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Orlando Bagwell

Documentary filmmaker Orlando Bagwell was born in Baltimore, Maryland, to Donald Bagwell, Sr. and Barbara Jones Bagwell in a family of seven. He attended Blessed Sacrament School in Baltimore. In 1969, his family moved to Nashua, New Hampshire, where he was a member of the Nashua High School football team. After graduating from high school, Bagwell pursued his B.S. degree in film at the Boston University. He completed his undergraduate studies in 1973 and furthered his education by earning his M.A. degree in broadcast journalism from Boston University in 1975.

In the early 1970s, Bagwell worked for the United South End Settlements (USES) and was active in the organization’s after school program. He later became a substitute teacher for the South Boston Public School District where he taught political science and history. Bagwell was contracted by Boston’s WGBH-TV to work as a film producer in 1975. In 1988, he served as a staff producer for the PBS weekly program Frontline. That same year, he produced a documentary on the Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr.’s presidential campaign entitled Running with Jesse. In 1989, Bagwell founded the Boston based media company, Roja Productions, Inc. and produced Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad. From 1991 until 1994, Bagwell was the executive vice president for the Eyes on the Prize PBS documentary series on the Civil Rights Movement. He produced episodes of the Blackside series entitled Mississippi: Is this America? and Ain’t Scared of Your Jails for which he received the Alfred DuPont Award and the Peabody Award. In 1995, Bagwell served as the executive producer for the not-for-profit WGBH Educational Foundation, and in 1999, he produced the six hour documentary called Africans in America: America’s Journey through Slavery.

Bagwell became the program officer for the Ford Foundation’s Media Arts and Culture unit in 2004. He works with the unit’s director and oversees international operations to accomplish the foundation’s goals.

Orlando Bagwell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 17, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.339

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/17/2007

Last Name

Bagwell

Maker Category
Schools

Nashua High School South

Blessed Sacrament School

Boston University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Orlando

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

BAG01

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Brazil

Favorite Quote

You Know.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/2/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Berkeley

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Short Description

Documentary filmmaker Orlando Bagwell (1951 - ) made Peabody Award-winning films; served as a staff producer for the PBS weekly program, Frontline; produced a documentary on the Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr.’s presidential campaign, "Running with Jesse," in 1988; and served as the executive producer for the not-for-profit WGBH Educational Foundation.

Employment

United South End Settlements

WGBH-TV

WNET-TV

WETA-TV

Blackside, Inc.

Ford Foundation

WGBH TV

Harriet Tubman House

Blackside Productions

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Orlando Bagwell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Orlando Bagwell remembers St. Clair Bourne

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Orlando Bagwell lists his favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Orlando Bagwell describes his mother's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Orlando Bagwell describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Orlando Bagwell describes his maternal great-grandmother and great-aunts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Orlando Bagwell remembers his extended family members

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Orlando Bagwell describes his community in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Orlando Bagwell talks about his parents' return to college, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Orlando Bagwell talks about his parents' return to college, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Orlando Bagwell describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Orlando Bagwell describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Orlando Bagwell remembers his daily activities in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Orlando Bagwell describes the Blessed Sacrament School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Orlando Bagwell recalls his teachers at the Blessed Sacrament School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Orlando Bagwell remembers the holidays with his family

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Orlando Bagwell describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Orlando Bagwell remembers his early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Orlando Bagwell describes the Civil Rights Movement in Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Orlando Bagwell describes the Wilson Park neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Orlando Bagwell talks about the political climate of his neighborhood

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Orlando Bagwell reflects upon attitudes in the black community during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Orlando Bagwell recalls the television and radio shows of his youth

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Orlando Bagwell describes his involvement in neighborhood sports leagues

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Orlando Bagwell recalls moving to Nashua, New Hampshire

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Orlando Bagwell remembers Nashua High School in Nashua, New Hampshire

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Orlando Bagwell describes his decision to attend Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Orlando Bagwell remembers his high school guidance counselor

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Orlando Bagwell describes his religious involvement in Nashua, New Hampshire

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Orlando Bagwell remembers Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Orlando Bagwell describes his decision to pursue a career in film

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Orlando Bagwell talks about civil rights leaders

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Orlando Bagwell remembers the film program at Boston University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Orlando Bagwell describes his role at the United South End Settlements in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Orlando Bagwell recalls teaching film at the United South End Settlements

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Orlando Bagwell describes his coursework at Boston University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Orlando Bagwell recalls working with PBS and WGBH-TV in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Orlando Bagwell describes his independent films

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Orlando Bagwell remembers pledging Omega Psi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Orlando Bagwell remembers his aspiration to become a filmmaker

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Orlando Bagwell reflects upon his career

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Orlando Bagwell reflects upon his work at the Ford Foundation

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

10$3

DATitle
Orlando Bagwell describes his decision to pursue a career in film
Orlando Bagwell describes his role at the United South End Settlements in Boston, Massachusetts
Transcript
I took my second semester, sophomore year, and I took off. And I think it was also that I was feeling that school wasn't--I couldn't make it connect with what I, I couldn't make it make sense or have a relevancy to me. And that was a tough year because I was, you know, kind of floating. I had an idea I was gonna work, you know, travel, and my sister and I were living together, and I was working and I lost my job. And, you know, it's just wasn't--trying to live in an apartment too and living in Boston [Massachusetts]. And my parents [Barbara Jones Bagwell and Donald Bagwell, Sr.], when I left school, they decided they weren't gonna pay anymore for me. So if I wanted to get back to school, I had to do it on my own. And, and it was the summer of the semester, and then the summer. And that summer, I had hooked up with this place [United South End Settlements, Boston, Massachusetts] and had, through a girlfriend, and said that I was gonna work at this camp for the summer. And it was with this Harriet Tubman House [Boston, Massachusetts] that was a community center in the South End of Boston. And that was a breakthrough for me because suddenly I was, I was with young people and what I believed in and everything. So I could make work and make sense, you know, on a work level. And so I started working there, and I decided I was gonna get myself back in school, and I had been--I had bought a still camera and had been taking pictures and doing some slide shows and things like that. And one of my, and my roommate in freshman year was in the school of communications [Boston University College of Communication, Boston, Massachusetts] and was in film school. And, not in the film school, the school of communications, and he said to me--and I had always worked with films in high school, teaching, using them for teaching things, for teaching with my CYO work, Catholic Youth Organization work, and had brought, done a presentation in my sociology class with films about conditions in schools in urban areas. And my friend said, you really under--you really seem to know something about movies, and when you talk about them, and I really didn't know that and feel that way because I didn't really go to movies and stuff, you know. But he got my attention, and I decided I'd try and get back in school in the film school, which was a very small program in the communications school. I think they had like ten students, and I got in.$How soon do you start working with children after school in film?$$Well, that happened immediately actually 'cause it was a funny thing. I came out of that summer as a counselor, and the center asked me to come back and work with their after-school program. And I started working there, and no sooner had I gotten there, that the woman who was running it quit. And they offered me a full-time job running the program, which meant that I would work most of my hours in the evening. But I would, the days when I didn't have classes at school [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts], I would spend my after- my days there, you know, working through the planning and the preparation and the, you know, just all the things to kind of set up the program. And it was really working in a center that really didn't have a lot of programs coming out of it. But what had happened is, once they gave me the job to run the after-school program, it didn't have a lot of kids coming to it either. But when they asked me to do it, I noticed that there is a lot of new housing projects that were built by the church in the neighborhood--there was a church on the corner, and they built a lot of low-income housing on Columbus Avenue. And I started recruiting from those homes. And then I, I petitioned for a little bit of money from the settlement house organization [United South End Settlements, Boston, Massachusetts] that ran this particular house [Harriet Tubman House, Boston, Massachusetts], and we renovated the house. And, you know, sanded and cleaned all the floors repainted the whole place and fixed it up so that somebody would want to come and be there and upgraded our offices and we started recruiting kids in and started bringing in a whole group of new kids. And suddenly the place was full of kids and teenagers. And we started a teen program too, and we then built a stage down on the corner and, you know, and started working and built, transformed a lot of the lots that were empty there into playgrounds and stuff like that, and started turning it into a new place. And then I started, I worked through the schools to get, to work with all the different schools in the area to kind of work with them to get our statuses up as an employer of work-study students, so I could recruit students in work-study programs. And I started building a cadre of teachers who were doing after school classrooms, teaching in math and reading and then other kinds of arts and other kinds of things. And then I taught a, I built a dark room on the top floor and taught photography and started doing a video class there.

William Greaves

Filmmaker William Greaves was born in New York City to parents from Jamaica and Barbados. Growing up in Harlem, Greaves attended Stuyvesant High School, and after graduating in 1944, attended the City College of New York. Greaves spent 1948 studying under German-born avant-garde filmmaker Hans Richter. After appearing in the musical Finian's Rainbow, Greaves was invited to join the prestigious Actors Studio in New York, where he trained with Marlon Brando and Shelley Winters.

Greaves began his career as an actor, and appeared in the Broadway hit, Lost in the Stars, as well as films such as 1948's Souls of Sin. Relocating to Canada in 1952, Greaves worked for the National Film Board as a writer and director. While in Canada, Greaves studied under John Grierson, regarded as the father of modern documentary film making. After returning to the United States in 1961, Greaves joined the International Civil Aviation Organization as a public information officer producing films for the organization, and in 1963 he went to work for the United Nations Film and Television Department in the African Academy of Arts and Research. Greaves formed William Greaves Productions in 1964, and soon thereafter began producing his own works. Greaves' first feature film, Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One, was released in 1968, the same year he began producing television's Black Journal, a monthly television newsmagazine airing on public television. Black Journal aired until 1970, and received an Emmy in 1969.

After leaving Black Journal, Greaves returned to independent film making with his 1971 Ali, the Fighter. Since then, Greaves has been prolific in his art, producing films such as Ida B. Wells: A Passion for Justice, From These Roots, and his most recent work, Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey. In all, he has produced more than 200 documentary films and has received more than seventy international film festival awards. He has been inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, received special tribute at the first Black American Independent Film Festival in Paris, and has received an "Indy," the Life Achievement Award of the Association of Independent Video and Filmmakers. Greaves has been a member of the Actors Studio for fifty-five years, and is the chairman of the Film Committee of the Princess Grace Foundation. Greaves and his wife, Louise, resided in New York.

Accession Number

A2003.082

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/17/2003

Last Name

Greaves

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Stuyvesant High School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

GRE06

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring, Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Dakaras, Senegal, Malibu, California, Goa, India

Favorite Quote

A race without knowledge of it's history and like a tree without roots.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/8/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese, West Indian, Caribbean Food

Death Date

8/25/2014

Short Description

Documentary filmmaker, stage actor, and film director William Greaves (1925 - 2014 ) began his career as an actor, but turned to film making. In 1963, he went to work for the United Nations Film and Television Department in the African Academy of Arts and Research, and later formed William Greeves Productions. Greaves has produced more than 200 documentary films, and has received more than seventy international film festival awards.

Employment

National Film Board of Canada

International Civil Aviation Organization

United Nations Film and Television Department

William Greaves Productions

Favorite Color

Olive Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Greaves's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Greaves discusses his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Greaves discusses his ancestors' origins

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Greaves tells of his father's emigration from Barbados and his personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Greaves discusses his mother's personality and how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Greaves talks about his siblings and his parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Greaves talks about growing up in Harlem and his interest in African studies

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Greaves discusses Africanist and scholar William Leo Hansberry

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Greaves discusses his intellectual peers in Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Greaves talks about his parents' role in his early education and the fault with America's media and educational systems

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Greaves discusses his academic education and his early interest in art

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Greaves discusses his early career in the performing arts and on screen

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Greaves talks more about his early acting career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Greaves details the racist attitudes that caused him to abandon acting and leave the United States

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Greaves discusses his work with the National Film Board of Canada

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Greaves discusses his return to the United States from Canada and his filmmaking career

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Greaves discusses his time in Dakar, Senegal with Langston Hughes

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Greaves discusses his film productions with various U.S. government agencies

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Greaves talks about his film 'Still A Brother: Inside the Negro Middle Class'

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Greaves details his experiences while working on the 'Black Journal' television series

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Greaves discusses his decision to transfer control of the 'Black Journal' television series to Tony Brown

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Greaves talks more about 'Black Journal' and compares it to others with a similar format

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - William Greaves details his documentary, 'Nationtime, Gary,' and the response it received from mainstream media outlets

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Greaves discusses his film, 'Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Greaves discusses his film 'Ali, the Fighter' and its impact on Hollywood films about boxing

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Greaves discusses his film, 'Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Greaves talks more about his film on Ralph Bunche

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Greaves discusses his film 'Voice of La Raza' and his experience with actor Anthony Quinn

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Greaves discusses the perspective needed for a successful black filmmaker

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Greaves gives advice to future filmmakers, and talks about those who inspired him

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Greaves discusses intellectual role models and the 'William Greaves Aesthetic' found in his films

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Greaves relates his impressions and relationships with notable people in the arts

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Greaves details more of his impressions of the notable people in the arts

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Greaves talks about his hopes for today's black community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Greaves discusses his parents' reactions to his career choices

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Greaves discusses what his legacy may be

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Greaves discusses how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Photo - William Greaves, age fourteen. Class photo from Fredrick Douglass Junior High School, New York, New York, 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Photo - William Greaves, age eleven, with Albert Popwell and others after a school play at PS89 Elementary School, New York, New York, late 1930s

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves from one of his acting roles, New York, New York, late 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves from one of his acting roles, late 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves from one of his acting roles, late 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Photo - Sir Alistair Cooke's photograph of William Greaves dressed as an Arab, Egypt, 1950s

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Photo - William Greaves's mother, Phyllis Emily Muir Greaves, New York, New York, early 1930s

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Photo - William Greaves with his wife, Louise Archambault Greaves, 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Photo - William Greaves with his great-granddaughter, Lauren, 1990s

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Photo - William Greaves's friend, Emily, ca. 1950s

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Photo - William Greaves with Senegalese filmmaker, Ousmane Sembène and unidentified woman, 1990s

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Photo - William Greaves working on 'Getting to Know Me' television series, during the 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - Photo - William Greaves with filmmakers Satyajit Ray and Elia Kazan, New York, New York, 1978

Tape: 6 Story: 15 - Photo - William Greaves with Louise Archambault Greaves, the President of India, Giani Zail Singh, and others in India, 1985

Tape: 6 Story: 16 - Photo - William Greaves with 'Black Journal' production staff, Madeline Anderson and Kent Garrett, New York, New York, 1968-1969

Tape: 6 Story: 17 - Photo - William Greaves with author Toni Morrison, New York, New York, 1988

Tape: 6 Story: 18 - Photo - William Greaves with the 'Black Journal' film crew, New York, New York, 1968

Tape: 6 Story: 19 - Photo - William Greaves with Louise Archambault Greaves and Bobby Shepherd, 1990

Tape: 6 Story: 20 - Photo - William Greaves with Louise Archambault Greaves and Dr. Robert Edgar, 1997

Tape: 6 Story: 21 - Photo - William Greaves with Mel Ferrer and Susan Douglas, reuniting with the cast from the movie 'Lost Boundaries,' 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 22 - Photo - William Greaves with actor Anthony Quinn and William H. Brown at the movie screening of 'Voice of La Raza,' 1972

Tape: 6 Story: 23 - Photo - William Greaves producing the film on either Booker T. Washington or Frederick Douglass, 1985-1986

Tape: 6 Story: 24 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves, 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 25 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves, 1995

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Photo - William Greaves on the set of his movie, 'Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One,' New York, New York, 1968

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Photo - William Greaves in his office at William Greaves Productions, Inc., New York, New York, 1999

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Photo - Publicity photograph of William Greaves, 1995

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$5

DATitle
William Greaves discusses his film, 'Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One'
William Greaves discusses his film 'Voice of La Raza' and his experience with actor Anthony Quinn
Transcript
So the film ['Nationtime Gary'] on the Gary [Indiana] Convention [of the first National Black Political Assembly, 1972] didn't get (unclear) we were just talking about that so next I guess. Oh, you made a film in '68 [1968] called 'Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One.' (laughs)$$(Simultaneously) 'Take One'.$$'Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One' is a very weird film, experimental avant-garde. As a matter of fact Steven Soderbergh [film producer] is crazy about the film and he said that, "This is the film that Jean-Luc Godard tried to make, you know, in the '70s [1970s] and so on, the '60s [1960s]." It's a, it's a film that is in many ways a revolutionary film. Revolutionary in it's artistic embrace of styles of, of filmmaking that were, at the time that that was coming, made, very new, that was cinéma vérité [filmmaking style that stresses unbiased realism] very, very new type of filming that had been used in documentaries by and large only and what I dared to do was to bring cinéma vérité style--the cinéma vérité style of filmmaking into the feature film arena. And so that was one aspect of it, but it had a number of other aspects which is very enigmatic for most people. I mean most people are not aware of the improvisational, role, the role that improvisation plays in the actor's performance. Most people are not aware of scientific principals like the [Werner] Heisenberg Theory of Uncertainty [quantum mechanics theory discovered in 1927] where you talk about the fact that we, as human beings, will never know what reality is because the means of perception of the ultimate reality, which is the atom, cannot be seen because of the fact--that that is the electrons of the atom cannot be seen because the means of perception is an electron microscope which sets out a beam of electrons at the atom and it knocks the electrons out of their respective orbits, so it doesn't get a chance to really see the atom, you see. And this, this comes from out of my science background of Stuyvesant High School [New York, New York] and that sort of thing. So there is, there's that plus there's the Second Law of Thermodynamics [theory explained by physicist Rudolf J. E. Clausius in 1850], then there's Hindu mysticism and Sri Aurobindo. There are all kinds of elements that are involved in this production. It's very controversial subject matter that's designed to provoke debate and discussion and most people are not aware of all these elements coming into play, but when you see the film, you can't take your eyes off the screen because it has that quality of drawing you in and you just don't know where you are, but you're watching it, you know. You just can't stop watching it and by the end of the film you realize it was a very interesting film that in the face of all the dissent, if you will, by the crew and rebellion by the crew against the, the content and against the style of shooting, it still is an interesting movie. And it's been at fifteen or seventeen film festivals by now, and we're going to make the sequel to it at some point this year, I guess.$Now, you made a film on La Raza ['Voice of La Raza,' 1972].$$Oh, yeah, Anthony Quinn, yeah. Yeah, well that was an interesting project, actually, because the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission commissioned us to do a film on the Latino experience with respect to employment in the United States, and the--I had put the film together, and then I said, "Oh, it would be a good idea if I could get Anthony Quinn, 'cause he's Latino and he has a crossover capability. It would be interesting to get him to narrate the film." So I contacted him and he said, "Well, I don't know," he says, "What is this, a documentary?" I said, "Yes. It's a documentary." He said, "Well, you know, I'm in features and so on." Anyway, I kept bugging him, I kept, you know, pursuing him and finally he said, "Well, listen--," he said, "you come out here," he said, "let me see some of the films that you've done." So I had done a film called 'Power Versus the People' [1970] with, and in that film it deal with the transgressions, the abuses of the corporate establishment against the Latinos as well as African Americans. So I flew out to California and I showed it to Quinn, and he was very moved with it, you know, and then I showed him, also, the material that I wanted him to narrate, and he said, "This is fantastic stuff," he says, but I said, "Well, will you narrate it?" And he said, "I not only will narrate it. I want to be in it." You know, so I said, "Well, fine," so I got this crew together on a moment's notice and we filmed him in Albuquerque, New Mexico and, as well as Los Angeles [California] and made the film. And it won, I think, four or five film festival awards, I can't remember now. But it was very successful and still is. I mean it still gets called for. My company [William Greaves Productions, Inc.] gets orders for distribution of the film to various, you know, Latino groups as well as non, non-Latino groups.