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Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr.

Professor Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr. was born on December 12, 1966 in Gary, Indiana to Marsha Dimmy Sullivan and Ronald S. Sullivan, Sr. Sullivan graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School in 1985, and went on to receive his B.A. degree in political science and philosophy from Morehouse College in 1989. He then earned his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1994.

In 1994, Sullivan became a visiting scholar for the Law Society of Kenya, where he served on the committee responsible for drafting a new constitution for Kenya, and worked on the Kenyan Human Rights commission. Upon returning to the United States, Sullivan joined the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia as a staff attorney He went on to work for law firms of Baach, Robinson & Lewis, LLP and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP. In 1998, Sullivan served on President Bill Clinton’s legal defense team. In 2000, Sullivan returned to the Public Defender Service, and was named director two years later. Then, Sullivan joined the faculty of Yale Law School as a clinical professor of law in 2004. The following year, Sullivan became a founding fellow of the non-profit think-tank, The Jamestown Project. He also designed a defense delivery system, which led to the release of 6,000 wrongfully incarcerated inmates after Hurricane Katrina. In 2007, Sullivan chaired then-senator Barack Obama’s criminal justice policy group during his presidential campaign, and was recruited by Harvard Law School Dean Elena Kagan to join the Harvard Law School faculty as a professor and director of the criminal justice institute.

In 2009, Sullivan and his wife, Stephanie Robinson, were appointed faculty deans at the Winthrop House of Harvard College, making them the first African Americans to assume the roles. Sullivan was appointed to the Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Services in 2011. Sullivan was also tasked with the design and implementation of a conviction review unit in Brooklyn, New York. Sullivan successfully represented the family of Michael Brown after Brown’s fatal shooting in Ferguson, Missouri. He went on to represent Usaamah Abdullah Rahim in 2015, and head the defense team for ex-NFL New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez in 2016.

Sullivan and his wife have two sons.

Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 19, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.171

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/19/2018

Last Name

Sullivan

Maker Category
Middle Name

S.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

SUL02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Stay Strong.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/12/1966

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Soul Food

Short Description

Professor Ronald S. Sullivan, Jr. (1966- ) was a Harvard Law School professor and director of the criminal justice institute where he has focused on the release of wrongfully convicted prisoners.

Favorite Color

Orange

Rebecca Ford Terry

Lawyer Rebecca Ford Terry was born on January 11, 1959 in Gary, Indiana to Dorothy and Frederick C. Ford, vice president and chief financial officer of Draper and Kramer. Terry graduated from Wirt High School in 1976, and received her B.A. degree in history from Harvard University in 1980. She then earned her J.D. degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1984, and clerked for Judge Harry D. Leinenweber of the Northern District of Illinois and Judge William S. White of the Illinois Appellate Court. In 2008, Terry earned her L.L.M. degree in real estate from John Marshall Law School.

From 1989 to 1994, Terry worked as an attorney at White & Case LLP; and from 1995 to 1998, she served as vice president of litigation and intellectual property at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Terry became the president of Isonford Intermedia and acting director of emerging domestic markets for the Milken Institute in 1998. In 2000, she joined Urban Entertainment, where she served as general counsel until 2002, when she became the senior vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary at Draper & Kramer. In 2010, Terry was named associate general counsel for the City Colleges of Chicago, a position she held until 2013, when she became managing attorney at the Chicago office of the Hardwick Law Firm. In 2017, Terry accepted a counsel position at Scharf Banks Marmor LLC. In addition to her legal career, Terry began writing a movie review column in the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin in 2017. Her movie, book and theater reviews have also been published in the Chicago Reporter, Chicago Tribune, The New York Law Journal, and The Milken Institute Review.

Terry served on the board of directors of numerous organizations, including the Field Museum of Natural History, the Chicago Humanities Festival and the Heartland Society as well as the advisory board of African American Legacy. She also served as co-chair of the Leadership Advisory Committee at the Art Institute of Chicago, and as a trustee of the Goodman Theater. Terry held memberships at the Chicago Bar Association, the National Association of Bond Lawyers and the National Association of Women Lawyers.

Rebecca Ford Terry is married to journalist Don Terry.

Rebecca Ford Terry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.028

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/24/2018

Last Name

Terry

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ford

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Rebecca

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

TER09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Barts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/11/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chocolate

Short Description

Lawyer Rebecca Ford Terry (1959 - ) worked as the president of Istonford Intermedia, senior vice president and general counsel at Draper & Kramer, and associate general counsel for City Colleges of Chicago before joining Scharf Banks Marmor LLC.

Favorite Color

Sea Foam Green

Donna Britt

Journalist and author Donna Britt was born in Gary, Indiana, to Thomas and Geraldine Britt.  The sole daughter among four children, Britt grew up in a tight-knit, achievement-focused household.  She graduated from Gary West Side High School in 1972, and attended Hampton University, where she graduated in 1976 with her B.A. degree in Mass Media Arts. The following year, Britt began working on her M.A. degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. In 1977, her older brother Darrell was shot and killed by a pair of Gary policemen.  After internships with the Charlotte Observer and the Ann Arbor News, Britt graduated with her M.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1979.

After graduation, Britt was hired as a staff writer for the Detroit Free Press, working for six years as a general assignment reporter, feature writer and fashion columnist. While in Detroit, Britt married a local public relations executive, a union that lasted three years and produced two sons. In 1985, she was hired as an editor at USA Today, eventually becoming the newspaper’s Los Angeles bureau chief and co-movie critic, positions she held until 1989. That year, Britt attained her “dream job” as a writer for the Style section of the Washington Post . After three years in Style, Britt was promoted to Metro columnist. Her opinion pieces covered a range of subjects, including gender and race relations, pop culture, books, film, and personal recollections. Syndicated by The Washington Post Writer’s Group, Britt’s column eventually appeared in sixty-two newspapers. From 2009 to 2010, Britt served as a columnist for the Politics Daily online news website.                       

In 2011, Britt published the critically-acclaimed book Brothers (& Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving, which was excerpted by Essence magazine and listed as one of “10 Titles to Pick Up Now” by O Magazine.  Winner of numerous local and national awards, Britt was nominated by the Washington Post for the Pulitzer Prize in journalism in 1990. That same year, she won Best Commentary from the National Association of Black Journalists. Britt’s columns won numerous local and national awards, including the Distinguished Writing Award for commentary and column writing by the American Society of Newspaper Editors, and honors from the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors. Britt is married to Washington Post Managing Editor Kevin Merida. They have three sons: Justin Britt-Gibson, Darrell Britt-Gibson and Skye Merida.

Donna Britt was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 6, 2013.
      

Accession Number

A2013.212

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/9/2013 |and| 3/20/2014

8/9/2013

3/20/2014

Last Name

Britt

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

West Side Leadership Academy

Hampton University

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Donna

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

BRI07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ranch La Puerta

Favorite Quote

I Know Nothing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/1/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Vanilla Ice Cream

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Donna Britt (1954 - ) was an award-winning columnist and the author of 'Brothers (& Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving.'

Employment

Detroit Free Press

USA Today

Washington Post

Delete

Favorite Color

Blue, Coral, Orange

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Britt's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donna Britt lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donna Britt shares her mother's stories about growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donna Britt shares her mother's stories about growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about her grandmother's high school field trip to Washington, D.C. and service work

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses growing up watching television and the experience of otherness

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's college education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Donna Britt talks about her paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Donna Britt talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Donna Britt describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donna Britt describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donna Britt describes Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about growing up in Gary, Indiana in the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about starting grade school in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about the role of church in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about what books she liked to read while growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about her favorite TV shows and movies from her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donna Britt remembers her favorite teachers from Garnett Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about the racial makeup of Ernie Pyle Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Donna Britt remembers watching Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington speech

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Donna Britt remembers her family trips to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Donna Britt talks about junior high school during desegregation

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Donna Britt talks about the first African American mayor of Gary, Indiana, Richard G. Hatcher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about the periodicals that she read when she was growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donna Britt discusses her high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about choosing a profession in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about seeing the Jackson Five in Gary, Indiana, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about seeing the Jackson Five in Gary, Indiana, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about high school graduation and deciding to go to college

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donna Britt describes working at the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about the Black Power Movement and its influence on her as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the transition from the term "Negro" to "black" in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about summer jobs and internships

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Donna Britt talks about journalism courses at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Donna Britt talks about extra-curricular activities and teachers at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Donna Britt talks about being encouraged to write at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Donna Britt talks about graduating from Hampton University and graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about activism and graduate school at The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donna Britt talks about her brother, Darrel Britt's death, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her brother, Darrell Britt's death, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the suspicious circumstances of her brother, Darrell Britt's death

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donna Britt discusses the official report of her brother's death and the death of Trayvon Martin

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about writing about her brother's, Darrell Britt, death

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about writing for the Detroit Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about an article that she wrote on Ebonics for the Detroit Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses the role of language in race and power politics

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the Black Arts Movement and Blaxploitation

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about leaving the Detroit Free Press for USA Today

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about working for USA Today as an editor

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donna Britt discusses her favorite interviews while working at USA Today

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about interviewing celebrities

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donna Britt discusses leaving Hollywood for the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about accepting an offer by Milton Coleman to write an opinion column

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about the subjects of her opinion column

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donna Britt discusses writing about the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donna Britt discusses writing about Nelson Mandela's release

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses her article about the widening gulf between the middle class and the poor

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Donna Britt discusses writing about her encounter with George Bush's physician

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Donna Britt discusses her approach to writing about race, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Donna Britt discusses her approach to writing about race, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Donna Britt and Geraldine Britt describe their photographs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Britt's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Donna Britt remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Donna Britt remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Donna Britt recalls the public's reaction to the O.J. Simpson trial verdict

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about the implications of the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her coverage of President Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Donna Britt remembers President George Walker Bush's election

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Donna Britt remembers the attacks of September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about the Iraq War of the 2000s

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the perception of print media within the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about the public's perception of print media during the Iraq War

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Donna Britt talks about Bill Cosby's Pound Cake speech

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Donna Britt describes her column, 'Cosby Becomes the Grandpa of Tough Love'

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Donna Britt remembers the presidential nomination and election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Donna Britt recalls the black community's concerns following the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about skin color bias within the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about the role of President Barack Obama's family in his election

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Donna Britt describes her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Donna Britt reflects upon the administration of President Barack Obama, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Donna Britt reflects upon the administration of President Barack Obama, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the implications of President Barack Obama's election

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Donna Britt describes her book, 'Brothers (and Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving,' pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her book, 'Brothers (and Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving,' pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Donna Britt remembers appearing on 'The Oprah Winfrey Show' and in O Magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Donna Britt recalls the shooting of Trayvon Martin, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Donna Britt recalls the shooting of Trayvon Martin, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the exoneration of George Zimmerman

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about her future plans

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Donna Britt describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Donna Britt reflects upon her life

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the role of women within the family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Donna Britt reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about her family

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Donna Britt describes how she would like to be remembered

Carolyn Armenta Davis

Curator, historian, lecturer, writer and producer Carolyn Armenta Davis is a native of Gary, Indiana and attended Froebel Public School from kindergarten until graduation from high school. Davis received her B.A. degree in mathematics from Indiana University in 1970.

After being a permanent high school substitute teacher from 1966 to 1970 in the Gary Community School District in Gary, Indiana, Davis moved to Chicago, Illinois, where she worked from 1970 to 1973 as executive staff of the American Medical Association’s Department of Community Health Care. For nine months in 1973, Davis was a television news writer for WMAQ-TV, the Chicago NBC affiliate. In 1974, Davis started her communications business in Chicago. She provided public relations, marketing communications, and media production services to national and international corporations, non-profits, and governments agencies, domestic and foreign.

Davis independently created, wrote and produced three landmark projects on accomplishments of men and women of the African Diaspora. Her debut project, The Black Classical Composers, was the first radio series on classical music written from 1771 to 1975 by Blacks and its 39, 1-hour programs aired from 1976 to 1977 on fine arts station WEFM-Chicago. In 1978, Davis did the Feminine Footprint radio series of mini-documentaries on 65 African American women trailblazers; it aired nationwide on 91 stations and earned the American Women in Radio and Television Award.

In 1990, Davis launched her Design Diaspora: Black Architects and International Architecture 1970-1990 ™ exhibition-lecture project on fifty contemporary African American, Black-European and African architects from eleven countries. From 1993 to 2000, Davis toured the Black Architects project to twenty venues in the Americas, Europe and Africa.

Davis continues to write and lecture on Black Diaspora architects. Lectures have included African Union of Architects Congress and Assembly, Nairobi, Kenya; International Biennial of Architecture, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Amerika Haus, Munich, Germany; University of Cape Town, South Africa; The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland; Society of Black Architects, London, England; Illinois-National Organization of Minority Architects, Chicago, IL; Chicago Cultural Center; Chicago, IL. In 2008, she lectured at the National Building Museum, Washington, D.C.; Boston Society of Architects AIA, Boston, MA; and Chicago Architecture Foundation.

Architecture writings by Davis include reviews of 1992’s African American Architects in Current Practice by Jack Travis and in 1994 of Architect to the Hollywood Stars, Paul R. Williams by Karen E. Hudson plus articles on Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureates Christian de Portzamparc, Tadao Ando, and Sverre Fehn.

In 1997, Davis served on the design jury for the Organization for African Unity (OAU) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Union of International Architects (UIA), and Republic of Senegal International Competition for the Design of the Gorée Memorial Complex for Dakar, Senegal.

In 2002, the documentation of contemporary Black Diaspora women architects compiled by Davis was added to the archives of the Winifred Foundation in the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe College, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Davis has served on several non-profit organizations’ boards. She is a member of numerous organizations including the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois, the Society of Architectural Historians, International Women Associations, Chicago; Old Town Triangle Association, Chicago; the Lincoln Park Renewal Corporation; and the NAACP.

In 2004, Davis qualified for a Series 3 License, National Commodity Futures registration.

Davis is writing a book on 21st century Black Diaspora architecture.

Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 21, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.141

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/21/2008

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Middle Name

Armenta

Occupation
Schools

Froebel School

Friedrich Froebel High School

Indiana University Northwest

Indiana University

First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

DAV25

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring, Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Quote

Et Cetera.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/8/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Short Description

Community leader Carolyn Armenta Davis (1944 - ) produced three Black Diaspora landmark projects: the 1976-77 Black Classical Composers radio series; the 1978 award-winning Feminine Footprint syndicated radio series; and the 1990-2000 exhibition, Design Diaspora: Black Architects and International Architecture.

Employment

American Medical Association

WMAQ-TV

Gary Public Schools

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carolyn Armenta Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her father's employment and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers her community in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls the black professional community in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers her piano performances

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her early awareness of the black arts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about the social history of Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the generational differences in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her parents' influence

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls Friedrich Froebel High School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls her early entertainment

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers the racial tensions in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls her activities at Friedrich Froebel High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers her aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers Indiana University, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers Indiana University, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls the start of her teaching career

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her work at the American Medical Association

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls interviewing with WMAQ-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis recalls her work as a communications consultant

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers African American newscasters in Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her time at WMAQ-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers her mentor, Studs Turkel

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis remembers AfriCOBRA

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her radio program, 'The Black Classical Composers'

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her radio program, 'Feminine Footprints,' pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about the healing power of music

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her radio program, 'Feminine Footprints,' pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about her research on African American architects

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about African American architects

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the cultural differences in architecture, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon the relationship between economics and architecture

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the cultural differences in architecture, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about the client-architect relationship

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her research process

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about her research plans

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about contemporary architects

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes the response to her research

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her family's health

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carolyn Armenta Davis describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
Carolyn Armenta Davis reflects upon her time at WMAQ-TV in Chicago, Illinois
Carolyn Armenta Davis talks about her research on African American architects
Transcript
How were you treated in the newsroom [at WMAQ-TV, Chicago, Illinois]?$$I was treated fine, other than the fact that I was naive. I mean I had never seen a wire tape machine (laughter). So I mean, you know, the professionals, you know, are like who is this person and why was she hired? And, and you know, and, and--but they couldn't figure it out because why I was hired, it was because of some friends of a friend of a friend I got an interview, but I also talked myself into it. Whereas, it was as an unlikely, unlikely--it was Ed Planer. I mean it was an unlikely person that would've hired, even though he said he didn't make the decision, the fact that he sent me over I think influenced it a little bit. Yeah, but--there were--yeah at the newsroom, I mean because the newsrooms are so time sensitive, one of the things I learned is people didn't have time to deal with people's drama and trauma. They had a newscast to get on. And if you fell over, then some of them would step over you and keep moving almost. Not, not that that happened. And then I also had to work weekends. Of course I got the lousy shifts. I worked Saturday and Sunday from three to eleven [o'clock] (laughter), and my off days were Tuesday and Wednesday, which turned out to be fine with me because it allowed me the wonderful opportunity after having such a structured type of, you know, you work, you teach school or you work for the medical association [American Medical Association] or some, then all of a sudden you have Wednesdays off and you realize there's a whole 'nother world out there. There's another world, there are people who, who wouldn't do anything on Saturday night, they leave it for the people who can't go out on Tuesday night, you know, 'cause they gotta go to work. So anyhow that was a--it was an interesting adjustment position to, to sort of do that. And friends that were recording at Universal studios [Universal Recording Corporation] at Walton [Walton Street, Chicago, Illinois], on Walton at that time, and you could go there and stay out all night with them 'cause you didn't have to go to work the next day.$The third big project is the architecture project?$$Yeah the black architects. 'Design Diaspora: Black Architects and International Architecture' ['Design Diaspora: Black Architects and International Architecture 1970-1990']. And again I saw a void in the knowledge of--void in the information about the contributions. And although blacks had graduated from architecture school in 1892, it seemed that every time I would ask someone in my architecture circles they didn't know of anybody old, living or dead. And I just--I've always liked buildings and beautiful things and architecture and design, et cetera. And I actually became a docent with the Chicago Architecture Foundation [Chicago, Illinois] probably 1981, '82 [1982] or something. I don't give tours anymore but I used to, you know, give tours, et cetera. And, and continued to read and go to lectures and take seminars on different aspects of architecture. And again noticed the void. I was also on the board of a small museum here in Chicago [Illinois], a museum of architecture and design [Chicago Athenaeum, Galena, Illinois], and there, there were no, you know, there just weren't anything shown by blacks, although there were blacks--as I used to say to a guy--they're building, you know, Johnson Publishing Company on Michigan Avenue [Chicago, Illinois] was built--was designed by Moutoussamy [John Warren Moutoussamy, Sr.] and had been open for what--I don't know--thirty, forty--it's been open for a long time, at least, at least about thirty years, right? Yeah, I, I, I just know it's a long time, I can't keep dates in my head (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Now Moutoussamy, he was a--I know he's the father of [HistoryMaker] Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe who--$$Yes.$$--married Arthur Ashe. He was responsible for a number--I think, oh god oh, there's a number of buildings here that, yeah--$$He was a well-known architect here. He also was a partner in the firm [Dubin, Dubin, Black and Moutoussamy, Chicago, Illinois] that was--I think it was Moutouss- anyhow he was--I can't call it off my head right now. But a number of projects that he was one of the leading, a well-established architect, black architects in Chicago. And since then, there've been a number of them. And--and the field has changed a lot. My project dealt with architects from around the world who are all licensed architects and built projects. And it didn't include everyone, people had to submit their work. If they wanted to be considered they had to submit it. And we got, oh probably about three hundred submissions and from the three hundred submissions, fifty projects were selected. And fifty projects but I don't remember how many studios--but I'm sorry seventy projects were selected by maybe thirty-eight studios or whatever. And represented architects in Canada, United States, Caribbean, and Brazil, as well as England, France, Amsterdam [the Netherlands], South Africa, the first architect to be licensed in South Africa, Peter Malefante [sic. M. Peter Malefane] who is now dead. Senegal, Nigeria, Cam- I think Cameroon, I can't remember. And so I knew, and it was literally the first time somebody could walk into a room and look around and see the picture of this black--of this black face or person of color and their built project and some information about them. And I often vacillate between saying people of color and black, because in certain countries like Brazil, people don't like to call themselves black, they'll say I have African ancestry, but you know, they--it's a country with I don't know a couple hundred words for variations of being black, so. I let people decide themselves whether they wanna be included or not. And Pedro Rocha which is--and I don't know how he's doing but one of the established architects down there who had done some wonderful residential, as well as some religious facilities was included.

Monroe Anderson

Journalist Monroe Anderson III was born on April 6, 1947, in Gary, Indiana. Growing up and attending public schools in Gary, Anderson developed a keen interest in writing at an early age. After graduation from high school in Gary, Indiana, Anderson attended Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and received his B.A. degree in journalism and English literature. After completing his B.A. degree, Anderson worked as a reporter at the National Observer, as assistant editor of Ebony magazine, and as a correspondent for Newsweek magazine prior to joining the Chicago Tribune. In the late 1980s, Anderson worked as the press secretary for democratic Mayor Eugene Sawyer.

Later in his career, Anderson taught feature writing at Columbia College Chicago, and for thirteen years he was director of station services and community affairs at WBBM-TV (CBS2). During this time at CBS television station in Chicago, he became host and executive producer of the public affairs television show, Common Ground. Anderson is one of the co-authors of the nonfiction book Brothers, which was published by William Morrow & Company in 1988. During Anderson’s thirty-five-year career as an award-winning journalist, Anderson became a contributing author to Restoration 1989: Chicago elects a new Daley, a book published by Lyceum in 1991 detailing the 1989 Chicago mayoral election.

In 2003, Chicago publisher Hermene Hartman named Anderson as editor of N’DIGO, a black community newspaper, and in 2003, Anderson became the editor of SaVoy magazine. Anderson also serves as a board member to the Gilda’s Club, a cancer support center.

Anderson lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Accession Number

A2006.144

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/16/2006 |and| 11/21/2006

11/16/2006

11/21/2006

Last Name

Anderson

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Pulaski Elementary School

Lincoln Achievement Center

Theodore Roosevelt College and Career Academy

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Monroe

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

AND03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Living Well Is The Best Revenge.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

4/6/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Journalist and editor Monroe Anderson (1947 - ) was the press secretary for Chicago mayor Eugene Sawyer. He was also the editor for N'Digo and SaVoy magazines.

Employment

Newsweek

Ebony Magazine

Chicago Tribune

WBBM-TV

N'DIGO

Savoy magazine

Chicago Sun-Times

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Monroe Anderson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson describes his maternal grandparents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson remembers his maternal grandmother and great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson describes his parents' return to Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Monroe Anderson remembers his home in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson describes the history of Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson talks about his father's profession

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson remembers his relationship with his father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson talks about his relationship with his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson describes his community in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson talks about the notable residents of Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson remembers his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson recalls being injured in a scalding accident

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson describes his early educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Monroe Anderson remembers his fifth grade teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Monroe Anderson recalls the influence of his English teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Monroe Anderson remembers his early interest in journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson describes his theater experiences at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson remembers his math teachers at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson recalls a lesson from his English teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson recalls joining the football and basketball teams at Theodore Roosevelt High School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson talks about his early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson describes his childhood personality

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson recalls his experiences of bullying

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers his summer job at the U.S. Steel Corporation's Gary Works in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson recalls being fired from the U.S. Steel Corporation's Gary Works

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Monroe Anderson recalls obtaining a position at the Republic Steel Company in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Monroe Anderson recalls his first impressions of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson recalls his first impressions of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson talks about being harassed at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson describes his professors at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson recalls his social and academic challenges at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson remembers his first car

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls switching his major to English

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson talks about his interest in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers the student movement at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson talks about the start of his journalism career

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson recalls covering the anti-war protests in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson remembers being assaulted by the police during the anti-war protests in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson reflects upon his summer internship at Newsweek

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson describes his activities after his internship at Newsweek

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson recalls his interest in the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson talks about his social life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson recalls a student protest at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers applying for journalist positions

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson recalls working for The National Observer

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson remembers interviewing the cast of 'Hair'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson remembers his celebrity interviews

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson recalls joining the staff of Ebony magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson remembers meeting Billy Dee Williams

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson describes his experiences at Ebony magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson recalls his challenges at Ebony magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers John H. Johnson's leadership

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson recalls his first investigative article for the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson remembers the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson describes his early experiences at the Chicago Tribune, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson describes his early experiences at the Chicago Tribune, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson recalls his news coverage of Operation PUSH

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson talks about his investigation of automotive repair shops

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls his investigation of cafeteria food in the Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson talks about his transition to columnist at the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson recalls investigating the black tax in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson remembers his investigation of Noah Robinson, Jr.

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson talks about the mayors of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson recalls the opposition to Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson remembers the boycott of ChicagoFest

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson describes Harold Washington's mayoral campaign

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson recalls the news coverage of Chicago's mayoral election in 1983

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson describes his experiences covering Chicago City Hall

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson describes his disputes with editor James D. Squires at the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson recalls his decision to leave the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson recalls returning to Newsweek as a Midwest correspondent

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson describes his experiences as a Newsweek correspondent

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson remembers writing 'Brothers' with Sylvester Monroe

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson remembers Chicago Mayor Harold Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson remembers Chicago Mayor Harold Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls Mayor Harold Washington's press secretaries

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson recalls becoming the press secretary for Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers the election of Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson recalls becoming Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer's press secretary, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson recalls his experiences as the press secretary to Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson remembers travelling with Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson describes his experiences of political corruption in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson remembers Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson describes his challenges as press secretary to Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer's reelection campaign, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson recalls Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer's reelection campaign, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson remembers working for WBBM-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson recalls hosting the 'Common Ground' television program

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson remembers his celebrity interviews on 'Common Ground'

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson recalls joining the board of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson talks about writing his novel

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson recalls his attempts to publish his novel

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson describes his chapter in 'Renaissance 1989: Chicago Elects a New Daley'

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson recalls becoming the editor of N'DIGO magazine

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson talks about becoming the editor of Savoy magazine

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Monroe Anderson describes his column in the Chicago Sun-Times

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Monroe Anderson remembers his friend, Leanita McClain

Tape: 11 Story: 10 - Monroe Anderson talks about the difference between a columnist and a television host

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Monroe Anderson talks about grieving the death of his friend, Leanita McClain

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Monroe Anderson reflects upon his life, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Monroe Anderson describes his plans for the future

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Monroe Anderson reflects upon his life, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Monroe Anderson reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Monroe Anderson narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Monroe Anderson narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

5$7

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Monroe Anderson remembers being assaulted by the police during the anti-war protests in Chicago, Illinois
Monroe Anderson talks about his investigation of automotive repair shops
Transcript
Well, there are signs, there were signs in the park [Lincoln Park, Chicago, Illinois] that had been there said, "Park closes at eleven p.m." Now, if you are a middle-aged white person walking through the Chicago [Illinois] park at three o'clock in the morning, hanging out in the park, the only thing a policeman is gonna say to you is, "Are you crazy," but they're not gonna arrest you or mess with you or anything like that. But, because they were young kids and protestors, eleven o'clock comes and the police were masked, full riot gear, helmets, face mask, they've removed their badges that I- identified them with the excuse being that the protestors may rip them off and use them as a weapon by them. But in the process of removing the badges, they are now a faceless mob. They announced and, and, and we're sort of back where we can hear, but we're not there. They announce that the park is closed eleven o'clock. That they have to disperse. In, in, in, in, in the, in the, in the street lighting you see a bottle fly from where the protestors are towards the police. Now--$$Oh god (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) I later learned that it's an agent provocateur, but at that time it looked like the demonstrators had attacked the police. So, they immediately start wading in and beating the living daylights out of people, shooting tear gas, and we're on the corner of LaSalle [Drive] and Clark [Street] and I decide this middle-aged reporter and I worked--white, Irish reporter while working with, John Culhane who was thirty-five at the time which I thought quite old for some strange reason (laughter), but anyway we, we started going against the crowd because these people are headed southbound away from the park down Clark Street and some of them are bleeding, bloody where they're beaten by the cops. So, we head into the crowd.$$With the cameras and everything?$$No, with our notepads, but we had our riot helmets on--$$Right.$$--and our press credentials hanging around our neck. We don't get very far. We get as far as, I'm having a mental block, but there's a Baptist church on Clark Street, black Baptist church, we get that far, it's about a half block off of LaSalle, god I'm, I'm blanking and I know the name of the church, but anyway, we get that far and it occurs to us the cops have just beaten the living daylights out of anybody who doesn't have a blue uniform on. I mean they were just whacking people. So we run into the church yard, you know to get out the way, and of course in American mythology a church is a sanctuary. It wasn't for us that day. Cops come to the fence and say, "Come out of there MFs."$$Come out of there what?$$MFs. (Unclear) is it okay for me to say the word. I, I will say what they said, but I'm trying to not say it, but I think you get the idea.$$Yeah.$$Yeah and as we come through the gate they beat us with their nightsticks. I have the dubious honor or being one of the first journalists beaten by the Chicago police.$$How incredible.$$So, they beat us, they--yeah. You know and I had grown up in, in the quasi ghetto, not the hard ghetto, but a block, block away from public housing projects [in Gary, Indiana] and never felt the sting of a policemen's nightstick until then. And so they're beating us and what they're doing is they're hitting us on the back and shoulders and in the kidneys and on the knees, yeah they're trying to hurt us, and you know and they hit us in the head, but the helmets protected us.$$Blocked that.$$Yeah. No, but, but for people who, anybody who is playing football you still get your, when you take a blow to the head you still get your bell rung. There is just no, I mean you know--$$Yeah, yeah.$$--it rattles your brain and what have you. So, we come out of there and then what I see is they've formed, the police have formed a gauntlet down Clark Street and they're beating people from one cop to the next cop to the next 'til they get past LaSalle street where it stops. And you know up until that time I'd always thought of myself as a humanitarian, but as I'm taking these blows, as they're beating me from one to--I'm trying--$$Oh my god.$$--to find another body to take one of those licks for me.$$Gee.$$I mean since, well as I later discovered 'cause again I didn't know anything about nightsticks, they're wood, but with lead on the inside--$$Oh my god.$$--so it's incredible. So, they beat us all the way down to LaSalle, you know it was a half a block. It was not a really huge distance, because we didn't make it in that far. But they beat us down to the corner and then we're done.$Let's see my break at the Tribune [Chicago Tribune] because I was just doing obituaries and I was doing not very great stories, but my break came in '76 [1976] when I got assigned to do invest- an investigative report with Bill Gaines [William Gaines] who was a Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter there, and Bill and I did this auto repair investigation, which I may have mentioned.$$Yes briefly.$$Yeah okay, but yeah right exactly because, yeah okay so, but I'll go, I'll go into greater detail. What we did was we had company, Tribune pool cars, it was Chevrolet Novas and we had, we had arranged to have the cars broken, different parts of the cars broken, by this auto repair instructor, this automob- automotive instructor at Waubonsee College [Waubonsee Community College], which was way out in, I, I forget the place now, but it's way out in the suburbs, a forty-five minute drive out. So, what we'd do is we'd go out there and either he would, he would, he would, he would either unplug or cut a hole in the vacuum hose so our brakes didn't work well. I'm sorry, so when our, our, our--$$Exhaust.$$Yeah trans- transmission didn't work right because it wasn't getting the right flow, fluid and so the car would jerk along like that. He would do something to the master cylinder so our, our brakes weren't working well, but I mean these were very specific defects that, that we knew how much they should cost to be repaired according to the Chilton repair book and their fees. And so over a three month period of time we took these cars out to fifty-two repair shops, dealerships, et cetera, places that fix cars. We got ripped off half the time. I mean we had one, an Amoco [BP Amoco Corporation; BP Corporation North America Inc.] where they, they rebuilt the transmission at one we went to the on the North Side [Chicago, Illinois]. Then we took it to one on the South Side [Chicago, Illinois] and which we had to drive, I had to drive the car through mud because it had been painted and looked so spanking new. My cover story I told the guy a friend of mine that sold me the car a week before and that I was having problem with, with it, it was, it was jerking along. So, he, he tells me we need the transmission rebuilt, so same transmission had been rebuilt by one, this one, one Amoco and then it's getting (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Just weeks later.$$Yes, it's getting redone again. But, we had all these experiences and then we ran, ran the series, which was incredibly popular. I mean it had an incredible because a lot of people have cars. Gene Siskel who was just at that time just a film critic at the Tribune. He was pretty much starting off. But he told me he didn't even drive and he had joined the series. But, but, but, okay as a result of this Mayor Daley called for these investigations. He changed the law, the consumer law in the city where now today in Chicago [Illinois] if you take your car in for repair they have to tell you how much they think, they have to give you an estimate on how much they think it's gonna cost and if that estimate, the actual cost is gonna be 10, 10 percent more than whatever they estimated, they have to call you and tell you that and so not to say that you still can't be ripped off, but--$$Yeah, but what a remarkable accomplishment.$$Exactly, yeah exactly and this, this is how as I mentioned we, we were on 'The Phil Donahue Show' because we had these incredible headlines with our investigation for five days in a row just with one, one series of things that had happened and, and Phil Donahue's people had seen, seen the newspapers 'cause he was here in Chicago at the time. His show was done out of Chicago, and so he had us on. It was Bill Gaines, myself, and, and Cecil Armstrong, the, the automotive professor. It was just the three of us on for the entire show, and of course that's when I told you my father [Monroe Anderson, Jr.] was really excited, but I mean all my, all my family, I mean everybody watched. And after the show was done, that was the first time I got recognized from TV because I was, afterwards I was walking down Michigan Avenue and some people had seen the show recognized me and came up to talk to me, you know I was like--that's when I first started thinking of the power of TV.$$Yeah.$$Now because before that I, I, I never thought that I could be on TV.$$Right, the media and the images.$$Yes exactly. Okay but I did three, we won, we, we won some awards, reporting awards for that, so I became an award winning investigative reporter.$$Was that your first award as, as an investigative reporter, you have of course numerous awards.$$Yeah, yeah and most of them were from (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Was that the actually the first?$$Yeah that was my first.

Barbara Samuels

Founder and president of THE LION'S SHARE, INC. Barbara Samuels was born August 15, 1937, in Gary, Indiana. The daughter of Blanche and Dr. John Wilson, Samuels grew up in Chicago where she attended Burke Elementary School and graduated in 1955 from Lucy Flower Vocational High School. She then attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Chicago State University.

Her career began at Sears Roebuck and Company in 1963 as a copywriter for the Sears & Roebuck Catalog. She was the first African American to hold that position. Samuels worked as part of a design team at Sears & Roebuck that made household accessories including lighting fixtures, dinnerware and tabletop items. Samuels was then promoted to buyer of handbags and later to national buyer of casual footwear. In 1998, she was named global "Buyer of the Year," winning out over 300 other contestants. She was also one of the first African Americans to visit many of the manufacturing facilities abroad.

After an early retirement, Samuels launched THE LION'S SHARE in 1994. The firm offers practical, profit oriented advice for fledgling designers, merchants and small companies in the fashion industry. Samuels organizes fashion shows for major organizations and charities such as the Jesse Owens Foundation, the Chicago Urban League, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. As a media personality, she has participated in fashion segments on Channel 32 Fox TV, WVON Radio, and the Bertrice Berry Show. Samuels was wardrobe and set design consultant for public television's America's Family Kitchen with VertaMae Grosvenor. She has also written a fashion column for N’DIGO. Samuels serves as board member or officer of several fashion-related entities, including Fashion Group International, the Apparel Industry Board, Inc. of Illinois, GenArt, The Color of Fashion, the Leaguers of the Chicago Urban League and the Costume Committee of the Chicago Historical Society.

Samuels has two sons, Michael and Gregory. She resides on Chicago's North Side.

Accession Number

A2003.301

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/17/2003

Last Name

Samuels

Maker Category
Schools

Lucy L. Flower Technical High School

Edmund Burke Elementary School

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Chicago State University

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

SAM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Isn't That Amazing?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/15/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Japanese Food

Short Description

Business consultant and retail buyer Barbara Samuels (1937 - ) has served as a national buyer for Sears, and founded THE LION'S SHARE, to offer profit-oriented advice for the fashion industry.

Employment

Sears Roebuck & Company

Lion's Share

N'DIGO

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barbara Samuels's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her mother's life raising three children in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels remembers a traumatic childhood injury in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barbara Samuels describes her grade school years at Burke Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Barbara Samuels describes her experience at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Barbara Samuels remembers visiting the Regal Theater and the Chicago Theater in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels remembers meeting famous actors during her teenage years

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels remembers experiences with the faculty and racial discrimination at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels shares memories from her time at Lucy Flower High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes her years at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels describes her job at the Chicago Urban League, including work with HistoryMaker Harry Belafonte

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her first years as a copywriter in the clothing business

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels recalls experiencing harassment as the first black female copywriter at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels recalls changes in culture and fashions during the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels describes her promotion from copywriter to retail buyer at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels remembers the aftermath of the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes her attempts to change the corporate culture at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels recalls winning the Buyer of the Year award while at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels explains her reasons for leaving her job at Sears, Roebuck & Co. in 1993

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels describes her involvement in the fashion industry and founding her own company during the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels talks about her time as a fashion writer for N'DIGO

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barbara Samuels describes some of her favorite advancements in fashion during her lifetime

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels reflects upon on trends and technological advancements in fashion

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels comments on style trends among African American men

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels describes changes in corporate fashion in the late 20th century

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels describes the influence of hip hop on modern fashion trends

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barbara Samuels talks about the disconnect between high fashion and average consumers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barbara Samuels talks about how an individual's clothing and style can reflect their personality

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barbara Samuels describes global influences in the fashion world

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Barbara Samuels describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Barbara Samuels reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Barbara Samuels talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Barbara Samuels narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

11$3

DATitle
Barbara Samuels remembers visiting the Regal Theater and the Chicago Theater in Chicago, Illinois
Barbara Samuels describes her attempts to change the corporate culture at Sears, Roebuck & Co.
Transcript
At what point in your life was your mother [Blanche Daniel] working for the Regal [Theater, Chicago, Illinois]?$$When we were in grammar school [Burke Elementary School, Chicago, Illinois].$$Okay and who were some of the personalities that you met, met there (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I met James Brown, Al Green, Leslie Uggams, anyone who appeared there actually. There were some, you know, kind of weird folks my mother didn't want us around--$$Okay.$$--you know, for obvious reasons, and so we had to stay back in the office. But one of the, one of the--my mother was a real good friend of Nat [King] Cole's, you know, so that was great. But we used to wait--in high school we used to wait outside the Chicago Theater when they had live, live shows, and that was a highlight, and get autographs. That's what we did. I must have gone through four or five autograph books and of course, some of the stars that we thought were absolutely incredible turned out to be the nastiest and the ones that we didn't really care that much about turned out to be really nice, nice people. One of the highlights from waiting around for autographs was when Zachary Scott and Joan, Joan Bennett's sister, I can't--Constance Bennett, they were in town with a play called 'Bell, Book and Candle' and all five of us-there were five girls who hung together and we went over to the theater to wait for autographs and this very tall, black guy came out with these dogs, walking these dogs and he saw us and he said, "Well hi, who are you girls," and we said, "We're waiting to see Mr. Scott or Ms. Bennett to get autographs," and he said, "Well I'm Mr. Scott's personal assistant." And he said, "Have you seen the play," and we said no. In fact, we had never seen a play. We had seen stage productions but we had never seen a play per se. And so he said, "Well how would you like to come and see the play?" And we said, "What," and we were only fifteen years old at the time and he said, "Why don't you come and see it." He said, "I'll make sure you can see it." And I said, "Well we have to discuss this with our parents first, okay," and he said, "Fine," so he gave us cards and we all went home, talked to our parents. They said, "Well, okay as long as everyone's going," and they were going to pick us up. And we were--oh, did we ever have a big conference about what we were going to wear, oh it was incredible. We decided at the time pique, cotton pique jackets, flyaway jackets those were the big things so we each went out and our parents bought each one of us a different color jacket and we all wore these pique jackets over our dresses and skirts, and when we got to the theater, they took us--we went inside and most of the people were seated already and these five little black girls, teenagers came walking down the aisle. We had our heads up, we were so proud and everyone was whispering, "Who are they? What's this?" And they sat us right down in front, and then William Windom the actor was right--he was there too and he took us to see Johnny Hartman.$By '68 [1968] were there many black employees in the--at the corporate level (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) But again--but everyone was at an assistant level. There were very few blacks at full title, very few blacks at full title. And those of us who were, were constantly being questioned about our abilities and double checked, checked and double checked and just all kinds of stuff. I worked for a buyer who was extremely difficult and really anal. He was somewhat embarrassed because I was his assistant, and one of the secretaries who had a high school education went over to personnel and she said, "I want to be a copywriter," and they said, "Well you can't write or anything, you haven't been to college," and she said, "Well if she can do it, I know I can." And this woman could barely type a letter properly, you know? Lots of, lots of jealousy and you build up defenses and so--a thick skin, that's probably better, a thick skin for all of that. So it was, it was quite rough. It was quite rough.$$Did you get a chance to write about fashion at some point?$$Oh yeah, because I was in a fashion department with footwear, okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) (Unclear).$$So what happened was the buyers, when I was a copywriter, they were coming to me because of the way I dressed and I don't know where--I just started picking up this fashion know how by reading. I started subscribing to all the magazines and reading and everything. So they would come to me about colors, silhouettes, everything, who is this going to appeal to, what do you think, and their sales were going up just by listening to me. So the national merchandise manager, a very powerful position, he said, "I want you to come to my department as an associate buyer and forget this copywriting thing." And I said okay, and he said, "Because you're a rebel and that's what I want" because I used to wait for buses for ever just to get over to the West Side [Chicago, Illinois] and then the "L" [elevated train] and then walk. When we had moved downtown and it was still cold, it was even worse because you had the wind from the lake blowing. So I decided I am not going to continue wearing skirts and freezing my tail off in the winter. So I wore pants to work one day and it went all over, all over the place and they called over to the We- the office manager called over to the West Side and said, "This woman is wearing trousers to work, she's wearing pants and that's not the law. I'm going to make her go home," but I didn't work for her so she couldn't do it. I worked for the advertising department so the merchandise manager came into my office and I was sitting there and one of the other girls who was a copywriter, very political, she was white and wasn't going to make any waves because she wanted to be promoted to something else. Well she wore pants too, we were going to do this and she chickened out and put a skirt on over them so that she could remove them in case there was too much heat. So Bill Grant walked into the office and he said, "Stand up," and I stood up. He says, "Turn around." Well see now today, he'd be in all kinds of trouble. But he said, "Stand up, turn around. Okay you look great. Sit down. You don't have to go home." And after that women started wearing pants to work in droves and so they changed the dress code because I had guts enough to do that.$$Now was Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.] ahead of or behind the rest of the corporate world in terms of women wearing pants to work? 'Cause it wasn't that long ago, I guess, well long ago now but there was a time when women couldn't wear pants publicly (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I think Sears was ahead of the time, because in most of the big corporations even when that happened women were not wearing pants to work and that was in--it had to be around '68 [1968], '69 [1969], something like that. So I was getting phone calls from everybody, "Aw, thank you so much. God it's great that we can wear pants to work," you know, and then guys would call me up and say, "Hey, do you know what you've started? What would happen if we started wearing skirts to work?" You know silly stuff like that. So that was--that was, that was good. That was good.$$This is about nineteen sixty (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah about '68 [1968]--$$Sixty-eight [1968], okay.$$--sixty-nine [1969], yeah somewhere around there.$$All right.$$And you know I mean really it was Sears was not a law office. I could understand the legal department if that was what they wanted to do but with all the running around and everything we had to do, it was stupid for us to not be able to wear them. My mother [Blanche Daniel] was very proud of me; she thought that was just great that I had done that because that's the same kind of thing she would have done.

Felicia Middlebrooks

Chicago radio journalist Felicia Middlebrooks was born May 29, 1957, in Gary, Indiana, to a teacher and a steelworker. Middlebrooks graduated from Gary's West Side High School in 1975; over the next seven years, she worked as a steelworker to finance her B.A. degree in mass communications at Purdue University, which she earned with honors. While pursuing her degree, Middlebrooks gained radio experience at four separate Northwestern Indiana stations.

Middlebrooks was hired as a full-time employee at WBBM news radio in 1983; for the next eighteen years, she worked as co-anchor of WBBM's Morning Drive, part of a lineup that toppled WGN's thirty-year streak as Chicago's top-rated morning station. The first woman and first African American to co-anchor Morning Drive, Middlebrooks was involved in numerous creative ventures; she served as the CEO of her own company, Saltshaker Productions. As a regular panelist on the Total Living Network's Chicago Newsmakers, Middlebrooks addressed spiritual issues; her written work appeared in a prestigious literary anthology, Souls of My Sisters. Middlebrooks contributed her time and talents serving as a trustee for the Children's Home and Aid Society, and was a member of the board of directors of WINGS, an organization founded to assist victims of domestic violence. Middlebrooks received the Associated Press Best Reporter Award for her insightful series of reports on domestic violence; the African American Leadership Council and the Urban League are among the many other organizations that honored her achievements.

When Middlebrooks left the air following a contract dispute in 2002, the Reverend Jesse Jackson and her fans intervened, and her needs were swiftly met. A longtime mentor to aspiring journalists, Middlebrooks continued working with young people in a teaching position at Purdue University's Calumet campus. In her spare time, Middlebrooks also wrote and published a novel.

Accession Number

A2003.064

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/3/2003

Last Name

Middlebrooks - Hill

Maker Category
Schools

Daniel Hale Williams Elementary School

Ivanhoe Elementary School

Edison Middle School

Purdue University

West Side Leadership Academy

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Felicia

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

MID01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Quote

You'll never change that which you can tolerate.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/29/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Mexican Food, Popcorn

Short Description

Production company chief executive and radio news anchor Felicia Middlebrooks (1957 - ) is the co-anchor of WBBM's Morning Drive in Chicago.

Employment

WLTH Radio

WBAA Radio

WJOB Radio

WGVE Radio

WBBM TV

Saltshaker Productions

Favorite Color

Charcoal Gray

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Felicia Middlebrooks interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Felicia Middlebrooks's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Felicia Middlebrooks describes her family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Felicia Middlebrooks remembers her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her father's profession, part I

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Felicia Middlebrooks remembers her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls her family's migration North

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Felicia Middlebrooks shares the sights, smells and sounds of her childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Felicia Middlebrooks describes her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls her early school years

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her family's involvement in the church

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls her high school years, part I

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her father's other jobs

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls her high school years, part II

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls famous African Americans from Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her early interest in radio/television

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Felicia Middlebrooks remembers influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Felicia Middlebrooks recalls having to leave college to work in the steel mill

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her early professional radio experience in Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Felicia Middlebrooks describes her first jobs in Chicago, Illinois, at CBS Channel 2 Television

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Felicia Middlebrooks describes getting her first on-air job as a radio reporter in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Felicia Middlebrooks considers her skill set as a journalist

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses the development of her career

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Felicia Middlebrooks describes her award-winning news coverage

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses the undertakings of her production company

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her payrate negotiations with WBBM, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Felicia Middlebrooks shares advice for aspiring journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Felicia Middlebrooks discusses her volunteer activities

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Felicia Middlebrooks expresses her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Felicia Middlebrooks considers her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Felicia Middlebrooks shares reflections on her career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Felicia Middlebrooks considers how she'd like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with Bill Cosby after a taping of 'The Cosby Show,' New York, New York, ca. 1990

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's parents, 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with other celebrities before a Starlight Foundation ball, 1993

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's fifth grade school portrait, Ivanhoe Elementary School, Gary, Indiana, ca. 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks in a Purdue University choir, West Lafayette, Indiana, 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks in her high school band uniform after a parade, Gary, Indiana, 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's seventh grade school portrait, Thomas A. Edison Middle School, Gary, Indiana, ca. 1970

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks dresses as Wonder Woman for a high school masquerade party, Gary, Indiana, ca. 1971

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her parents upon her high school graduation, Gary, Indiana, 1975

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with his sisters and father at her Miller Beach home, Gary, Indiana, 1998

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks conducts a radio interview at WLTH-AM, Gary, Indiana, late 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks early in her tenure at WBBM-780 AM, Chicago, Illinois, 1982

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with winemaker, Robert Mondovi, at a wine tasting event

Tape: 4 Story: 19 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks represents WBBM-780AM, Chicago, Illinois, at a March of Dimes fundraiser, 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 20 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks welcomes guests to "Hollywood Comes to Chicago" event, Chicago, Illinois, 2000

Tape: 4 Story: 21 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her cousin and sister outside of her childhood home, Gary, Indiana, ca. 1967

Tape: 4 Story: 22 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and her older sister, Gary, Indiana, 1957

Tape: 4 Story: 23 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with Chicago radio personalities at an awards luncheon, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 24 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and colleagues represent WBBM AM-780 in a Christmas parade, Chicago, Illinois, 1983, part I

Tape: 4 Story: 25 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks at lunch with her mentor and two reporter colleagues, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 26 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and colleagues represent WBBM AM-780 in a Christmas parade, Chicago, Illinois, 1983, part II

Tape: 4 Story: 27 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her former co-anchor in the WBBM AM-780 studio, ca. 1992

Tape: 4 Story: 28 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's mother while pregnant, 1956

Tape: 4 Story: 29 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her sisters on a family outing, early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 30 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks at her sixth birthday party, Gary, Indiana, 1963, part I

Tape: 4 Story: 31 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and her sister with their Christmas presents, ca. 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 32 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks at her sixth birthday party, Gary, Indiana, 1963, part II

Tape: 4 Story: 33 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks at her twelfth birthday party, Gary, Indiana, 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 34 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks on Memorial Day, Gary, Indiana, 1970

Tape: 4 Story: 35 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks, her sisters and her mother on Easter Sunday, Gary, Indiana, 1970

Tape: 4 Story: 36 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's maternal grandmother and aunt, Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 37 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and Dan Rather in the WBBM AM-780 newsroom, Chicago, Illinois, 1997

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with guest Tony Bennett, WBBM AM-780, Chicago, Illinois, 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's family portrait, Gary, Indiana, early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with Patti Labelle, 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks is awarded the key to the city of Gary, Indiana by Mayor Richard Hatcher at an NAACP dinner, 1989

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's mother presents her husband with a birthday present, late 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her sisters, mother and maternal grandfather, early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and friends at her sixth birthday party, 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her sisters and her paternal grandfather, Bessemer, Alabama, early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's mother with her three daughters in the family home, Gary, Indiana, February 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and her sisters before Sunday School, Gary, Indiana, early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her mother and sisters on the steps of the library in Birmingham, Alabama, early 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks watches her mother barbeque, Gary, Indiana, 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks with her Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. sisters, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, late 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's high school senior portrait, West Side High School, Gary, Indiana, 1975

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Photo - A portrait of Felicia Middlebrooks and her sisters, ca. 1980

Tape: 5 Story: 16 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks's youngest sister, 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 17 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks attends Homecoming at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, 1978

Tape: 5 Story: 18 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks and other contestants at the Voice of Democracy competition, sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars, 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 19 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks emcees the Starlight Foundation ball, ca. 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 20 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks on the cover of Chicago, Illinois weekly N'Digo, 2002

Tape: 5 Story: 21 - Photo - Felicia Middlebrooks included in a feature on women in media, ca. 1988