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Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary

Theologian Rose Eileen Niles McCrary was born on October 26, 1961, in New York City, the daughter of Jean Niles of Brisbane, Australia, and David Niles of St. Vincent, British West Indies. As a child, McCrary grew up in the University Heights Presbyterian Church in the Bronx where she served as a member of Youth Connection. McCrary received her diploma in 1979 from the Bronx High School of Science, and that same year enrolled in Harvard Radcliffe University where she received her B.A. degree in comparative world religion in 1983. In 1990, in addition to receiving her Masters of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School, McCrary also received training in family and group process at Kantor Family Institute and the Family Center, Incorporated in Somerville, Massachusetts.

McCrary was ordained to the ministry of Word and Sacrament in 1991, by the Presbytery of New York City, and served as Pastor of the Emmanuel Presbyterian Church in the Lower Eastside of Manhattan until 1996. McCrary also served as a moderator of the Synod of the Northeast Presbyterian Church. Moving to Mount Vernon, New York, in 1996, McCrary became the Minister of the First Presbyterian Church; included in her ministry are a women’s homeless shelter, a music academy, and an immigration justice ministry. Returning to her studies, McCrary received her doctorate of ministry degree in 1998 from the New York Theological Seminary where she also became a member of the faculty. As a volunteer, McCrary served as a religion professor at Sing Sing Correctional Facility in Ossining, New York.

In 2003, McCrary was elected a trustee to the Mount Vernon School District School Board and in 2004 served as the President of the Board. McCrary served for over twelve years as the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. McCrary continued to work with the community and speak out on behalf of the underprivileged in Mount Vernon, New York, where she resided with her daughter, Eupha Jeanne.

Accession Number

A2007.031

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/26/2007

Last Name

McCrary

Maker Category
Middle Name

Niles

Occupation
Schools

Bronx High School of Science

Harvard University

Harvard Divinity School

New York Theological Seminary

First Name

Rose

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

MCC09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Jesus Christ, Who Is My Strength And My Life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Kentucky

Birth Date

10/26/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Lexington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweets

Short Description

Pastor and theologian Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary (1961 - ) served as the Minister of the First Presbyterian Church in Mount Vernon, New York. In addition to her work as a minister, McCrary served as a trustee, and later, president, of the Mount Vernon School District School Board; an advocate for the underprivileged of Mount Vernon; and a volunteer teacher of religious studies at Sing Sing Correctional Facility.

Employment

The Kantor Institute

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church

New York Theological Seminary

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her father's education and employment

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her father's experience in Harlem

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Dr. Roles Niles McCrary describes the role of religion in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her experience in a mixed race family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about her parents' approach to her racial identity, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about her parents' approach to her racial identity, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her family's cultural traditions

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her godparents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary remembers P.S. 26 in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes the diversity of the Bronx

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls her religious influences

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Reverend Dr. Rose McCrary recalls the assassinations of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about racial discrimination in the United States and Australia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary remembers The Bronx High School of Science

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her influences in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary remembers Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls her decision to study religion

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes the Phillip Brooks House Association

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recites her poem, 'Diaspora Dreaming'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes various approaches to religion, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes various approaches to religion, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her religious perspective as an African American woman

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls joining The Kantor Institute staff

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her work at The Kantor Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her calling to the ministry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about Reverend Dr. W. Franklyn Richardson

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her ordination

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls pastoring Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about the black Presbyterian clergy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes the New York Theological Seminary

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary talks about her interfaith outreach

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls joining the Mount Vernon school board

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her achievements at First Presbyterian Church

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her experiences as a black clergywoman

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her concerns for the black community and how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

11$6

DATitle
Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary recalls her religious influences
Reverend Dr. Rose Niles McCrary describes her calling to the ministry
Transcript
You talked about the minister that had impressed you and that, did you have any personal relationship with God at this time, as a child?$$You know, I remember going through a kind of a crisis, you know, 'cause, you know, there were ups and downs of family life, ups and downs of school life. All kids go through encountering bullies from time to time and getting picked on and, you know, having to deal with things of that nature. I remember going through kind of a crisis and feeling like I couldn't discuss it with anybody. I couldn't discuss it with my father [David Niles, Sr.], my mother [Jean Davis Niles], anybody, but feeling like I still experienced a kind of, a presence, a relationship. That was, that's the closest that I think I came to understanding that--I used to ask a lot of questions in Sunday school as a child. And I had a teacher in Sunday school, the organist of the church [University Heights Presbyterian Church, Bronx, New York] had also grown up in the neighborhood, and she was a white woman, very brilliant woman. And she was the organist and choir director. And she and her husband at that time, he was an artist, a calligrapher, and he taught my Sunday school class. And I asked him, "If God was the first thing that ever was," you know, "who made God, or what made God?" And so he said to me that, "I can tell you what I believe, and I can tell you what the church believes, but you have to decide what you're going to believe." And I found, you know particularly because of growing up in this very rigid West Indian structured, my father thinking Plymouth Brethren and literal fundamental interpretation was the correct way to go on some level, I think that I found that really--I've never forgotten that. That's, you know, and that's still, in many respects, the, the, the guiding principle. Next week I start to--I, I teach for New York Theological Seminary [New York, New York], and I teach in the master's degree that they award in Sing Sing prison [Sing Sing Correctional Facility, Ossining, New York]. And when I go to the prison, one of the first things that I say to the class--when I go to any class, any of the classes that I teach, one of the first things that I say is, "I will transmit a body of knowledge. Part of it will be my own thinking. Part of it will be more generally rooted thinking, in terms of other authorities, external authorities. But in the end of the day, you have to construct meaning out of all of this. You have to decide what you're going to accept. You know, so, just be, be, be strong" (laughter), you know, because I just got through teaching a class in exegesis at the certificate level, which is a preliminary degree in the seminary. And teaching exegesis is a real challenge when people have not previously had an understanding that the Bible is not a monolithic document that got handed to us from a cloud, you know, but that it developed over a period of time. And it's a lot of different kinds of literature, and it comes from a historical context. And you know, there are two versions of the creation account; you know, there are two versions of the flood account that were mixed together. And you know, I had a young lady say, "You're trying to tell me that Noah didn't really put everything that existed into the--." Said--you know, this language of sacred myth, myth doesn't go down too well the first time. You know, it's a very bitter pill. So it's learning to be able to say to folks, you know, "Use your own hermeneutical suspicion, you know. You have your own reality," as June Jordan would say, "your own ware," you know, so. You come from that place, and you apply your own principles of exploration to the material. And I mean I get all of that from that one moment with that Sunday school teacher, you know (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) That's incredible, yeah.$$Yeah.$What pulled you back to the calling, to say, "Okay, I can't--I've gotta go back to divinity school."$$My supervisor at The Family Center [Somerville, Massachusetts] said to me one day--you know, 'cause I would, you know, be real excited, come barreling into her office and--as I said, we were co-creating the model [Family Union Network (ph.)]--and I'd be like, "We just gotta get these kids singing," (laughter) you know, and: "We just need some, some, some lectures about good ideas for the parents." And she was, she said--(unclear)--you, "You're, you're kind of trying to start a church; you know, I can see that." It was, it was like all the pieces you're trying to bring in here, you know. I said you know, oh, wow. And eventually, my husband just kind of said, "Look, you know, everything you do is ministry, so you might as well go to seminary." You know, so he came to the point of, of accepting and supporting, and we--you know, it just, it just felt the right thing to--'cause I had struggled, should I get a psychology degree? Should I get social--? I knew I had to get some degree, you know, in order to continue, you know, working. That (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Because you wanted at this point your own church, was the idea. To go, going back to divinity school would mean--$$Right, right. At that point, when I'd made the decision to go back to divinity school, it was pretty clear in my mind that I was, really what--I didn't feel call to social work or psychology, you know, that there were limits to all of these feels, whereas I think the key, the key moment came, I worked with a young woman who had a small child. She had a lot of mental problems, a lot of psychological issues. But she also had just a huge story of loss and pain. She, she just had had a terrible life story, and she was afflicted physically, you know, with a lot of ailments, skin diseases, just, just problems that would make people shun her. She had a very beautiful soul. And there was a model that was working in this housing project as well, which was a, a kind of a writing project that had been funded. And so they were working with the women around writing poetry and doing things. And she, this woman, was very involved with that program. And just some of the things that happened, some of the things that we went through in, in working together helped me to understand that the significant issue would not be solved except through spiritually, you know, that the, the, the depth of the healing that was needed and restoration in her life was a--you know, social services could give, get her all sorts of things, you know, could--it, you know, and--but then, none of that seemed to avail, you know. And I started feeling a strong sense that that was, that was my calling, to deal with things that I couldn't talk about with people from the standpoint of a social work contract (laughter), you know. You, you know, I mean it wasn't like I could say, "Okay, so let's now talk about, you know, kind of your faith journey." You know, so I figured that was, and I, I still think it's all necessary, that you can't--I think, I think [HistoryMaker] Marian Wright Edelman talked once that I heard her, about it's, it's kind of like a pyramid. And if you leave out any of the foundational stones, the whole structure is gonna crumble. So it's not enough just to do faith, you know, as they say, "You can be so heavenly you're of no earthly good." You know, so, you know, you've gotta try to cover all the bases in order to really transform some of the stuck places in people's lives.

Vincent Harding

Theologian, author, and civil rights activist Vincent Gordon Harding was born on July 25, 1931, in New York City. Harding’s mother grew up in Barbados before coming to New York City. As a child, Harding developed a strong relationship with the church as a member of the Victory Tabernacle Seventh Day Christian Church in Harlem.

As a student, Harding was interested in journalism. In 1948, he received his diploma from Morris High School in the Bronx and entered the City College of New York, where he became the first African American editor of the college’s newspaper. Harding received his B.A. degree in history from the City College of New York and continued his studies at Columbia University where he received his M.A. degree in journalism in 1953. That same year, Harding was drafted into the United States Army where he served at Fort Dicks in New Jersey. During that time, he became more drawn to the bible. Upon being discharged from the Army, Harding attended the University of Chicago where he received his PhD in the history of Christianity and became a lay pastor at a small church in Chicago.

During the 1960s, Harding was a civil rights activist with the Southern Freedom Movement. He was also a close associate and speechwriter for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Harding was the first director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center in Atlanta, Georgia. He also taught at Spelman College. Serving as senior academic advisor, he has worked for film and television projects including the PBS television series Eyes on the Prize.

While a founder and co-chair of the Veterans of Hope Project, Harding produced videotapes that feature African Americans whose work personifies the ongoing struggle for human rights. In addition, he is the author of numerous essays and nine books, which include Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement in 1990; There is a River: The Black Struggle for Freedom in America in 1993; and Martin Luther King: The Inconvenient Hero in 1995.

As Professor of Religion and Social Transformation at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado, Harding continues to teach and serve as lecturer and advisor to churches, synagogues, schools, prisons and community groups.

Vincent Harding passed away on May 19, 2014.

Accession Number

A2006.082

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/21/2006

Last Name

Harding

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Morris High School

P.S. 24

City College of New York

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Galvani Junior High School

First Name

Rachel

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

HAR21

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Barbados

Favorite Quote

If You Know, You Owe.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

7/25/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Death Date

5/19/2014

Short Description

Civil rights activist and theologian Vincent Harding (1931 - 2014 ) was Professor of Religion and Social Transformation at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado. A close associate and speechwriter for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Harding was the first director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center in Atlanta, Georgia, and was co-founder and chair of the Veterans of Hope Project.

Employment

Spelman College

The King Center

Favorite Color

Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Vincent Harding's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Vincent Harding lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Vincent Harding describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Vincent Harding describes his mother, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Vincent Harding describes his mother, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Vincent Harding talks about being the only child of a single mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Vincent Harding describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Vincent Harding describes his mother's religious involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Vincent Harding describes the Harlem neighborhood of New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Vincent Harding recalls his activities at the Victory Tabernacle Seventh Day Christian Church in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Vincent Harding describes the Victory Tabernacle Seventh Day Christian Church

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Vincent Harding talks about his religious involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Vincent Harding recalls his early interest in journalism, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Vincent Harding recalls his early interest in journalism, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Vincent Harding remembers his decision to study history

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Vincent Harding describes his aspirations after graduating college

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Vincent Harding remembers the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Vincent Harding remembers serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Vincent Harding recalls his spiritual awakening in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Vincent Harding remembers his aspiration to become a teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Vincent Harding describes his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Vincent Harding recalls his junior high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Vincent Harding remembers Morris High School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Vincent Harding describes his teachers at Morris High School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Vincent Harding remembers his advisor at Morris High School

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Vincent Harding recalls a lesson from his teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Vincent Harding remembers working on the Morris Piper newspaper

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Vincent Harding describes his decision to pursue teaching

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Vincent Harding remembers pastoring a church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Vincent Harding recalls studying the history of Christianity

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Vincent Harding remembers writing sermons

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Vincent Harding recalls graduating from the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Vincent Harding talks about Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Vincent Harding recalls his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Vincent Harding remembers his activism in the South

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Vincent Harding remembers his mother's occupation as a domestic worker

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Vincent Harding remembers his mother and uncle

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Vincent Harding describes his wife's family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Vincent Harding reflects upon his experiences in the South

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Vincent Harding reflects upon his role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Vincent Harding recalls the history department at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Vincent Harding recalls the unrest after Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$8

DATitle
Vincent Harding recalls his spiritual awakening in the U.S. Army
Vincent Harding remembers his activism in the South
Transcript
And one of the most powerful moments in all of that came for me when I was down on my stomach on the firing range. I remember it was one, it was a winter day, very cold, very damp and very Fort Dix [New Jersey] and I was shooting whatever we used at that time M something and I was enjoying the target practice which is sort of like me. I enjoy all kinds of testing out of skills and things of that sort. Down on my stomach it was almost as if someone said to me: "So you're enjoying this. Isn't that nice? You think the [U.S.] Army is paying all this money so that you can enjoy yourself here at Fort Dix? No they're teaching you how to kill somebody without him even being able to see you and what does that have to do with Jesus." I really got into a big struggle with myself over that issue of the Jesus who teaches us to love our enemies and I was training to kill my enemies. It was probably even more vivid and hard when I began bayonet training and quite consciously was being taught how to rip somebody's guts out of them as quickly as possible and while doing it to yell and growl like an animal. The sergeant told us, some of us like crazy me always asking why, I was asking why were we yelling and growling like that and he said well that was to throw them off balance. I really knew that it was really to help us to forget that we were humans and that we were acting like some of the worst practices of animals. I had a long struggle at that point. First with my own deep convictions about being in the Army.$The precise detail was that we started saying to Mennonites, Mennonites ought to be in the South in this movement not in some quiet safe places but should be there because that's a part of what we say we believe. After a period of time finally some of the powers in the church said well that is right, you're probably right why don't you go for us (laughter). So that's what we did, we became the official representatives of the Mennonites churches to the freedom movement and that double task we understood to be our task, probably triple just to learn as much as we could about what was going on, to encourage people, to know that this was part of the biblical teaching that they said they believed in. To encourage Mennonite to know that was what was going on in the South. To help them to become supportive of it in whatever way they could and to be with our friends who were in the movement in the South and to encourage them, support them through whatever teaching we could, do whatever kind of helping we could. So maybe I knew it through that visit with King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] in September '58 [1958] but maybe I knew it before that.$$With the 1958, when you're with the three, with the interracial Mennonites through the South can you tell me how that played itself out that trip to Mississippi?$$Actually we started in Little Rock [Arkansas] and drove across and went through your state and then got to Atlanta [Georgia] and then went back up north from there. We had some fascinating experiences including one in which I guess in Tennessee where the five of us pulled up to this restaurant and went in to take our seats and as soon as we got in the owner closed all of the blinds in the place. I assumed because he didn't want people to think that he was serving black folks and white folks in his restaurant. The waitress told us that she couldn't serve us that they didn't serve colored people there or whatever the term was at the time and said that if we wanted to they would serve the black guys in the kitchen. So the white guy said, "Well if they can eat in the kitchen, we're going to eat in the kitchen too." "No you all can't eat in the kitchen together," and finally the owner came and told us it was time to leave and all of us coming from either academic or church backgrounds started to want to talk with him. He wasn't interested in talking (laughter) and on the way out which is where he insisted we go we stopped at the counter and wanted to talk to him some more and he pulled out his pistol and said, "You better shut up and get out of here," (laughter) and we stopped talking at that point (laughter).

James H. Cone

Theologian James Hal Cone was born on August 5, 1938 in Fordyce, Arkansas. With his parents’ teachings on faith and his strong understanding of the value of an education, Cone began his formal training with a diploma from Ouachita County Training High School in 1954. That same year, he received his call to the ministry and became a pastor at age sixteen. After receiving his B.A. degree from Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1958, he attended Garrett Theological Seminary in Evanston, Illinois where he received his B.D. degree in 1961. Continuing his studies, Cone received both his M.A. degree in 1963 and his Ph.D. in systematic theology in 1965 from Northwestern University.

Armed with a strong divinity education and serving as an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Cone began his professional career as a professor at Philander Smith College, in 1966. He then taught at Adrian College in Michigan. Beginning in 1970, Cone joined the faculty of Union Theological Seminary in New York, where in 1977, he was awarded the distinguished Charles A. Briggs Chair in Systematic Theology. Cone also created a systematic Black theology. Cone created a Christian theology that was based on African American experience, history, and culture.

Among his numerous books are Black Theology and Black Power (1969), A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), For My People: Black Theology and the Black Church (1984), Martin & Malcolm & America: A Dream or Nightmare (1992), and Speaking the Truth: Ecumenism, Liberation and Black Theology (1999).

Cone passed away on April 28, 2018.

Accession Number

A2006.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/24/2006 |and| 5/10/2006

Last Name

Cone

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Occupation
Schools

Philander Smith College

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Northwestern University

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Fordyce

HM ID

CON03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Black Theology.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/5/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon, Broccoli, Potatoes

Death Date

4/28/2018

Short Description

Theologian James H. Cone (1938 - 2018 ) was an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church and a faculty member of the Union Theological Seminary. Rev. Cone was also the author of 'Black Theology and Black Power,' 'A Black Theology of Liberation,' and 'Speaking the Truth: Ecumenism, Liberation and Black Theology.'

Employment

Philander Smith College

Adrian College

Union Theological Seminary

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James H. Cone's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James H. Cone lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James H. Cone describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James H. Cone talks about his maternal uncle who ran away from home to study

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James H. Cone talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James H. Cone describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James H. Cone talks about his mother's emphasis on education and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James H. Cone recalls his father's lawsuit against Ouachita County Training School

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James H. Cone talks about the demographics of Bearden, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James H. Cone describes his childhood neighborhood in Bearden, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James H. Cone describes how his church and community influenced him

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James H. Cone recalls the community leaders of Bearden, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - James H. Cone recalls memories of the black community in Bearden

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - James H. Cone recalls race relations in Bearden, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James H. Cone recalls attending first grade and his uncles in World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James H. Cone recalls his parents' lessons about segregation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James H. Cone recalls his admiration for black lawyers and ministers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James H. Cone recalls the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James H. Cone remembers the murder of Emmett Till

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James H. Cone recalls his calling to the ministry

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James H. Cone recalls his decision to attend Shorter College in North Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James H. Cone recalls attending Philander Smith College before integration

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James H. Cone recalls the integration of Little Rock's Central High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - James H. Cone talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - James H. Cone talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s philosophy

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - James H. Cone reflects upon the differences in white and black religious doctrines regarding segregation

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - James H. Cone recalls debating whether to interrupt a white Methodist church

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - James H. Cone recounts the history of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James H. Cone describes his experience of segregation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James H. Cone recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit to Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James H. Cone recalls his initial turn toward the black power movement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James H. Cone describes his interpretation of black power

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James H. Cone compares the audiences of Martin Luther King., Jr. and Malcolm X

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James H. Cone reflects upon the Nation of Islam and his own mis-education

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James H. Cone describes his discovery of blackness in the gospel

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James H. Cone talks about his theological writings on black power

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James H. Cone describes the white clergy's support of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James H. Cone describes the emergence of the black power movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James H. Cone reflects upon what led him to black theology

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James H. Cone reflects upon the clergy's reception of his black theology

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James H. Cone reflects upon his teachings on black theology

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James H. Cone talks about teaching that Jesus Christ was a person of color

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James H. Cone reflects upon the segregation of churches

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James H. Cone reflects upon the demography of the Catholic church

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James H. Cone talks about Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James H. Cone narrates his photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Slating of James H. Cone's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James H. Cone recalls teaching religion and philosophy at Philander Smith College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James H. Cone explains what precipitated the Watts riots of 1965

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James H. Cone recalls the passage of the Voting Rights Act and the Watts riots

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James H. Cone recalls his resignation from Philander Smith College

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James H. Cone recalls how he founded black theology, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James H. Cone recalls how he founded black theology, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James H. Cone describes how he reconciled his race with his religion

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James H. Cone describes his decision to maintain his role as a theologian

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James H. Cone compares the struggles of Jesus Christ and the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James H. Cone describes Martin Luther King's and the clergy's response to black theology

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James H. Cone calls for white churches to denounce African Americans' oppression

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James H. Cone reflects upon the role of the church in slavery

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James H. Cone describes Malcolm X's point of view regarding Christianity

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James H. Cone reflects upon how race affected interpretations of Christianity

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - James H. Cone talks about the misrepresentation of Jesus Christ's race

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - James H. Cone recalls being offered a position at Union Theological Seminary

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - James H. Cone recalls the African American community's response to his first book

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - James H. Cone describes his position as a black theologian and a Christian

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James H. Cone reflects upon the acceptance and relevance of black theology

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James H. Cone reflects upon the incompatibility of the ministry and politics

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James H. Cone talks about contemporary religious incidents

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James H. Cone reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James H. Cone describes the greatest achievement of the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James H. Cone reflects upon the genocide in Darfur, Sudan

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James H. Cone describes his hopes for the African American community

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
James H. Cone reflects upon the Nation of Islam and his own mis-education
James H. Cone compares the struggles of Jesus Christ and the African American community
Transcript
If blackness was the bond in the North, what role did Islam play in Malcolm's [Malcolm X] life and in the movement and in your life as a theologian and a Christian?$$See Malcolm was talking about black in the '50s [1950s] from the time he got out of prison. So Nation of Islam was describing Christianity at the white man's religion all the way back in the 1930s and '40s [1940s]. Now Elijah Muhammad didn't emphasize blackness, Malcolm emphasized that, but Elijah Muhammad did critique whiteness, and he critiqued Christianity in the most powerful way that anyone could think about from a black point of view. So already with Malcolm's voice criticizing the churches for preaching a white man's religion, that impacted us profoundly in the church, particularly in the '60s [1960s]. Now we sort of passed it off in the '50s [1950s], but when black power emerged we could see the whiteness of Christianity as white people preached it. And as it was found in the black churches 'cause we had these white pictures of Jesus in these black churches. We could see this white gospel that was being preached. Now--and we begin to say now how can we black people bow down to a white Jesus. We are not worshiping a God that looks like us, a savior that looks like us. We are worshiping a savior that look just like the man who oppresses us. Now that's a powerful message, and it was a Muslim that articulated that in such a way down in Harlem [New York, New York], in Detroit [Michigan], in Chicago [Illinois], they articulated that with the force of moral and religious power that no black could ignore that. I certainly could not.$$So what did that make you think about the education that you'd received--(simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Well I--$$Of and, and--$$Yeah, the education that I received.$$Was white (laughter).$$I said, I said (laughter) I sort of smiled, and I said, you know, I've been mis-educated, mis-educated. I remember going back reading Carter G. Woodson, 'The Mis-Education of the Negro.' And which if you teach a person what to think you don't have to worry about what he does. And here I had learned all this theology, all this religion, six years in graduate school [Garrett Theological Seminary; Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois] I was studying religion, white religion. Teaching me what the gospel was about; all these theologians I read but not one of them mentioned anything about black people, anything about black people's struggle for justice in this society. Here, I was in seminary from '58 [1958] to '64 [1964] and didn't read one book by a black person, didn't hear anything about the Civil Rights Movement in my classes. And when I got my conversion to blackness I got myself liberated from the mis-education I had learned in graduate school. That's when I knew I had to either leave the church or discover in that gospel the truth that would empower black people in their struggle for justice.$So how did you relate the struggle of Jesus Christ to the struggle of black people?$$Well, I began to see that Jesus did not come from an advantaged group. Jesus was a Jew in the time in which Rome oppressed the Jews. So Jesus was a carpenter; he was a man who was concerned about the poor, the weak, the helpless in the society. There was no doubt about that when you read the New Testament. Jesus didn't say blessed are the rich for they shall inherit the kingdom of God. No; blessed are the poor, blessed are the meek, blessed are those who struggle for justice; that the blessed right there. So it wasn't difficult--Jesus began his ministry by saying the Spirit of the Lord is upon me because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. To set at liberty the captives and to set free those in prison. Now that's how he started his career, and he died just like black people died in those riots. He died humiliated on a cross like a lynched victim, like white people lynching black people. So if you want to understand something about Jesus, you have to see what happened to black people in this society. As Jesus was crucified, and the crucifixion was nothing but a lynching, a 1st century lynching. It happened to slaves; it happened to the foreigners, not to the Romans citizens. So when you come to this country, then Jesus was in a similar position that black people are in this country. So the lynching of black people was nothing but a crucifixion and people like Langston Hughes and W.E.B. Du Bois, Countee Cullen, they made that connection between lynching and the crucifixion. Between Jesus-what's happened to black people and what's happened to Jesus in the 1st century and I saw that. And anybody can see if you read the Bible with a little bit of openness.$$What did your critics say?$$They did not like what I was writing, and they came at me fiercely, but I was ready for that. Because I went into the ministry in order to defend the gospel, in order to preach the gospel. And in order to do precisely who in--the very same thing that the one who embodied that gospel to us, namely Jesus Christ. So I--you cannot do right and not expect people to oppose you. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] had already demonstrated that, and so had Malcolm X. So I was not surprised when there were objections to the way in which I understood the Christian faith. And they were powerful. And, and especially in the white community, but a lot of people in the black community didn't like it either.

Evans Crawford

Theologian and academic administrator Evans Edgar Crawford, Jr. was born on July 2, 1923 in Temple, Texas, to Mary Enge and Evans Edgar Crawford, Sr. A Methodist preacher, his father travelled often due to his job with the Santa Fe Railroad. Following the death of his mother, a former teacher, when he was just three years old, Crawford was raised by his paternal grandmother, Rosie Crawford. Religion was extremely important in his family, and Crawford was called to the ministry at the age of eleven. In 1939, Crawford graduated from Dunbar High School, where his extracurricular activities were devoted to speech and oratory competitions. In 1943, Crawford received his B.S. degree from Huston College (now Huston-Tillotson College). He continued his education at the Boston University School of Divinity, earning his bachelor’s degree in sacred theology in 1946 and his Th.D. degree 1957. In 1949, Crawford married his wife Elizabeth.

Crawford spent his professional career at Howard University where he began in 1958 as a theology instructor and acting dean of the university chapel. For nearly fifty years, he served in a number of posts at Howard, including Dean of Andrew Rankin Memorial Chapel, Assistant Professor, Acting Associate Dean of the school of Divinity and Interim Vice President for University Advancement. He retired in 1991 as professor emeritus of social ethics but continues to teach courses on preaching and social ethics as an adjunct professor at the Howard University School of Divinity.

In 1996, Crawford served as president of the Academy of Homiletics, an international organization of instructors who teach preachers. He also served as president of the National Association of College and University Chaplains, as a Danforth Associate and a member of the Northern Illinois Conference of the United Methodist Church. He is the author of several books about the African American church, including The Hum: Call and Response in African American Preaching (1995).

Crawford passed away on February 16, 2019.

Evans Crawford, Jr. was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on September 23, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.176

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/23/2004

Last Name

Crawford

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Meridith-Dunbar Elementary School

Dunbar High School

Huston-Tillotson University

Boston University School of Theology

First Name

Evans

Birth City, State, Country

Temple

HM ID

CRA02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Islands

Favorite Quote

I Count Blessings.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/2/1923

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beans (Red), Cornbread

Death Date

2/16/2019

Short Description

Academic administrator and theologian Evans Crawford (1923 - 2019) served Howard University for almost fifty years in several positions, including professor of ministry and as the dean of Andrew Rankin Memorial Chapel.

Employment

Howard University

Favorite Color

Black, Gold

Timing Pairs
0,0:3281,67:20838,369:22778,394:31110,530:36566,601:50382,806:50998,815:61370,863:61730,868:70100,977:72350,1098:77390,1157:81144,1167:89486,1359:125842,1795:132640,1822:133396,1832:142804,2027:145408,2066:146332,2085:151960,2235:162286,2333:167530,2420:168214,2430:168670,2438:188340,2732$0,0:30606,349:32664,373:33154,380:35604,434:40406,562:86913,1123:87940,1139:88651,1153:89836,1176:97183,1326:117348,1555:120570,1562:123098,1606:123651,1614:125073,1633:128154,1681:143900,1848
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Evans Crawford's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Evans Crawford lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Evans Crawford describes his mother, Mary Enge Crawford

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Evans Crawford remembers his father's story about a lynching in Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Evans Crawford describes his father, Evans Crawford, Sr.

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Evans Crawford describes his paternal grandmother, Rosie Crawford

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Evans Crawford talks about his paternal family's connections to Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Evans Crawford recalls his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Evans Crawford talks about his maternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Evans Crawford describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Evans Crawford describes his hometown of Temple, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Evans Crawford remembers holidays as a child in Temple, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Evans Crawford remembers celebrating Juneteenth in Galveston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Evans Crawford describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Evans Crawford remembers his teachers at Dunbar School in Temple, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Evans Crawford describes himself as a young student at Dunbar School in Temple, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Evans Crawford talks about his dreams and aspirations as a young man

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Evans Crawford recalls his activities and interests at Dunbar School in Temple, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Evans Crawford explains his decision to attend Samuel Huston College in Austin, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Evans Crawford talks about his experience at Samuel Huston College in Austin, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Evans Crawford explains how pursuing graduate studies in theology kept him from entering the U.S. military during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Evans Crawford recalls his transition from Texas to Boston, Massachusetts in the early 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Evans Crawford remembers being amazed by the public library in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Evans Crawford describes Boston, Massachusetts in the early 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Evans Crawford recalls his decision to pursue a Ph.D in theology at Boston University School of Theology in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Evans Crawford talks about his decision to teach theology rather than minister a church

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Evans Crawford talks about the political climate at Howard University in Washington, D.C. during the era of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Evans Crawford recalls interacting with Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Evans Crawford remembers Howard University students advocating for changes to the school, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Evans Crawford remembers Howard University students advocating for changes to the school, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Evans Crawford remembers events and speakers hosted by Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Evans Crawford talks about the changes he witnessed during his tenure at in Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Evans Crawford remembers the debate over teaching black theology classes at Howard University School of Divinity, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Evans Crawford remembers the debate over teaching black theology classes at Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Evans Crawford talks about his interest in hermeneutics and its application to theology and sociology

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Evans Crawford reflects upon the historical role of the black church

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Evans Crawford reflects upon his life

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Evans Crawford describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Evans Crawford reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Evans Crawford narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

10$4

DATitle
Evans Crawford describes his earliest childhood memories
Evans Crawford talks about the changes he witnessed during his tenure at in Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C.
Transcript
[HistoryMaker] Dr. [Evans] Crawford, tell me what is your earliest memory of growing up?$$Well my earliest memory of growing up, I do remember always being in church because that was a, that was the background. I grew up in the church. My grandmother [Rosie Crawford] was very active in the Methodist [Episcopal] Church [South; United Methodist church], and they had missionary (unclear) and since I had to always be with her, they had a little thing called mother's jewel, and we felt that was mostly for the young ladies, but since I, since I always was where my grandmother was, so I joined it. Some of the fellows gave me a little trouble for it. But, I remember though she was in church, she was ecclesiastic and my grandmother what we have in the system was a Methodist class there. They're the ones who visit details and then they have prayer night. They have come and would tell their testimonies and whenever we'd come, she would stand up and take the testimony from people in her class meeting. She would go out and she would collect the money and meet them. It kind of gave them some extension of the church. I remember her being in the church, I remember her inviting the ministers over. My grandmother was from that period in time when they, they so treasured the, revered the Sabbath. They would cook on Sunda- Saturday and then we'd have everything mentioned. So my grandmother could cook. My grandmother would visit with the people. My grandmother, though she never went to school in her life, she could count a dollar bill as long as she could just see it because she, I always said she was illiterate by that sense, but she wasn't dumb. So I, she was the key person and wherever you saw her, you saw me. My father [Evans Crawford, Sr.], because he could give a pass and in those days the Methodist church was divided not geographically as in, like Northeastern [Jurisdiction of the United Methodist Church], we had a central jurisdiction wherever there were colored in certain sections, so my father because he could always provide passes for her, we went to all the Methodist conference when I first went. We went to San Antonio [Texas] and I'd go out to Laredo [Texas], all of these places, but my grandmother was the common denominator. So I got a chance to meet a lot of people from whom only recently we've had a reunion in that tradition 'cause it's changed now. And we, I was recalling some of these things, so she had a tremendous influence on my life because she was the one who provided and some of the others, my father's brothers and sisters in that area, but I lived with her. She took care of me, and my father never married again, so he provided and leaned a great deal upon her.$Did the number of students interested in theology, did it ever begin to drop?$$For a while, but basically what happened there is that we found that many students found a sense of focus in the Civil Rights Movement, and they wanted to come to seminaries. One of the ways we found it here [Howard University School of Divinity, Washington, D.C.] was this. Usually we could have a course in, we have conducting prayer, but many of the students, some of us had come like I had. They had come from an active local church, they had been nurtured and go to school. Some of these people wanted to come to theology studied the larger part of dimensions of world religion and so forth. So what we found was, and we had the impact on curriculum, I know of one here. One young lady was a lawyer and she had gone to Harvard [University, Cambridge, Massachusetts], one of these schools, so she came and so she wanted to come. Even her parents weren't sure if you graduated from Harvard. What are you doing going into theology now? Now I'm up here dramatizing. But to make the point and follow up and you're helping me to think about this, she came into the school and she had the forensic matters and the fellows would say, because she was (unclear), the only one in the class. We had a class of twelve. And they said, "Sister, you're all right." But she was, she was very much feeling away and using the task. So she said to the dean, "I, I know what they're telling me about this, but they have something I don't have. What am I doing?" So we put in a course specifically for introduction because we're getting people whose not a whole lot, who are not nurtured say through the church, but who had come to the justice issues and they were coming to theology and, and asking for those dimensions that they wanted to see as a part of spirituality.

Reverend Emmanuel McCall

Pastor, scholar, and author Reverend Emmanuel McCall was born on February 4, 1936, in Sharon, Pennsylvania. As a native of Sharon, McCall matriculated at the public schools of West Shenango in Township, Pennsylvania. After graduating high school, he attended Simmons Bible College, University of Louisville, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Emory University. McCall holds four degrees including a doctorate of ministry from Emory University. He also has honorary degrees from Simmons Bible College and United Theological Seminary in Louisiana.

McCall was a faculty member at Southern Baptist Seminary from 1970 until 1996, where he developed the Black Church Studies program that was later used by three SBC seminaries. He also served as visiting professor at theological seminaries in Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, West Africa, and Emory University. McCall has written four books and has contributed chapters to thirty-one others. He has also written for denominational and theological magazines. McCall has served on the board of trustees for the Interdenominational Theological Center since 1978. He also served on the board of the Atlanta University Center, the board of governors of the Georgia Association of Pastoral Care, the Ethics Commission of the Baptist World Alliance, and the Arrangements Committee for the International Summit of Baptists Against Racism and Ethnic Conflict, just to name a few. He has received many honors and recognitions, such as the E.Y. Mullins Distinguished Denominational Service Award in 1990, which is the highest recognition given by the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. In 1999, he was inducted in the Morehouse College “M.L. King Board of Preachers,” and he also received the James H. Costen Award from the Interdenominational Theological Center.

McCall is married to Emma Marie McCall. They are the parents of two children and five grandchildren.

Accession Number

A2004.181

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/25/2004

Last Name

McCall

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Emmanuel

Birth City, State, Country

Sharon

HM ID

MCC05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, Seniors

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Adults, Seniors

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/4/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (Louisiana)

Short Description

Pastor and theologian Reverend Emmanuel McCall (1936 - ) served on the faculty at Southern Baptist Seminary, where he developed the Black Church Studies program that was later used by three SBC seminaries. He also served as visiting professor at theological seminaries in Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, West Africa, and Emory University.

Employment

Southern Baptist Seminary

Theological Seminaries in Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, West Africa, and Emory University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Emmanuel McCall's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls his naming and a prediction about his call to ministry

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about his father's Gullah heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls the sounds, sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes the farming community near Farrell, Pennsylvania where he was raised

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about the racism he encountered in the South and the prejudice against ethnic whites in his hometown community

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls attending Stoney Hill School in West Middlesex, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls his childhood church in Wheatland, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall remembers his school activities and the work ethic he learned from his father

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall remembers attending West Middlesex Joint Consolidated School in West Middlesex, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes influential members of his childhood church

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall remembers his call to ministry

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes his postsecondary education and theological training

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls meeting his wife and teaching and pastoring in Louisville, Kentucky until 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes his experience as an African American at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls racial tensions at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes beginning an interracial minister's conference

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about becoming the first African American executive in the Southern Baptist Convention

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about reactions to the Black Power Movement amongst African Americans and whites

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about alliances between the Southern Baptist Convention and black Baptist conventions

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls the schism in Union Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia in 1991

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about establishing Christian Fellowship Baptist Church in College Park, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls pastoring 28th Street Baptist Church in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall explains how he addressed the damage caused by the split at Union Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls earning his doctorate in ministry from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls fellow ministry student Edward Wheeler

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes the basis of his pedagogy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects on what distinguishes his church

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects upon mega-churches

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall shares his thoughts on gospel rap and the necessity of theological training

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects upon changes in values in the black church

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about books he has written

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall details his travels

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about his experiences in Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects upon the African Heritage Bible and ethnic depictions of Jesus

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall critiques current Southern Baptist Convention's leadership and politics

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects upon his life and hopes for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall offers a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Reverend Emmanuel McCall narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
Reverend Emmanuel McCall recalls his naming and a prediction about his call to ministry
Reverend Emmanuel McCall talks about becoming the first African American executive in the Southern Baptist Convention
Transcript
And Sam [Reverend Samuel] DeLane became a very forceful person in our family life; not only because he was my dad's [George McCall] adopted father, spiritual mentor to us. He also had the privilege in naming me. And so that's why I have two biblical names, Emmanuel Lemuel. He was very--I want to say legalistic in religious affairs. He took very seriously that in the Old Testament they dedicated babies after eight days. And so on the eighth day after my birth they--a group of the members had a fellowship and that fellowship was for my naming. And my dad gave him the privilege of giving me the name. And he made a prediction his prediction was that I would preach. And for that reason he gave me the biblical names Emmanuel, which means "God with us," Lemuel, which is "son of wisdom," coming out Solomon. And then he made the eight people who were witnesses to that swear that they would not say a word about it until it actually happened. And at age fourteen I announced my sense of call to ministry. And on the day that I was presented to do an initial sermon Reverend DeLane, who was no longer pastor of the church then, but he was present. And he called on the eight people who were eyewitnesses to stand, and he recounted my naming on that eighth day.$But during those two years I had made--during that span of time I'd made a reputation for myself as one who could help deal with interracial situations. One of my colleague--one of my seminary professors had come to what was the Home Mission Board [North American Mission Board, Alpharetta, Georgia] here in Atlanta [Georgia], as the director of missions. His name was Hugo [H.] Culpepper, and Hugo was a part of our activity in Louisville [Kentucky] and persuaded the Home Mission Board. That there ought to be a black staff person to help Southern Baptists nationally deal with the matter of race. And he in time convinced the leadership including the board of directors and then they said well find the man. And I was chosen, so in May of 1968, I was elected first black to have an executive position in the Southern Baptist Convention. And I did not give to move to Atlanta until August of that year because my wife [Emma Marie Johnson McCall] was pregnant with my daughter [Evalya McCall Morris]. And we needed for her to not only have the birth which occurred in June but time for the healing. So we moved here in August.$$Uh-hm.$$And I worked at the Baptist Home Mission Board for twenty-three years from '68 [1968] to '91 [1991]. And during that time the first from '68 [1968] to '74 [1974] I was an associate to Victor Gladys [ph.]. And then in '75 [1975] I became the director of the department. And then an '85 [1985] director of the division. They expanded the operation I had close oh to three hundred people in this states. All of the states where we had Southern Baptists organize, they were doing several things racial reconciliation (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay.$$Working for the development of African American churches, assisting historically black colleges and universities [HBCUs] in their existent survival.

Reverend Gayraud Wilmore

Writer, historian, educator and theologian Gayraud Stephen Wilmore was born on December 20, 1921 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His mother was a domestic worker and his father, a World War I veteran, was an office clerk. His parents were active in the community where he grew up, and his father founded the first Black American Legion Post in Pennsylvania. He attended Central High School later renamed Benjamin Franklin where he was active in the drama club and wrote for the student newspaper. In 1937 Wilmore, just a junior in high school won a citywide contest for an essay he had written on Benjamin Franklin. He was also a member of the Young Communist League; he left the organization several years later after he discovered “he would not be allowed to think for himself.” He received his high school diploma in 1938. After high school, his studies at Lincoln University were interrupted when he was drafted into the army.

As a “Buffalo Soldier,” he served with the all black 92nd Infantry division in Italy. In 1943, he received his call to the ministry while dodging bullets in a foxhole during the war. He received his bachelor’s of arts degree in 1947 and his bachelor’s of divinity in 1950 from Lincoln University. He was also installed as the pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Westchester, Pennsylvania in 1950, and would serve that congregation for three years. In 1951, Wilmore helped integrate Westchester elementary schools; his son was the first black student to attend an all white school. In 1953, he began his work with students as an associate executive with the United Presbyterian Church’s Department of Social Education and Action, a position he held for five years. From 1959 to 1963, Wilmore was an assistant professor of social ethics at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. From there, he served as the executive director of the United Presbyterian Commission on Religion and Race until 1972. In that position, he helped to organize and train ministers who participated in boycotts and protests in the South during the Civil Rights movement. From 1972-1974, he taught Social Ethics at Boston University School of Theology, and then taught Black church studies at Colgate Rochester Divinity School until 1983. Wilmore served as the dean of the divinity program at New York Theological Seminary until 1987 before becoming a teacher of church history at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta. In 1990, he became the editor of The Journal of the ITC, and he remained in that post for five years. From 1995-1998, Wilmore was an adjunct professor at the United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio.

Wilmore has written and edited sixteen books including Black Religion and Black Radicalism: An Interpretation of the Religious History of African Americans, which was published in 1998, and Pragmatic Spirituality, which was published in June of 2004. He is also the recipient of innumerable awards and honors.

Wilmore was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 21, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/21/2004

Last Name

Wilmore

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Central High School

Temple University

Lincoln University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Gayraud

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

WIL16

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Abaco Island, Bahamas

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/20/1921

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Pastor and theologian Reverend Gayraud Wilmore (1921 - ) was the pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Westchester, Pennsylvania, and has served as a professor at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and Interdenominational Theological Seminary, and worked as the executive director of the United Presbyterian Commission on Religion and Race.

Employment

United States Army

Second Presbyterian Church

United Presbyterian Church's Department of Social Education and Action

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

United Presbyterian Commission on Religion and Race

Boston University School of Theology

Colgate Rochester Divinity School

New York Theological Seminary

Interdenominational Theological Center

Journal of the Interdenominational Theological Center

United Theological Seminary

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Gayraud Wilmore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his father's work and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his maternal and paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his family life growing up in North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his experiences attending Elisha Kent Kane School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about winning a city-wide essay contest in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about individuals who influenced him growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his experience at Benjamin Franklin High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about founding a drama club and joining the Young Communists League as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his aspirations as a high school student at Benjamin Franklin High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his decision to go to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his experiences at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about being enlisted in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about completing his college education at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and attending seminary school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his affiliation to the Communist Party and timeline following his stint with the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his wife's reaction to his decision to enter the ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his calling to the ministry while he was in combat during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his work with the Mid-Atlantic student Christian movement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore explains how he became active in the Civil Rights Movement through the Presbyterian church, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his experiences working in the South during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore explains how he became active in the Civil Rights Movement through the Presbyterian church, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about resigning from his work with the Presbyterian church in New York, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his experiences teaching at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School in Rochester, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his students, including what he hopes they have gained

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his seminary teaching experiences in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about his writing and challenges facing African American churches

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes an experience his family shared with white neighbors while living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his sermon topics

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about effects of the Black Power movement on education about African American history and religion

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about the importance of white ministries to acknowledge and incorporate African American church history

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore reflects upon his ministry to students

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore reflects upon ministerial goals, his chosen career and his late father's support for his writing

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his hope and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore explains the importance of African American history

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reverend Gayraud Wilmore narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Reverend Gayraud Wilmore describes his earliest childhood memories
Reverend Gayraud Wilmore talks about effects of the Black Power movement on education about African American history and religion
Transcript
What is your earliest memory of growing up?$$Earliest memory, a very early memory is the coming of white immigrants from Eastern Europe into the neighborhood in which we lived. Boys and girls who came from Poland or someplace in eastern Europe, Russia who didn't speak English, who were coming into this black neighborhood because that was the cheapest rental property you could find. They came as immigrants just at the close of the great European immigration to the United States in the early '20s [1920s] which was stopped after the First World War [WWI, World War I]. I remember that we taught how to speak English and--the kids but I also remember that very shortly after they arrived, like maybe six months or a year, they learned the word nigger from white people and they soon moved out to neighborhoods that were not open to us in the next ring of residential living in North Philadelphia. So that's a early memory, I remember fighting white boys on my way to Fairmount Park [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] which was not far from where we lived but you had to fight to get through to Fairmount Park at 26th and 27th Street on Jefferson and on some of those other streets that ran out to the park. You would almost always be accosted by white gangs or white kids and you had to fight. So those are early memories. I went to a white school; I never had a black teacher when I was in either elementary school or high school. I went to a school called Kane Elementary School [ph.] and the earliest memory I have is of the smell of the carpet in the kindergarten class (laugh), at Kane elementary school [Elisha Kent Kane School]. It was a straw carpet and I remember the woman's name was Mrs. Rudolph [ph.]. Mrs. Rudolph was the kindergarten teacher, white woman of course, very kind, very nice to me and I and a few other little black children from that neighborhood went through our first grades at Kane.$When the Black Power movement started, you see. Black Power started around 1965 out of the [James] Meredith March and [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther] King's [Jr.] failure in Chicago [Illinois]. Out of that came a northern movement of black clergy which was more radical than King. Some people would have said that it was a violent movement. It wasn't violent, but it was a movement that wanted to emphasize the ethnicity--the ethnic identity of African Americans; the history of African Americans as contributive to our strong concern about justice and our demand that the academy--the white academy recognize this history and this philosophical or theological perspective that came out of the black church. When I was in Colgate Rochester [Crozer Divinity School, Rochester, New York], the students had just come through a rebellion against the faculty and administration because of the lack of teaching about African American religion and about the black church. They locked themselves up in the administration building and for several days ministers in the community fed them through buckets that were let down from windows. They really took over at campus and stopped everything until they were promised a Martin Luther King professorship and a greater emphasis upon black church history and greater involvement of the school itself and the work of justice in the African American community of Rochester. Well I came at that time and so I was a part of that new emphasis upon black studies in theology. That was already going on in the college issue, though; just beginning I guess during King's--the latter part of King's ministry. But when I went to New York [New York], it was at its height after I had gone to Pittsburgh [Pennsylvania]. I went to New York, it was at its height and while I was directing the commission on religion and race of the Presbyterian Church, I helped to organize a group called the National Committee of Black Churchmen, NCBC and that group published a long statement in the New York Times and in the Los Angeles Times on Black Power--a theological meaning of Black Power. It spelled Black Power out from the perspective of those who believed in Jesus Christ and from the perspective of the church, what were we after, who were we, why were we emphasizing blackness or the identity of black people as being important to give pride and self-esteem to our children, young people in this struggle. We also organized a group called The Society for the Study of Black Religion in 1970 and that organization is still in existence. I've been president of it, I am one of the past presidents and it is made up of men and women who are teaching in universities and theological seminaries in the field of African American religious studies in Bible and history, theology and so forth. So it's a very important part of my life, a very important movement in academia. I haven't said very much about it in this interview but we could talk more about it if you'd like.

The Honorable Michael A. Battle

Dr. Michael A. Battle, the seventh president of the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC), was born on July 28, 1950, in St. Louis, Missouri. He earned his B.A. degree from Trinity College, the master of divinity degree from Duke University and the doctor of ministry from Howard University. Other academic achievements include certifications from the Institute of Educational Management at Harvard University, the Executive Leadership Institute of Hampton University, and American Association of State Colleges and Universities' Millennium Leadership.

Before assuming the presidency of ITC, Battle was vice president of student affairs at Chicago State University. From 1996 to 1998, Dr. battle served as associate vice president of student affairs at Virginia State University, where, under his leadership, the institution's successful planning and assessment was widely acknowledged. From 1976 to 1996, Battle served as dean of the University Chapel at Hampton University, pastor to the Hampton University Memorial Church and executive secretary and treasurer of the Hampton University Ministers' Conference, the nation's largest interdenominational conference among African American clergy. His active participation in the conference helped increase the number of members, which successfully raised significant amounts of money toward the construction of the university's convocation center. Dr. Battle was also a teacher of philosophy and religion, and served for twenty years as a Chaplain in the United States Army Reserve.

Other notable achievements include serving as vice president of the American Committee on Africa form 1994 to 1998, as well as participating as an election observer for the first free election in South Africa. Awards and honors given to Battle include: the Leadership Award from the National Association of Student Affairs Professionals; the Martin Luther King Memorial Speakers Award from Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; the Echoes of Excellence Award for Community Service; the National Conference of Christians and Jews Humanitarian Award; and was a Rockefeller Fund for the Theological Education Scholar from 1973 to 1976. Dr. Battle has also authored numerous books and publications on topics related to ecumenism and the Black church.

Battle is married to the former Linda Ann McClure, and is the father of three children: Michael Jr., Lisa Angela and Martin Luther. Michael is a graduate of Malcolm X College in Chicago, Lisa is a graduate of Elizabeth City State University and Central Michigan State University and is also a captain in the U.S. Army; and Martin is completing his undergraduate work in religious studies at Hampton University.

Accession Number

A2004.032

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

3/22/2004

Last Name

Battle

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A.

Organizations
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Michael

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

BAT04

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any. Faith Development, Civil Rights, Community Involvement, Academic Leadership, Ecumenism Of Africa, African American Public Policy

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Depends on audience - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Availability Specifics: Needs Three Month Notice
Preferred Audience: Any. Faith Development, Civil Rights, Community Involvement, Academic Leadership, Ecumenism Of Africa, African American Public Policy

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Gambia, Senegal

Favorite Quote

Such is life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/28/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon, Pie (Key Lime)

Short Description

College president and theologian The Honorable Michael A. Battle (1950 - ) was the seventh president of Interdenominational Theological Center and was an administrator at Hampton University, Virginia State University and Chicago State University.

Employment

Chicago State University

Virginia State University

Hampton University

Hampton University Memorial Church

Hampton University Ministers' Conference

Interdenominational Theological Center

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michael Battle interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michael Battle's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michael Battle recalls his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michael Battle shares childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michael Battle remembers his mother and father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michael Battle talks about his own childhood and that of his father, who had to leave school in third grade

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michael Battle contrasts his safe, nurturing childhood neighborhood in St. Louis with myths about "the ghetto"

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michael Battle recalls his childhood church activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michael Battle recounts his educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michael Battle remembers his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michael Battle remembers influential teachers and the memorial scholarship that allowed him to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michael Battle recalls his extracurricular activities and jobs as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michael Battle relates how he became involved in politics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michael Battle discusses the importance of reading in his upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michael Battle recounts his involvment in coaching youth sports

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michael Battle details his involvement in activism and teaching at a GED program while in college in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michael Battle remembers his college extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michael Battle outlines his graduate and postgraduate studies

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michael Battle details his career path

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michael Battle recalls memorable events from his career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michael Battle shares some of the challenges he's faced on the job

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michael Battle offers his advice to young people

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michael Battle reflects on his life

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michael Battle discusses his family life

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michael Battle recalls how Groove Phi Groove helped make chapel a standing-room-only event at Hampton

Robert Franklin

Robert Michael Franklin, Jr., is the presidential distinguished professor of social ethics at the Candler School of Theology at Emory University, and former president of the Interdenominational Theological Center.

Franklin was born February 22, 1954 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from Morehouse College in 1975 with a double major in political science and religion before going on to study at the University of Durham in England to pursue international studies. After traveling to North Africa and the Soviet Union, he enrolled in the Harvard Divinity School and received the master of divinity degree in 1978. He earned his doctorate degree in 1985 from the University of Chicago where his major fields of study included social ethics, psychology and African American religion.

Over the years, Franklin has worked as a scholar-theologian, educator, former seminary program administrator and foundation executive. He has served on the faculties of divinity and theology schools for the University of Chicago, Harvard University, Colgate-Rochester and Emory Universities. Before his presidency at the Interdenominational Theological Center, he served as a program officer at the Ford Foundation, where he was responsible for grants to African American churches that were engaged in secular social service delivery and for advising the president of the Foundation about future funding for religion and public life.

Franklin has written two books, Liberating Visions: Human Fulfillment and Social Justice in African American Thought and Another Day’s Journey: Black Churches Confronting the American Crisis. He has also co-authored a book with Don Browning and others entitled From Culture Wars to Common Ground: Religion and the American Family Debate. Franklin is also the author of an internet study guide on the congregational use of the DreamWorks SKG film, The Prince of Egypt.

Sought after by the media, Franklin has provided guest commentary on religion for CNN and National Public Radio. He also serves on numerous boards of directors, including the Center on Philanthropy, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, the Congress of National Black Churches, the Georgia Humanities Council and Religion and Ethics News Weekly. He is also a member of the advisory board of the American Assembly and the Children’s Defense Fund’s Black Church and Community Crusade. Franklin has worked with the White House on numerous projects related to religion, race, public health and community development. He is also a member of the professional fraternity Sigma Pi Phi.

Franklin has been married to obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Cheryl Goffney Franklin since 1986. They have three children.

Accession Number

A2004.038

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/26/2004

Last Name

Franklin

Marital Status

Married

Schools

Morgan Park High School

Esmond Elem School

Morehouse College

Harvard University

University of Chicago

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

FRA03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean, Negril, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

The World Is Equally Balanced Between Good And Evil And Your Next Act Will Tip The Scales.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/22/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Scallops (Grilled), Fruit Salad

Short Description

College president and theologian Robert Franklin (1954 - ) was the Presidential Distinguished Professor of Social Ethics at the Candler School of Theology at Emory University and former president of the Interdenominational Theological Center. Franklin also served as a program officer at the Ford Foundation.

Employment

NPR

Harvard University Divinity School

Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

Emory University Candler School of Theology

Ford Foundation

Interdenominational Theological Center

Morehouse College

Favorite Color

Black, Red

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Franklin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin talks about his paternal and maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin describes his childhood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Franklin describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Franklin recalls his experiences at Esmond Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert Franklin describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin talks about his role models during his adolescence, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin talks about his role models during his adolescence, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin describes the community of Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin describes his activities and studies while at Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin talks about influential teachers at Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin describes his church community during his high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin describes his impressions of the Civil Rights Movement during his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin talks about his interest in attending Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin recalls being expelled from Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin talks about his decision to return to Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin recalls returning to Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois after his initial expulsion

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin recalls being fired from his job at a grocery store

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin talks about his views on activism during his senior year at Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin describes his parents' educational backgrounds

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin recalls travelling to Atlanta, Georgia to enroll at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin recalls his freshman year at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin talks about his extracurricular activities at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin talks about studying abroad at Durham University in England

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin talks about traveling in Europe and North Africa during college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin talks about his impressions of Moroccan culture during his college travels

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin talks about how his international travels changed his outlook on American politics and journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Robert Franklin describes how his academic interests shifted from political science to theology

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin remembers his search for a graduate program in divinity

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin describes his experiences at Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin recalls his experiences pursuing a Ph.D. degree at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin talks about the beginning of his career as a professor of religion

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin talks about serving on the faculty of the Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin talks about joining the Interdenominational Theological Center as its president

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin describes his travels while on sabbatical from the Interdenominational Theological Center

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin shares his thoughts on the relationship between church and state

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin talks about the present situation for black churches

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin talks about the film 'The Passion of the Christ'

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Robert Franklin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Robert Franklin talks about his views on gay marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Robert Franklin describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Robert Franklin describes how he wants to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Robert Franklin reflects on his father's feelings about his career

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Robert Franklin describes working as a commentator for National Public Radio

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Robert Franklin talks about the future of African American churches

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Robert Franklin reflects on the legacy of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Robert Franklin talks about the modern trend toward megachurches in Christianity

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Robert Franklin narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$2

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Robert Franklin talks about serving on the faculty of the Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia
Robert Franklin describes his impressions of the Civil Rights Movement during his high school years
Transcript
Well, 1988 rolled around, and I was a guest speaker here at Emory University [Atlanta, Georgia] for the Black History Month chapel program at Candler School of Theology [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia], and I talked about the black church studies program at Colgate Rochester [Crozer Divinity School, Rochester, New York], which was the first of its kind to have in a seminary, predominantly white seminary, an academic program on the black church that looked at its history, its theology, its distinctive styles of worship, music, and preaching and its ethics and there's a role that it played in the Civil Rights Movement. I hadn't known that you could actually teach academic courses in that area and so they were, the students at Emory were excited. Why don't we have such a program? We're here in Atlanta [Georgia] where [Reverend] Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] lived, and so they invited me to come and help establish such a program. So I joined the faculty at Emory's Candler School of Theology in the fall of 1989, and helped to set up that program. Had a good experience there, we moved to Atlanta and I had this wonderful opportunity of getting to know many of the pastors and religious and political leaders of Atlanta that I've read about and known from a distance, and was happily in the Emory University community for a few years, when my research on why black men leave the church came to public visibility; in fact, there was an article in the Atlanta Journal [Atlanta Journal-Constitution] that focused on some of that research. Someone at the Ford Foundation [New York, New York] saw the article and called me and asked if I would consider becoming a consultant, 'cause they were working with black churches and clergy, given the importance of those churches, and helping to guide African American communities. The question was could clergy be trained to help deliver what might be called secular social services, so the church has a place where after-school public health, after-school violence prevention programs, where economic literacy could be taught where greater voter participation could be encouraged, so these were interests of the Ford Foundation, and they were really wanting to experiment with working with black clergy and churches in that area; so, they invited me. You know, I'm an emerging low-level expert on the black church at that point, having been at Colgate Rochester, and ultimately they persuaded me to join full time, so I left Emory and worked at the Ford Foundation as a program officer.$In my own study time, I began to read more and I was really being intellectually stimulated by, I recall, I mean this is Chicago [Illinois] in the late '60s [1960s] now, and so there is the [1968] Democratic [National] Convention in '68 [1968] and Sly and the Family Stone concert downtown. I begged my parents [Lee McCann Franklin and Robert Franklin, Sr.], can I go down? No, no you can't go, given the chaos that was likely to ensue, which, and some did. But Chicago was an exciting place to be at that time, and so at home watching this on television, getting as close to it as we could, but to see Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver, Huey [P.] Newton, all these people on the scene, the leaders of SDS [Students for a Democratic Society], and others, and then, of course, with Dr. King's [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] death in April of that year, '68 [1968] and Bobby Kennedy [Senator Robert F. Kennedy] in June. It was, that was a turning point year for me, more young men went to Vietnam [Vietnam War] in that year, or more died in 1968, than any other year of our fifteen, eighteen year engagement in Southeast Asia, and beginning to sort of see the remnants of young men that I knew who were returning from Vietnam, including a couple of cousins, my uncle, my father's youngest brother who also used to make those journeys from Mississippi to Detroit [Michigan] to visit his mother, would stop in Chicago to see my dad and a few brothers and sisters that were in Chicago, and he was killed in Vietnam, and this was the youngest brother so, in some sense, he was closest in age to me as I'm emerging in high school [Morgan Park High School, Chicago, Illinois]. And that had a real impact on war and the meaning of war and the finality of war and death and, this young guy, fun-loving, handsome young brother, who wasn't bothering anybody. He got on a plane one day and was taken to Asia and never came home. There was a whole painful mystery around, even, his remains because we had a funeral in which there was a closed coffin and we weren't sure it was him. In fact, half of the family insisted that it was not when they did insist that the remains be displayed to the family. So, it was kind of traumatizing never to have real closure on young Willie Franklin [ph.]. So, that was a part of my growing awareness that behind this little world I inhabited, Morgan Park [Chicago, Illinois], South Side of Chicago, these great leaders like King and Kennedy and Fred Hampton, and others, were being murdered, that the police no longer seemed to be just this efficient bureaucratic Chicago operation, but seemed to be, themselves, a kind of criminal class and the more ominous period in my own coming of age and the reading of literature and James Baldwin and Ralph Ellison's 'Invisible Man,' and findings language to name that sense of alienation and despair and anger. And then, I guess the other part of this was the college decision because I wouldn't graduate until 1971, but I recall watching the death and the funeral of Dr. King, and much of that memorial service occurred on the Morehouse [College, Atlanta, Georgia] campus, watching that procession of leaders march on to the campus, watching [Dr.] Benjamin Mays. My father, it was the first time he sort of basically said, "Sit down, I want you to watch this." And afterward, he said, "I think you oughta consider Morehouse College," so, that was his first time being kind of directive in terms of saying this institution is one you ought to think about. Of course, I went back to school, you know, I began to ask around and ask Mrs. Carmichael [ph.], I wanted to learn more about Morehouse, and she provided some materials, and began to focus on people like [HistoryMaker] Julian Bond and [HistoryMaker] John Lewis, who were in Ebony magazine, and others who had attended HBCUs. And I thought, yeah, that's for me.

Richard I. McKinney

Scholar and minister Richard McKinney was born on August 8, 1906, in Live Oak, Florida. McKinney graduated as valedictorian of his high school class at Morehouse Academy in 1927, and went on to attend Morehouse College. In 1931, McKinney received his A.B. degree in religion and philosophy; from there, he attended Andover Newton Theological School, where he earned his B.D. degree in 1934 and his S.T.M degree in 1937 in philosophy of religion. From Andover, McKinney went on to Yale University to earn his Ph.D. in 1942 with a focus on religion in higher education; he did his post-doctoral research at the University of Chicago, Columbia University, and the University of Paris.

While attending Andover, McKinney began his ministry in 1934, preaching at Pond Street Baptist Church in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1935, McKinney left Pond Street Church to join Virginia Union University as the director of religious activities and an assistant professor. McKinney remained at Virginia Union until 1944, eventually rising to the rank of dean of the School of Religion in 1942. Hired in 1944 by Storer College in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, McKinney became the first African American president of the school. In 1951, McKinney was recruited by Morgan State University to work as a professor and to chair the Department of Philosophy and the Division of the Humanities. McKinney remained at Morgan State University until 1978, rising to the position of acting dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

After leaving Morgan State University, McKinney returned to Virginia Union for a year, where he served as acting vice president for academic affairs. After leaving that position, McKinney continued his own research, writing, and lecturing, independently.

McKinney was listed in Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Black America and in the Dictionary of International Biography. McKinney served as the chairman of the Board of Union Baptist Church, and on the Board of Trustees of the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore.

Richard McKinney, the father of two, grandfather of five, and great-grandfather of six, passed away on October 28, 2005 at the age of ninety-nine.

Accession Number

A2003.119

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/5/2003

Last Name

McKinney

Middle Name

I.

Organizations
Schools

Morehouse Academy

Morehouse College

Andover Newton Theological School

Yale University

First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

Live Oak

HM ID

MCK05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

We must use our minds.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/20/1906

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Trout

Death Date

10/28/2005

Short Description

College president and theologian Richard I. McKinney (1906 - 2005 ) was the first African American president of Storer College.

Employment

Pond Street Baptist Church

Virginia Union University

Storer College

Virginia State University

Morgan State University

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:25640,295:26190,301:29651,336:30652,350:31380,360:31926,367:33018,382:47161,494:69807,736:71263,795:89220,1064:92326,1086:94302,1099:94566,1104:94896,1112:99225,1157:101560,1163:153592,1878:172000,2047:172588,2057:180232,2194:181408,2211:187569,2259:201102,2392:203528,2413:204188,2427:211686,2523:222709,2625:223597,2634:258627,2927:261138,2964:261510,2969:267558,3048:269799,3089:279002,3162:286068,3261$0,0:4620,100:5467,124:5775,129:8085,189:8470,195:8778,200:17237,274:39829,494:43030,522:48435,599:51805,623:63087,766:63939,822:72048,957:74909,977:90548,1127:103056,1218:110186,1289:110796,1296:120028,1376:127470,1426:133916,1501:134730,1517:135100,1523:141410,1583:141970,1591:142290,1596:144758,1625:148505,1667:160105,1787:169588,1889:173946,1933:175052,1946:176800,1958:177230,1964:192846,2107:199658,2194:200468,2205:219283,2336:223614,2438:224537,2452:225531,2475:226170,2485:244200,2686:244716,2694:248670,2737:249570,2755:267340,2891:267970,2899:269860,2927:270700,2936:272024,2952:272764,2974:276583,3002:280299,3022:282285,3043:282665,3048:285345,3064:285605,3069:285995,3077:286580,3088:287035,3097:287490,3106:295032,3161:296438,3187:300315,3211:300840,3220:301740,3235:302940,3260:303765,3281:304515,3292:306390,3321:309530,3338:309902,3343:315307,3411:315583,3416:320580,3486:326490,3553:341860,3743:342260,3749:344740,3820:347378,3830:354712,3931:357052,3972:357364,3977:357832,3985:358456,3995:361920,4008:362300,4013:372176,4120:372743,4130:377440,4189:382280,4227:384440,4237:389160,4292:392268,4330:393456,4352:394446,4379:399586,4445:400396,4463:400774,4472:401044,4477:405175,4516:413124,4654:413652,4664:414048,4671:415698,4703:416160,4712:419908,4727:420176,4732:420913,4746:421181,4753:421650,4761:422670,4768:424740,4799:430200,4857:431948,4882:444096,5031:447235,5057:456704,5199:457408,5212:458960,5217:460663,5234:462670,5243:466187,5274:469896,5324:478256,5447:478651,5453:478967,5458:486640,5568:487084,5575:499825,5696:500425,5705:505036,5790:505272,5795:525800,6028:526080,6033:539694,6173:549554,6329:553258,6349:553578,6355:553962,6362:554282,6369:558986,6432:567644,6573:568054,6579:573690,6650:592269,6894:592767,6901:593514,6918:616554,7088:618138,7111:618578,7117:620050,7122:621948,7168:622459,7176:638140,7389:638710,7396:639185,7402:639660,7408:640944,7413:648061,7543
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Richard McKinney interview: name and date of birth

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Richard McKinney interview, continued

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Richard McKinney describes his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Richard McKinney discusses his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Richard McKinney remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Richard McKinney remembers the sights, smells and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Richard McKinney reflects on media outlets of the early 20th century

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Richard McKinney reviews his early avocations

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Richard McKinney reflects on his education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Richard McKinney recalls his participation in musical activities in college

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Richard McKinney remembers lessons from influential instructors

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney recounts episodes from his college years at Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Richard McKinney recalls winning a fellowship to study the Quakers

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Richard McKinney recalls working to fund his seminary education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Richard McKinney recounts his experience at Andover Newton Theological School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney reviews key concepts from ancient philosophers

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Richard McKinney shares reflections on the black church

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Richard McKinney remembers his contemporary, Reverend Joseph Jackson

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Richard McKinney evaluates mega-churches

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney discusses his early teaching post and his pursuit of graduate studies

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Richard McKinney remembers influential instructors from his graduate years at Yale University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Richard McKinney details his tenure at Storer College in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Richard McKinney discusses the closings of black colleges

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Richard McKinney recalls his interactions with W. E. B. DuBois

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney expresses his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Richard McKinney considers his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Richard McKinney explains his longevity

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Richard McKinney discusses his many book projects

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Richard McKinney describes how he'd like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

9$5

DATitle
Richard McKinney reviews his early avocations
Richard McKinney details his tenure at Storer College in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia
Transcript
What kind of little boy were you growing up? What did you like to do and what were you interested in?$$Well, as a child, my father [George McKinney, Sr.] being the pastor of the church and the head of the school, I became interested in what he was doing, as an educator and as a preacher. And every year, there was an opportunity for people at the school to become members of the church. And they called it a, a, a student revival. I was six, I didn't need to be revived, but I--when they, that week was held, and I--of course, my first year in school, I was six, six years old, when they asked for people to come and join, I went up too. I told my mother [Sally Ellis McKinney] about it. She was not too happy. She didn't think that I knew what I was doing. I thought I knew what I was doing. My dad, of course, was very adamant. He, he said, he's knows what he's doing. And so I was baptized into the church at, at the age of six. And since my dad was my ideal, my role model, I said I was gonna be a preacher. And that was my intension until I got into my third year of college. At that time, I discovered philosophy. And I decided that I would maintain my determination to go into the ministry, to take a theological degree at a seminary, work in a church for five years and withdraw and go back to the university and get a Ph.D in philosophy. That was my scenario. I did the first part of it. I did go to the seminary. I did get a church in Providence, Rhode Island, and after I'd been there for less than a year, I was invited to teach at Virginia Union [University] for one semester to substitute for a man who was unable to be there on account of illness. It was easy for me to get a, a replacement for me at my church in Providence, Rhode Island for that semester. But after I got down there, I got the bug of wanting to teach. So I stayed there, after they gave me the job. The man for whom I was substituting had a terminal illness, and so I, I took the job, and I've been an academe ever since.$$Okay.$$That's a long ways from boyhood.$$Right, but I want to go back to boyhood, but that's, yeah, that's, we'll get to all that.$$But in boyhood, I, I had, as a young man, I did have a job working at somebody's house as a--to clean up the yard, helped clean out the garden and things that a ten, twelve-year old boy might be able to do. I later on had a job helping out the, the owner of that house who had a photography shop. And I helped clean up the photography shop and so. So those were the kinds of occupations I could get for about fifty cents or less a day. And it was part of my becoming aware of the world of work. Later on, when I was in, in, in college--first of all, before I was able to get to college, as the youngest of eight children, all of the others had to go out of town for their, their education. And they went to Morehouse College and Spelman College. And by the time I finished the seventh grade at this school in Live Oak [Florida], there was no money for me to go to college or to continue my education. I stayed out two years after the seventh grade. And eventually, my father found a school that I could get a scholarship in Georgia, Americus Institute in Americus, Georgia to which I went.$When you graduated from Yale [University] you continued--you came back as the dean of the School of Religion again?$$Yes, I came back to Virginia Union [University]. And Virginia Union up until that time had a curriculum in the college with emphasis upon religion and upon graduation, instead of getting an A.B., you got--or some other, I forget the name of the degree. But it was not an adequate preparation for religious work. And many schools discontinued that, who had had it as part of college. So Virginia Union discontinued it too. And the president asked me to set up a religious study program on the graduate level. And I reorganized the whole study of religion at Virginia Union and made it into a, a graduate program, following the standards of the American Theological Association and so on, or American Association of Theological Schools. And that was in the early 1940s. And I became dean of that school and served there for about two years as dean. And then I changed schools and went to a college in West Virginia, Storer College.$$Now, what--tell us about Storer College. Who founded it and who, you know, what was the nature of Storer?$$After the Civil War, there were a lot of freedpeople living in that area, Harpers Ferry. Prior to the Civil War, there had been a factory in Harpers Ferry, manufacturing ammunition and arms. It was run by the government, and that is the reason why John Brown decided to go to Harpers Ferry because there were good guns there. And he felt that if he could capture that armory and the guns, the slaves would have the weapons with which to fight for their own freedom. That was his, his, his logic in going to Harpers Ferry, to get something where he could fight. And after the war was over--of course, the army did not operate, and there were all these people. And as was happening in other denominations, the Free-Will Baptist in New Hampshire sent a man down to that area to minister to these people, educationally. His, his name was--is [Nathan] Brackett, B-R-A-C-K-E-T-T. I can't recall his first name at the moment, but he started classes of these freed people, and he was allowed to use one of the buildings that the government used for his operation of the, of the, the armory. And, well, people in that denomination, living in New England, sent money down there for the school. And they were talking it up because the Free-Will Baptist wanted to be, as the denominations were, established with Morehouse College and a number of other institutions, Fisk [University] and others. So they wanted to establish their particular school. And they were able to get a very wealthy industrialist in Maine, by the name of John Storer. And John Storer wanted to do something for the education of the freedmen. But he challenged the Free-Will Baptists to work themselves for the basic needs to operate this school. He said to them, if you will raise ten thousand dollars, I will give you ten thousand dollars. That was a lot of money in 1867. But they went at it, and they finally at last were able to raise this money to meet the deadline. And they were able to get the commitment of John Storer and named the school for him. And it became a center for the education of, of blacks, first starting at an elementary level and as I said earlier, moving up to the high school. And many of the middle-class blacks sent their children to high school at Harpers Ferry and Storer College. They got them out of the city and its temptations. And it was a very good school, had good teachers.$$Now, you became president in what year?$$1944.$$1944. And you were president until '54 [1954]?$$1950. I was there six years.$$Six years, okay, now, there's a--now, what were the major challenges at Storer College for you?$$The major challenge was raising money and also increasing the student body. The problem was twofold. Many of the colleges that had been, had been founded around that time, 1867, had been able to develop a constituency from which students and, and finances could be raised. Storer College, located as it was in a village, did not have that base or students. We had to forage around for students to come there. The second challenge was money. I knew that before I took the job. But I said, maybe we could be able to get the money. Tied into the challenge of money was the challenge of accreditation by the regional accrediting agency. Because it was accredited by the State of West Virginia, but not by the North Central Association of College and Secondary Schools, as accredited by the State of West Virginia, our graduates go out into the community and do teaching, social work or similar occupations, go into the ministry. But they could not get into a medical school because the facilities did not measure up to North Central Association standards. So my challenge was to get the school accredited and I went there and said if I could get it accredited in four years, I will stay. If not, I will leave. I was able to raise the income, but not enough to meet the demands of the North Central Association for our science department. We couldn't meet the demands because we didn't have money. We couldn't get into some fundraising programs because we didn't have all the programs that we needed. So we were in a vicious cycle. We couldn't get accredited because we didn't have money--we didn't have the money, we couldn't get accredited. So after five years, I told the trustees I was leaving. And they had persuaded me to stay. I did stay another year, but I didn't feel that that was the place I should spend the best years of my life. So I did resign, and in my first year, I went to Virginia State [University] for a year. Mean while, the job at Morgan State [University] had been promised to me for the following year. So while I was at Virginia State, I was doing the work of a friend of mine who was on leave, directing religious activities and then getting prepared to come to Morgan, which I did in 1951. I came here as a full professor of philosophy, head of, head of department, and stayed as their head for over twenty-five years. So that's my, my career.$$That's like, it's almost--that is, like fifty years ago, you know, that's--.$$Oh, yes, it's fifty--yes, when I go to, to the meeting of the alumni association, I meet these people whom I knew when they were eighteen, nineteen, twenty years old. One year, I went to alumni reunion--the alumni still has reunions although the school is closed. And they had on the program there was to be an award given to me, and I was sitting on the, on the podium--on the platform, trying to see if I could see this person. I didn't see the person, I thought. Time came for that part of the program, this person came up. And I didn't recognize her from what she looked like fifty years earlier. But it's fascinating. The school closed here some years after I left. I left in 1951. And they closed in 1955. Up until that time, the State of West Virginia--$$Keep talking, finish.$$--the State of West Virginia had given Storer a stipend every year because that part of West Virginia was in the eastern panhandle.$$And that year, that, '55 [1955], they didn't give it?$$No, up until '55 [1955], yes. As I said, they gave the money because there was a law against the co-education of races in Virginia. There was a school seven miles away from Storer, Shepherd College [now Shepherd University]. Black kids in that panhandle could not go there for a college education.

Marshall Grigsby

Educational adviser Marshall Grigsby was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 18, 1946. After earning his B.A. in political science from Morehouse College in 1968, Grigsby relocated to Chicago, where he pursued a master's of theology and doctorate in ministry from the University of Chicago, completing his program in 1972.

Grigsby began his career after earning his master's in 1970, working as the executive director of the Black Legislative Clearing House, which provided educational and research services to the nation's black legislators. After completing his Ph.D., Grigsby moved to Ohio, where he became the associate director of the Association of Theological Schools of the United States and Canada. In that capacity, he worked with the schools to address the concerns of the minority students of the programs. In 1975, Grigsby was named assistant dean and an associate professor at the Divinity School at Howard University, where he remained for the next ten years. Continuing on in the academic world, Grigsby was named president of Benedict College in 1985, and in 1993 he was appointed to the positions of executive vice president, provost and CEO of Hampton University. After serving only a year at Hampton, Grigsby was summoned to Capitol Hill, where he served as the senior higher education specialist for Democratic members of Congress and as special adviser to Congressman William Clay. Grigsby left in 2001 to form his own company, Grigsby and Associates, an educational policy development consulting firm.

In addition to his consulting work, Grigsby serves on the Board of Trustees of USA Funds, which provides guaranteed loans of more than $10 billion a year to students across the country. He is also a managing consultant with the Council for Opportunity in Education and is the senior scholar with the Claiborne Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Education. Grigsby was one of five college presidents in 1991 to receive the Knight Foundation Presidential Leadership Award. Grigsby and his wife, Harriet, live in Maryland.

Accession Number

A2003.155

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/15/2003

Last Name

Grigsby

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Phoenix Union Bioscience High School

Phoenix College

First Name

Marshall

Birth City, State, Country

Charlotte

HM ID

GRI03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/18/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Academic administrator, theologian, education chief executive, and education policy consultant Marshall Grigsby (1946 - ) founded Marshall Grigsby and Associates, an educational policy consulting firm. He also served as the former associate dean and associate professor at Howard University Divinity School, president of Benedict College, executive vice president, provost and CEO of Hampton University, and the senior higher education specialist for Democratic members of Congress.

Employment

Black Legislative Clearinghouse

Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada

Howard University School of Divinity

Benedict College

Hampton University

United States Congress

Grigsby & Associates

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:7198,118:7684,125:17323,265:17971,275:18457,282:51104,724:51452,729:52670,842:56150,888:76160,1080:77600,1101:92907,1290:93362,1296:96729,1350:97184,1356:104522,1446:106982,1482:109770,1525:114116,1596:117500,1616:121470,1664:158535,2209:158883,2214:159318,2220:161667,2249:166539,2332:167061,2339:171498,2414:179630,2451:180380,2462:181805,2489:185630,2575:186305,2589:187505,2615:187955,2622:192238,2663:192910,2689:194638,2694:197038,2725:197710,2733:198862,2750:201454,2784:202606,2801:214736,2895:215960,2925:217112,2945:217400,2950:217832,2958:224467,3034:230194,3149:230526,3154:233763,3212:246950,3342$0,0:5638,91:16330,269:38435,509:39030,517:40050,532:40475,538:52142,676:55086,711:55546,717:59134,761:59594,767:62262,802:62998,811:76819,918:77386,926:79897,974:82084,1010:87835,1092:91885,1157:103166,1278:103574,1285:104050,1293:104798,1307:107518,1376:113502,1504:113774,1509:131052,1728:136980,1773
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marshall Grigsby's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marshall Grigsby lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marshall Grigsby describes his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marshall Grigsby describes his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marshall Grigsby shares the story of his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marshall Grigsby describes the personality and occupation of his father, HistoryMaker Jefferson Eugene Grigsby

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marshall Grigsby describes Phoenix, Arizona in the 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marshall Grigsby describes segregation in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marshall Grigsby talks about Carver High School, the former all-black school in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marshall Grigsby describes his love of school and reading as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marshall Grigsby talks about his favorite elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences attending Phoenix Union High School in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marshall Grigsby describes his and his parents' involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marshall Grigsby talks about leaving the NAACP Youth Council to organize a chapter of CORE

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marshall Grigsby talks about Elijah Muhammad's home in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marshall Grigsby describes traveling from Phoenix, Arizona to Atlanta, Georgia by train to enroll at Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marshall Grigsby talks about his limited involvement in the Civil Rights Movement as a student at Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marshall Grigsby talks about Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marshall Grigsby talks about important figures associated with Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marshall Grigsby remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marshall Grigsby describes enrolling at the University of Chicago Divinity School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marshall Grigsby comments on the concept of "higher law"

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marshall Grigsby talks about studying under Charles Long at the University of Chicago Divinity School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marshall Grigsby describes why he chose to be ordained as a Unitarian Universalist minister

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marshall Grigsby talks about his civic involvement in Chicago during the early 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences working for the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences working for the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marshall Grigsby talks about Howard Thurman

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marshall Grigsby talks about theological debates

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marshall Grigsby talks about the Mega Church Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marshall Grigsby comments on the black church

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences teaching at the Howard University School of Divinity

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences serving as President of Benedict College, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences serving as President of Benedict College, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marshall Grigsby describes leaving Benedict College

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marshall Grigsby talks about reforming higher education policy in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marshall Grigsby shares his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marshall Grigsby talks about his future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Marshall Grigsby talks about his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Marshall Grigsby talks about Dr. Benjamin E. Mays
Marshall Grigsby describes his experiences serving as President of Benedict College, pt. 2
Transcript
Well what was life like on the campus, did you get the chance to know Dr. Mays?$$Oh yeah, yeah. We--and knew him and worked with him literally up until the time he died. We, as I said, he was my Advisor so I had to report--he and his wife Sadie Mays. And then a number of people that took me under their wing, he's one. Never will forget when Martin King was coming back from Oslo, having won the Nobel Peace Prize, I had to ride with Dr. Mays in his car to the airport, cause we went to the airport to meet Dr. King and his family. Dr. Mays couldn't drive a lick, and he wouldn't get on the expressway, and he drove all the way from campus to the airport with one foot on the brake and on the accelerator. And it was like that all the way out there.$$But he--I've interviewed, at least two people, James Compton [HM] being one of them that was a chauffeur for Dr. Mays. They were students, and their job was to drive him around, so there may be a good reason for that.$$Well, yeah, sure, absolutely. And in those days, and to some extent now, you know College Presidents were driven around. When I was a President I basically insisted on driving myself, but I didn't want the trappings of all of that and everything else. But he, we became friends over the years in a way that I never realized. One of the things, he would always come to every year to Howard University [Washington, D.C.] and speak in the Chapel. And while I was at Howard, I spent 11 years at Howard; several times I would pick him up from the airport and take him to the campus. But whenever I encountered him, I always gave him the respect of telling him my name. Cause I didn't expect him to remember who I was, I mean the man travelled in incessantly and was constantly involved. I remember the last time I spoke with him; I had picked him up from the airport. He had a plane ticket in his pocket, cause he was going someplace else, and I walked up to him and he said Grigsby, if you tell me your name again, I'm gonna scream (laughing) it was funny. But later on, I discovered something about him, and this was after he had died, he and a good friend of his, Sam Nabrit, and Sam was the first black recipient of a PhD from Brown University. He got a PhD in Chemistry and he was, [President Dwight D.] Eisenhower appointed him to the Atomic Energy Commission. I mean, he's involved in all kinds of stuff; Sam was also the President of the Southern Fellowship Foundation which was the organization that underwrote my graduate education, so he supported me through the years. Sam, he also ended up being the Chairman of the Search Committee for the Presidency of Benedict College and he is the one that basically engineered to get me elected President at the college. And told me a few years after that, said that he and Mays were traveling on a plane going somewhere, and he said that keep your eye on Grigsby and that if the right situation opens up, make sure he gets in it. And so you never know what kind of impression you're making on people, and you never know who's looking over your shoulder and who's making opportunities available that happened long before you even got on the scene. But he was a--and also there was and is a black good ol boy network too that looks out for folks. That was an interesting experience that I had with him.$As I said, I saw my mission as helping to strengthen the infrastructure of the institution which is what we did through the academic programs and were able to be recognized in a number of arenas as having a top notch quality programs. As again, I mentioned the Honors Program became one of the leading of its kind, certainly throughout the state and in throughout the Southeast and became a model for a number of other Institutions. We created an Environmental Science Program, the first of its kind in the state. Looking at the whole notion of helping minority youngsters get into the whole minority--in the whole Environmental Field and used in ways to address what, has emerge over the years. As another issue that is Environmental Racism, where much of toxic waste dump activity takes place in minority communities, that those become the expendable areas, and so that was another arena that we worked on. Our Teacher Education Program, now everybody recognizes the importance of identifying top notch teachers, well we had a program that was completely moribund, demoralized and the like. When I left there, it was at the top of its game. It was creating things that have since become kind of routine, such as we created something called the After Program, The Armed Forces Teacher Education for Retirees. We have Fort Jackson sitting right there, an awful lot of people retired from the Military out of Fort Jackson, tremendous resource. All they needed was--and many of them wanted to get into education, so we created a whole program and had a unit out at Fort Jackson where we created a cadre of black males, teachers for Elementary and Secondary schools. So doing a series of things like that, you know, good that we were able to accomplish much of that.