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Asa Hilliard, III

A professor of educational psychology, Asa Hilliard, III, was born in Galveston, Texas, on August 22, 1933. After completing high school, Hilliard attended the University of Denver, earning his B.A. degree in 1955; his M.A. degree in counseling in 1961; and his Ed.D. degree in educational psychology in 1963.

After earning his bachelor’s in psychology, Hilliard began teaching in the Denver Public School system, where he remained until 1960; that year, he began as a teaching fellow at the University of Denver, where he remained until he earned his Ph.D. Joining the faculty at San Francisco State University in 1963, Hilliard spent the next eighteen years there. While at San Francisco State, Hilliard first became department chairman, then went on to spend his final eight years as dean of education. Hilliard also served as a consultant to the Peace Corps and as superintendent of schools in Monrovia, Liberia, for two years. Departing from San Francisco State, Hilliard became a professor at Georgia State University; he served as the Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Urban Education, serving in both the Department of Educational Policy Studies and the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education.

Hilliard was a founding member of the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations and served as vice president. He served as an expert witness in court testimony on several federal cases regarding test validity and bias, and was the co-developer of an educational television series, Free Your Mind, Return to the Source: African Origins. Hilliard wrote hundreds of articles on a wide variety of topics, including ancient African history, teaching strategies, and public policy. Hilliard was the recipient of the Outstanding Scholarship Award from the Association of Black Psychologists; a Knight Commander of the Human Order of the African Redemption; and the Distinguished Leadership Award from the Association of Teachers of Education.

Hilliard and his wife, Patsy Jo, raised four children.

Asa Hilliard, III, passed away on Sunday, August 12, 2007, at the age of seventy-three.

Accession Number

A2003.098

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/6/2003 |and| 6/20/2005

Last Name

Hilliard

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Whittier ECE-8 School

Cole Junior High School

University of Denver

First Name

Asa

Birth City, State, Country

Galveston

HM ID

HIL04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Texas, Ghana

Favorite Quote

Study To Show Yourself Approved Unto God A Workman That Need Not Be Ashamed, Rightly Dividing The Word Of Truth.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

8/22/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue

Death Date

8/12/2007

Short Description

Educational psychology professor Asa Hilliard, III (1933 - 2007 ) was the Fuller E. Calloway Professor of Educational Psychology at Georgia State University and author of The Maroon Within Us.

Employment

Baker Junior High School

San Francisco State University

Georgia State University

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Asa Hilliard interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard recalls his family history during and after slavery

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard remembers stories of his grandfather's youth

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard tells some of his father's stories

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard talks about his extended family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard gives more details about his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Asa Hilliard discusses his mother's life

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard explains his family's involvement in civil rights activism

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard discusses his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard reflects on his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard details his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard talks about living in Denver, Colorado as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard remembers his interests in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard discusses his high school teachers and experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Asa Hilliard talks about his plans after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Asa Hillliard talks about his decision to study psychology

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard discusses his extracurricular activities during his undergraduate education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard remembers graduate school mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard explains his political influences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard tells of his military service, high school teaching job and graduate school studies

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard talks about his decision to work at San Francisco State University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard reflects on desegregation activity in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Asa Hilliard recalls conflict over black students' demands at SFSC in the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Asa Hilliard talks about his experience in Liberia with the Peace Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Asa Hilliard, III's interview, session 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his high education in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his teachers at Manual Training School in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III describes Denver, Colorado

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his teenage activities

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his early interest in African dance

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his early experiences of social activism

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls his start at the University of Denver in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his experiences at the University of Denver

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the faculty at the University of Denver, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the faculty at the University of Denver, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls being hired at San Francisco State College in San Francisco, California

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his experiences of challenging racist theories

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about psychological theories of race

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the book, 'Stolen Legacy' by George G. M. James

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his introduction to African American history

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls joining a Peace Corps training project in Liberia

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his experiences in Liberia, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls the work of Horace G. Dawson and Lula Cole Dawson

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his experiences in Liberia, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III reflects upon the contributions of the Peace Corps in Liberia

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls his return to San Francisco State College in San Francisco, California

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the growth of mental health centers in the San Francisco Bay Area

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his career at San Francisco State University

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls joining the faculty at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls joining the faculty at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers the creation of the Nile Valley Conference

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls the inaugural issue of The Journal of African Civilizations

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the field of Egyptology, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the King Tutankhamun exhibit

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard, III describes the scholars of Egyptology

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his first trip to Egypt, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the Nubian ethnolinguistic group in Egypt

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III remembers his first trip to Egypt, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his experiences in Daboud, Egypt

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III recalls the creation of the African-American Baseline Essays

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III describes the impact of the African-American Baseline Essays

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the field of Egyptology, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about the critics of Afrocentrism

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his published works

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III reflects upon the importance of learning and preserving cultural history

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about Afrocentrism

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his book, 'The Maroon Within Us'

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Asa Hilliard, III reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Asa Hilliard, III reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his family

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Asa Hilliard, III talks about his parents' support

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Asa Hilliard, III describes his non-academic employment

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Asa Hilliard, III reflects upon his upbringing

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Asa Hilliard, III describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Asa Hilliard explains his family's involvement in civil rights activism
Asa Hilliard remembers graduate school mentors
Transcript
Were any of your relatives involved in organizations--?$$Yeah. NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]. My dad [Asa Grant Hilliard, II] was involved in that. My uncles were involved and I believe my aunts were as well. Plus they started organizations. My dad began the--he was one of the founders of the [Texas] State Teachers Association for black teachers. Now he also was one of the founders--the primary founder for the nation-for the statewide student council association. Because he thought that the young people oughta' began to get their feet wet. So that they would be prepared to move on into some of these other organizations. He did work with the Urban League in Texas. And then they did just a lot of work without organizations. Without formal organizations. As--like the whole thing I was telling you about the board of trustees for the university [Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas]. But other things as well. My aunts were--they were sit--they were refusing to get up and move on bus long before Rosa Parks did that. My--one of my aunts had a threat to fight on the bus. Told the bus driver she wasn't moving anywhere, you know. And I found out a lot of women did that in other parts of the country. But yeah, they were--They were some organizations and some independent efforts that were proactive as far as civil rights kind of things.$$Okay. You were saying off-camera that your father would be considered a race man.$$Yeah.$$You were explaining that. Can you explain--?$$(Simultaneously) That was a word they used when I was a child. A race man was one who gave a large part of their time to challenging white supremacy and segregation. I had one uncle who never went to school. Well, take it back he went to fourth grade and he became the richest one in the family. He was a millionaire, you know. And used to buy us clothes every time we went--when my dad became principal [of Emmett Scott High School] in Tyler [Texas] and had to move with no money. 'Cause he was always broke. It was that uncle that went and bought him a house and then bought him a car. So he could go in without being ashamed as the principal of the high school, wouldn't have to live in poverty. So that particular uncle was a strong civil rights person. And single-handedly became a lead politician in Houston [Texas]. The mayor's, the mayor's son, I guess it was, came to the funeral and said that his dad told him that, who was also mayor, that, if you intend to do anything politically in Houston, the first person you see is Sid Hilliard. And so he said, "I did." And he said, I got, you know, overwhelmingly elected, because he was able to mobilize that kind of support for him. He was a very strong political person. And he would be called--he called himself a race man. My Uncle Robie who taught at Prairie View [Agricultural and Mechanical University, Prairie View, Texas] and also at Texas Southern [University] called himself a race man. Because they were keenly interested in injustice and, and fighters for justice. That's how they saw their function.$Had pretty good grades in undergraduate school [University of Denver, Denver, Colorado]. Not great. But, I had professors that I bonded with that became important to me later in graduate school [University of Denver].$$Now who are-were some of them and did they (unclear)?$$The--one of the key people for me was a guy named Phil Purdue. Who was a teacher educator. And he just had a personal liking for me. And I didn't remember him as being a great teacher but I guess he was for--not so much for what was taught in class, but the other things. He was the one who taught me how important it was to be in professional organizations. He said that, "You will never function effectively in education unless you participate deeply in professional organizations." So he and his wife became very close friends. His son became one of my first students when I taught both in student teaching and when I taught for my first year as a teacher in high school--South High School in Denver. His--so he was very important to me. Bernard Spilka, who was a psychologist was important in kind of a role model way. He took his class--our class to his house one time. And all I saw was books for days. And he knew what was in everyone of them. And I used to sit in his class and just wait for him to drop book titles and then I would immediately go over to the university and get those titles. You know, so I became very informed in certain areas of psychology in particular. Largely, because of his model and his teaching, you know. And I still regard him as one of the really great inspirations for me. And then the third was Frances Brush who probably more than any other did everything he could to facilitate my growth and also was a model for me. He was a philosophy professor. And later in graduate school, because of the work that I'd done in trying to understand what he was doing in philosophy, he remembered me and invited me to be one of the teachers in the honors program in philosophy for the university. And it was three years of pure heaven. You know, as far as working with him and understanding his philosophy and working with these high performing students and the challenges of having to do the reading and do the thinking and all of that, that went with that made it--made him one of the really important people. So that would be Spilka, Purdue and Frances Brush that were probably the central people in my academic career through graduate school.