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Sandra Long Weaver

Journalist Sandra Dawson Long Weaver was born on June 25, 1952 in Annapolis, Maryland. She attended the University of Maryland, where she worked for the Black Explosion college newspaper and received her B.S. degree in journalism in 1974. She also worked as an intern for Newsweek, and went on to attend the Advanced Executive Program at the Northwestern Media Management Center.

Upon graduation from the University of Maryland in 1974, Long Weaver was hired as a staff reporter for the News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware. She then went on to work for Philadelphia’s Evening Bulletin as a reporter, copy editor and editorial writer before joining the staff of The Philadelphia Inquirer as a correspondent in 1984, where she went on to become the first African American female managing editor. There she held several executive positions, including deputy managing editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2005 to 2007, and managing editor for Philadelphia Newspapers, LLC and the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2007 to 2008. Then, in 2008, Long Weaver was named vice president of newsroom operations for Philadelphia Media Holdings, and worked in both The Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News newsrooms.

In 2010, she established and became president and chief executive officer of the Dawson Media Group, a multi-media communications and consulting practice. Long Weaver left her position with Philadelphia Media Network in 2011, and went on to work as communications coordinator for United Methodist Communications and editorial director for the Tennessee Tribune. She created “Take 10 on Tuesdays” with the Tennessee Tribune, a weekly video series featuring African Americans in the Nashville area; and, in 2014, she launched Tea and Conversations with African American women, a networking and communications event.

Long Weaver is a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and has served for many years as chairperson and publisher for the Acel Moore Minority Career Development Workshop at The Philadelphia Inquirer. In 2011, she organized the first Founders Reception and the first “Divine Nine” breakfast for NABJ members. Long Weaver has served on the boards of African Women’s Development Fund USA and the Phillip Merrill School of Journalism at the University of Maryland. She also acted as the secretary-treasurer of the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors.

Long Weaver has received multiple awards, including the 2008 Woman of The Year Award given by the Philadelphia Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, the 2007 Trailblazer Award from the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, and the 2007 Courage Award from the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Cancer Society. In addition, she was a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes in arts and journalism.

Sandra Long Weaver was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 23, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.066

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/23/2014

Last Name

Weaver

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Long

Occupation
Schools

Annapolis Elementary School

Annapolis Junior High School

Annapolis High School

University of Maryland

Walter S. Mills-Parole Elementary School

First Name

Sandra

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

WEA02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

I'm Doing The Best I Can With What Little I Have.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

6/25/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab

Short Description

Journalist Sandra Long Weaver (1952 - ) was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists. She worked at The Philadelphia Inquirer for twenty-nine years.

Employment

United Methodist Communications

The Dawson Media Group

Philadelphia Media Network

The Philadelphia Bulletin

The News Journal

Temple University

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sandra Long Weaver's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her relationship with her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the history of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers meeting her father for the first time

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her paternal family reunions

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the demographics of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her likeness to her parents and grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her community in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her community in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers segregation in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early education in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early education in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls working at the United States Naval Academy library in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers applying for college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls writing for the Black Explosion student newspaper

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her experiences at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers reading African American publications

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers interning at Newsweek in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her decision to pursue a career in journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the start of her journalism career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her experiences at The News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver describes the community of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the publication of Alex Haley's 'Roots'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her colleagues at The News Journal

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her experiences at the Evening Bulletin

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about writing news headlines

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the black journalists in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the politics of the Philadelphia Bulletin

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her career at the Philadelphia Bulletin

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls being hired as a reporter at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers the bombing of MOVE in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her career at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers the Janet Cooke scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the credibility of news media

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her work as editor of finance and administration at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the changes at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her role as managing editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls becoming vice president of newsroom operations at Philadelphia Media Holdings

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about leaving the Philadelphia Media Network

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes the Take Ten on Tuesdays video series

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the Tea and Conversations networking event

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver reflects upon her career

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver reflects upon her legacy and her hopes for African American journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her family and recent activities

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her stamp collection

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her admiration of Ida B. Wells and Robin Roberts

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Sandra Long Weaver recalls the start of her journalism career
Sandra Long Weaver describes the Take Ten on Tuesdays video series
Transcript
So this time, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think there was a lot of information available especially about black thought and black ideas in those days in the public media--$$Right (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) music and radio, TV. I mean, a lot black reporters were trying, were starting to make a noise; you had like Tony Brown on.$$Right, the- 'Tony Brown's Journal.' When I went to the Phil- and some of this grew out of the Kerner Commission report and looking at the fact that there were hardly any black reporters available to cover the news in 1968. So there was this big push in the early--late--the very late '60s [1960s] and early '70s [1970s] to do more public affairs talk shows. And so coming into Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] I watched 'Tony Brown's Journal.' There was a show with--oh gosh I'm blanking on his name, and it's right over there--but it was a black talk show in Philadelphia with [HistoryMaker] Acel Moore and with, he's dead now, oh, I can't think of his name but it will come to me. But anyway their talk show was very popular and it was 'Black Perspectives on the News,' and that's what it was. It was a black perspective looking at the events of what was going on and covering it. Vernon Odom, a television reporter in Philadelphia also had a TV show that he did that looked at issues going on in the community. So there were a number of people who did that. In newspapers in Philadelphia, one of the things was [HistoryMaker] Chuck Stone was a columnist at the Philadelphia Daily News; Claude Lewis was a columnist at the Evening Bulletin [Philadelphia Bulletin]; and Acel Moore was a columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer. So the city had three major newspapers--actually four, there is a Philadelphia Journal. But there were three black columnists who were writing all the time about issues going on in the black community. And that's one of the things that attracted me to Philadelphia, and to that whole area. I spent--$$Wilmington's adjacent to Philadelphia.$$Exact- yeah, so.$$(Unclear) like how many miles, what--?$$About thirty--$$Thirty miles.$$--about thirty miles. So I, I get to Wilmington [Delaware] in 1974, and I'm the only black reporter on the staff [of The News Journal]. (Laughter) And the- I used to talk to a woman who worked in the newspaper library and black janitor at night, because I worked at night when I first got there. But you know I used the opportunity to cover as many stories as I could. I would fight to get my stories on the front page. And in--I wanted to connect with other black journalists to talk about their experiences, what could I do--because I was very young and did not know how to you negotiate in the newsroom, how do you get to these other points? So Philadelphia, I think I met [HistoryMaker] Joe Davidson somehow, and he invited me to a meeting of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. So I would drive up from Wilmington to Philadelphia; and at this point they hadn't connected 95 [Interstate 95] between Wilmington and (laughter) Philadelphia so you had to wind your way through the City of Chester [Pennsylvania]--very interesting (laughter). But I would go to the meetings and that's how I met Claude, I met Acel and Chuck and they all became mentors to me in various ways. And Acel was very helpful in me getting to The Philadelphia Inquirer; and I met--I worked at the Evening Bulletin before The Inquirer, and Claude Lewis always had an open door to talk to black journalists, and I would go in just about every day to talk to Claude. And, of course, I met Chuck through the meetings of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. Now the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists is considered the founding chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists because much of what's in the bylaws is based on what we had in Philadelphia. And Philadelphia was--Journalists was started while I was still in college [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland], so I didn't join it at the beginning but I'm one of their early members that came into the organization.$You're currently in Tennessee and--you're in Tennessee because you got married [to Lance Weaver], right, in?$$Yes.$$Right.$$I moved to Tennessee in 2011. I was let go [from the Philadelphia Media Network] in July, and I got married in September 2011; and moved here then and decided I really did not want to go back into daily newspapers. So I n- haven't pursued doing that at all, but I was interested--there is a black newspaper that was thriving, came out once a week, The Tennessee Tribune, so I do some freelance work for them. I do freelance editing, looking at the design of the paper, the stories that they have. I created a video series for the newspaper it's called Take Ten on Tuesdays with The Tennessee Tribune because I like alliteration, but the idea is to extend the brand beyond Thursdays. The paper's published on Thursdays, but on Tuesdays we put up a video and it's an interview with someone from the Nashville [Tennessee] area who may be starting a business, who's been in the area for a while but usually it's with someone who is African American to let people know what other people are doing. And sometimes we interview people who come into Nashville who may be notable African Americans and they are connected to Nashville for some reason. And we've now done it for just about a year and a half; it started in January 2013. I host it sometimes, there is a young man, Jason Luntz who also will host it and we just do a video; and the idea is that it's ten minutes--taking ten minutes out of your day with The Tennessee Tribune to watch an interview with someone you may or may not know. It's been pretty successful. The view- the viewership has gone up steadily over the course of a year and half and we now get requests from people that say can you do a Take Ten about this issue or a Take Ten you know interviewing this person. So it's growing and it's a little bit different--I think we're the only black newspaper in the country that does a video series like this.$$Okay, okay it's the first I've heard about. So this is on the website of The Tennessee Tribune?$$Yes, you access it through The Tennessee Tribune's website: tntribune at--tr- tntribune.com--$$Okay.$$--that's how you can access it.$$All right.

James Johnson, Jr.

Civil engineer and education administrator James H. Johnson, Jr. was born on May 27, 1947 to parents, James and Arline in Annapolis, Maryland. He earned his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Howard University. He then attended the University of Illinois, where he received his M.S. degree in sanitary engineering in 1970. Johnson worked as a consultant and as an engineer at Engineering Science before continuing his education at the University of Delaware. He received his Ph.D. degree in civil and environmental engineering in 1982.

Following the completion of his graduate studies, Johnson was offered a position on the faculty of his alma mater, Howard University. Johnson’s research focused on the treatment of hazardous compounds, contaminated soil including explosive waste, and environmental policy. He became chair of the Howard University Department of Civil Engineering in 1982. From 1989 until 2002, Johnson served as associate director of the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic Hazardous Substance Research Center. In 1996, he was appointed dean of Howard University’s College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences and in 2005 he was named the Samuel P. Massie Professor of Civil Engineering. Four years later, Johnson became professor emeritus of civil engineering at Howard University. In 2010, he was appointed chair of the National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson. Johnson was the first African American to chair this independent committee for the Agency. He has also served as chair of the U.S. EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors. In 2012, Johnson was appointed director of EPA's National Center for Environmental Research (NCER) within the Office of Research and Development. Johnson has co-edited two books, contributed to three more, and he has published over 60 academic papers.

Johnson is a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and in 2005, he received the National Society of Black Engineers Lifetime Achievement Award in Academia. He has also been recognized with the 2008 Water Environment Federation Gordon Maskew Fair Distinguished Educator Award and a Lifetime Achievement Award by National Society of Black Engineers (DC Chapter) in 2009. He is a member of the Water Environment Federation, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Association of Environmental Engineers and Science Professors and the American Academy of Environmental Engineers.

James H. Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 15, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.139

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/15/2012

Last Name

Johnson

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

"Jim" H.

Schools

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

University of Delaware

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

JOH40

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches, Golfing

Favorite Quote

To him or her that is given much, much is expected.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/27/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Civil engineer and education administrator James Johnson, Jr. (1947 - ) is the former dean of Howard University’s College of Engineering, Architecture, and Computer Sciences, and the first African American chair of the National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology (NACEPT).

Employment

United States Environmental Protection Agency

Howard University

Engineering Science, Inc. (Parsons)

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2532,26:3000,39:9610,164:9810,169:10210,178:10460,184:10810,193:13590,229:15768,275:16428,286:17088,296:19464,345:19992,355:20322,361:21840,387:22434,399:30853,531:31420,550:32617,581:33247,597:33940,611:36334,666:40541,720:41297,733:42494,762:43250,778:43628,786:43943,792:44447,801:44951,811:46337,843:46652,849:47030,857:47408,869:47786,876:48920,906:49172,911:49487,917:51629,960:52322,978:52574,983:53582,1011:53960,1018:58825,1035:59281,1046:59623,1053:60877,1086:61162,1092:61960,1111:62416,1120:63043,1134:65987,1166:68323,1224:78094,1323:85158,1420:85662,1432:87734,1494:88406,1508:88630,1513:90030,1555:90254,1560:96938,1666:100322,1722:101066,1744:101562,1753:104786,1823:105282,1832:106088,1849:106522,1858:106770,1863:107018,1868:107576,1879:108072,1890:108754,1906:109374,1927:110676,1959:111234,1969:115858,2008:116322,2018:116728,2029:117018,2036:117250,2041:117830,2060:118062,2065:118526,2078:118758,2083:119338,2097:122064,2154:122354,2160:124036,2208:125080,2229:126298,2251:126994,2264:130786,2281:132154,2312:132586,2322:133018,2329:135227,2360:135581,2370:136230,2382:137115,2403:137351,2408:138236,2426:141823,2465:142178,2471:144237,2523:148781,2613:149349,2622:150343,2641:155450,2689:155919,2698:157259,2719:159275,2731:159610,2738:161151,2769:162156,2794:162558,2804:163094,2813:163965,2834:164501,2845:166109,2888:166645,2898:170062,2977:170330,2982:171201,2998:176260,3023:178388,3067:178612,3072:179452,3095:180404,3117:180684,3123:181524,3145:181804,3152:182644,3170:183988,3211:184324,3218:184716,3226:184996,3232:185444,3244:185724,3250:187684,3295:188076,3303:188748,3318:189476,3334:189924,3344:190148,3349:195140,3376:195756,3388:196036,3409:199228,3474:199508,3480:200348,3499:200684,3506:202084,3539:202756,3554:202980,3559:203372,3568:207974,3631:211336,3672:211746,3678:217115,3776:221735,3893:223495,3944:223770,3950:224430,3961:224815,3970:226630,4020:226850,4025:229940,4030:230453,4040:230681,4045:232676,4094:233189,4107:233417,4112:234215,4133:235754,4169:239463,4203:239805,4210:240375,4223:241572,4247:241971,4259:242655,4277:242940,4283:243225,4289:245196,4300:245630,4308:245940,4314:247304,4349:248048,4365:248544,4374:248792,4396:250466,4410:251706,4463:252016,4469:252636,4484:254682,4520:261170,4569:261590,4576:264180,4623:264740,4632:267610,4692:269710,4726:270410,4737:270690,4742:271320,4752:273000,4779:277160,4793:279778,4857:281087,4896:287880,5005:289920,5044:295052,5125:295370,5132:295582,5137:295794,5142:296006,5147:296218,5152:296430,5157:296801,5165:298126,5198:298921,5230:299292,5239:299557,5245:300935,5274:301306,5284:302048,5307:302260,5312:306447,5439:311080,5472$0,0:4226,94:4958,105:5202,110:5507,116:6239,133:7520,163:9960,218:14772,254:15627,274:17166,313:17508,320:18192,344:18534,352:18819,359:19332,370:19788,380:20415,396:21099,410:21726,424:22125,434:23436,463:24063,478:24519,495:26115,524:29760,535:30384,543:34250,562:34605,569:34960,575:35457,586:35954,596:36380,603:38060,614:38390,621:38852,632:40238,666:40898,677:41690,692:41954,697:42416,707:43010,717:43868,731:44660,746:44924,754:48224,816:52052,889:53240,924:53570,930:56012,972:56342,978:56936,991:57200,996:61645,1019:62245,1029:62695,1040:63220,1052:64195,1071:65170,1089:65695,1098:72768,1167:73153,1173:73769,1183:74770,1202:76300,1207:76672,1212:78472,1231:79011,1239:80243,1260:81244,1277:83862,1328:84632,1338:85017,1344:86018,1361:89406,1430:93280,1437:96780,1513:97060,1518:100140,1587:100910,1601:101190,1606:101750,1617:102870,1638:103570,1649:104130,1663:104550,1670:108935,1690:109980,1702:110360,1707:113880,1794:117675,1852:117951,1857:118917,1873:124098,1908:124828,1920:125339,1928:125704,1934:128055,1949:128468,1958:128822,1965:129117,1971:130544,1982:131056,1991:132080,2018:132720,2032:133360,2045:137008,2123:137264,2128:137648,2139:138032,2147:138672,2158:139376,2171:139888,2183:142704,2241:143024,2266:147166,2274:147698,2283:148914,2296:150512,2312:150867,2318:151648,2330:154701,2384:158535,2485:160097,2535:163764,2560:171996,2705:172584,2713:173004,2721:180580,2845:180980,2852:181460,2860:182100,2870:185140,2925:185460,2930:189749,2961:191657,3020:192823,3051:193300,3063:193512,3068:194519,3098:194731,3103:195579,3131:196268,3151:197222,3172:198547,3201:198759,3206:199024,3212:199448,3221:202204,3284:207778,3326:208026,3334:208274,3339:209080,3353:212304,3451:214164,3503:214474,3509:215218,3525:215776,3553:217078,3571:217326,3576:217698,3584:217946,3589:218194,3594:218814,3606:219062,3611:219310,3619:219868,3629:220364,3640:220612,3646:220860,3652:221108,3657:221604,3666:222410,3681:222968,3687:224270,3713:228928,3726:229468,3738:229954,3748:230224,3755:230926,3761:231142,3766:231358,3771:231952,3786:232870,3810:233302,3819:233896,3838:234112,3843:234544,3853:234814,3859:235246,3870:237410,3877
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Johnson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Johnson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Johnson talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Johnson talks about the history of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Johnson talks about his family's history in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Johnson talks about his mother's growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Johnson talks about his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Johnson talks about his hometown of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Johnson talks about his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Johnson talks about his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Johnson talks about how his interest in civil engineering developed

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Johnson talks about Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination and the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Johnson talks about his experience at Bates High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Johnson recalls President Lyndon B. Johnson's visit to Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Johnson talks about civil engineering

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Johnson talks about his mentors at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Johnson talks about his studies at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Johnson talks about his decision to attend University of Illinois for graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Johnson talks about his experience working at Engineering Science and the 1972 Watergate Scandal

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Johnson discusses his research on active carbon to dechlorinate water

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Johnson talks about his doctoral studies at University of Delaware while teaching at Howard

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Johnson discusses his dissertation on solid-liquid separation in water treatment

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Johnson talks about serving as chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Johnson reflects on his work at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Johnson discusses his contributions as Dean of Howard University's School of Engineering

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Johnson talks about Howard University School of Engineering's Leadership Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Johnson talks about receiving the Man of Courage Award

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Johnson talks about treating water contaminated with radiological and hazardous waste

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Johnson talks about his work as an Environmental Health and Safety Consultant

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Johnson talks about his professional honors and awards

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Johnson describes his transition to Professor Emeritus and his research on producing biofuels

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Johnson reflects on his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Johnson talks about his family and their belief and pride in him

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Johnson talks about his brother

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Johnson shares his thoughts about sustainability and climate change

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Johnson reflects on his career

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Johnson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Johnson describes his photos

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
James Johnson talks about his mentors at Howard University
James Johnson talks about Howard University School of Engineering's Leadership Institute
Transcript
Okay. Okay. So who were some of your teachers and mentors at Howard [Howard University]?$$Well, I have to say I had a lot of--I had a lot of mentors. But let me talk about at least three of them. One was a guy by the name of Walter T. Daniels. He was--Dr. Daniels was a structural engineer, first African-American to get a Ph.D. He got it from Iowa State University. Dr. Daniels, when he was working on his Ph.D. and all through his schooling while he was--he went to Prairieview undergraduate, but when he went to graduate school, and he had laboratories, he had to do his labs by himself because there were segregated--it was a segregated--he basically was segregated. But he was able to do all that and do it well, and he understood the importance of education. And when we would complain about how hard it was on us at Howard, he would tell us what it was really like to be hard. So he was a role model because he had--he got his Ph.D., he was a scholar, he had a good understanding of all of the course material, and he also was a caring person, and he nurtured a lot of young people to go on to graduate school and do things. The second one was the person who got me into environmental engineering, and his name was Man Mohan Varma.$$How do you spell that? Now what is it?$$Man, M-A-N, M-O-H-A-N, and the last name is Varma, V-A-R-M-A. Dr. Varma was a (sic) environmental engineer, and he was the one that got me interested in environmental engineering and invited me to his laboratory to work when I was a junior; said, "Why don't you come down to my lab and work and I can you some of the things we do?" So he was--he had an influence on me in terms of going into environmental engineering which, at that time, was called sanitary engineering. And I worked in his lab. He also helped me to select a graduate school. And so, that was very good because he sent me to help me go to a school where he knew that it would be a caring and a welcoming environment. So, and I actually had a chance to come back, when I came back to Howard, to work with him for many years, and he still was very helpful mentoring me; made sure I did the right things, took the right professional--made right professional choices about memberships and professional societies; being active. He and I coauthored a couple of papers together and actually hosted a couple of conferences together. So he was very influential in my career in the environmental area. The third person was a guy by the name of Raymond Jones. Ray Jones was a Howard graduate who had gone to the University of Michigan and had gotten his master's degree in sanitary engineering, and came back to Howard to teach. What was unique about Ray was that he was also a practicing engineer, and I had times that I worked on a couple of projects with him and--but he also was a good mentor, because he had a nice balance about his life. He was one of the faculty, he did--he was a practitioner, so he brought that practice to the classroom so e could see really how we could take the information we were using, learning in the classroom, and how we could take and translate it into a project. So, Ray Jones was a person who helped me see the bigger picture about life, and I think that was a--he was--he also, I think, took a special interest in me because I had a chance to work with him too. Oh, and the interesting thing that--that was that I had--I had a chance to be on the faculty with all of them after leaving Howard and coming back to the faculty. So I had a chance to know them from two perspectives.$$Okay. As a student and a faculty member?$$As a student and a faculty member.$$Now, what other activities were you engaged in at Howard? Were you part of the--$$Oh, I was a studier.$$Okay.$$I just studied. (Again?) a continuation of what I did in high school, but studying in a different way. I actually, I really did study here. And I remember being in my first classes in math and science, and I was in there with students who had come from technical high schools, and so, they'd had one year of calculus already. So what they saw in calculus they already knew, and to me it was Greek. And so, it required me to really study and go back and brush up on my algebra and trigonometry, and learn those things and relearn those things as I was doing the calculus classes. So, I remember that it was at Howard that I had to have good study habits, and I didn't have time to do other things. And I actually had a detailed schedule of everything I did, and my time for relaxation was Friday evening and, also, it would be a little bit on Saturday evening. But all the other time, except for church time on Sunday, I was studying.$$That's a tremendous work ethic. I mean, who do you cite as a source of the inspiration for that? Or did you internally (unclear)$$No. It wasn't internally. But a couple of my buddies who were in the Boy Scouts with me, at least one of them that lived right around the corner from me, also was--went to Howard and he was in electrical engineering. But he stayed one year and actually flunked out. And I always knew that they were much smarter than I was because they were two years older. So there were new things I never knew. So my inspiration was that, our high school was a good high school, and I wasn't going to do what he did and I didn't care what price I had to pay, I was going to study enough so I could make it. (So that's what I did?)$So, I'm going to--I'll repeat a little bit of what I said for continuity. I think one of the things I'm very happy about that I did while I was dean is to try to find a way to follow-through on our--the mantra of the university. When President Swygert came in, the mantra became "Leadership for America and the Global Community." So we were able to find a partner in Black and Veatch that was interested in helping us to provide a leadership institute for our students. And this was a (sic) extracurricular activity for students. What we tried to do was to have a guest speaker to come on a Friday afternoon, have a lecture on leadership that'll be open to the university community, and then have that following Saturday, the following day, full of workshops on leaderships. And we were able to do that for 15 years. So, the--our partner, Black and Veatch, stuck with us for all 15 years, and they provided us with a small grant of about 25,000. But the important thing they did is, they gave us a lot of their people to help us to prepare the material. And so, they put a lot of time and effort in beyond the dollars and cents. So, highlights. So, we had guest speakers, like, to kick off, like Bill Gates. Bill Gates came to campus. He was on a tour, and he was trying to convince--on this tour, he was doing six schools a given week, and we got selected to be done (on it too?). We were selected for his visit on Friday afternoon, and so we scheduled--we scheduled our Leadership Institute to be that weekend and here's Bill Gates to kick it off. So our students got a chance to see Bill Gates. We also had a Four-Star General to come, General Lester Lyles. He actually came in the same year of 9-11. So that was kind of iffy as to whether he would be able he'd be able to come, but I should be able to tell you he came and he was well protected. The last institute we had, our plenary speaker was General Colin Powell. So he came and talked about leadership from his perspective, followed by a workshop. We also had the administrator of the EPA, Lisa Jackson, to come and talk. So we had a lot of good people who were in leadership positions to come and to talk to our students about leadership, and we followed up with students within our college with the workshops on Saturday. So I think that, to me that was a way that we bought into the vision for the university and the mantra, and we were able to carry through. And I felt as (though?) as that was a contribution that had an impact upon a lot of our students.$$Okay. So did that start in '95 (1995) and run through 2010?$$It ran 'til 2010, right; '95 (1995) to 2010.$$Okay.$$Was the last one.$$All right. So, you said fifteen years. That pretty much locks you in (laughs).$$Oh, yeah. Yeah.$$Okay. So, what else? Anything else?$$You know, actually, I can make a list of students, because a lot of what we did was with students. I can talk about the, I think, maybe some special moments I had with students, whether it would be a teaching moment or a mentoring moment, and then look at the students three or four years down the road. But I guess I would say I always had a gang of students that I worked with, even after stepping down as dean and going into the--America's ranks and having my research projects at Howard, I still have four or five students that were, not necessary--I didn't have classes then, but they weren't in my classes, but students who came to me and kind of found me to be a person they could confide in or a person they could talk and- talk to, and we'd find ways to move them forward and help them to grow. So there were many, many, many students throughout the years that we had relationships with, in and outside the classroom that I think were very special to me, because I could see the students grow and go to the next places in their lives as a result.

The Honorable Royce West

Royce West has received numerous accolades as a politician in addition to his responsibilities as managing partner of a law firm. He was born on September 26, 1952 in Annapolis, Maryland. West attended the University of Texas at Arlington where he received his B.A. and his M.A. degrees in Sociology. While an undergraduate, West became the first African American to serve as president of the Student Congress, foreshadowing later events. He went on to receive his J.D. degree from the University of Houston in 1979 and worked in the Harris County District Attorney’s Office before joining the Dallas County District Attorney’s office where he became Texas’ first African American chief felony prosecutor. Following his time there, in 1994, West became a senior partner at the Dallas law firm Robinson, West, and Gooden.

Since 1993, West has represented Dallas County (District 23) in the Texas Senate. He won the Democratic primary the previous year against Jerald Larry and Jesse Oliver with over 57 percent of the votes. He has served on Senate committees including Education, Finance, Health and Human Services, and Criminal Justice; has served as chair of committees on Jurisprudence and Higher Education, and is the current Chair of Intergovernmental Relations. He has also been appointed to the Education Commission of the States in 2005, the Intergovernmental Affairs Committee of the Council of State Governments in 2009, and the Southern Regional Education Board Legislative Advisory Council also in 2009. In 1994, West created the “One Community-One Child Program” to increase parental involvement in students’ academic careers. West furthered his law career by becoming managing partner of West & Associates, now a law firm of 11 attorneys in 1994. He was sworn in as President Pro Tempore of the Texas Senate in 2006 and during that period, served as Governor for a Day.

West has received Honorary Doctor of Law degrees from Paul Quinn College and Huston-Tillotson College in 1997 and 2000, respectively. In 2001, his alma mater, the University of Texas, recognized him with a Distinguished Alumni Service Award. Texas Monthly Magazine named him of the “Ten Best Legislators in Texas” in 1999 and one of the “25 Most Powerful People in Texas Politics” in 2005. That same year, the Associated Press called him one of the “key players of the 2005 Legislature” in their “Movers and Shakers” list.

Royce West was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 12, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/11/2010

Last Name

West

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Walter S. Mills-Parole Elementary School

University of Texas at Arlington

University of Houston

Phillis Wheatley Elementary School

Wilmer Hutchins High School

First Name

Royce

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

WES06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

If It Is Going To Be, It Is Up To Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

9/26/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Lawyer and state senator The Honorable Royce West (1952 - ) was Texas’ first African American chief felony prosecutor, and served as State Senator of the Texas twenty-third district.

Employment

7-11

General Motors Company

Harris County District Attorney's Office

Dallas County District Attorney's Office

West and Associates, LLP

Royce West and Associates

Robinson, West and Gooden, PC,

Favorite Color

Gold, Purple

Timing Pairs
234,0:1014,13:1404,19:1950,28:2886,49:4212,96:14660,293:19180,354:52318,900:54320,933:60876,1112:74884,1327:75643,1351:82310,1481:82967,1512:88150,1587:88734,1602:91750,1635$0,0:1909,139:15976,298:17705,327:18342,335:19343,352:20526,368:24803,449:27533,516:34150,601:34750,610:69660,1081:70000,1086:70680,1105:86148,1354:87390,1378:87804,1385:89736,1436:90081,1443:90840,1455:92082,1490:92841,1510:94083,1541:98844,1646:105352,1684:106024,1695:106888,1705:107368,1711:108328,1722:112744,1769:125584,1954:133227,2037:135820,2072
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Royce West's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Royce West lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Royce West describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Royce West describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Royce West describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his paternal grandparents' legacy

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Royce West lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Royce West describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Royce West describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Royce West remembers Parole Elementary School in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Royce West describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his community in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - The Honorable Royce West describes his early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his early aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - The Honorable Royce West remembers moving to Augsburg, Germany

Tape: 1 Story: 18 - The Honorable Royce West describes his experiences in Germany

Tape: 1 Story: 19 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his schooling in Germany

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Royce West recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Royce West remembers moving to Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Royce West recalls Phyllis Wheatley Elementary School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Royce West describes his community in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Royce West recalls Pearl C. Anderson Junior High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his academic interests

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his aspirations to become a lawyer

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Royce West describes his reading habits

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Royce West recalls the influence of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Royce West remembers Wilmer-Hutchins High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Royce West remembers Bishop College in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Royce West remembers the Highland Hills area of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his experiences of discrimination at Wilmer-Hutchins High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his mentors at Wilmer-Hutchins High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Royce West remembers applying for college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Royce West describes his experiences at Paris Junior College in Paris, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Royce West recalls playing football at the University of Texas at Arlington

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his election as student body president

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his left handedness

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his part time employment at the General Motors Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his influential professors

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his graduate studies in sociology

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Royce West remembers the University of Houston Law Center in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Royce West remembers the bar examination

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Royce West remembers passing the bar examination

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Royce West remembers working with Tom Joyner

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Royce West recalls joining a motion to dismiss a racist jury, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Royce West recalls joining a motion to dismiss a racist jury, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his experiences of discrimination as the chief felony prosecutor of Dallas County, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Royce West remembers trying a murder case against a black minister

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his private law practice

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Royce West recalls the establishment of his law firm

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Royce West shares his advice to young lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Royce West talks about his family

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his campaign for district attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Royce West remembers his election to the Texas Senate

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his achievements as a state senator

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - The Honorable Royce West describes his juvenile justice initiatives

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - The Honorable Royce West describes his elderly care initiatives

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Royce West reflects upon the demographic changes in Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Royce West talks about the Dr. Emmett J. Conrad Leadership Program

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Royce West describes the One Community-One Child program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Royce West recalls his chairmanship of the Senate Interim Committee on Gangs and Juvenile Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Royce West remembers Texas Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Royce West talks about University of North Texas at Dallas

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Royce West describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Royce West reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Royce West shares a message to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

7$12

DATitle
The Honorable Royce West talks about his aspirations to become a lawyer
The Honorable Royce West remembers his election to the Texas Senate
Transcript
What did you think that you would become at that time, had you given it any thought?$$Very good question. I'm gonna tell you about a story. Mr. Edwards, Tommy Edwards [ph.] it's, it's amazing how I can now recall all of this. Mr. Tommy Edwards was the metal shop teacher, now I think we're about the eighth grade, at that time, seventh eighth grade. Someone had stolen someone's apple, so he shut down the metal shop class. And basically said, "Denise [Denise Gines], I'm gonna teach you all something about law and order," something like that. But, what he did, he decided to have a jury trial, 'cause this guy who's apple had been stolen was accusing someone else. And so, what he did he said, "I'm gonna put you guys over here as a jury. I'm a put you over here as the defendant. Royce [HistoryMaker Royce West] you will defend him, okay." And then had another guy who was presenting the evidence. We never resolved the issue, but he planted a seed. And mind you I told that in elementary school [Parole Elementary School; Walter S. Mills Parole Elementary School, Annapolis, Maryland] my favorite character was Perry Mason. So, in junior high school [Pearl C. Anderson Junior High School, Dallas, Texas] Mr. Edwards further, I guess you could say, fertilized that seed in my mind. And, and it was just, it was just the thought in the back, in the recesses of my mind. I wanted to be a football player, okay. That's what I wanted to be. But, it was at that time that he, he began to fertilize that seed. And even though I still wanted to be a football player, it was there. In the back, in the recesses of my mind.$When's the next time you decide that you want to be in public office?$$Well, interesting enough I, I'm in--my wife [Carol Richard West] is from New Orleans [Louisiana], she talk like dat, you talk like you know, people down there talk like dat. And I'm, I'm standing--[HistoryMaker] Eddie Bernice Johnson, Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson, was the senator in this district before me becoming the senator. And she's now in [U.S.] Congress. Be, before I became a senator, excuse me. And you know, she's talking about, you know, drawing a congressional seat and running for Congress. And so, I'm thinking about the possibility of running for the state senate [Texas Senate]. And the thought actually crystallized in my mind when I was standing on banquette--the porch of my in-laws' house in New Orleans. And look across the street and there's a sign on a tree and it says, "Marc Morial [HistoryMaker Marc H. Morial] for state senate." Marc at that time was the mayor of New Orleans, I said, "Yeah, that's what I'm gonna do." Because that will help me to continue what at that time was kind of a mission for me, of, of public service. As it relates to doing some things in the community. So, I decided to run and I ran against two great guys, one by the name of Jerald Larry [Jerald H. Larry], who was a sitting state representative. And Mr. Jesse Oliver, who was a former judge and also a state representative. We did not have a contentious election, I was able to win on the first ballot and in part I won on the first ballot because I had previously ran for district attorney. And had a lot of name identification as a result of that. I became state senator and was sworn into office as state senator in January of 1993.$$And what district was this?$$District 23 [Texas Senate District 23], which is out of Dallas, Texas.$$And you won with 50 percent of the vote?$$I think I had about 57 percent.$$Okay. So, what was your platform?$$My platform then as it is now, is to deal with issuing concerning juveniles, elderly, education and economic development.

John S. Chase

Architect John Saunders Chase was born January 23, 1925, in Annapolis, Maryland. When his parents, Viola Hall Chase, a teacher and cook, and John S. Chase, Sr., a school principal and postal worker, separated, Chase was raised primarily by his mother. Every year at the United States Naval Academy graduation, Chase could earn $25 for each tossed hat he retrieved. At Bates High School, his teacher, Mr. Marchand, introduced Chase to architecture; he earned his B.S. degree from Hampton University in 1948, and became the first African American to enroll in and graduate from the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture in 1952.

Chase's professional career began the same year as his graduation when he was appointed assistant professor of architectural drafting at Texas Southern University, and founded John S. Chase, AIA Architect. Chase's early designs were for churches, schools, homes, and small public buildings.

Chase became the first African American licensed to practice architecture in the state of Texas, and later was the first African American to be admitted to the Texas Society of Architects, and the Houston Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Chase co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) along with 12 other black architects at the AIA convention in Detroit in 1971. When President Jimmy Carter selected him in 1980, Chase became the first African American to serve on the United States Commission on Fine Arts. Projects designed by Chase’s firm include: the George R. Brown Convention Center, the Washington Technical Institute, Links, Inc., National Headquarters, Delta Sigma Theta National Headquarters, the Harris County Astrodome Renovation, the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. School of Humanities at Texas Southern University. Chase was later awarded a commission to design the United States Embassy in Tunis, Tunisia; a fifty million dollar complex.

Chase was elected to the AIA College of Fellows, was awarded the AIA Whitney M. Young Citation, and was the recipient of the NOMA Design for Excellence Award for four consecutive years. Chase also received the commendation for Meritorious Service by the Houston Independent School District, and the Honor Award for Architectural Excellence in School Design by the Texas Association of School Boards for his design of the Booker T. Washington High School. Chase and his wife, Drucie, raised three children together: John, Anthony and Saundria.

Chase passed away on March 29, 2012 at age 87.

Accession Number

A2004.223

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/1/2004

Last Name

Chase

Maker Category
Middle Name

Saunders

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Bates High School

Wiley H. Bates High School

Hampton University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

CHA06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Pebble Beach, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

1/23/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Corn

Death Date

3/29/2012

Short Description

Architect and federal government appointee John S. Chase (1925 - 2012 ) was the first African American licensed to practice architecture in the state of Texas, and later was the first African American to be admitted to the Texas Society of Architects and the Houston Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Chase co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects, in addition to becoming the first African American to serve on the United States Commission on Fine Arts during the Carter Administration.

Employment

Texas Southern University

John S. Chase, AIA Architect

National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA)

United States Commission on Fine Arts

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:3233,73:3525,78:4109,87:5496,118:6080,128:7321,204:10168,289:20614,475:21316,484:26308,666:28414,718:32392,822:38402,883:39010,891:39390,897:55900,1099:74306,1279:74716,1301:84238,1397:84582,1402:85270,1412:87162,1475:91028,1508:91496,1519:100354,1720:100921,1728:103999,1898:115390,2027:118314,2173:121444,2184:121900,2189:137702,2311:144360,2364:156820,2490:157310,2499:157730,2506:164430,2601:164810,2606:167090,2885:192880,3045:248988,3368:250940,3373:251335,3379:251809,3390:252915,3408:253389,3419:253863,3426:263310,3508:265150,3530$0,0:912,11:1296,16:4368,50:12574,105:13858,120:16133,129:23790,154:24470,163:25660,213:26680,225:40970,313:41290,318:44680,382:51963,443:52449,451:53259,467:74064,636:78894,711:85153,730:94788,839:98860,856:100204,861:106543,924:109082,947:109863,960:110147,965:121378,1071:123586,1100:125602,1129:130668,1168:135966,1226:136946,1237:141850,1264:142355,1270:152338,1327:154460,1338:154810,1344:163790,1471:164290,1476:177474,1602:178214,1615:187540,1682:189925,1699:191665,1724:193366,1733:195412,1772:196900,1792:197458,1800:203674,1854:217094,1996:219327,2045:219635,2050:228648,2210:229485,2241:246490,2336:246862,2348:252800,2406:256700,2450
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating for John S. Chase's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John S. Chase lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John S. Chase describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John S. Chase talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John S. Chase describes his father's personality and career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about his sister's family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John S. Chase describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John S. Chase recalls the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John S. Chase remembers his influential elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John S. Chase remembers discovering his aspiration to be an architect

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John S. Chase recalls his architectural mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John S. Chase remembers making his grandmother's tombstone

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John S. Chase recalls collaborating with John T. Biggers at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John S. Chase describes himself as a young man

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John S. Chase talks about being jailed in Heflin, Alabama, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about being jailed in Heflin, Alabama, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John S. Chase recalls his time at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John S. Chase recalls serving in World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - John S. Chase recalls the segregation in the United States Army during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John S. Chase recalls the mistreatment of Japanese prisoners in World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John S. Chase remembers graduating from Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia and his initial architectural career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about recruiting new clients by visiting churches

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John S. Chase recalls his acceptance to the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas in the wake of Sweatt v. Painter, 1950

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John S. Chase reflects on his experience at the newly integrated University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John S. Chase reflects on being the first African American graduate of University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John S. Chase talks about his alumni involvement with the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John S. Chase remembers the trials and advantages of graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - John S. Chase tells about his initial professional success in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - John S. Chase describes his political involvement while working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John S. Chase remembers his time in the United Political Organization of Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John S. Chase describes spending time with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John S. Chase remembers working on the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John S. Chase gives his opinion of President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John S. Chase names his architectural works in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John S. Chase talks about his architectural aesthetic

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John S. Chase describes his current and past projects

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John S. Chase describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - John S. Chase reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John S. Chase describes his children

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John S. Chase talks about his wife, Drucie Chase

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John S. Chase talks about his mother and sister

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John S. Chase reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John S. Chase describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John S. Chase narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
John Chase reflects on his experience at the newly integrated University of Texas at Austin in Austin, Texas
John Chase remembers working on the Vietnam Veterans War Memorial
Transcript
Let me just set the stage for something else here.$$Um-hm.$$You, give us your personal reflection on this but, in the school of architecture [at University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas] now, you had someone who wanted you there, the dean [Hugh L. McMath] wanted you there, and he was really, and he couldn't let you in because of the law of the State of Tex--Texas--$$That's right.$$--in the beginning. But now he could, but in terms of Herman [Marion] Sweatt, and the four law school, they were before the student's right, that applied to the University of Texas law school [University of Texas at Austin School of Law, Austin, Texas], they were on that suit with him?$$Um-hm.$$They had a pretty rough, the law school didn't really want 'em there, am I right?$$See, had, had the [U.S.] Supreme [Court], I've always said this, I don't know how much truth is in it, but had the Supreme Court decision been Chase [HistoryMaker John Chase] versus Painter, I would have never made it. Sweatt would have probably got in and become a very fine lawyer by now, he was, Sweatt was quite a person now, great speaker, very intelligent, but I really, I couldn't tell you, point to nothing specific there but, I, I, I just believe that had that case been built on me, that I would not have gone in or had I gone in, I would have been flunked out, Sweatt was flunked out, you see, and heck I knew Sweatt well enough to know that Sweatt wasn't supposed to been flunked out of no law school.$$Yeah. The person I was asking you about when I came in off camera we were talking about it, Dr. Jacob Carruthers [HistoryMaker Jacob H. Carruthers, Jr.], he was one of the four students with Sweatt and he ended up becoming a political science professor and getting a Ph.D from the University of Colorado [Boulder, Boulder, Colorado] but he couldn't deal with it either, he couldn't deal with their law school.$$I could understand.$$Once they started, he had to get outta there.$$Yeah, I can, I can--$$He said, he said, he was--$$--understand that.$$--he was so angry--$$Oh yeah.$$--he couldn't really continue.$$Oh yeah. I tell you when, when I worked the walked in that class, the very first day, Life magazine was there among others, Austin [Texas] statesmen and all the rest of 'em and let me tell you, you could pick the friends out right away, you could pick the foes out. Nobody had to tell you, you could tell it, you could tell it. Now, the, I mean the ones that you thought and felt were okay, would do things like, you'd be sitting at your desk drawing and studying and doing on, they'd come in, saw you been working long enough let's go to the union and get a soda or a sandwich or something, come on go with us, you know? See, now that made you feel good, or, or the time that Hollands [ph.] and his wife said, and that, at this time now I'm married see? Said look, why don't you and your wife [Drucie Chase] and, and my wife and I go to the game this weekend, go to the game on campus and, oh we did. And, and the joke there, in fact Holland said, yeah, we in there walking into the stadium and he says, "Boy I'll tell you the eyes of Texas are on you now." (Laughter) yeah.$$So, it wasn't ea--it wasn't easy though, I mean, to try to--I would imagine all the media made--made it difficult I would guess.$$It, it had its affect, it had its affect, I thought at one time these people who were following me around the campus were negative and I had some checking done on them and found out they were [U.S.] Secret Service people.$They were, they were good times, we, we've gotten presidential appointments again in the first category, being first we were the first member of the, the planning commission [U.S. Commission on Fine Arts] for the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.], this is the commission that the, besides the worthiness of such projects as the Vietnam [Veterans] Memorial [Washington, D.C.], that came across their desk when you go look at that and see that in addition to the memorial, you've got a three person statute down there. Have you ever seen the mem--you know those three soldiers in the, that was part of some of the things we did on that commission. We, we said that, see at that time there was a big to do about serving, you know, in, in the service where even the monument itself that Maya Lin designed and she presented that to our commission, even that memorial was a memorial to the dead so they said, it had fifty some thousand names of soldiers who were killed. There's but one living name on that board, so this got a group of veterans very mad because they didn't feel that, they said, good gosh is that some model monument to the dead? And, and so our commission decided well maybe something else is needed to counteract that point and on came the three soldier monument with, in combat clothes with their arms with them, right where the, the "V" is like that on the monument, the statue is right there, you see? Some people, we had said in the meeting, some people are gonna' think well goodness we don't have one monument there, we've got two, you know, and in essence that could or could not be true, I don't know but, at least it's there and that, plus doing a directory at the beginning of the "V," up here, so that if, if you're coming down to that monument to see the name of your husband, or brother, or uncle or father, see the names aren't on there in alphabetical order, they're on there in chronological order of death in Vietnam so, you got fifty something thousand names scattered all over this wall so how do you know what panel to go to? So, we decided that you should have this directory so a person could look up the name, in which would be alphabetized and you'd find that name and across from that name would be the panel and line that the name would, they would find that name. And, so those are some of the things I think politically we, we, we got out of it, many more, but they were some of the highlights--

Philip L. Brown

Author, historian and educator Philip Lorenzo Brown was born on January 16, 1909, in Annapolis, Maryland. His father operated a grocery store and worked as a maintenance man at the U.S. Naval Academy and his mother was a homemaker. In 1926, he earned his diploma from Stanton High School in Annapolis. While in high school, Brown enjoyed attending movies, playing football and working in the family grocery store. He graduated from Bowie Normal School, now know as Bowie State University, in 1928, and began his teaching career when he was just nineteen in the Anne Arundel County, Maryland school system.

In 1932, Brown married Rachel Hall, a teacher at the two-room school where he served as principal. Shortly after his marriage he and his wife attended classes at Morgan State University where both earned their bachelors degrees in education. After forming the Colored Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County in 1938, Brown led the effort to sue the Anne Arundel Board of Education for equal pay for African American teachers. The teachers were represented by former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1955, Brown earned his master’s degree in education from New York University.

During his tenure as a teacher in Anne Arundel County, he taught in several elementary schools and later at Bates High School, where he served as Vice Principal in 1966 when Anne Arundel County schools were finally integrated. In 1970, Brown retired from the school system.

Brown spent most of his retirement years researching and documenting local black history, especially that of black schools. In 1988, Brown published his first book A Century of Separate But Equal Education in Anne Arundel County. Six years later he published a pictorial book documenting the history of blacks in Anne Arundel County, The Other Annapolis, the Life and Times of Blacks in Annapolis from 1900-1950. In 2000, Brown put pen to paper again when he published The Mount Moriah Story 1875-1973, a book detailing the creation and rise of the first African Methodist Episcopal church in Annapolis. Finally in 2001 he published his latest book, The Stanton Elementary School Story, which was the first school in Annapolis for blacks and his alma mater.

Brown passed away on October 13, 2009 at age 100.

Accession Number

A2004.063

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

6/3/2004

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lorenzo

Organizations
Schools

Stanton College Preparatory School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Philip

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

BRO21

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Honolulu, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/16/1909

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes, Crabcakes

Death Date

10/9/2009

Short Description

Elementary school teacher Philip L. Brown (1909 - 2009 ) taught for four decades, and in his retirement has authored books documenting African American education and segregation, including, "A Century of Separate But Equal Education in Anne Arundel County."

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Philip Brown interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Philip Brown's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Philip Brown remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Philip Brown remembers his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Philip Brown explains his little knowledge of family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Philip Brown shares memories from his family life in 1910s Annapolis

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Philip Brown recalls his early years in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Philip Brown recalls his elementary school years

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Philip Brown describes going to church three times each Sunday as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Philip Brown recalls activities from his pre-teen and early teen years

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Philip Brown describes some of his teachers

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Philip Brown recalls his high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Philip Brown evaluates his academic performance as a high school student

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Philip Brown recounts his years at Bowie State University, Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Philip Brown discusses his first teaching job and his marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Philip Brown recalls the lawsuit over wage disparities in the Anne Arundel County, Maryland school system, 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Philip Brown discusses his pursuit of graduate studies, New York University, 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Philip Brown discusses the integration of Anne Arundel County, Maryland schools, 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Philip Brown discusses the integration of Anne Arundel County, Maryland schools, 1960s, part 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Philip Brown details changes in black education in Anne Arundel County, Maryland from 1926-1970

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Philip Brown describes his post-retirement writing pursuits

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Philip Brown reflects on school integration, test score disparities and teaching methods today

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Philip Brown discusses writing and publishing his first book, 'A Century of "Separate but Equal" Education in Anne Arundel County, Maryland'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Philip Brown discusses his second book, 'The Other Annapolis 1900-1950'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Philip Brown discusses sales of his first two books

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Philip Brown reflects on his life's course

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Philip Brown discusses careers in the teaching profession

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Philip Brown expresses his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Philip Brown shares thoughts on preserving history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Philip Brown describes how he'd like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Philip Brown reflects on his seventy-two years of marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Philip Brown shares thoughts on longevity

Zina Pierre

As a high-ranking member of President Bill Clinton's administration, Zina C. Pierre worked on issues and programs affecting the lives of women, African Americans and small business owners. Born in 1964 in Annapolis, Maryland, and educated at Catholic University of America, Pierre is the founding president and CEO of the Washington Linkage Group, a political lobbying and consulting firm.

Early in her career, Pierre worked in television journalism as a writer, field reporter and producer. She then moved into the government following Clinton's inauguration in 1993 as a speechwriter. She worked in the Labor Department as communications director for the Women's Bureau. In that capacity, she developed public relations strategies and campaigns for informing women of their rights in the workplace. This included a ten-city tour for the "Don't Work in the Dark" initiative.

Pierre was appointed to director of the Small Business Administration. She was responsible for the department's "Welfare to Work" initiative, for which she developed partnerships with public and private entities to hire approximately 200,000 former welfare recipients. In 2000, Pierre worked as one of the highest-ranking African American women in the White House, serving as special assistant to the president on intergovernmental affairs. In that role, she served as a presidential liaison to city and county governments across the country, promoting the presidential agenda on a local level. Pierre also worked to bridge the "digital divide" by making technology accessible to people from low-income backgrounds.

After leaving the White House, Pierre started the Washington Linkage Group. She also served as director of the National Council of Black Mayors Corporate Advisory Council, and as vice chairperson of the Future PAC, a national African American women's political action committee. Pierre is frequently sought out for her views on women's issues and politics, and is the recipient of many awards and commendations. She is an associate pastor at her childhood church in Annapolis and is working on a master's degree in divinity.

Accession Number

A2003.133

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/14/2003

Last Name

Pierre

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Zina

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

PIE01

Favorite Season

March, May

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sun City, South Africa

Favorite Quote

At The End Of The Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/29/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab ( Maryl Blue)

Short Description

Government relations chief executive, presidential appointee, and presidential advisor Zina Pierre (1964 - ) was Special Assistant to the President on Intergovernmental Affairs under President Bill Clinton, and founded the Washington Linkage Group, one of the few minority owned political lobbying and consulting firms in Washington D.C.

Employment

United States Women's Bureau

United States Small Business Administration

White House

Washington Linkage Group

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:42820,335:57409,588:75452,841:76844,862:77192,867:86410,966:87190,983:87736,991:112567,1310:124445,1466:130445,1581:147610,1788:155030,1852:163082,1960:164408,2027:182440,2245$0,0:20386,228:51595,657:52015,662:65000,768:65468,773:81024,950:91793,1128:92416,1136:111645,1399:132844,1672:133168,1677:139452,1724:146404,1851:147431,1869:154778,1992:155331,2000:155647,2005:166690,2080:180210,2303
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Zina Pierre's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes her household as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre describes her aunt and cousin

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre shares her school memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre describes her school activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Zina Pierre recalls her interest in religion as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre talks about moving away from home at age fifteen

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre describes attending Anne Arundel Community College in Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes attending The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre recalls working briefly for the National Rifle Association (NRA)

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes working at the Gannett Company and becoming a production assistant on the USA Today television show

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre describes her various jobs in television production

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre remembers working at News Channel 8 in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre describes how she was hired as a communications aide in the Clinton administration

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre outlines her career trajectory during the Clinton administration

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Zina Pierre describes working as the Director of the Welfare to Work Initiative at the U.S. Small Business Administration

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre describes the Welfare to Work initiative

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre recalls the challenges of people on welfare

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre talks about the challenges of ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes becoming a Baptist minister and attending Howard University School of Divinity

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes becoming the Special Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre recalls her first meeting with Bill Clinton as Special Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre talks about the impeachment of President Bill Clinton

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre talks about her mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre describes the 2000 Presidential Election

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre remembers the final days of the Clinton administration

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre remembers saying goodbye to President Bill Clinton

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes becoming CEO of Washington Linkage Group

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre talks about how she does not have regrets

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Zina Pierre describes how she was hired as a communications aide in the Clinton administration
Zina Pierre describes the Welfare to Work initiative
Transcript
I had an opportunity to cover the inaugural ball of President [Bill] Clinton. And I was just so enthralled and excited about all of the things that were happening, in terms of this new person who came out of nowhere and became President of the United States, even amidst all of the issues that he was facing then with the allegations that were taking place then.$$This is '92 [1992], right?$$This is '92 [1992]. But I was impressed with him, because he had a message for the people, and it was for all people. And I'll never forget going to, we covered the...There were a number of us that they had... they sent off, News Channel 8 sent off, they sent, provided us with gowns, sent us to a hair salon. And we all split up and went to various balls. And the minute I saw him, I knew I wanted to work for him. It was something about his message that made me feel like I was someone, and that I counted. And so, I'll never forget when someone came to me, it was just by chance. Someone from the administration came to our studio, and I was assigned to escort them back to the studio to be interviewed by one of the anchors. And I just boldly said to the woman, "Do you have a communications or a press office?" And she goes, "Yeah, by chance, yeah, we do." And I said, "I'd love to find out more about that." And so she said, "Well, get me your resume." And I went over to my computer and printed off my resume. And I gave her my resume there, and then I officially sent her a letter and another resume and told them that I was very much interested in being afforded an opportunity for an interview. And that was granted. And so they called me in, I guess, about two months after begging (Laughter) and I had two interviews with two people at the same time. And really, the rest is history. You know, most people's stories are that they worked on the campaign trail, etc., etc. I did a lot of local political stuff in terms of volunteerism and campaign stuff, but never anything on the national level. And so, never in a million years would I have thought that I would have--this little girl from Annapolis, Maryland--would have been working for the President of the United States. And it was a very humbling experience for me.$I was in the story of the Welfare to Work Initiative--$$That's right.$$--and how rewarding it was. I remember we were putting together a videotape to show to businesses... to use as a piece to show businesses the importance of getting involved in the Welfare to Work Initiative, and the benefits of doing so. And we were interviewing several women had surpassed the odds. And one woman was Sarian Bouma. And Sarian became our poster child, because she was a self-made millionaire.$$Can you spell her name for us?$$B-O-U-M-A is the last name. First name is S-A-R-I-A-N.$$She was, she came from Africa?$$Yes, she was African. She came from, I think she came from East Africa. And she came over with a very abusive husband... pregnant... and didn't know a soul in this country, but knew that she had some rights when she got here. And she packed up her bags one day after she had the baby, took the baby along with her to a shelter, went to the House of Ruth, and the rest is sort of history for her. She's... now she owns a thriving multi-million dollar business. It's a cleaning service. A number of her contracts are defense contracts. And she, the great thing that I love about her is that she never forgot where she came from, and she began to hire people off the welfare rolls. In fact, her vice-president would... When I remember her vice-president working for her company she was cleaning bathrooms. And Sarian mentored her all the way up to vice-president of her company. And I remember us interviewing Sarian, and I remember interviewing this one girl, Tamika, who said "People think that we're lazy and we're shiftless. But don't they understand that there is no raise on welfare. And so, if they think that we're living high off the hog every year, that's not true." And it really gave, for me, a different perspective of what I saw, too. Because it... there were points and times where I felt like, "Well, my tax dollars are going to people who can be out here working just like I am." And when I got to understand and know some of the people that actually are on the welfare rolls, many of these women don't want to be on it, and they want the dignity of a paycheck just like anybody else. But there were just circumstances that prevented them from being able to do so.

Thelma Daley

Thelma Daley was born on June 17th, in Annapolis, Maryland. Attending Bowie State University in Maryland, Daley graduated at the age of nineteen with her B.S. degree. She went on to New York University, earning her M.A. in counseling and personnel administration. More recently, she has received her Ed.D. in counseling from George Washington University.

Daley began her career at the Baltimore County Board of Education, serving as the coordinator for guidance and counseling services. She has also served as a visiting professor at North Central Western Maryland College, the University of Wisconsin and Harvard University. Daley has been active with a wide number of organizations over the years, beginning with her sorority, Delta Sigma Theta. She served as the national treasurer from 1963 to 1967. Daley became national vice president in 1971, and in 1975 she became national president, holding the position for four years. Daley also served as the national president of the American School Counseling Association from 1971 to 1972 and as president of the American Personnel & Guidance Association from 1975 to 1976. She has been active with the United Negro College Fund. Daley is also the national director of WIN, the Women in the NAACP. Currently, Daley and WIN promote knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and AIDS prevention within the African American community.

By presidential appointment, Daley became the first woman to chair the National Advisory Council on Career Education. She has appeared in Who's Who Among Black Americans and has served on the board of directors of the National Testing Service. Daley and her husband, Guilbert, live in Maryland.

Accession Number

A2003.164

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/22/2003

Last Name

Daley

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Lothian Elementary

Bates High School

Bowie State University

New York University

George Washington University

First Name

Thelma

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

DAL01

Favorite Season

Spring, Winter

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

The World Is As Big As You Make It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

6/17/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Social activist, school counselor, and foundation executive Thelma Daley (1927 - ) was the director of Women in the NAACP (WIN), and became the first woman to chair the National Advisory Council on Career Education.

Employment

Baltimore County Board of Education

North Central Western Maryland College

University of Wisconsin, Madison

Harvard University

National Advisory Council on Career Education

Favorite Color

Hot Pink, Tangerine

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Thelma Daley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Thelma Daley lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Thelma Daley describes her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Thelma Daley talks about her grandparents and her United Methodist upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Thelma Daley describes her mother, Hattie Virginia Randall Thomas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Thelma Daley talks about how her parents may have met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Thelma Daley talks about her five siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Thelma Daley talks about her father's background, and her family's history of land ownership, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Thelma Daley talks about her father's background, and her family's history of land ownership, pt.2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Thelma Daley talks about her paternal grandfather, John H. Thomas, a funeral director

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Thelma Daley describes her father's personality and his charter bus business

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Thelma Daley talks about how she learned to be an entrepreneur from her mother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Thelma Daley remembers selling vegetables at her family's market stand

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Thelma Daley recounts family road trips as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Thelma Daley remembers her grade school years

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Thelma Daley talks about her social life in grade school as well as a "catastrophic" moment in Latin class

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Thelma Daley talks about her favorite subject and her decision to attend Bowie State College in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Thelma Daley describes her father's charter bus company which also bused elementary school children in Anne Arundel County, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Thelma Daley describes influential teachers during her grade school years

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Thelma Daley tries to recall some of her extracurricular activities in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Thelma Daley talks about why she attended Bowie State College in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Thelma Daley recounts her experience at Bowie State College in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Thelma Daley talks about her activities as a student at Bowie State College in Bowie, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Thelma Daley describes how she became a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Thelma Daley describes her family's influence on her civic involvement and personal development

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Thelma Daley compares Bowie State University and New York University, and talks about the distinguished professors at NYU

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Thelma Daley talks about why she waited to pursue a doctorate and her marriage to Guilbert Daley

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Thelma Daley makes a quick comment about her marriage to Guilbert Daley

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Thelma Daley talks about how exercising kindness was important to her

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Thelma Daley talks about her acquaintance with Fannie Lou Hamer, her friendship with HistoryMaker Dorothy Height, and her philosophy as a leader

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Thelma Daley talks about the Wednesdays in Mississippi project led by HistoryMaker Dorothy Height and Polly Cowan

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Thelma Daley talks about the establishment of the Pig Bank in Mississippi by Fannie Lou Hamer

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Thelma Daley remembers Fannie Lou Hamer's funeral

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Thelma Daley talks about her contributions to the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Thelma Daley describes her work to combat racism and sexism in the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Thelma Daley talks about how she worked to effect change from within different organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Thelma Daley talks about the highlight of her professional career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Thelma Daley talks about her leadership roles in the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Thelma Daley describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Thelma Daley talks about the strength of counseling in the schools

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Thelma Daley talks about the role that school staff can play in systemic issues in the community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Thelma Daley talks about her involvement in various organizations

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Thelma Daley talks about her love of cooking and her personality

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Thelma Daley reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Thelma Daley talks about what she would do differently

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Thelma Daley describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Thelma Daley narrates her photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Thelma Daley talks about her acquaintance with Fannie Lou Hamer, her friendship with HistoryMaker Dorothy Height, and her philosophy as a leader
Thelma Daley talks about her contributions to the American School Counselor Association and the American Counseling Association
Transcript
Now your engagement of social change activities--(simultaneous)--$$Yes.$$--seems to be through most of the traditional black organizations, right? But what I heard you say, I guess, not too long ago, you said you met Fannie Lou Hamer in Mississippi.$$Yeah.$$Was it--in what capacity were you in Mississippi dealing with Fannie Lou Hamer?$$Well, I was with the National Council of Negro Women with [HM] Dorothy Height very early it was down there with her. Right now, I serve as vice chair of the board for the National Council of Negro Women, which I never thought I'd get to that position, you know. But very early, she invited me on one of those tours to Mississippi and working with the women and with their head start program and it was all--$$Had you known Dorothy Height a long time before--$$Well, Dorothy was the president of Deltas [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] and I met Dorothy Height through the, through the, you know, through Delta. You know everybody who is a president in Delta. And in Delta, I've served in several roles in Delta. I've served as national treasurer. I served as national projects chair. I served as national first vice president and chair of the scholarship and standards committee and then as president of Delta and then on some other committees and things, so. But you know everybody who, who's a president. You know those people. Does that make sense to you? So--(simultaneous)--$$Can you tell us about Ms. Dorothy Height? I mean, she's, she's really a legend now--(simultaneous)--$$Oh, she's wonderful.$$What are some of your reflections on (unclear)?$$On Dr. Height? She--there's no one like her. She has the most acute mind I've ever seen of anybody. She can recall dates and moments and hours and you can be relating something and she'll sit there and she'll say--you'll think maybe she's sleeping or crocheting or something--she say, no, no, no, it's not like that. They went down this street and that street and this street. And it was 5 o'clock in the morning on January the 12th, 1963 and it was in Lebanon. And it was not in some other place. And she--very, very brilliant. I've never heard her talk about anybody. I've never ever heard her say negative things about anybody and her ability to conceptualize and she's moving from one thing to another. You think that this big event, well the next day she had something else going out there--blooming, blossoming, like that; and the whole thing of wisdom and the whole thing of the ability to see the global and the ability to relate to people. And I'm very fortunate. I am very honored that, that, that she considers me to be a friend. We sometimes she--well sometimes I get a call from her every day. Isn't that interesting? Sometimes I get a call from her every day and sometimes two and three calls from her a day. And she'll say, well what about this, what about this, you know. And I'm honored that it's because she feels she can trust me. And I want to come back to trust. I feel that trust and loyalty are very, very key, okay. And that, that if you ask me to do something and I accept, then I feel that you should be able to trust me. And then if I feel that you're not worthy of my trust then I would sever, okay. And so that is my whole philosophy there. So I feel that Dr. Height feels that she can trust me. I think she also likes my creative ability. She likes my creative thinking 'cause a lot of times I do training for the Board. And she'll always say the Board has come in, can you do something to help them in the leadership development and so forth. So, and I don't mind doing it. The other thing is whatever I do for people--I mean the speeches I make, the workshops I've given across the country, I don't charge. If somebody would like to give me a gift, that's fine. Pay my airfare, pay my hotel but I'm not out there so say, give me $1,000, give me $2,000 in terms of that but if you want to give me a gift, that's fine but you don't have to stretch to do it, okay, all right 'cause I feel in some way that I'm supposed to share and help people to grow. And when everybody can grow and grow no matter how old they are and we grow from each other and that's my whole philosophy. That's my philosophy with my students. I teach part-time at Loyola College [now Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland] in the graduate school. And I say to them, and I start teaching Thursday. I have to teach classes this week and next week, okay. And I say that we learn from each other. And I learn from you and you learn from me and that's a part of the sharing process in here, okay.$But ma'am, can--what, what has been for you the highlight of your career of service? You've been involved--I mean--(unclear) (simultaneous)--$$Well, let me just tell--(simultaneous)--$$You, you've had a career as an educator (simultaneous)--$$Yeah, but let me just tell you a couple things for me. As a counselor--and the whole counseling profession has been major--has been mainly white males, okay. And for me, at that time, I was a high school counselor, chair of a department in a basically white school in Baltimore County [Maryland]. They had eighteen black kids and 1,800 students. But when I moved through and became the president-elect of the American School Counselor Association, okay. And that was in the '70s [1970s]. And let me tell you how institutionalized I was. Because I was elected to the board of the American School Counselor Association which I possibly was the first person of color. First, I was appointed to the board of American School Counselor Association and, and it was mainly male and we, we were--the building was located at 1607-1609 New Hampshire Avenue in Washington for the American Personnel and Guidance Association and the division was the American School Counselor Association, which was the largest division. After being on the board, the board members said, you're gonna become president. And I said, oh, no, not me. They said, you're gonna become president and they signed the petition for me to run to become president and I emerged to become president of the American School Counselor Association, which was breaking history. Our overall big, big organization was called the American Personnel and Guidance Association which is now--the name has been changed to the American Counseling Association. The American Counseling Association represents school counselors, mental health counselors, rehab counselors, college ed counselors, college supervisors. There fifteen divisions in it, okay. Are you not following me exactly in terms of the structure there, okay. I was first elected to become president of a division, the American School Counselor Association at that time. At that time, the division had 15,000 members but we represented all of the school counselors in the country but later I emerged to become the president of the overall organization, the American Personnel and Guidance Association of the American--now called the American Counseling Association, which is made up now fifteen division, represents all forms of counseling in the country; mental health counselors, you name it, there's a--the government counselors, whatever form of counseling there is, okay. And it's always been a male-dominated group and I broke the barriers to be the second female to emerge as president; and the first person of color to emerge in that organization. And not a year has passed that they have not asked me to be in some leadership role in the American Counseling Association. This past year for their convention in Anaheim, California, they asked me to keynote the convention. And I keynoted the very large convention of about, well, I guess by 7,000 people. I keynoted the convention in March in Anaheim, California. I've served as national treasurer twice. I've served as parliamentarian so many times. I've chaired every task force. I've chaired the foundation. I've chaired whatever major part--I was one of the persons to help set up the National Board for Certified Counselors and became the first secretary treasurer of the certifying body which is now a separate body of it, so that's been my involvement in my field, in my field itself and I'm very proud of my involvement in my field, which is counseling.