served as president of the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, where he helped ensure the passage of Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965.

Employment

United States Bureau of Labor Statistics

Morgan State University

United States Department of State

Bowie State University

National Association for Opportunity in Higher Education

Minority Access Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Samuel Myers' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Samuel Myers lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Samuel Myers talks about his Jamaican family heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Samuel Myers describes why his parents migrated to the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Samuel Myers describes his family's participation in the West Indian community in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Samuel Myers talks about growing up in Baltimore, Maryland and his teachers at Frederick Douglass High School

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Samuel Myers describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Samuel Myers describes his school experience in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Samuel Myers describes his favorite subjects in school and talks about passing a French exam at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Samuel Myers talks about his siblings and his activities at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Samuel Myers talks about the Great Depression and his family's political affiliation in the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Samuel Myers describes his decision to attend Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland and how he was able to afford it

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Samuel Myers describes his trip to India in 1937, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Samuel Myers describes his trip to India during in 1937, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Samuel Myers talks about his experience at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Samuel Myers describes deciding to attend Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts and, later, Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Samuel Myers talks about being drafted for World War II and attending Officer's Candidate School [OCS]

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Samuel Myers describes his experience with racial discrimination in the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Samuel Myers talks about meeting his wife while in New Orleans, Louisiana with the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Samuel Myers recalls his duties in the Pacific in the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Samuel Myers reflects on his decision to leave the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Samuel Myers describes studying under John D. Black and John Kenneth Galbraith at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Samuel Myers describes economist John Kenneth Galbraith

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Samuel Myers talks about Gottfried Haberler and Joseph A. Schumpeter at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Samuel Myers talks about teaching at Morgan State University and HistoryMaker Earl G. Graves, Sr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Samuel Myers talks about leaving Morgan State University for the U.S. State Department

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Samuel Myers explains the history of Bowie State University in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Samuel Myers describes the changes he made as President of Bowie State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Samuel Myers talks about the 1968 student protests at Bowie State University in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Samuel Myers recalls joining the student protesters at Bowie State University and the changing demographics of the university

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Samuel Myers describes the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO), pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Samuel Myers describes the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO), pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Samuel Myers describes becoming chairman of Minority Access, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Samuel Myers describes the initiatives of Minority Access, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Samuel Myers describes his hopes for the African American community and reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Samuel Myers considers what he would have done differently in his life and describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

8$4

DATitle
Samuel Myers talks about Gottfried Haberler and Joseph A. Schumpeter at Harvard University
Samuel Myers describes his decision to attend Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland and how he was able to afford it
Transcript
So the work was--more was--you didn't find it very difficult. I mean you--$$Well, no. Well, well no Harvard [University, Cambridge, Massachusetts] was very difficult. But the--and I frequently mention to people that the difficulty for me and again I went through, I think I--with all A's. So, so I was able to move through. So I had no academic adversities. But, but there were people who were considered to be some of the greats in our society, one man named [Gottfried] Haberler in international trade was preaching a lot of things that only now people are coming around to. An even greater person was [Joseph] Schumpeter, who advanced some theories about economic development that now are considered to be out on the cutting edge. But they--$$How, how do you spell his name? I'm sorry.$$S-C-H-U-M-P-E-T-E-R.$$Okay.$$S-C-H-U-M-P-E-T-E-R.$$Okay.$$Joseph A. Schumpeter. He, he had a theory of economic development and a matter of how things become of obsolete and how you keep going and so I'm saying that I was saying great, great people. But, but for me, they--one was from Austria and, and indeed perhaps they were top world class people who came here in order to avoid [Adolph] Hitler. But the point is I understand that Harvard had a whole boatload of the best minds in the world coming because of the persecution in Europe. But it was extremely difficult to understand him for me in terms of the language and the like. Now in time it mattered not, but and--but it required trying to break through, what were they saying, what were they--and it required digging and digging and doing even more extensive reading that I could understand, than just getting it from the lectures. But I went back and it worked out, it worked out well. At the end, I was scheduled, had finished all of my work in 1949. Finished all of the requirements for the degree and had finished the dissertation. And when the fellowships for which Dr. Black, John D. Black, had recommended me, all of the came through at once. Got one from the [U.S.] Department of Agriculture, got one from the Rosenwald Fund, and a third one from the Rockefeller Foundation. And all of them came through. And so I did what I think many people not even thought of doing, in that I delayed really getting the degree in order to take advan--and then to go back and really dig into the kinds of study to understand all that I'd done. So I spent an additional year. And then I--Dr. Black wanted me, recommended and I was accepted, to become an economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. So I--after the semester ended, I left. But then--$$So you were, you were there a couple of years you said?$$No, I stay, stayed there only half a year--$So when you were on the verge of graduating from high school [at Frederick Douglass High School, Baltimore, Maryland], did you know that you were going to college or where you were going? Did you know?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$My brother was brighter than I and he was a brilliant student himself, even though I was a good student. And he had gone to college before me. So he had paved the way. So there was a very--it was just the expectation that I would go to college. And again, because he paved the way and people assumed that I was a good student, there were scholarships that were available to pay the way to go to college. So that--there was no question about whether. I mean it was just a matter of when I would go. And I looked forward to that. And as I've also indicated, I was the renegade in the whole class because there were--we had to pay our way to go to Morgan [State University, Baltimore, Maryland], even though I told you I was able to get scholarships. But Coppin State College [later, University, Baltimore, Maryland] which was the, or perhaps it was the normal school at that time, was free. Not only was it free, but the person could be assured that once they finished, they would step into a teaching position and so to have a job ahead. In liberal arts college, you come out and you have to begin searching and so on. But in spite of that, I knew I was going to college and I have never regretted that.$$Okay. So, so you didn't go to Coppin [State University, Baltimore, Maryland], but you went to--$$Morgan.$$Morgan State [University, Baltimore, Maryland].$$Yes.$$And you all had to pay, you had to pay some sort of tuition?$$That's correct, yes. But I was able to get scholarships. Plus I indicated to you that I was--my father [David Elcanah Myers] provided--was able to arrange for us to get employment and so we were able to work on the ship during the summer. And that, that opened, opened just, just whole new avenues for us. We--I was number one in my freshman class at Morgan. And I had the--received again at that time, parents aspired for their youngsters to be physicians. So I just knew I was gonna be in pre-med. Excelled in, I got the prize as the leading student in chemistry.