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Dr. Kneeland Youngblood

Physician, businessman, and presidential appointee Dr. Kneeland Youngblood, was born in Galena Park, Texas, on December 13, 1955. At the age of fourteen, Youngblood was working as a page on the floor of the Texas State Legislature; after graduating from high school, he attended Princeton University, earning his B.A. degree in political science in 1978. While at Princeton, Youngblood spent time studying abroad, attending both Warnborough College in Oxford, England, and the University of Stockholm in Sweden from 1976 to 1977. In 1978, only a few months shy of his graduation, Youngblood took part in a sit-in at Nassau Hall with two hundred other students to protest Princeton’s investments in South African businesses, risking the threat of expulsion. Youngblood and the other students were not expelled, and in the autumn of 1978, he began attending the University of Texas Health Science Center, from which he earned his M.D. in 1982. During his studies at the University of Texas, Youngblood traveled to Egypt, where he studied at the Cairo University Medical School.

After earning his M.D., Youngblood moved to New York City, where he held a surgical internship with Columbia University for a year; in 1983, he moved and began his two-year residency in emergency medicine at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. After completing his residency, Youngblood returned to Texas, taking a position as an emergency physician at the Medical Center of Plano, a Dallas suburb. Youngblood remained in Plano until he left the medical profession in 1997, at which time he co-founded and became the managing partner of Pharos Capital Group, LLC., a private equity firm that invests in technology, business services, and health care companies, and manages more than $200 million in investments.

In 1993, Youngblood was appointed by President Clinton to serve on the board of directors of the United States Enrichment Corporation, a government-owned corporation that provided nuclear fuel to countries hoping to utilize nuclear power. Youngblood remained at the United States Enrichment Corporation until 1998, at one point traveling with a delegation to South Africa, where he met with both F.W. DeKlerk and Nelson Mandela. Youngblood's time in South Africa prompted him to write an essay entitled From Sit-In to Soweto, detailing his experiences as a young man protesting South African policies dealing with working with the country. During his tenure with the Clinton Administration, Youngblood was also a part of First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Health Care Task Force.

Youngblood served on the board of directors of numerous corporations and organizations, including the Teacher Retirement System of the State of Texas, an $85 billion pension fund, and the boards of AMR Investments; Starwood Hotels & Lodging, Incorporated; Burger King, Incorporated; and The Gap, Incorporated. Youngblood also served as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Accession Number

A2004.219

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/28/2004

Last Name

Youngblood

Maker Category
Schools

Princeton University

University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center

First Name

Kneeland

Birth City, State, Country

Galena Park

HM ID

YOU03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Petersburg, Russia

Favorite Quote

What Do You Want To Be When You Grow Up?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

12/13/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Investment executive and emergency physician Dr. Kneeland Youngblood (1955 - ) worked as an emergency physician in the Dallas area before leaving the medical profession to co-found and become the managing partner of Pharos Capital Group, LLC. In addition to his activities with Pharos Capital Group, Youngblood was appointed by President Clinton to serve on the board of directors of the United States Enrichment Corporation, served as a part of First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Health Care Task Force, and sat on the boards of directors of numerous corporations and organizations.

Employment

Texas House of Representatives

Columbia University

Emory University School of Medicine

Medical Center of Plano

Pharos Capital Group, LLC.

White House

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Kneeland Youngblood's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his maternal family's medical careers

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his maternal family's musical connections

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his parents meeting

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood speaks on his father's family and the tradition of hard work

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood describes his childhood neighborhood of Galena Park, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Galena Park, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his early exposure to government and international affairs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recalls attending Fidelity Elementary School in Galena Park, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his childhood hobbies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood his experience in the newly integrated Galena Middle School in Galena Park, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers on his time as a page in the Texas Legislature

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood reflects on his experience in Greece in 1972

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his time at Jesuit College Preparatory School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his time at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his political activism at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his political activism at Princeton University, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers deciding between a legal or medical career

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers entering the University of Texas Health Science Center in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recalls his trip to Egypt in 1981

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recalls attending Christmas Mass at the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, Israel in 1981

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recounts his experience as an African American traveling in Egypt

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his career in emergency medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood outlines his transition from medicine to political fundraising

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers his successful fundraiser for U.S. Senator Bill Bradley

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood explains how his political fundraising led to Texas Governor Ann Richards appointing him to her tax policy committee

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers how his time in government prompted his business career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood explains the challenges facing black-owned businesses

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about serving on the board of directors for the United States Enrichment Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood remembers becoming a board member for American Airlines in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood recalls his time on the board of directors of Starwood Hotels and Resorts

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about the African American community's lack of access to capital

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood explains the risks and payoffs of private equity

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood describes a business venture he hopes will benefit the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood explains the basics of private equity investing

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Kneegood Youngblood talks about how to succeed in private equity investing

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood speaks about the opportunities for young African Americans in business

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his wife, Dr. Sharon Youngblood, and their children

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his parents' support for his success

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about his interest in supporting political candidates

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood offers advice for those considering a career in finance

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. Kneeland Youngblood narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Dr. Kneeland Youngblood outlines his transition from medicine to political fundraising
Dr. Kneeland Youngblood talks about serving on the board of directors for the United States Enrichment Corporation
Transcript
So you were an emergency physician through nineteen what?$$Nineteen eighty-six [1986] to around 1996.$$Okay all right so that's a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Approximately ten years.$$All right, but you didn't stay, you didn't plan to stay in medicine and you didn't.$$Well I was actually pretty happy you know I was you know married, I have six kids and was on way to you know the big house, the mortgage the you know all the things that, that most professionals get into. But again I got involved in politics 'cause I wanted to give back to the community and I found that very few people of color had been involved in the financial side of politics. And I wanted to make a difference politically and so I focused on the finance part of it. Started with a guy named Bill Bradley who was then a senator out of New Jersey was running for re-election, got to know them, him through a Princeton [University, Princeton, New Jersey] alumni, organization and said look, I'd like to raise money for you. And if you tell that any politician they're like please sign me up, and so I had the good fortune of hosting for him a fund raiser here in Texas around 1986 and '87 [1987], which was enormously successful and--$$Now Bill Bradley he was a basketball star at Princeton, star in the NBA [National Basketball Association] with the [New York] Knicks and also I mean as a senator from New Jersey, he seemed like a, a pretty strong candidate for the presidency at one point, right?$$Yes, and that was in part precisely the reason why I supported him and, and my colleagues supported him, in that it was an investment in the future. One wanted to get involved and number two wanted to be involved with people who were sensitive. And he was in the middle of the road guy, very thoughtful guy, we knew he had a sensitivity for some of the issues, we had, sort of within the African American community, but, but in the broader American community, and someone who was respected having been a Rhodes Scholar, having been captain of the [1964 Summer] Olympic[s] [Tokyo, Japan] team, won a gold medal, NBA, All-Star, won World Championship twice, again United States senator. This is a guy who had you know broad network of lots of accomplishments and still was very progressive in terms of his thinking. So myself, group of friends we starting raising money for him here originally in Texas, that was very successful. Then you know others raised money for him in Chicago [Illinois], [HistoryMaker] John Rogers [Jr.] having come down, come down to the event we did in, in Dallas [Texas], he then did for him in Chicago. Friends we did for him in New York and again, he became very good friends, he's godfather for one of my kids. But along the way then Ann Richards called said look you're raising all this money for some guy for New Jersey, I wanna run for governor of Texas, will you help me? And Ann Richards is a very charming woman, and, and very savvy, I sat down, met with her and how could I say no. So, you, know I signed up to help her and began to raise money for her to run for governor.$I'd been very successful in fundraising politically and I knew that if I set my mind to it, I also could raise money for myself and for businesses that I was interested in terms of private equity. So I knew you know a couple things I needed to do, I needed to do improve my own personal expertise in business and number two put together a good team of people. On the personal side, again I've been involved in politics and so the president, the United States president, [President William Jefferson] Bill Clinton and the U.S. Senate confirmed me to go on the board of directors of a company we formed in 1993 to supply low-level uranium to utilities around the world, called the United States Enrichment Corporation [Bethesda, Maryland]. Why I wanted to do that was for the experience of being involved in corporate boards and you know being engaged in a very important transaction. We formed this company in 1993 supplied low-level uranium, to utilities around the world. We put together 80 percent of the domestic market, 40 percent of the world market; negotiated to purchase the nuclear weapons grade uranium from the former Soviet Union [Russia] to de-enrich it, sell it to utilities. And then we took it public, we've had $2 billion (unclear) offer so that experience that capital marks experience was very important to my own maturity in terms of business. And yet there are only five people on the board of directors, the original board was a guy named [William] Bill Rainer who was chairman of the board, founded a company by the name of Greenwich Capital [Markets, Inc.], Margaret [H.] Greene was the highest ranking woman at BellSouth [Corporation], Greta [Joy] Dicus who became chairman of [U.S.] Nuclear Regulatory Commission, myself and a guy by the name of Frank Zarb who was former energy secretary [sic.], but also former CEO of Smith Barney, and also former CEO of NASDAQ, so some very important people.

Dr. Rameck R. Hunt

Dr. Rameck Hunt was born in Orange, New Jersey, on May 1, 1973. Hunt's mother, only seventeen when he was born, worked hard to support the family, but they were constantly moving back to his grandmother's house. When Hunt was fourteen, he moved to Newark to live with an uncle and attend University High in a rough neighborhood; the friends he made there would send him on the path to medical school and becoming an inspiration to many urban youth.

Once at University High, two other students, George Jenkins and Sampson Davis, recognized Hunt for his intelligence. The three soon bonded, spending their time together but still getting their class work done. When Hunt was sixteen, he was out with a different group of friends and was involved in the beating of an old man. Hunt awoke the next morning in juvenile detention and vowed never to return. The opportunity to escape the ghetto came when Jenkins convinced Hunt and Davis to go to Seton Hall University, which offered a program for minority students interested in careers in medicine. Despite the obstacles they faced growing up, and even more when they were accepted to the program, the three graduated. From there, Hunt went on to Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and despite the fact that the three of them were split up, they still saw one another frequently, providing support through tough times. Hunt graduated in 1999, and his grandmother, with whom he had spent so much time growing up, attended despite her poor health; she passed away two days later.

Hunt went on to become the medical director at St. Peter's University Hospital's How Lane Adult Family Health Center. The three friends also established a nonprofit organization, the Three Doctors Foundation, which provides scholarships to inner-city youth. The Three Doctors also tour the country speaking about their experiences and encouraging others to follow in their footsteps. The doctors co-wrote a critically acclaimed book, The Pact, about their experiences, and they were honored at the 2000 Essence Awards for their community service.

Accession Number

A2003.137

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/18/2003

Last Name

Hunt

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

University High School of Humanities

Seton Hall University

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

First Name

Rameck

Birth City, State, Country

Orange

HM ID

HUN03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/1/1973

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cabbage (White)

Short Description

Emergency physician Dr. Rameck R. Hunt (1973 - ) is one of the Three Doctors, a group of childhood friends who escaped the slums of Newark, New Jersey, to become doctors. Their story is chronicled in the critically acclaimed book, "The Pact," which Hunt co-authored.

Employment

St. Peter's University Hospital How Lane Adult Family Health Center

Three Doctors Foundation

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Rameck Hunt interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rameck Hunt's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rameck Hunt discusses his family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Rameck Hunt describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Rameck Hunt describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Rameck Hunt discusses his parents' courtship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Rameck Hunt discusses his family's adoption of the Nation of Islam

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Rameck Hunt details his family structure growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Rameck Hunt reflects on his education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Rameck Hunt reflects on his early years in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Rameck Hunt describes his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rameck Hunt details his political activity while in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rameck Hunt recalls his high school experience with Sampson Davis and George Jenkins

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rameck Hunt talks about college choice and aspirations to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rameck Hunt recounts a pivotal moment in his life

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rameck Hunt reflects on the choices facing urban youth

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rameck Hunt reflects on his juvenile arrest

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rameck Hunt assesses his educational experience

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rameck Hunt discusses good and bad teachers from his educational experience

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rameck Hunt reflects on his college experience

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rameck Hunt reflects on his commitment to service

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rameck Hunt shares thoughts on his medical school experience

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rameck Hunt details his residency experience

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rameck Hunt describes the Three Doctors Foundation

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Rameck Hunt shares thoughts on the hip-hop generation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rameck Hunt expresses his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rameck Hunt considers his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rameck Hunt shares thoughts on racial uplift

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rameck Hunt describes how he'd like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Rameck Hunt recalls his high school experience with Sampson Davis and George Jenkins
Rameck Hunt details his residency experience
Transcript
Of the three doctors in--who we've interviewed, of you three young doctors, you're the only one that's got a political kind of story, you know, (unclear).$$(Simultaneously) Yeah, yeah.$$Now when did you meet George and--?$$Ninth grade in high school. See I, I, yeah, I was--I met Sam [Sampson Davis] and George [Jenkins] in ninth grade of high school. I was in, placed into the advanced placement classes. And they were also in there. So we met just by default because we were classmates. And all of our classes were the same. Like we, we had every single class--all eight periods were, were pretty much the same. And so we just, we met each other that way and we, we had a initial bond because we realized that we had a lot of similarities--like we liked to get our work done, but we also liked to have fun. We liked to hang out and stuff like that. And so it, it, it started that way. And so our friendship just developed over time. That--and Sam and George had already known each other 'cause they, they had met in the seventh grade two years before I came along. And at, at--'cause University High School actually started in seventh grade. They had like a junior high school component. And so it went from there. And it, it just kind of grew over time. And, I mean, actually, in high school before--I mean I always knew Sam and George, but they weren't my best friends initially. My best friends were Ahi Baraka and this guy named Hassan Abdu Sebord (ph.), and we were like the three amigos initially. And me and Sam and George were very, very cool, but I hung out with them a little more. Me and Sam were, were a--just got closer as we got older because me and Sam had jobs. We were probably one of the couple of guys in the--and then George did get a job, too. One of the, the couple of guys who actually went out there and got a job and tried to get some money in their pocket and me and Sam were the first two people to get cars at the high school and so me and him hung out more. And as the years went on we got a lot closer because we, we did a lot of same things. We liked to go out to parties, you know. We liked to, you know, liked the girls and all of that other stuff. So we, we got a lot closer as years went on.$$Okay, all right. Now I'm just thinking that that's not unlike a lot of young (laughter) what things that you all say you had in common. But the most unique thing might be the study habits, you know.$$Yeah, and I think that is, that is the study habits were unique and what really bonded us because Ahi and Hassan weren't in the same classes I wa-, I was in. Even though we, we were friends, we had totally different classes and we had different study habits. And so as time went on me, Sam, and George were a lot closer. And Ahi and Hassan--our relationship was still close but it, it, it was like I was in the middle. Like I was really cool with Sam and George and also really cool with Ahi and Hassan. And, and the, and actually the, the crossroad came when it was time to think about going to college. And, initially, I wanted to go to Howard [University] along with Ahi and Hassan (interruption).$$Now you were an honor student in high school?$$When I first started high school I was a honor student. But then I wanted to hang out more. And so I just--and I--and high school was pretty easy so I realized I could just get by and be fine. So I didn't really do any-, try to excel academically like I used to.$$Now you were taking honors courses, right, so you're on another track. And it was still kind of easy--you know what I'm saying?$$Yeah. It, it wasn't, it wasn't hard at all. I mean it just wasn't hard. This, this school that I went to was actually a college preparatory school but I--it just wasn't as challenging as I would have, would have expected it to be. And it's unfortunate, but it, it just wasn't--I mean it probably would have been, I mean if I had to compare it, it probably would have been compared to just a regular public school in your, you know, average suburban community. But in Newark in the inner city that was like the echelon of, of, of public schools. And it, it just, it wasn't really that challenging. I mean when I first got there I was getting straight A's, B's. And then after I kind of met people and, and realized it wasn't that hard I, I kind of slacked off and it was--I was okay with C's and B's. So it was--and, and I got by with C's and B's without not really doing much work at all. So I, I was like oh, that's cool--'cause, again, it wasn't like I really had a goal or direction. And it wasn't until I actually went to college that I refocused again and started getting straight A's again.$Now what about residency? Now, like the other two had discussed that as being tough part of--.$$Yeah, residency is, is, is hard, too. Again, though, the residency that I chose was a very academic residency [at Robert Wood Johsnon University Hospital] and it was a little, it was more friendly on, on the wear and tear part. So--.$$Okay, so Sam [Sampson Davis] had the like emergency room (unclear).$$Yeah, I, I was internal medicine. So we--I was, I was in emergency room a lot because after Sam would evaluate them, he would pass them on to me--not literally, 'cause we're in different hospitals, but the emergency room docs would pass them on to me. So, I was also in emergency room admitting patients, you know, chest pain, heart attacks. And once he stabilized them, then I had to deal with the, the aftermath of it. Or, oftentimes they can't necessarily be stabilized in emergency room and so once they get in there, once he diagnoses them with whatever they have, then it's my, my job to, to stabilize them. So, it was, it was always challenging. And when I was in--I did like a lot of ICU rotations. And ICU is intensive care unit where people are obviously deathly ill, so that was challenging. But it was interesting; it was fun. I learned a lot and, and I did a lot of good. So it was, it was--my perspective on it was a little different. It was hard, but the perspective that I had was that, you know, I'm learning so much and I'm never going to have this experience again in my life. So I enjoyed it.

Dr. Sampson Davis

Dr. Sampson Davis was born in Newark, New Jersey, on January 19, 1973. He was the fifth of six children, and after graduating from University High, a magnet school in Newark, he went on to attend Seton Hall University. Davis was accepted into the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and received his medical degree in 1999 at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Things were not easy for Davis growing up. He lived in an area of high crime and poverty, surrounded by drug use and gangs. Davis, along with his friends Rameck Hunt and George Jenkins, decided they wanted something more from life and set out to become doctors. They formed a tight-knit group, studying together throughout high school and later attended college together. All three were accepted to medical school, and they all succeeded in their shared dream to become doctors. Today, Davis is the attending emergency room physician at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, the same hospital where he was born. He also tours the country speaking to youths about the opportunities available to them other than gangs.

Davis, Hunt and Jenkins are known as the Three Doctors, and they have written a book about their experiences, The Pact: Three Young Men Make A Promise and Fulfill A Dream, which spent six weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. He is also a co-founder of the Three Doctors Foundation, which brings health education and mentoring to inner-city youth. Davis and the other doctors have been featured in People, Reader's Digest and The Oprah Winfrey Show. In 2000, Davis and his friends were honored with an Essence Award.

Accession Number

A2003.134

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/16/2003

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

University High School of Humanities

Seton Hall University

Dayton Street Elementary School

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

First Name

Sampson

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

DAV09

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Always Use The Three D's: Dedication, Determination, and Discipline.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/19/1973

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Emergency physician Dr. Sampson Davis (1973 - ) co-wrote a book chronicling he and his friends' lives titled, "The Pact: Three Young Men Make A Promise and Fulfill A Dream." They also started a health education and mentoring foundation called The Three Doctors.

Employment

Beth Israel Medical Center

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Sampson Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Sampson Davis lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his parents' family histories

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Sampson Davis talks about listening to his father's family stories

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his parents' separation and his family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his childhood in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his childhood personality and how it conflicted with what was expected of him

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes how he made money for his family following his parents' separation

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Sampson Davis reflects upon how getting arrested for armed robbery turned his life around

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his experience at Dayton Street Grammar School and in the Dayton Street Projects in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes enrolling at University High School in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes meeting HistoryMakers Dr. George Jenkins and Dr. Rameck Hunt at University High School in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his pact with HistoryMakers Dr. Rameck Hunt and Dr. George Jenkins, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his pact with HistoryMakers Dr. Rameck Hunt and Dr. George Jenkins, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his indifference about being a doctor until his residency at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his family's support while he was studying to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes how his pact with HistoryMakers Dr. George Jenkins and Dr. Rameck Hunt prevented him from quitting medical school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes the educational disadvantages he faced

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his decision to do his residency at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes how he felt when he returned to Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes serving as a role model in his old neighborhood and emphasizes the importance of education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes the process of co-writing his book "The Pact" with HistoryMakers Dr. George Jenkins and Dr. Rameck Hunt

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes the influence that the "Autobiography of Malcolm X" had on his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes the responsibility that doctors have to be involved in their communities before emergencies happen

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes his experience with the Three Doctors Foundation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Sampson Davis reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Sampson Davis describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

11$4

DATitle
Dr. Sampson Davis reflects upon how getting arrested for armed robbery turned his life around
Dr. Sampson Davis describes his indifference about being a doctor until his residency at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey
Transcript
I got caught up in a robbery game for a little while as well and, you know, once again, I started to lose friends. I started to see people dying, you know, and even when I--I speak about it in the book [The Pact: Three Young Men Make A Promise and Fulfill A Dream] that we [Davis, HM Rameck Hunt, and HM George Jenkins] wrote about, being arrested for armed robbery as a juvenile and how that pivotal point right there served as the turning point in my life. And sometimes something bad really has to happen to you in order for you to turn your life around. But the guys that I was involved with that two of them are dead now, you know. So there's four of us, so two are dead. And that's just--that could have easily been me, hands down, could easily have been me. And I'm not proud of it and even with revealing some of it is somewhat a fear factor attached to it but I realize there are other people in my situations, and if you're not in my situations, there are other people who have struggles that they're dealing with in life. And that's the point about it. We--I don't care how you fix it. I don't care where you're from. I don't care what your family may have or what they may not have. I don't care how much love in your family and how much love there isn't, there's always going to be challenges and obstacles that you have to face as an individual and those are called life experiences. And some of us navigate them quite well and some of us don't. But the point is to be there for each other while going through it. The point is to be a support system and to lend that helping hand to your fellow man, your fellow woman, while you're going through these different struggles. That's the main ingredient. And my upbringing and my decisions that I made as a juvenile or as a youngster, I don't make any excuses for, but I know for sure I would have choose differently if that multiple choice would have had some other options on there, but it didn't.$$Oh sure, I mean, you know, it's a tough time to grow up in a, you know, in a time when, you know, when people of a generation ago had a mixed community, you know, before integration.$$Um-hum.$$And all of the people with means left the community.$$Yeah.$$(Simultaneous) (unclear).$$And at that time, the crack epidemic was starting to come about. It's just--I don't know, I look back at it now and I'm just--sometimes I have to pinch myself because one, I can't believe I made it out of there. Literally, I've lost more than a handful of friends from the drug game, from the gun violence, from HIV/AIDS, which has really destroyed our nation, and I don't know. Like sometimes I sit back and people are like, man, how can you keep so much inspiration and stay so motivated. And if I sit back and I think about it, I don't know how 'cause if I really break it down to the pure entity of what it all means, it's--it's this hopeless, it really is.$Was there any point during the process that you said, "Well, being a doctor seems like a good idea?"$$It was points where, I was like man, this is still the worst idea of--the worst process of a plan I've ever embarked upon. I mean there would be little moments like, that reminded me, that I was on the right track and if I was home, 'cause I would get phone calls, I still kept a close tie to the street. So, I would go home and somebody I grew up with was locked up over the weekend or something crazy happened to them and it reminded me of myself of like, I'm fortunate to be in a position I'm in because if I wasn't, there are chances are I would be with them this weekend and so it was--and if something would have went wrong, and I probably would have been the victim there. So it was always these constant reminders that made me realize I was in a good position, although I didn't want to be a doctor. When I came back and--and finally took on this position as an ER resident [at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey], that's when it came full circle. That's when the, "Why am I doing this?" sort of came to me. That's the whole four years of college [Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey], the four years of sacrifice through medical school [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, New Jersey], the countless hours of studying, the "why" to that question came full circle when I stepped into the same hospital that I was born in as an Emergency Medicine resident at the time. And it was almost like pins and needles in which, for the first time in a long time, I felt like this was the right thing. It was so revealing that, I mean, it--it almost--I can smell it and taste it, that's how much realness was attached to me coming back home and practicing Emergency Medicine. Everything just fell into place. My sense of ownership, where I belong, how I can help people, seeing friends that I grew up with, taking care of their loved ones, taking care of them, serving as that concrete image, giving that helping hand, delivering medical care, giving spiritual healing, all that stuff came full circle and--and I was like, "wow", if I just could imagine a little bit of this when I was going through some of the struggles, I probably would have bought into the concept more. But initially I did the four years of college, the four years of med school because we were a team. We were a team and, you know, maybe I'm not going to be the point guard on a team or the homerun hitter, but, you know, I've come in and throw down a few bunts and run a few passes on the sideline, whatever it may be, but I did it because I didn't want to be the first one to give up on us. I didn't want to be the one that didn't complete the whole project, although I came close many times of quitting. I didn't want to be the one to be blamed for letting "the pact" down, and we didn't have a name, but letting the group down at the time. You know, I didn't want to be that one that gave up first just because of the competitiveness that I have within myself not to be a quitter and I wasn't going to quit regardless of why I didn't see you--I should be doing this or where I belong in the field of medicine. I mean, shoot, for the first time I saw a surgery, I was like, queasy and, you know, retching my guts and, I'm just like, man, that's gotta hurt (laughter). And I'm like, I don't want to do this, you know, and now it's like night and day. I mean I can eat lunch and go save a person's life and not have a problem with it but you grow into it. See, that's the thing, you don't--we often take the path of least resistance. We often travel this road because we feel that we have a niche for it. But I didn't have a niche for medicine. Or maybe I did have a niche for medicine and it just was unknown to me at the time.