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Elizabeth B. Rawlins

Elizabeth B. Rawlins, dean and professor emeritus at Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts, was recognized for her effective and tireless dedication to numerous educational and community organizations in Boston, across private and public higher education in Massachusetts, over a fifty-year period. Born on November 25, 1927, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Rawlins attended the local public schools and graduated from Cambridge High and Latin School in 1944.

After high school, Rawlins attended Salem State Teachers College, where she earned her B.S. degree in education in 1950; from there she became an elementary school teacher in urban and suburban public schools, and in private schools in Massachusetts. From 1953 to 1954, Rawlins taught at Narimasu Elementary School in Tokyo, Japan. After earning her master’s degree in urban education from Simmons College in 1967, Rawlins left elementary school teaching and began working as a lecturer at Simmons, where she was an associate professor by 1976. From 1979 to 1992, Rawlins served as the associate dean of the Human Services Program; she became a professor of education in 1991, the same year that she received her Ed.D. degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

For ten years, Rawlins served as chairperson of the Salem State College board of trustees; she also served as a board member of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, and a member of the Simmons College Corporation. Rawlins also served as president of the Massachusetts Association of Mental Health; between 1982 and 1988, she served on the Education Commission of the States.

During her long career at Simmons, Rawlins often addressed racially sensitive issues; the establishment of the Elizabeth B. Rawlins Scholarship Fund at Simmons, and the Salem State College Rawlins Oratorical Contest are testaments to her leadership and contributions to higher education in Massachusetts, and the respect she earned in the process.

After her retirement in 1992, Rawlins served on the advisory council to the Martha’s Vineyard Regional High School on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, and as the vice president of the Martha’s Vineyard branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

Accession Number

A2005.146

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/22/2005

Last Name

Rawlins

Maker Category
Middle Name

B.

Schools

Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Martin Luther King Jr. School

Salem State University

University of Massachusetts Amherst

First Name

Elizabeth

Birth City, State, Country

Cambridge

HM ID

RAW02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/25/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Martha's Vineyard

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Academic administrator, education professor, and elementary school teacher Elizabeth B. Rawlins (1927 - ) served as the associate dean of the Human Services Program and a professor of education at Simmons College.

Employment

Raytheon

Buckingham School

Simmons College

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Elizabeth B. Rawlins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her maternal grandmother's family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls being raised by her grandmother in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her community in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins details her maternal ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her relationship with her younger brother

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her time at Cambridge's Houghton School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls being dissuaded from a teaching career

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her educational experience in Cambridge

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her time at Cambridge High and Latin School, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her time at Cambridge High and Latin School, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls working for Raytheon in Watertown, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her first year at Salem Teachers College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her financial challenges as a college student

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her early teaching career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls teaching at Cambridge's Buckingham School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes applying to teach in Japan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her relationship with her husband, Keith W. Rawlins, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her teaching experience in Tokyo, Japan

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes the teaching careers of Boston-area African Americans

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her children

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins talks about her children and grandchildren

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls becoming a lecturer at Boston's Simmons College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls her teaching experience at Simmons College, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls her teaching experience at Simmons College, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls becoming associate dean at Simmons College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her role as associate dean at Simmons College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls Salem State College establishing a graduate social work program

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes serving on the Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes serving on the Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes chairing Salem State College's board of trustees

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes Simmons College's involvement in school desegregation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins remembers students from her tenure at Simmons College

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes leading black alumni symposia at Simmons College, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes leading black alumni symposia at Simmons College, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins reflects upon sharing her story

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins describes organizations she belongs to on Martha's Vineyard

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Elizabeth B. Rawlins narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls being dissuaded from a teaching career
Elizabeth B. Rawlins recalls her teaching experience at Simmons College, pt. 1
Transcript
When I got ready to go to high school [Cambridge High and Latin School; Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, Cambridge, Massachusetts] and choose my program, I chose college because I knew I wanted to be a teacher. I--I didn't think about what it cost or how I was gonna pay for it. I didn't think about that, I just knew that's what I wanted to do. My [maternal] grandmother [Grace Hawkins Williams], by this time, was about eighty-two or three years old, you know. And she'd had a couple of heart attacks, but she was really a very strong woman. She didn't pay a lot of attention to what the doctor said, so she was up on her feet sooner than she should have been. And so when I got ready to go, the eighth grade teacher [at Houghton School; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. School, Cambridge, Massachusetts] I had, who was also the principal's assistant, looked at what I'd chosen and told me that I really needed to choose another course because they were not really hiring black teachers, she said colored teachers then and I would want to get a job. I will never ever forget it. And when I talked with my grandmother about it, she said you know, "I just can't fight, I can't go up tho- I can't climb those stairs. Maybe if you take," what did she tell me, "take something with typing," this is the secretary, "so you'll be able to get this job if you're not able to teach." And I was distressed, but I did it. That's the way kids did then, you know. My minister who had heard me talk about wanting to teach since I've been that high during the first term said to me, "How you doing," you know, and that sort of thing. And I said, "Well, I'm not in the program I want," and told him the story. And he wrote a letter to the dean of--of students and the next day I was in what they called the normal course because this--we were on the fringes then in the '40s [1940s] of normal school and college. So that the on--thing that I missed taking was Latin. Everything else was like a college course. And that was my first racial experience. The first time I ran into somebody saying I couldn't do something on the basis of race that I recognized anyway. It turned out okay because I did it.$How was that transition for you leaving the teaching in elementary school and becoming a instructor--teacher at a place like Simmons College [Boston, Massachusetts]? How was that--how did that transition feel?$$It was scary, really. I remember it as--Erma Brooks asked me, you know, she--she said what we're asking here is what you've been doing for, at that point, thirteen or fourteen years. I had taught several of the grades. I had run some workshops. I, you know, I had done like with Circle Associates [Circle Inc., Boston, Massachusetts] and all of that. Said that's what we need, that's what the students are asking for that kind of experience. So, you know, te--teach the course in Nature of Classroom Teaching. And frankly I thought well it would be convenient because of my daughter [Pattie Rawlins] and her age and so forth. So I approached one of the faculty in the ed [education] department and said to her, "Lydia [ph.], I don't see anywhere that teachers, professors have been taught to teach and so how about some hints for me." She said, "You're right, we haven't been taught to teach, but--so you have all the skills and knowledge and pedagogy and so forth, and we just have the information and we should make a good team." So I taught thinking the way I did teaching elementary and junior high kids, that you gotta have a plan. You have to know what you're gonna teach. You gotta do something to engage them. And that was always the way. And--and that you have to think about the whole person. So I approached it in that way. And as long as I was doing the urban teacher prep program, I was really fine. But then, when these black students who began to come and saw that they were not in the material anywhere, wanted somebody to teach thinking about that and approached me. (Laughter) I thought I was--might be getting a little above my head, but what I did was to ask them to help me plan what it was they were talking about. That's because that's not been my experience. What you wa- I know what it is you want, but it hasn't been my experience so I need you to be engaged in this, and they were, they were wonderful.

Olive Lee Benson

Olive Lee Benson of Boston, Massachusetts, was recognized as a premier hair stylist and an expert in relaxing and straightening hair. Benson was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on September 11, 1932, the ninth of ten children. She attended Cambridge public schools, graduating from Cambridge High and Latin School in 1949. After high school, Benson studied at the Wilfred Academy in Boston, where she received her diploma and certification to practice hairdressing and styling. In later years she continued her professional training and education at Pivot Point (Chicago), Vidal Sasson and Jingles (London, England), Clairol (New York) and Wella (Massachusetts).

In 1959, Benson opened a small storefront beauty shop in north Cambridge, in the neighborhood where she grew up. Her clients, mostly African Americans, were women with extremely curly hair. She offered the most advanced styling and hair treatment techniques. Benson moved her Cambridge salon business to Boston in the 1960s. With the success of her first Boston salon, she moved to two larger locations in Boston's upscale downtown retail districts, before opening up her largest enterprise in 1997 in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, a nearby suburb. Women from a variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds came to Olive's Beauty Salon to have their curly hair straightened and styled with the most up-to-date fashion.

Following the successful completion of her Hair America examination in 1976, Benson became the designer and coordinator for several industry publications that set seasonal trends for both ethnic and non-ethnic styling. She also became an editorial columnist for Shoptalk Magazine, a national publication for salon professionals. After researching at Soft Sheen, Johnson Products, and other hair care companies, one of Benson's lifelong dreams was realized in 1996, with the creation and marketing of her own line of hair products. The line known as Universal Textures, included a relaxer for all types of hair texture—which she called a “universal relaxer,” a protein hair conditioner, a shampoo and a leave-in conditioner. Her products were marketed under Universal Textures at her Chestnut Hill salon.

A holder of numerous awards, she received a citation and honor as the first black inducted into the Hall of Renown of the National Cosmetology Association in 1991 and awards from the International Beauty Show from 1991 to 1994. In 1996, she was the first African American to receive a North American Hairstyle Award.

Benson passed away on June 27, 2005 at age 72.

Accession Number

A2005.025

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

1/26/2005

Last Name

Benson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Lee

Organizations
Schools

Abraham Lincoln School

Lesley Ellis School

Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Wilford Academy of Cosmetology

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Olive

Birth City, State, Country

Cambridge

HM ID

BEN05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spas

Favorite Quote

I'm Not Always Right, But I'm Very Seldom Wrong.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

9/11/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

6/26/2005

Short Description

Personal care entrepreneur and salon owner Olive Lee Benson (1932 - 2005 ) opened many Olive's Beauty Salons in the Boston area including her largest enterprise in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, a Boston suburb. Benson also developed her own line of hair care products, Universal Textures, after researching at Soft Sheen, Johnson Products and other hair care companies.

Employment

Filene's Basement

Straight Hair Company

Revlon

L'Oreal

Soft Sheen Products

Universal Textures

Olive's Beauty Salon

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Olive Benson interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Olive Benson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Olive Benson recalls her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Olive Benson describes her father's authoritarian discipline

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Olive Benson talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Olive Benson describes her childhood community in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Olive Benson remembers her father playing both parental roles after her mother died

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Olive Benson shares childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Olive Benson recalls her elementary school and her career options after high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Olive Benson remembers her middle and high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Olive Benson recounts her jobs as a teenager including doing her sisters' and friends' hair

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Olive Benson reflects on beauty school and her early career

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Olive Benson talks about her daughters' careers and families

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Olive Benson details opening her own salon

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Olive Benson recalls facing discrimation in renting property for her business

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Olive Benson describes her salon's rapid expansion in the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Olive Benson recounts how she became the first black hairdresser to win the Massachusetts hair styling competition

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Olive Benson discusses her success with all different hair textures

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Olive Benson remembers developing her own beauty products

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Olive Benson relates how she kept her business running

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Olive Benson details her work for L'Oreal and Soft Sheen on product development and education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Olive Benson recalls facing unethical practices as a product developer for Pantress

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Olive Benson recounts developing her own line of products

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Olive Benson discusses her salons

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Olive Benson reflects on the people who inspired her

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Olive Benson describes the world of style competitions and her own greatest awards

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Olive Benson offers her advice to young people interested in hair styling

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Olive Benson remembers styling hair for the 2004 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Olive Benson discusses legal problems in her business

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Olive Benson shares her advice for young business people

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Olive Benson reflects on her life and career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Olive Benson shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Olive Benson ponders her legacy

Hilbert D. Stanley

Hilbert Dennis Stanley, an educator, was born on February 24, 1931, in Cambridge, Maryland. He attended the all black Robert Moton School. Although he was not sure if he could afford college, with a gift from his mother and grandfather, he was able to go on to Morgan State University. He excelled in school, earning a B.S. degree in biology in 1952 and an M.S. degree in science in 1972. Stanley went on to Wayne State University in Detroit, and in 1978 earned an Ed.D. in administration and supervision.

Stanley taught science, but soon became a high school principal at Edmondson High School. He also served as principal at Lake Clifton Senior High School and Southwestern High School. As an urban area administrator, Stanley's assignments included system reorganization and decentralization, desegregation, drug abuse leadership training, and career development programs. He also served from 1981 to 1984 as the director of human services and education liaison officer to the Mayor of Baltimore, William Donald Schaefer. In 1993, Stanley retired from the Baltimore City Public Schools and became an instructor part time at Morgan State University. He has remained loyal to his alma mater, serving as the president of the National Alumni Association and also as its treasurer. He has guided the improvements in procedures and practices in the Alumni Office management, created new positions, and has been helpful in renovating and making available a building to house alumni operations. Under his leadership, he expanded the newspaper, developed an investment portfolio, and took fiscal responsibility of the budgetary issues. Stanley now serves as chair of the Board of Trustees of the MSU Foundation.

Stanley has served as director of development for the NAACP Baltimore Branch ACT-SO Program. He serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Baltimore City Historical Society. As an extension of his interest in educational activity and civil rights, Stanley became involved in the concerns of African American Catholics. From 1991 to 2002, Stanley was executive director of the National Black Catholic Congress (NBCC). With some three million Catholics of African descent in the U.S., the NBCC provides leadership and programs aimed at raising the consciousness of the Church to the history and cultural values of African Americans. Pope John Paul II appointed Stanley as a Knight of St. Gregory the Great. Stanley played a key role in the construction of "Our Mother of Africa Chapel" at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. The canonization by Pope John Paul II of St. Josephine BAKHITA, the first African woman, took place at the Vatican in 2000, and was attended by a pilgrimage organized by Stanley. A relic of St. BAKHITA was placed in the altar at the "Our Mother of Africa Chapel."

Stanley was an R.O.T.C. graduate and served as an officer in the U.S. Army. He now resides in Baltimore.

He is a widower and has a son, a daughter, and several grandchildren.

Hilbert D. Stanley was interviewed by The Historymakers on March 6, 2004.

Mr. Stanley passed away on February 12, 2010.

Accession Number

A2004.018

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/6/2004

Last Name

Stanley

Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

Dennis

Organizations
Schools

Robert Moton High School

Robert Moton Elementary School

Morgan State University

Wayne State University

First Name

Hilbert

Birth City, State, Country

Cambridge

HM ID

STA03

Favorite Season

None

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

God is Omnipotent.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/24/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

2/12/2010

Short Description

Education administrator, church leader, and high school principal Hilbert D. Stanley (1931 - 2010 ) worked in urban schools and helped in reorganization and decentralization, desegregation, drug abuse leadership training, and career development programs. He served as the president of the National Alumni Association of Morgan State University and as chair of the Morgan State University Foundation's Board of Trustees. He was also the executive director of the National Black Catholic Congress. For his work, Pope John Paul II appointed Stanley as a Knight of St. Gregory the Great.

Employment

Edmondson-Westside High School

Lake Clifton Senior High School

Southwestern High School

City of Baltimore

Morgan State University

National Black Catholic Congress

Favorite Color

Gold, Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hilbert D. Stanley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hilbert D. Stanley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his immediate family members

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his relationships with his parents and paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his paternal grandmother's religious background and his grandparents' house in Easton, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes Maryland's Eastern Shore at the mid-20th century

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about the history of Robert Russa Moton High School in Easton, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes his childhood neighborhood in Easton, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his grandmother's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes Easton, Maryland at the mid-20th century

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hilbert D. Stanley explains why he majored in biology at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about fellow students and teachers from Easton, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his extracurricular activities in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his college preparedness

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his extracurricular activities at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hilbert D. Stanley considers the history between Morgan State University and the City of Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about student activism at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hilbert D. Stanley outlines his career in Baltimore City Public Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hilbert D. Stanley shares advice he gave students as a teacher in the Baltimore City Public Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes the NAACP ACT-SO Program

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes his emphasis on career preparation as an administrator in Baltimore City Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hilbert D. Stanley explains how he became executive director of the National Black Catholic Congress (NBCC)

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about the Mother of Africa Chapel at the National Shrine in Washington, D.C. and his papal appointment

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about the history of the National Black Catholic Congress (NBCC)

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hilbert D. Stanley explains the mission of National Black Catholic Congress

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes Our Mother of Africa Chapel at the National Shrine in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about Saint Josephine Bakhita

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about working on his Ed.D. degree at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his pilgrimage to Vatican City for the canonization of Josephine Bakhita in 2000, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his pilgrimage to Vatican City for the canonization of Josephine Bakhita in 2000, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hilbert D. Stanley talks about projects which he has been involved with since his retirement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hilbert D. Stanley reflects upon his role as an educator

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hilbert D. Stanley considers his greatest achievements

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hilbert D. Stanley expresses gratitude for his good health

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hilbert D. Stanley describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Hilbert D. Stanley shares his advice for future generations

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Hilbert D. Stanley explains the importance of history

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Hilbert D. Stanley reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Hilbert D. Stanley narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hilbert D. Stanley narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hilbert D. Stanley narrates his photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
Hilbert D. Stanley explains how he became executive director of the National Black Catholic Congress (NBCC)
Hilbert D. Stanley talks about his pilgrimage to Vatican City for the canonization of Josephine Bakhita in 2000, pt. 1
Transcript
Can you tell us a little bit about your medals and your--particularly the one that you're wearing, and how does that fit into the whole scheme of things?$$Well I guess I need to say to you that when I retired from the school system [Baltimore City Public Schools], my mother [Emma Magee Stanley Lewis] had had a stroke and I had enough time to retire and I said I would retire and I'd spend time with her. And I was beginning to work with my church and the National Black Catholic Congress [NBCC], which had been organized over a hundred years ago, they had five national meetings in the 1800s, and then they stopped. And in 1987 they revived the congress movement and had a congress meeting in Washington [D.C.] and attracted people from the--in the Catholic church who were African American to that meeting, and had a re-awakening of that program. Well when they planned that one, the bishop here [Baltimore, Maryland], Bishop John Ricard who's now the bishop of Pensacola-Tallahassee [Florida], asked me if I would work with them in planning, so I did. And as it happened, I didn't go to the congress because I ended up in the hospital the day before it started. And I couldn't go. But it was such a success, I wanted to continue doing that. So when I retired in 1991, my last day at work was on Friday. On Sunday, I got a call from the bishop asking me if I would be willing to work a couple hours a week with the congress. And I said yeah, I think I can do that. So I was looking forward to working a couple hours a week. In a couple of weeks, he wanted to know if I would be executive director because the executive director was from out of the city and she was gonna go home. So I said here I go. So I did. But I worked with that because the point is growing up in the Holiness church, which was all black, and you know you have all the other predominantly African American congregations and, and religious groups. A lot of the people I was working with were asking me, "Why do you belong to that white church?" And I said you know what you need to look into this because we've had black Catholics in this country when the first people stepped on the soil. Anyway I worked with the congress and as a part of my work, I, I had a project that was assigned to help build our Mother of Africa Chapel at the [Basilica of the] National Shrine [of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C.] in Washington, which is the mother church for Catholics. And in that shrine, there are ethnic chapels all around the walls of that church, but none dealing with blacks. So when I started working on that, the leadership in the Catholic church here in Baltimore [Maryland] recognized that I had some skills to bring to that job. So I was recommended to the Pope, Pope John Paul II, to be awarded an award, Knights of St. Gregory the Great, and that's what this medal is. It's a--I was named a knight and this is one of the Pope's organizations. And now whenever I go to Rome [Italy] and I have this on, then this introduces me to the guards and that kind of thing. But also it lets people know that some African Americans are recognized by the Pope, and he said that many times that you know we need to serve all of our people. And when we had the [Second] Vatican Council over when Pope John XXIII, they had the, the conference and they began to say we could have Mass in English and this kind of thing, it made a difference--$And one of the highlights that you've talked about during this interview was your pilgrimage to the canonization of the black saint. So could you tell us a little bit about that? I mean not too many people have done--had an experience like that so we'd like to hear (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay. Well the main thing I want to say over and over again and loud, Saint Josephine Bakhita, B-A-K-H-I-T-A. She is the person who was kidnapped when she was seven years old into slavery and I said that before. But the point is when we put her relic in the altar at our Mother of Africa Chapel [Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C.], and I found out she was gonna be canonized, I said we need to have people there to witness this canonization so they make it more real that it's important that she's in the altar. And what I did, I contacted the order that she belonged to, which was the Daughters of Charity of Canossa. They were in Rome [Italy]. And when I went to Rome to check on the--some of the artwork that was being done for our Mother of Africa Chapel, I met with the Daughters of Charity of Canossa and found out that they had sisters in Albuquerque, New Mexico. So I contacted them and told them that we wanted to do a pilgrimage to Rome for the canonization and of course you know they were all excited about it because she was one of their sisters. So I had a person there in Albuquerque who worked with sisters they had here in the United States and in Mexico. And I worked with the offices of the dioceses that we worked with, and that was 130 and had them register. I got a travel agent here in Baltimore [Maryland] to work with us and they had people in Rome who knew the sights and they were gonna be our guides and all. So we sent out the notices and we had over ninety people who signed up. We got some people like the ones from the West Coast, met us at the airport in New York [New York]. And the ones from Baltimore, we went by bus to New York and we met there. And what was so interesting, Cardinal [William Henry] Keeler, who is the archbishop here in Baltimore, was on his way to Rome for the canonization and he saw us there. So you know that was a great, great moment for him. So we went there, we got there and they had the identification tags for us to wear. They had scarves with her picture on it to wear. And I tell you, there were a lot of people there for the canonization.

Frank Lucas

Graphic designer Frank Lucas was born on August 29, 1930, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He went on to become the first African American illustrator and photographer in Boston's advertising industry.

Raised in Cambridge, Lucas was attracted to art at an early age. With his talent, he was hired as an Army illustrator and photographer during the Korean War. After the war, he returned to Boston and graduated from the Vesper George School of Art in 1955. Lucas was then hired as a graphic designer at Parsons Friedmann and Central. He would later move to Barker Black Studios, where he worked primarily with publishers.

In 1966, Lucas was hired at Ginn and Company, a publishing house where he supervised art editors in the purchase of illustrations and photography for school textbooks. During his thirty-one years there, Lucas also managed packaging and oversaw art direction for the firm's advertising and promotional materials. Later, as director of art and design for children's trade books, Lucas pioneered new techniques in design, production and printing. He retired from the company in 1997. Since then, he has served as a consultant and art director to Course Crafters, a firm that produces materials for Sesame Street, Berlitz and several other educational publishers.

In addition to his work experience, Lucas has directed the career of many art students teaching art at several Boston art schools. He also taught graphic design and lectured at the famous Rhode Island School of Design. Lucas and his daughter, Diahanne, published a monthly New England newspaper, Reunion, for four years. Lucas has drawn wide praise and is the recipient of several awards for his professional work. He and his wife, Patricia Ann, have been married since 1957 and have three children. They reside in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

Accession Number

A2003.078

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/13/2003

Last Name

Lucas

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Houghton Elementary School

Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Vesper George School of Art

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Frank

Birth City, State, Country

Cambridge

HM ID

LUC01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Life Is One Our Greatest Blessings.$Everyone Should Have An Honest Occupation.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/29/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Rice

Short Description

Graphic designer Frank Lucas (1930 - ) became the first African American illustrator and photographer in Boston's advertising industry. As director of art and design for children's trade books, Lucas pioneered new techniques in design, production and printing. Lucas also taught art at Boston area schools.

Employment

Parsons Friedmann and Central

Barker Black Studios

Ginn and Company

Course Crafters

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Frank Lucas's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Frank Lucas lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Frank Lucas describes his family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Frank Lucas describes how his mother and father came to the United States from Barbados

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Frank Lucas describes his father's employment

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Frank Lucas describes how his father defended himself and his family with a homemade wooden club

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Frank Lucas describes his mother's experience as a domestic

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Frank Lucas describes his parents' emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Frank Lucas describes how his parents met and when they got married

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Frank Lucas describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Frank Lucas describes how his mother took care of his family

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Frank Lucas describes his experience at Houghton Elementary School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Frank Lucas describes his experience at Ridge Technical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Frank Lucas describes his decision to enroll at the Vesper George School of Art in Boston, Massachusetts in 1950

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Frank Lucas describes how he paid for tuition at the Vesper George School of Art in Boston, Massachusetts in 1950

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Frank Lucas describes his experience as an artist/illustrator with the Ninth Division of the U.S. Army during the Korean War

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Frank Lucas describes his service in the U.S. Army and graduating from the Vesper George School of Art in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Frank Lucas describes the first job he received as an advertising designer

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Frank Lucas describes the racism he experienced trying to find employment in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Frank Lucas describes being hired to work at Parsons, Friedman and Central Advertising in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Frank Lucas describes getting married to Patricia Ann Lucas in 1957

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Frank Lucas describes his brother and role model, Ray Allen

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Frank Lucas describes leaving Parsons, Friedman and Central Advertising to work at Barker-Black Studios

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Frank Lucas describes his experience with Barker-Black Studio and his work after it closed

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Frank Lucas describes being hired by Ginn and Company in 1966

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Frank Lucas describes his experience as high school division supervisor at Ginn and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Frank Lucas describes his experience at Ginn and Company and the corporations that owned Ginn and Company while he worked there

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Frank Lucas recalls the way he was hired at Ginn and Company

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Frank Lucas describes his experience as the only African American editor at a meeting of nationwide publishers in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Frank Lucas describes his struggle to introduce diversity into his book designs for Ginn and Company, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Frank Lucas describes his struggle to introduce diversity into his book designs for Ginn and Company, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Frank Lucas describes his retirement from Ginn and Company and his experience working for Course Crafters

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Frank Lucas describes publishing the Reunion newspaper with his daughter Diahanne Lucas

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Frank Lucas describes the labor that was involved in publishing the Reunion newspaper

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Frank Lucas talks about his children

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Frank Lucas shares the advice he gives to others about careers in graphic design

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Frank Lucas describes organizing the Cambridge Reunion Group to raise money for college scholarships

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Frank Lucas describes his collection of multicultural art and historic artifacts

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Frank Lucas describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Frank Lucas reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Frank Lucas describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Frank Lucas narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Frank Lucas narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

5$6

DATitle
Frank Lucas describes the first job he received as an advertising designer
Frank Lucas describes his experience as the only African American editor at a meeting of nationwide publishers in Detroit, Michigan
Transcript
But I soon learned fast when I started to go out there and started to look for my first job. And it was interesting because you know I would--the school had a great placement and they would send off letters saying that they have this guy Frank Lucas who was good at photography, he could--was good at calligraphy, design, illustration. He knew a lot about you know specification of type and all that sort of stuff that makes a designer. Everybody was wanting to see me. But when you got there they usually say "Well the job is taken" or "You're too good for us," you know all those types of things. So I would go home and I would--my father [Kenneth Lucas] would ask me, "Well how did it go today?" And I would tell him that I didn't get the job. I didn't--because I was innocent to the whole thing. And he would simply say to me "You didn't get it because you weren't good enough." "You just didn't have what it took, okay." He didn't brow beat me but he just said, you need to know more. And so I would take additional classes wherever I could find them at Northeastern University [Boston, Massachusetts]. I tried some courses at MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts]. I tried other things sharpening up my skills so that when I went in there again they would know. I think one of the things that proved to them that--because I'm sure they were apprehensive about whether or not I could make a living from this thing was that there was store, a department in Cambridge [Massachusetts], they had two stores, big stores and we would shop there from time to time, Cochran's Department Store. And I went in there one day and I would just walk into a store and says, you want any artwork done? That's how naive I was. And the business manager came over to me, says, "Yeah." He says, "you know I could use some signs for my window. We're about to celebrate our Seventy Fifth Anniversary of the store. How would you like to do the signs for the window?" I mean these are huge department store windows and I was pretty good at lettering. And he told me what he wanted and he told me the type of, the type that wanted, old--kind of an old fashioned Bonham [ph.] type I believe it was called. And I had no car so I had to buy the supplies. I went over to the big store in Boston that sold art supplies and I got rolls of paper. I mean these rolls were like eight feet long because these windows are huge. I bought buckets of paint. I had to get these things back home on the street car, if you can imagine and I got them home and my father--I told him that night that I got a job from Cochran's Department Store and he's, oh wow that was great. That's where we bought our clothes. That's where we did our shopping. How big can you get? And what was great about our house is that our bathroom was like a railroad car. It was long and it had walls that you couldn't believe and so I stretched the paper. The thing that I remembered about my father because it was so important to him that I succeed and even though he was going to work the next day at seven o'clock in the morning, this man stayed up with me all night long and he watched me work and he'd talk to me about all kinds of stuff. And he got me coffee or cocoa, or whatever it was to keep me awake because it was many times during that night I wanted to say to heck with it, throw my hands up and walk away. He kept talking to me. And I finished the job and I took it down to the store and the guy looked at me and says kid, he says I didn't think I was going to see you today. But there was the stuff, spelled right, looked good huge amount of stuff. And he says, how much do you want for it? I had no idea, no idea at all. And I whispered, a hundred and fifty dollars okay? Well, the job was probably worth fifteen hundred dollars but a hundred and fifty, I thought of all the money in the world. And he called after the secretary and she came in and she wrote me a check for a hundred and fifty dollars and I came home. I don't even think I walked I must have ran all the way home. And I showed my mother [Millicent Alleyne Lucas] and she gasped cause it was more money than--I made in one night than my father would make in maybe three weeks or maybe a month. And she says don't cash the check. Wait until your father comes home. And I waited and he came home and I showed him the check and he says to me--he didn't even say it to me. He looked at my mother and he says, I guess he's going to be okay. That was it. So they knew that I could make it with the skills that I had.$I know that there was a friend of mine and he was a long time, he left the company [Ginn and Company], but he was the first black salesman and so forth. The Ginn always had, and other publishing companies always have black salesmen. These are the people that can go into the black neighborhoods and these are the people that can go into certain areas that maybe a lot of white people might not want to go into and so forth so they were always there. The--there's a little story there too. Many years ago, working for a company, we got a call from Detroit [Michigan] and Detroit was reading the riot act to every publisher in the entire country. And what they were saying was that we just don't like how books are presenting our life and so forth. I mean there was still--because there was no one else there to say you're wrong. I mean there were people there that had jobs but they didn't know what our culture was like or what things that we liked. They only saw that from maybe the shows that they saw on television, so there was a lot of bad stuff going out there. But Ginn made it a point since I was there to use me as best they could to fill in those gaps, to train them so to speak. And I can recall going into, flying out one night to Detroit. I mean it was a last minute thing, rush, rush, rush. Get on, you know get out of here. So I got there and there's this meeting of all--our salesmen now are coming in. This is serious. I mean we, we're spend--I mean revenue's coming out of Michigan was several hundred thousand dollars and now Detroit's saying we don't want you anymore to everybody. So the next day we went to the Superintendent's office, a big building in Detroit and the school board, cause I was there once before, but the school board was never that many blacks. I think the--on the dais then it was probably about, out of the ten or twelve people there, there was probably about nine blacks and so forth. And one fellow who I can't recall his name now but he stood up and he says "I know who you all are out there" because there was a sea of black people there. Where did they, all these people come from? He says, "I know who you are." He says "you're all the salesmen they can find to send out here." I mean we're talking about three or four hundred people in this audience. He says, "Is there anyone here that represents the editorial side of things, anyone here that call the shots?" So I was sitting in this row of people and I can remember one of the VPs of sales, he kind of leaned over and looked down past seven or eight people to where I was sitting, I caught his eye and it was like telling me, get up, get up. And so, not a public speaker, I got up and they wanted to know who I was. And I told them that I was the person who put the right things in the books for our children and I believe that Ginn and Company does a great job. I can't speak for the other companies here. I was going to put in as much as I could but this is what we're doing and so forth. And he says well thank you very, very much. Is there anyone else? There was nobody else. And even today, there's nobody else really out there that did what I did, okay. So I can feel you know somewhat comfortable but I get very upset, myself, when I look around me and I see that some of our boys and girls are not really doing the things that they should be doing. Again my parents without--with a seventh grade education knew that education was key to the whole thing.