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Hazel Trice Edney

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney was born in Charlottesville, Virginia. She received her M.A. degree from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. Edney also graduated from Harvard University’s KSG Women and Power Executive Leadership program.

In 1987, Edney was hired as a reporter for the Richmond Afro-American newspaper. She went on to work as a staff writer for the Richmond Free Press until 1998, when she was awarded the William S. Wasserman Jr. Fellowship on the Press, Politics and Public Policy from Harvard University. In 2000, Edney was hired as the Washington, D.C. correspondent for the National Newspaper Publishers Association. Then, in 2007, she was appointed editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com, serving in that role until 2010. Edney also worked as an investigative reporter as part of the NNPA NorthStar Investigative Reporting Program. While at NNPA, she covered the World Conference Against Racism in Durban, South Africa in 2001; the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon; Hurricane Katrina; and earthquake-ravaged Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

In 2010, Edney launched the Trice Edney News Wire. She also serves as president and CEO of Trice Edney Communications and editor-in-chief of the Trice Edney News Wire. Edney has worked as an adjunct professor of journalism at Howard University, and has served as interim executive director of the NNPA Foundation. She has appeared on the Tavis Smiley Show; CNN; C-Span, Bishop T.D. Jakes' Potter's Touch; The Al Sharpton Show; Washington Watch with Roland Martin; and the Washington Journal.

Edney’s awards include the New America Media Career Achievement Award; a fellowship at the Annenberg Institute for Justice in Journalism at the University of Southern California; the Lincoln University Unity Award in Media; the Tisdale Award; and NNPA Merit Awards, including the NNPA First Place Feature Story Merit Award in 1990 for her final interview with Virginia death row inmate Wilbert Lee Evans. She was also a congressional fellow in 1999 and 2000, and was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame. Edney was named a "2008 Role Model" by the National Baptist Congress of Christian Education, and a "2010 Phenomenal Woman" by the Phenomenal Women’s Alliance. Hazel Trice Edney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 6, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.339

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/3/2013

Last Name

Edney

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Trice

Occupation
Schools

Harvard University

Thomas Jefferson Elementary School

Louisa Elementary School

Louisa County High School

Saint Paul's College

Virginia Commonwealth University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Hazel

Birth City, State, Country

Charlottesville

HM ID

EDN01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Unto Everything There’s A Season And A Time For Every Purpose Under The Heavens

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/13/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Journalist Hazel Trice Edney (1960 - ) , founder of the Trice Edney News Wire, was editor-in-chief of the NNPA News Service and Blackpressusa.com. She was the first African American woman inducted into the Virginia Communications Hall of Fame.

Employment

Trice Edney Communications

Trice Edney News Wire

National Newspaper Publishers Association

BlackPressUSA.com

Richmond Free Press

Richmond Afro-American

Howard University

Greater Abyssinia Baptist Church

Greater Mount Calvary Holy Church

WTVR-TV

WFTH Radio

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hazel Trice Edney's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her mother's singing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her mother's favorite songs

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her father's military service, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney lists her siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early memories of her father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her early home

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her community in Louisa, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the desegregation of Louisa public schools

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the difficulties at home

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers the birth of her son

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls seeing a vision of an angel as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about an inspiring teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her behavior in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her early encounters with black media

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers marrying Eugene Edney, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the end of her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers transferring to Virginia Commonwealth University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the challenges in leaving her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the emotional support she had while finishing school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working at WTVR-TV in Richmond

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls being the news director at WFTH radio station

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working freelance at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about working full time at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coworkers at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes Richmond, Virginia's political climate

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her success as a political news reporter

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her move to the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her coverage of the L. Douglas Wilder's gubernatorial election

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers working with media leaders at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the highlights of her work at the Richmond Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about contemporary instances of racial discrimination

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers being offered a fellowship at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers influential instructors at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls speaking at her Harvard University graduation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about becoming a correspondent at the National Newspaper Publishers Association

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2000 U.S. Election scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls the events of September 11, 2001, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers her coverage of Hurricane Katrina, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls flying with the family of Rosa Parks

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about a lack of recognition for female leaders in African American civil rights organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney describes the similarities of discrimination against individuals of African descent worldwide

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney remembers covering the 2008 U.S. elections

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about the importance of accountability in black leadership, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls founding the Trice Edney News Wire

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her work at the Trice Edney Newswire

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her presidency of the Capital Press Club

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her experiences as a professor at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hazel Trice Edney describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Hazel Trice Edney reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Hazel Trice Edney talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Hazel Trice Edney recalls her encounters with racial slurs throughout her life

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Hazel Trice Edney describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hazel Trice Edney narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Hazel Trice Edney talks about her decision to pursue collegiate study
Hazel Trice Edney recalls major stories she covered at the Richmond Afro-American
Transcript
When you were a senior then in high school [Louisa County High School, Mineral, Virginia], are you in the--you're in a school play, you're doing better in school? You feel energized; you won the contest. What did your counselors tell you about college?$$ They didn't. I sought them out. I, I had to go and seek out the counselors. You know, I wa- I had been the bad girl and who had suddenly become, you know, sort of like the star. And, and everybody was watching to see what was gonna happen next, but nobody said, "You know what, let me sit down and talk to you about college." I just suddenly decided in a conversation one day with a government teacher, Mr. Clutter [ph.]. I had written a story--a paper about John F. Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy], and he was discussing the paper with me. It was something about it he disagreed with. Maybe I didn't do my research or something. It was something about he was scolding me. And I threw my head back and I said, "Well, I'm going to college" (laughter). And I didn't know--I, I don't even know why that came up at that moment, but--or why I said it at that time, but I--that was the first time I declared I'm going to college. And it was fra- and that was in the eleventh grade, and that's when I began to seek out the guidance counselors. And one of them told me actually about Saint Paul's College in Lawrenceville [Virginia], and they thought that I could possibly get in. And so in the twelfth grade I applied to Saint Paul's; and surely they accepted me. That was my, my bright--I always tell people that was my HBCU [historically black colleges and universities] cred.$What were some of the big stories in, in Richmond [Virginia] that you remember, or the memorable stories?$$ The memorable stories pertain to usually the, the, the pain and suffering of, of black people. There was a story, for example, about a, a food stamp line that stretched for blocks. You know, I wrote this story--that stretched for blocks in the wintertime, in, in the cold, in, in the summertime, in the sweltering heat, you had pregnant mothers. You had elderly women, et cetera who had to wait outside for their food stamps. And I would notice this line year after year, and finally I inquired, "What is this line?" It was in August that particular year. And I went inside the facility where they got their food stamps. There was no water, no air conditioning. It was like third world. I hate to use that term, but that's what it was like, literally. This was like--it couldn't be America happening. And so I wrote a story on it, and that story impacted the public policy pertaining to that particular food stamp distributor. The city manager at that time, who was Robert [ph.], Bob, actually cut the contract--ended the contract for that particular distributor and moved the, the recipients to another facility that--in which they could pick up their food stamps in a much more humane condition. And at the same time--and I don't take credit for this, but it just happened to have--happen at the same time. So it could have been my story that did it. Virginia went to like a stagger system in the, the food stamp recipients picking up their food stamps. They didn't all pick 'em up on the same day that caused that humongous line. And so a lot happened after that story broke that I, I believe brought hu- you know, humanity to the people who were suffering there. There were so many other stories. I remember doing a story on, on this--on seeing homeless people sleeping in paper--in cardboard boxes outside the shelter at night in the dead of winter. And we took pictures of these cardboard boxes with these people in them outside, and it was on the front page of the Afro [Richmond Afro-American; Afro-American Newspapers]. And then the next day, it was on the front page of the white daily--the Richmond Times-Dispatch. And so in many instances the stories that we were doing were followed by the white press, and this is just at the Afro. This is before I'd go to the Richmond Free Press. And, and--$$Now this is the opposite of what happens in some of the cities that I know of where the black press seems to--you know, pe- people joke that they're actually reading a white pa- paper the night before, you know.$$ Yes, they'll say we--we're following--well, this is--it's always been opposite in--you know, for, for me. It's always been opposite. I--you know, I've always tended to say okay, this is the story that goes against the grain, but nobody else is saying it. Nobody was writing it, so I'm gonna write it. And it ends up, for example, in The New York Times, which happened when I was at the Free Press. And it ended up on the front page of The Washington Post, which happened when I was at the Afro. And so it's, it's just a matter of having a gut instinct as a journalist and saying, you know what? This is a story regardless of what paper; and other papers will follow you, 'cause it is a story.

Malcolm Brown

Visual artist and educator Malcolm McCleod Brown was born August 19, 1931 in Charlottesville, Virginia to Dorothy R. and Franklin M. Brown. He attended the public schools of Charlottesville and went on to earn a B.S. degree from Virginia State University in 1964 and a master’s of arts degree from Case Western Reserve University in 1969.

After working as an artist at Ohio Bell and American Greetings, Brown began his career as an arts educator and taught at the Shaker Heights High School from 1969 to 2000. Since 1980, he has been co-owner with his wife Ernestine of the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Malcolm Brown’s work has been exhibited in numerous solo and group shows, including “The Art of Malcolm Brown” at the Butler Institute of American Art; “Something All Our Own: The Grant Hill Collection of African American Art,” a touring exhibit; and “Discretionary Accounts: The Artist Speaks,” at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe.

In 1973, Brown was elected to membership in the American Watercolor Society, the most prestigious organization for watercolorists. Founded in the 18th century, today it has approximately 500 members, with ten members being elected annually. He is also the recipient of numerous public commissions and awards, including the Board of Director’s Award from the Watercolor Art Society; participation in the Art in Embassies Program of the U.S. State Department, and the Cleveland Arts Prize “Distinguished Service to the Arts” Award. His works can be found in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Springfield Art Museum, Coca-Cola, and Progressive Insurance, among others.

Brown is also a member of the Ohio Watercolor Society and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Accession Number

A2004.023

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

3/15/2004

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

M.

Organizations
Schools

Virginia State University

Boston University

Case Western Reserve University

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Malcolm

Birth City, State, Country

Charlottesville

HM ID

BRO20

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

8/19/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Painter and high school art teacher Malcolm Brown (1931 - ) co-owned the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Ohio. He was also the recipient of numerous public commissions and awards, including the Board of Director's Award from the Watercolor Art Society.

Employment

Ohio Bell

American Greetings

Shaker Heights High School

Malcolm Brown Gallery

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:8393,145:8855,152:9933,180:11165,204:11781,214:15939,291:16478,299:16863,305:17941,326:18249,335:21021,378:30314,438:63509,689:64067,697:85360,788:86020,804:87010,816:91186,833:98540,912:99520,921:101410,952:105960,1136:133245,1431:142512,1521:161410,1750$0,0:3382,38:3734,43:4790,58:6110,67:6990,78:9894,126:10686,138:25125,278:35739,386:44068,515:44719,524:62422,675:63398,684:86243,851:87062,859:96925,1015:106255,1129:113691,1230:125913,1334:134330,1379:134880,1385:157503,1582:158530,1596:159241,1607:160663,1635:161690,1651:162322,1660:163112,1671:163665,1679:179568,1843:179836,1848:180171,1854:180640,1863:231625,2235:233569,2267:234379,2278:238400,2327
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Malcolm Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Malcolm Brown lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Malcolm Brown talks about his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Malcolm Brown talks briefly about his father's background and his childhood in Crozet, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Malcolm Brown talks about living temporarily in Warm Springs, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Malcolm Brown describes his earliest memories of his childhood neighborhood in Crozet, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Malcolm Brown describes his memories of family holidays and meals

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Malcolm Brown talks about his identical twin brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Malcolm Brown describes his childhood community in Crozet, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Malcolm Brown describes attending Hillsboro Elementary School and Albemarle Training School

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Malcolm Brown describes wanting to be a commercial artist

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Malcolm Brown remembers picking blackberries with his twin brother

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Malcolm Brown describes attending Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Malcolm Brown describes attending Piedmont Baptist Church in Crozet, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Malcolm Brown describes his social life and extracurricular activities as an undergraduate student at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Malcolm Brown explains why he chose to attend Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Malcolm Brown talks about completing post-baccalaureate work at Boston University and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Malcolm Brown describes the artistic landscape in Boston, Massachusetts and Boston's African American art community

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Malcolm Brown describes relocating to Cleveland, Ohio and joining the faculty at Patrick Henry Junior High School and Shaker Heights High School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Malcolm Brown describes his children

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Malcolm Brown describes the art curriculum at Shaker Heights High School in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Malcolm Brown describes the racial demographic in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Malcolm Brown describes challenges he encountered as an educator at Shaker Heights High School in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Malcolm Brown talks briefly about sociopolitical issues that affected his classroom

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Malcolm Brown talks about the introduction of technology into artistic disciplines

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Malcolm Brown describes opening his own gallery, the Malcolm Brown Gallery, in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Malcolm Brown describes working at American Greetings and being inducted into the American Water Color Society

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Malcolm Brown describes his painting style

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Malcolm Brown talks about the Cleveland Museum of Art and his original piece, 'Grooving'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Malcolm Brown talks about African American artists featured in the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Malcolm Brown describes memorable artists, gallerists and exhibitions featured at the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Malcolm Brown talks about the landscape for visual art in Cleveland, Ohio at the time of the interview

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Malcolm Brown lists artists that have inspired his work

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Malcolm Brown talks about the existing market for working artists, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Malcolm Brown talks about the existing market for working artists, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Malcolm Brown talks about affordable artwork versus expensive artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Malcolm Brown summarizes his experience as co-owner of the Malcolm Brown Gallery in Shaker Heights, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Malcolm Brown talks briefly about politics in African American art

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Malcolm Brown explains what he considers is an artwork's purpose

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Malcolm Brown reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Malcolm Brown describes how both the professional and personal aspects of his life have been rewarding

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Malcolm Brown and HistoryMaker Ernestine Brown narrate their photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

4$5

DATitle
Malcolm Brown describes opening his own gallery, the Malcolm Brown Gallery, in Shaker Heights, Ohio
Malcolm Brown describes working at American Greetings and being inducted into the American Water Color Society
Transcript
--Well, let's talk about the '80s [1980s] for a minute. I don't know how old school that is, but I know in 1980, you opened your own gallery in Shaker Heights [Ohio], a community where you're homeowner, raising a family, and teaching full-time in the schools and now you're co-owner of the Malcolm Brown Gallery. How do you find the time to do that?$$Well, had a good partner with Ernestine [HM Ernestine Brown] my wife, and we used to travel around to shows. I used to go to Virginia Beach (unclear) and that's one of the reasons we stopped--and that is one of the reasons we wanted to have a gallery to become stationary for a while and just stop. So it helped me as far as having a body of work and having a place to show, and get things going as far as--and also helped to have a place so we can bring other people here, and people of note like (unclear) and Hughie Lee-Smith and so forth.$$Okay. So it helps to have Mrs. Ernestine Brown as a partner in life and also in business as far as the gallery is concerned.$$Sure.$$Where do you find--oh, that frees you up some time that you have someone helping you, but where do you find the space to paint? Where is your studio in the '80 [1980]?$$Well, it has always been at my house. When I first started, it was at my kitchen table. I was winning prizes from the stuff I was doing on the kitchen table even before I got a little studio at the back of my house. I have a little studio at the back of my house.$$Was that something that you added to the existing structure?$$Right.$$Okay, so you made an artist space?$$Right.$$I read somewhere--(simultaneous)--$$--but at the beginning, I was painting more exciting paintings then than I'm doing now for some reason. I don't know what it is.$I think I read that in the 1970s, you were elected to the American Watercolor Society. Okay, can you tell me about the steps that led to that election? I understand it is a very exclusive organization.$$Well, prior to doing that, I worked in American Greetings for one year. That was one place I worked for one year, and that was a good experience because I met a lot of people that were into showing their work off and talking and criticizing each other, and a lot of these were in that society, so I wanted to become a member, where I could sign my name and become one of the elite members of this society, so I had to submit paintings to New York City and I had to get selected four times--be selected four times, and then they vote on you and I was elected in 1973. And I was very fortunate because sometimes people work for you ten years and fifteen years and never get in. I was very lucky.$$Okay, so, now, how old were you at that point in 1973? Now, we're going to do the math.$$(Laughter).$$What was your birth year again, '31 [1931]?$$'31 [1931]$$Oh, so you were very young artist! Oh my goodness!$$Yeah, when I first started painting--simultaneous)--$$--'41 [1941] or '42 [1942].$$I won a lot of prizes over the years and pretty lucky and successful as far as being in the right place at the right time, putting the right piece in the shows. Right now, I'm in about thirty corporate collections, corporations across the country, and you've seen the resume with all the places I've shown over the years. And that's happened within the last twenty years.$$Tell us some of those honors and awards that you received in addition to the American Watercolor Society membership?$$They're so numerous.$$Not that I would recognize because I'm not an artist but, you know, some of the other folks listening to the tape might and then know where they can find other information on you.$$Well, I've been in three--two movies.$$Okay.$$The 'Antwone Fisher' was the last one and 'Waiting To Exhale' movie in '94 [1994]. And as far as prize winners, there are so many of them. I'm a member of Watercolor Society also and the prize that I won there. I have to be reading something to tell you. But I can't--simultaneous)--$$--but that one's also honorary and by invitation only?$$Yeah, right.$$Okay, so another high honor.

Warrick L. Carter

Warrick Carter was born in Charlottesville, Virginia, on May 6, 1942, the second of four children. Attending Tennessee State University in Nashville, Carter earned a B.S. in music education in 1964, followed by advanced study in percussion at the Blair Academy of Music at TSU from 1964 to 1965. Carter earned his master's degree in music from Michigan State University in 1966, and a Ph.D. in music education from the school in 1970.

Carter began his career in education in 1964, teaching instrumental music and working as the band director at Alton Park Junior High in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In 1966, he became an assistant professor of music at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore. In 1971, Carter was selected to be one of the inaugural leaders of Governors State University in Park Forest, Illinois, as a professor of music. Carter was promoted to the position of coordinator of the Division of Fine and Performing Arts in 1976, and in 1979, to division chairman. In 1984, Carter was hired as provost and vice president of academic affairs at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts. After twelve years at Berklee, Carter became the director of entertainment arts for Walt Disney Entertainment, where he was responsible for managing all internship programs, education and performance opportunities for college students at all of Disney's global parks. Carter was hired by Columbia College of Chicago as president in 2000.

Carter wrote extensively about music, as well as performed at such venues as the 7th Annual International Jazz Festival in Montreaux, Switzerland. In 1996, Carter was inducted into the International Jazz Educators Hall of Fame. That same year, Walt Disney established a scholarship in his name. He was listed in Who's Who in Black America and served on a number of boards of directors, including the International House of Blues Foundation and the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts. Carter and his wife, Laurel, lived in Chicago.

Carter passed away on July 15, 2017 at age 75.

Accession Number

A2003.034

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/27/2003

Last Name

Carter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

L.

Organizations
Schools

Jefferson Elementary School

Jackson P. Burley High School

Tennessee State University

Michigan State University

Blair Academy of Music

First Name

Warrick

Birth City, State, Country

Charlottesville

HM ID

CAR05

Favorite Season

All Seasons Except Winter

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Martin

Favorite Quote

I've Got It. Do You Know What I Mean?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

5/6/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Orlando

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Death Date

7/15/2017

Short Description

Academic administrator and college president Warrick L. Carter (1942 - 2017 ) was the president of Columbia College of Chicago, and was the former Director of Entertainment Arts for Walt Disney Entertainment.

Employment

Alton Park Junior High School

University of Maryland, Eastern Shore

Governors State University

Berklee College of Music

Walt Disney Entertainment

Columbia College

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Warrick Carter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter lists his favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter lists his favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter describes his maternal grandmother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter talks about African American composer Harry T. Burleigh

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Warrick Carter describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Warrick Carter describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Warrick Carter describes his experience at Jefferson Elementary School

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Warrick Carter describes the formation of Jackson P. Burley High School

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter describes his experience at Jackson P. Burley High School in Charlottesville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter describes enrolling at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter describes his graduation from Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter describes his experience with the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter describes his experience at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter describes his experience learning to play multiple instruments

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter describes his experience at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter describes becoming coordinator of music at Governors State University in University Park, Illinois in 1971, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter describes becoming coordinator of music at Governors State University in University Park, Illinois in 1971, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter describes his experience as coordinator of music at Governors State University in University Park, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter describes some of his students at Governors State University in University Park, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter describes the origin of Governors State University in University Park, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter describes being hired as Dean at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts in 1984

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter describes his experience in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Warrick Carter lists some of his students at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Warrick Carter describes his experience as Director of Entertainment Arts for Walt Disney Entertainment

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Warrick Carter describes his career as a writer and composer

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Warrick Carter describes the differences between the corporate and academic worlds

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Warrick Carter talks about moving back to Chicago, Illinois to serve as president of Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter describes leaving Walt Disney Entertainment and becoming President of Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter talks about the management lessons he learned from working at Walt Disney Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter discusses diversity in animated films that were made during his time at Walt Disney Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter discusses the separate divisions of Walt Disney Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter describes the lessons he learned from Walt Disney Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter describes the programs available at Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter describes the changes he made at Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Warrick Carter describes the difficulty of managing artists in a collaborative environment

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Warrick Carter talks about the criticism he received from students at Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter describes his experience as president of Columbia College Chicago in Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter shares his philosophy of arts education

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter talks about the importance of arts education in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter describes the approach to arts education at Columbia College Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter talks about black European classical musicians Chevalier de Saint-George and George Bridgetower

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter describes the role of Columbia College Chicago in increasing the number of minorities in film and journalism careers

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter talks about the decline in public school music education programs in integrated schools, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter talks about the decline in public school music education programs in integrated schools, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Warrick Carter talks about the role of newer art forms in arts education programs

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Warrick Carter talks about his experience as a performing musician

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Warrick Carter describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Warrick Carter describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Warrick Carter talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Warrick Carter reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Warrick Carter narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Warrick Carter narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

9$5

DATitle
Warrick Carter describes his experience as Director of Entertainment Arts for Walt Disney Entertainment
Warrick Carter talks about black European classical musicians Chevalier de Saint-George and George Bridgetower
Transcript
So, then comes--the next job is, is the most glamorous sounding of all--$$(Laughter).$$--or fantastic one of all--$$Yeah.$$--with Walt Disney [Entertainment], you know.$$Yes, you know, that was kind of interesting. That, that, that sounds like a complete left or right or whatever kind of turn out of this, you know, out of this career path, but I had been, I'd been a consultant to The Disney Company for probably about five to s- five to eight years, someplace in there, before I took the job. And I'd been, and I had--I would go down periodically and, and consult on projects in which the company was involved in, the entertainment unit of the company was involved in. And the, and they had kind of dangled positions for me--in front of me. He said, "Warrick, well, how would you like to come and join us and do this, and join us and do that?" And, and, and I was happy at Berklee [College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts]. I was very happy at Ber- Berklee. In fact, when I left, I wasn't unhappy with Berklee, but the particular job that they finally did offer was something that I thought that I could get my teeth around, and sounded like something that would be fun to do, and would be an, an, a, a nice direction for me and my career, and so I accepted it. And so I went to, I went to The Walt Disney Company to work for Walt Disney Entertainment as director of entertainment arts. And the entertainment arts pro- program was a global program in charge of training for live entertainment for The Walt Disney Company. So, so we had offices in--our, our corporate offices were in Orlando [Florida], but we had offices in Tokyo [Japan] and Paris [France], and in, and in California, needless to say, and then with, with, with, with small outposts in Melbourne, Australia; Singapore; and London [England]. And so, and so my travel schedule kind of reflected where the offices were and the things that we were doing. And we took new product, new entertainment product to each of the parks. And so we introduced some using student, student groups and cali- and college students; we introduced a new, a new student program and, in Paris and one in ka- and, and one in Japan, u- using both American kids and European kids, as well as American kids and Japanese kids. And so it gave our American kids an opportunity to get out of the country and have a wonderful experience during the summer, which was fun.$$So you'd identify American kids to, to go to another--$$Um-hm.$$--place to entertain basically or for--$$Yeah, sh--yeah, what, what, what was happening in the company, in the company when I joined it [1996] was that the, the company was in the process of, of, of, of creating four new parks around the world, and as, as they begin to make the plans, they realized that those parks were going to need a whole lot of new entertainment. And the question was, where is it gonna come from? Do we have a process by which we can put it in the pipeline to develop our own talent so that when we open these parks, we have talent available and ready and able to go in and do what has to be done? And by talent, I mean everything from people who you see on stage, to all of the support backstage, for costuming and sound and lighting and, and, and pyroglyphics [sic, pyrotechnics], and--I mean you name it--all of that's, all of that's management, stage management, and the la- and the lights and so forth. And so we needed all of that kind of talent. And so, we decided to start, start developing our own talent by identifying kids pre, pre-graduation in college and working with them for a summer or two, and then choosing the best cream of the crop from those experiences to come and work at our parks. Because, because we had the, the new park in cal- in Florida was the Animal Kingdom [Disney's Animal Kingdom], which was just about to open. And, and on the drawing board we had a, an MGM Studio park in France, a Disney California Adventure in, in [Anaheim] California, and, and Tokyo DisneySea, which was gonna be a new park in Tokyo. And so we knew that, we, we knew when, when they were gonna be opening, and so we had to position ourselves for that. And so, and so that's what we were doing, we, we were developing talent. We also developed some educational programming, also, for, for the parks. And when I left the company to, to accept this present job [president of Columbia College Chicago], we were involved in developing a TV show, a, a kids' TV show, educational TV show based, based upon music for, for, for the company as well.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$You know, I think there is something that you wrote I wrote--I mean there is a paper you wrote called "The Impact of African Music on the Development of European Concert Music."$$Oh, um-hm, um-hm.$$And what--tell me about that. That was just so intriguing, you know.$$Yeah, yeah, that was a, a paper I wrote a long time ago when I was--I really had this, this great interest in looking at the influence of the Diaspora. And, and so the, that paper looks at, at, at, at two kind of influences. Num- number one has to do with those, th- those individuals who were writing European concert music who were black; that people didn't realize they were black or knew that they were black at various, at, at various hi- times in the history of concert music. I mean one of, one of [Wolfgang Amadeus] Mozart's contemporaries was, was an African American--no, no, no, it was a European American [sic, Afro-European], was a European in France, whose name is George de Cavalier [sic, Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges], who was a very, very important composer in France at the time, and, and his--he come from Guadeloupe. And everybody talked about how much more rhythmically active his music was than the standard music of the day. And so, I mean, and so we understand why that music--why it was rhythmically active, because of this African tradition that, that he'd heard in Guadeloupe. And so, therefore, he was bringing that into, into what was cla- into, into the classic period of music. And so his contemporaries were Mozart and [Franz Joseph] Haydn, and, and so, and, and, you know what, what that music sounded like. A contemporary of [Ludwig van] Beethoven's was a, a violinist named George [Augustus Polgreen] Bridgetower, who, who, who was actually a friend of, of Beethoven's. And the two of them actually argued over a woman. And Beethoven had dedicated a violin concerto [Violin Sonata No. 9 in A Major, also known as the Kreutzer Sonata] to George, and got angry at him and scratched it out, and dedi- and dedicated it to another, another, another violinist [Rudolphe Kreutzer]. And so we, and we, we know this because we have the original, the original manuscript where Beethoven scratches off, off--scratches through George's name, and puts, and puts the number one competitor of George. And George was known to, to favor very rhythmically challenging music, and probably was drawn to Beethoven because Beethoven was known as the, as the blackamoor of the, of the German composers. Now, whether or not Beethoven was black or not is an argument that has gone on for long periods of time. But, but, but he clearly had a, a friend in George Bridgetower, who was visibly black, where- whereas Beethoven was not. And, and, and so I looked at, first, those, you know, the, those artists who were, and composers themselves who were black, and, and what they were doing and whether or not you could see some, some form of the Diaspora in their music. And then, and then I looked at those other composers who, who, who looked to, to, to, to African themes or to, or to black folk literature, or African folk literature, to see how that worked its way in, into their music, if, if, if, if at all. And, and you did find some examples of that, of that influence. So that's what that article is about, yeah.$$Okay.