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Judith N. Batty

Lawyer Judith N. Batty was born on January 4, 1959 in Buffalo, New York to Constance Wheat Batty and Beauford Batty. Batty graduated one year early in 1975 from Friends Academy High School in Glen Cove, New York. Batty received her B.A. degree in political science from New York University in 1978, and was admitted to New York University School of Law. During the summer of her second year, she interned at the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust division.

After obtaining her law degree in 1981, Batty became a staff attorney in the antitrust division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. In 1985, she joined the law firm of Galland, Kharasch, Morse & Garfinkle, P.C. as an associate. In 1987, Batty became the senior counsel for Mobil Oil Corporation. She moved to Dallas, Texas in 1990 to work with Mobil New Exploration Ventures before joining the London offices of Mobil North Sea Limited in 1994. Upon her return to the United States in 1996, Batty began working in Mobil’s major transactions department. In 2006, Batty moved to Tokyo, Japan, where she worked as general counsel with ExxonMobil Yugen Kaisha. After her relocation to Washington, D.C. in 2009, Batty specialized in government and public affairs at ExxonMobil Corporation until her retirement as senior counsel in 2014. Over her career, Batty worked on various policy issues, including patent reform, trade sanctions, and STEM education.

Batty served as president of ExxonMobil’s Black Employee Success Team (BEST), and was a member of the Xi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. in Washington, D.C. In the early 2000s, Batty joined the board of trustees of the Levine School of Music and the Legal Aid Society of Washington, D.C. In 2010, Batty became an executive board member of Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater, before beginning her tenure as chair of the board of trustees in 2016. Starting in 2014, Batty served as international commissioner of the Girl Scouts of the USA’s board of directors. Batty also served as chair of grants on the national board of The Links, Incorporated.

Judith Batty was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 25, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.175

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/25/2018

Last Name

Batty

Maker Category
Middle Name

N.

Organizations
First Name

Judith

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

BAT11

Favorite Season

Spring, Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bali

Favorite Quote

What Goes Around Comes Around.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/4/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Rice

Short Description

Corporate general counsel Judith N. Batty (1959 - )

Favorite Color

Blue

Almeta Cooper

Association general counsel Almeta Cooper was born in 1950 to her mother Patricia Carter Cooper and her father. She attended Wells College in Aurora, New York, graduating with her B.A. degree in 1972. She then attended Northwestern University School of Law in Evanston, Illinois earning her J.D. degree from there in 1975.

Cooper went on to pursue a career in health law. She began her work as assistant director of health law at the American Medical Association (AMA) in 1977. She then worked as legal counsel for Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee in 1982, MCP Hahnemann University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the mid-1980s, and the Ohio State Medical Association in Columbus, Ohio in 1999. In the early 2000s, Cooper became Associate Vice President for Health Sciences and Associate General Counsel for Health Sciences at The Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. In 2014, she became the senior vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary for Morehouse School of Medicine. She has been very involved in the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA) since 1980, serving as the first African American woman president of the organization in 2003 among many other leadership roles. In 2012, Cooper was named a fellow of the AHLA in order to continue her contribution to the association. She is also an active member of the American Bar Association (ABA) and sits on a program committee for the Physician Legal Issues Conference and chairs the Public Health and Policy Interest Group. Cooper lectures regularly at law education conferences and other professional gatherings on topics such as “Medical Staff: The Fault Line between Physicians and Hospitals” and “How to Stay Focused on a Health Law Career.” Cooper was honored as a Mentor by the 2011 Top Corporate Counsel awards from Columbus Business First.

In addition to her health law career, Cooper was involved in numerous groups and organizations, including serving as president of the Central Ohio Links Inc. Chapter. She is also involved with Columbus Reads, the Women’s Fund of Central Ohio, and the YWCA Family Center. She was awarded the YWCA Woman of Achievement Award in 2009 to honor her commitment to her community.

Almeta Cooper was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 10, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.163

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/10/2013 |and| 8/18/2018

Last Name

Cooper

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Wells College

Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

Loudon Elementary School

Millbrook Park Elementary School

Spelman College

John F. Kennedy High School

Schiller International University

First Name

Almeta

Birth City, State, Country

Durham

HM ID

COO11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

You Should Always Have A Dollar For The Robber. If You Don’t, He Will Kill You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/27/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Corporate general counsel Almeta Cooper (1950 - ) was senior vice president of health services and general counsel for The Ohio State University Medical Center.

Employment

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

American Medical Association (AMA)

Meharry Medical College

MCP Hahnemann University

Ohio State Medical Association

Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation (AHERF)

St. Thomas Hospital

Vedder, Price, Kaufman & Kammholz

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Almeta Cooper's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper talks about her maternal great-grandfather, Hawkins W. Carter

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Almeta Cooper talks about her mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Almeta Cooper describes her maternal grandparents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Almeta Cooper describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Almeta Cooper talks about her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Almeta Cooper describes her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Almeta Cooper remembers moving with her family to Willingboro, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Almeta Cooper talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Almeta Cooper describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper remembers her father's sense of humor

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper talks about her sister

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper recalls her home in Roanoke, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Almeta Cooper describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Almeta Cooper talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Almeta Cooper recalls her academic strengths

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Almeta Cooper remembers her early religious experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Almeta Cooper talks about moving to a predominantly white area of New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Almeta Cooper talks about her accelerated education program

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Almeta Cooper remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Almeta Cooper recalls her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Almeta Cooper remembers John F. Kennedy High School in Willingboro, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Almeta Cooper remembers her cousin's advice to study law

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper recalls her decision to attend Wells College in Aurora, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper remembers the Civil Rights Movement of the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper describes the black community at Wells College in Aurora, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper remembers her travels abroad

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Almeta Cooper recalls her college exchange programs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Almeta Cooper remembers her trip to Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Almeta Cooper describes her time at Spelman College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Almeta Cooper describes her time at Spelman College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Almeta Cooper remembers the mentorship of R. Eugene Pincham

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Almeta Cooper recalls her mentors at Wells College in Aurora, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper remembers her summer employment at the Western Union Company

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper remembers the Northwestern University School of Law in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper recalls her mentors at the Northwestern University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper recalls her classmates at the Northwestern University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Almeta Cooper recalls joining the law firm of Vedder, Price, Kaufman and Kammholz, P.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Almeta Cooper recalls her position at the American Medical Association

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Almeta Cooper remembers being recruited to work for Dr. David Satcher

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Almeta Cooper recalls her challenges at the Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Almeta Cooper recalls the highlights of her time at the Meharry Medical College

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Almeta Cooper talks about her marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Almeta Cooper recalls her position at St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Almeta Cooper recalls joining the Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Almeta Cooper describes her role at the Ohio State Medical Association

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper talks about the Ohio State Medical Association Frivolous Lawsuit Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper reflects upon her time at the Ohio State Medical Association

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper describes her position at The Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper recalls her challenges at The Ohio State University Medical Center

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Almeta Cooper reflects upon her professional accomplishments

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Almeta Cooper talks about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Almeta Cooper talks about her civic engagement

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Almeta Cooper reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Almeta Cooper describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Almeta Cooper talks about her friendship with Earlene Wandrey

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Almeta Cooper talks about her daughter

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Almeta Cooper describes her support from the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Almeta Cooper describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Almeta Cooper narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Almeta Cooper talks about the Ohio State Medical Association Frivolous Lawsuit Committee
Almeta Cooper recalls her challenges at The Ohio State University Medical Center
Transcript
Now this was in your file, a frivolous liability case filed against a Dr. Michael A. Banks, in 2007. Did, did you have anything to do with that?$$Right, well, that's what I was talking about, the frivolous lawsuit committee [Ohio State Medical Association Frivolous Lawsuit Committee] that I was involved in, is that what, there were several cases and I'm not sure if this was Dr. Banks' case but there was a case where, one example was, where the physician, the plaintiff, basically, had the plaintiff's lawyer tell the physician's lawyer that, "If you would agree to make a payment to me, even though I know that your physician doesn't have any liability, then we'll release you from the lawsuit." Well that's a very egregious situation right there and, you know, most malpractice companies at the time really didn't have the, the focus to really pursue when those types of situations arose so we were able to put a, you know, kind of shine a spotlight on that kind of conduct and say this is inconsistent with what the standards are in Ohio, you, you know, you cannot do that. And so that was a case where it was found in favor, the one I'm describing, in favor of the physician plaintiff, not the physician plaintiff, I mean, in terms of the physician who brought an allegation of frivolous lawsuit against the lawyer who represented that, that particular plaintiff. That we had another situation where a, a physician, we had another situation where a physician had a name that didn't sound like the typical name that you might hear in Ohio. It wasn't Cooper, it was another name, and the plaintiff's lawyer brought a lawsuit against this physician simply because she had the same last name as the physician who was actually involved in the medical care of the patient and the physician was very upset and she complained and we looked into her case and the lawyer did withdraw the case, but, you know, what people don't understand is once you're named in the case, you have to, you know, notify your company, you have to, you know, the company spends money to get you dismissed and so, you know, those, that, that all adds to the cost and expense of professional liability action. So--$$And adds to the cost of healthcare eventually, right (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) And adds to the cost of healthcare, exactly, exactly. So we were very excited to have some success in, in that arena.$What's been the biggest challenge working f- at Ohio State [The Ohio State University Medical Center; The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio]?$$Well, in the last year, probably the single largest challenge I've had, and it's been in the papers so I can talk about it. We did have an unfortunate incident in which there was a mistake in referral of a proficiency test in our clinical laboratory and a proficiency test is a test that's used to validate the testing that is done in the clinical laboratory. It's not, it does not involve a patient, an actual patient, and what happens is that you're supposed to treat that sample just as you would treat a real patient specimen except you do not process it all the way to its natural conclusion but you send it back to the testing authority and in this instance, one of our employees mistakenly referred it, treated it as a patient specimen and referred it to another laboratory. So, in the clinical laboratory world, even though at the time OSU was doing 10 million tests a year and ten thousand of these proficiency tests, there wasn't any flexibility in the way the code of regulations were written to allow CMS [Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services] to be flexible with the medical center in terms of what kind of penalty would be assessed and, fortunately, during the time, during the nine months or so that this process was going on there was, the TEST Act [Taking Essential Steps for Testing Act of 2012] was passed which did give CMS more flexibility but in addition, we had very excellent outside counsel. I was able to identify the top lawyer at, Hope Foster [Hope S. Foster], who was at the Washington, D.C. law firm of Mintz Levin [Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo, P.C.], who represented us and through the teamwork, both of the staff and the leadership in the laboratory, with excellent representation, I'm very pleased to say that in the end we were able to resolve the situation with CMS and it did not result in the very severe penalty of not being able to own or operate a clinical laboratory. So, but along the way we discovered a lot of opportunities that we could, that we needed to address as an organization and as a result of that, one of the things is that, in fact, I'm just in the transition of beginning to do this. I'm now the executive director for HHS [health and human services] advocacy, regulatory and quality improvement program so I will be doing more of this type of work to try to assist us as an organization in addressing any issues that we might have that relates to that, that regulatory environment.

Kenneth C. Frazier

Pharmaceutical executive, lawyer, and corporate general counsel Kenneth C. Frazier was born on December 17, 1954 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to janitor and former sharecropper Otis Tindley Frazier and homemaker Clara Elizabeth Frazier. The second of three children, Frazier grew up in the deeply impoverished neighborhood of North Philadelphia. Frazier’s parents strongly encouraged education and hard work, ensuring that each of their children knew what it took to succeed. In 1966, when Frazier was twelve, his mother passed away, leaving Otis Frazier to raise three children alone. Frazier graduated from Northeast High School in Philadelphia before attending Pennsylvania State University. Upon completing his B.A. degree in 1975 with highest honors, Frazier enrolled at Harvard Law School, receiving his J.D. degree in 1978.

For the next fourteen years, Frazier worked as a lawyer and, eventually, partner at the Philadelphia law firm of Drinker, Biddle, & Reath. There he represented many corporate clients, including AlliedSignal and Merck & Co., Inc. However, the case which brought Frazier the most praise during this time was the pro bono work he contributed to freeing the innocent Willie “Bo” Cochran after twenty-one years on death row. Frazier accepted a position at Merck & Co., Inc in 1992. Frazier has served in various capacities at Merck, including general counsel, secretary, and vice president. During his tenure as general counsel, Frazier achieved great success in leading the company through more than 5,000 lawsuits regarding the alleged harmful effects of Vioxx.

In 2007, Frazier accepted the role of president of Merck & Co., Inc, and was given the additional roles of CEO and chairman in 2011, making him the first African American to serve as CEO of a major pharmaceutical company. Frazier has served on the boards of several organizations, such as Exxon Mobil, Penn State University, and Cornerstone Christian Academy, a private charter school serving at-risk youth in Philadelphia, which he also co-founded. Due to his professional success and his position on the board of trustees, Frazier was selected to lead the investigation of the allegations against former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky and university officials. Frazier has received numerous awards, including the 2001 Penn State Alumni Fellow Award, the Association of Corporate Counsel’s 2004 Excellence in Corporate Practice Award, and the Equal Justice Initiative’s 2009 Equal Justice Champion award.

Frazier lives in Pennsylvania with his wife, Andréa, and their son, James. Their daughter, Lauren, is an engineer.

Frazier was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 2, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/2/2012

Last Name

Frazier

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Schools

M Hall Stanton Elementary School

Northeast High School

Pennsylvania State University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

FRA09

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bermuda

Favorite Quote

You Can Be Anything You Want To Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

12/17/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Whitehouse Station

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

Pharmaceutical executive, lawyer, and corporate general counsel Kenneth C. Frazier (1954 - ) was the first African American to serve as CEO of a major pharmaceutical company and was known for his success in corporate law.

Employment

Merck & Co.

Astra Merck Group

Drinker Biddle & Reath

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:693,8:945,13:1575,29:1827,34:2079,39:3087,62:3339,67:3969,108:4473,117:4725,122:5544,163:5922,170:6363,178:6615,183:7119,195:7686,205:7938,210:8505,221:8757,226:9387,236:10017,248:10899,263:11277,270:11970,283:12222,288:12978,306:13293,312:13986,324:14616,337:15183,348:15435,353:19810,367:20330,377:21175,396:22345,418:22605,423:23125,433:23385,438:23840,446:25530,484:25920,491:26570,503:27480,518:30015,590:30535,606:31120,616:31380,621:32680,651:33200,660:33525,666:33980,675:37380,681:38069,699:38440,707:38811,717:39129,740:39447,747:41264,760:41588,765:42236,778:42722,786:43451,812:45233,855:45638,861:46448,873:48149,907:48716,915:49850,948:50579,979:51065,987:52523,1033:59252,1096:62191,1122:62419,1127:62932,1138:64450,1145:64996,1155:65386,1161:65698,1166:66244,1175:67180,1190:70680,1238:71460,1252:73890,1278:75058,1303:75569,1312:76226,1322:76956,1336:78343,1364:79292,1380:82010,1403:83816,1415:84254,1426:84546,1431:85714,1451:86298,1465:86736,1472:87904,1507:89437,1540:89875,1547:90167,1552:90459,1557:94160,1598:95000,1610:102118,1665:102454,1673:103014,1685:105529,1704:106376,1717:107300,1730:107993,1742:109533,1801:109841,1806:112536,1869:116386,1941:117464,1965:118311,1979:122792,1992:125522,2039:125912,2049:127004,2071:127316,2076:127628,2081:129656,2127:133174,2147:134050,2166:134488,2173:135437,2207:135948,2217:138941,2289:139890,2318:140182,2323:146724,2397:147816,2416:148284,2423:148908,2435:151862,2453:152555,2464:152863,2469:154634,2493:155250,2503:155635,2509:155943,2514:156251,2519:156867,2531:157175,2536:157714,2546:159793,2579:163829,2599:165323,2622:166236,2636:166817,2645:167149,2650:171288,2695:172494,2723:174370,2768:175174,2788:175442,2793:177595,2810:179359,2851:179863,2895:180115,2900:180367,2905:181249,2928:181501,2933:181816,2940:182194,2948:183643,2978:188284,3039:188552,3044:189222,3056:189959,3070:190227,3075:190495,3080:190763,3085:191299,3097:191634,3103:194944,3125:195264,3131:195968,3145:196288,3151:196736,3160:197312,3174:197824,3189:198592,3203:199488,3219:199744,3224:200448,3243:201024,3254:201600,3269:202304,3288:202816,3297:203968,3331:208008,3353:208374,3360:208984,3385:209289,3391:210310,3400$0,0:4016,34:4448,41:5168,53:5456,58:9992,254:10640,264:15880,342:18760,400:21730,496:22450,506:22810,511:23530,527:27746,574:28130,581:28770,597:29090,603:30242,627:32354,685:32802,693:33890,731:34722,748:35298,761:35618,768:35874,773:40630,821:40870,826:41410,834:41890,844:43390,881:44230,900:46510,977:47770,1008:48010,1013:48370,1020:48610,1025:48910,1031:49270,1041:50290,1065:50590,1071:54672,1084:55416,1094:55974,1101:56718,1112:59400,1122:60030,1133:60380,1144:61970,1149:63620,1169:64500,1178:66404,1190:66700,1195:67292,1206:67736,1214:68476,1225:71310,1263:71630,1268:71950,1273:73592,1282:74184,1292:74702,1302:74998,1307:75516,1316:77144,1353:78328,1373:78624,1378:79734,1400:82856,1421:84205,1443:84986,1457:85625,1468:87420,1474:87931,1482:91581,1549:92311,1565:93479,1593:94355,1608:95961,1642:97202,1666:101026,1685:104113,1754:104743,1770:104995,1775:105373,1783:111312,1847:112376,1865:114732,1910:115872,1944:119590,1958:120328,1972:120656,1977:120984,1982:121886,1994:122542,2007:122870,2012:123280,2019:123772,2027:125084,2075:125658,2083:126150,2091:131698,2151:133480,2189:133876,2196:134998,2216:143248,2419:143710,2428:149782,2553:155988,2580:157414,2614:158282,2636:159212,2656:160948,2701:161382,2717:162126,2731:162498,2738:163118,2747:165970,2819:166218,2824:167644,2853:168202,2863:168512,2869:173055,2889:173355,2894:173955,2903:174480,2911:176880,2957:177480,2968:178005,2976:178455,2983:179355,2996:179955,3006:180480,3015:181005,3023:181380,3029:181755,3040:182280,3049:182655,3055:188920,3228:189272,3233:189624,3238:190944,3261:191824,3273:193144,3294:193584,3300:194200,3314:194640,3320:199040,3398:200184,3413:200536,3418:204646,3430:205222,3439:206734,3473:207094,3481:207382,3486:207742,3496:208534,3512:209542,3542:210118,3552:210406,3557:211198,3570:211558,3576:212134,3585:212566,3592:213286,3606:215014,3639:217840,3647:218360,3656:218880,3669:219595,3684:219920,3690:220180,3695:221805,3729:223235,3764:225315,3799:225835,3808:228750,3824:228974,3830:229870,3851:230318,3860:230598,3867:231326,3886:231774,3896:235210,3926:235930,3937:236650,3988:241284,4031:242390,4048:243022,4058:243417,4064:243812,4070:246702,4084:250482,4142:257416,4220:258256,4236:259012,4246:259684,4255:260272,4264:261196,4277:261868,4286:262792,4299:263296,4307:263632,4312:265480,4341:265900,4376:271024,4469:276001,4527:277072,4549:279340,4594:279718,4601:279970,4606:281950,4623:284125,4672:284725,4682:285100,4688:285550,4695:286600,4717:291092,4778:291524,4786:292028,4796:292532,4804:292820,4809:293540,4822:294044,4830:294548,4839:295484,4857:296132,4867:296492,4873:298364,4910:299804,4931:305410,4946:305785,4952:306310,4960:306610,4965:307510,4976:308035,4984:308710,4994:309385,5004:311260,5038:311560,5043:312235,5053:312610,5059:313510,5073:314710,5092:315085,5098:315685,5114:318740,5129
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth C. Frazier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth C. Frazier lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth C. Frazier lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes his household growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers an influential teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes the Julia R. Masterman Laboratory and Demonstration School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his mother's death

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Kenneth C. Frazier recalls the role of his maternal aunts after his mother's death

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his early understanding of race

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers North East High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his influences at Nort East High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth C. Frazier recalls his admission to Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers entering college at sixteen years old

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth C. Frazier recalls his decision to study political science and history

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes the racial discrimination at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his graduation from Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his social life at the Harvard Law School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kenneth C. Frazier recalls his accomplishments at the Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his club football team at the Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about the school busing crisis in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his mentors at the Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his first legal case

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers the case of Cochran v. Herring

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about African Americans in the law profession

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers being one of two black partners at Drinker Biddle and Reath LLP

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his role as general counsel for a joint pharmaceutical venture

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Kenneth C. Frazier recalls his promotion to vice president of public affairs at Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his promotion to general counsel of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about the recall of Vioxx by Merck & Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth C. Frazier explains his strategy as general counsel of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his perserverance during the Vioxx trial

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers becoming the CEO of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his accomplishments at Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth C. Frazier remembers being named CEO of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his performance as the CEO of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his role as the CEO of Merck and Co., Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes his involvement at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth C. Frazier talks about his interest in education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth C. Frazier reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth C. Frazier describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth C. Frazier shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Kenneth C. Frazier narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

10$7

DATitle
Kenneth C. Frazier remembers his mother's death
Kenneth C. Frazier remembers being named CEO of Merck and Co., Inc.
Transcript
So then high school, name of your high school?$$Was Northeast High School [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]--the academic high school in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] is called Central High School, but Northeast High School had just started a program for scientifically gifted children who were interested in the space exploration effort and I really was very interested in space and science. And so I chose to go Northeast High School to this program within there that was again sort of a magnet program for scientifically strong children.$$Now are your parents encouraging you in this regard?$$Well there's an important fact that we've not covered in the academic thing which is that, when I was in the seventh grade, my mother [Clara Frazier] passed away. So at this point, I had only my father [Otis Frazier] who raised me.$$And your father is raising two other children in addition to you?$$Correct.$$So in seventh grade, that's you're what you're twelve?$$Something like that.$$Twelve, thirteen, something around that age?$$Uh-hm.$$That had to be devastating?$$It was, it was, I have to say the most pivotal moment in my life because my mother died of a blood clot that was secondary to a hysterectomy. So she went into the hospital to have a pro- a procedure that I wouldn't call routine, but it was also not something that where we thought she was sick and in jeopardy of her life. And I can still remember my father, we came downstairs to go to school and my father said, "There's something I need to tell you kids and it's that your mother died last night." And I sa- you, know, I can still remember it like was yesterday, how devastating that was.$$And you made it through the seventh grade even this, I mean academically well and in spite of (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh yes.$$And was that because of your father?$$Yes.$$Tell us a little bit, what your father did. How he kept you guys, how he moved you guys through this?$$Well let me just put it this way. My father was a wonderful man, but he was not very sentimental about his children. And he had very high standards and I remember, I didn't finish the story. We were all devastated when my mother died and I remember he said, "You guys, you kids go up to your room and you can cry a little bit, but when you come down, we're going to have to keep going in life." And we did cry a little bit, but we came down and we had breakfast. And my father said, "Life goes on." And my father was very distant man before then because I think like many families of that time, the mother was the nurturer, the one that raised us. My father, his job in the family was to work and earn money and to hand out the discipline when my mother encouraged him to do that. He taught us obviously how to throw a baseball and things like that. But, like unlike modern parenting where I think my children [Lauren Frazier and James Frazier] feel like they know me, I didn't feel like I knew my father. I knew my mother, my mother was the, was the nurturing parent. And then when she died suddenly my father had to step into that role, and I think that for him it was a great opportunity. Years later he would say, "I would not have even known my children had my wife died." But he, he became the mother and the father. He had no domestic skills but he learned to cook, he learned to do all the things that you needed to do to raise children.$Let's move on to the day that you become chairman of this company. You've been here what (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) CEO.$$CEO.$$First I became CEO and then chairman$$CEO and then chairman. But you've been at Merck [Merck and Co., Inc.] about what seventeen years when you become the CEO?$$Yes.$$Tell, tell me about that day. What was that when the announcement was made, and how you felt and what it meant, what's your thought?$$I felt overwhelmed by the announcement. I've never been a person to feel glad that I got somewhere. My wife [Andrea Wilkerson Frazier] always says, you don't enjoy anything because you're always on to the next thing. So when I became CEO, I was worried about whether or not I could run this company in a way that I would make a very satisfactory mark as CEO. I knew I felt really good when, I can't lie when the announcement came out and I looked at it and I realized I'm the CEO of Merck and my father [Otis Frazier] had a third grade education and was a janitor, I felt really good about that. My family felt really good about that. But I really am honest when I say that it's really not about me. This company Merck is no ordinary place. The work that we do here is incredibly important to mankind. And so, if you step into that CEO role. My office, I feel like I'm renting that office and that it's my obligation to leave this company better than I found it. And so, I think my overwhelming feeling was a feeling of huge, awesome responsibility. And if you knew the scientific enterprise of this company and the people who comprise it, the quality of the scientists and the physicians who make up the core of our research labs. In some ways, you're saying, I'm a mere mortal. How can I be the CEO of people that are that sort of otherworldly smart? And so, I also say, how can I do my job so that I can enable great science since I'm not a scientist. So it's not a kind of thing that you feel very--at least I don't feel very egotistical about it. I feel like I have to prove to the world that my tenure here put this company back on track to greatness.$$Well let's talk a little bit about the symbolic torch at, at Merck that gets passed from one CEO to the next CEO. You, you were telling me a little bit about that previously. Tell us about that on the record?$$Well I think--again I say this is not the ordinary company and one of the exemplars of that is that the modern day founder of Merck is a guy named George W. Merck and he had a saying that every Merck employee knows by heart. He said, "Medicine is for the people, not the profits," and the more we've remembered that the better the profits have been and then he went on to say that, "It's our obligation to ensure that our finest achievement," meaning the medicine and vaccines we created, "are made available to everybody." So everybody knows that and there is a Time magazine article from I believe it's 1951 [sic. 1952] where he made, a, a medical school commencement speech in which he uttered those words. He became a cover story of Time in 1951. And that Time magazine (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The year you were born. No sorry, I'm wrong sorry.$$No, I was born in 1954, but it's, that, that Time magazine, the original magazine is preserved in a, in a glass case and that glass case is handed from one CEO to the next CEO and you're supposed to display it prominently in your office as a reminder that, that's what this company is about. It's about the people, not the profits. And although, we're under the same pressure any other publicly traded company is, I think it's my obligation all the time to remember that while I have to do the short term performance that drives the stock price. What I'm really here is to create long term medical value and societal value. If I do that, that would drive the economic value, which in term will drive the stock price.$$So when you say this is no ordinary place. Then for you, it's a very special place.$$It is, I mean you just look at any indicator of the number of Nobel Prize winners. The work that was done to commercialize penicillin. The work that was done to commercialize the corticosteroids. The work--something like thirteen of the seventeen vaccines that are required for American children are made by this company. So the, the nation trust its newborn to us. The work that we've done in past on HIV [human immunodeficiency virus], which I've talked about a few minutes ago. Work that we're doing on cardiovascular and infectious diseases. What this company has done single handily to expand life expectancy. The work that we've done in Africa where by donating products, we've almost eradicated a horrible series of diseases exemplified by river blindness. When you come to work in a company like that and you realize that the company exists to alleviate human suffering, if you just say that, the company's reason for existing is to apply cutting edge science to develop medically important products, vaccines, and medicines that alleviate human suffering and improve and extend human life. It is no ordinary place.

Solomon Brown Watson, IV

Senior vice president and corporate general counsel to The New York Times, Solomon B. Watson IV was born on April 14, 1944, in Salem, New Jersey. In 1966, Watson graduated from Howard University with his B.A. degree in English. During the Vietnam War, Watson joined the U.S. Army. He served as a lieutenant in the military police corps from 1966 to 1968 and was awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medals. In 1968, while still in Vietnam, Watson took the LSAT and was accepted into Harvard Law School. Upon being discharged from the army in 1968, he entered Harvard Law School and graduated in 1971 with his J.D. degree.

After graduation, Watson worked as an associate in the Boston law firm of Bingham, Dana & Gould where he was one of their first minority lawyers. In 1974, he joined the legal department of The Times Company and became the assistant secretary of the company in December 1976, and secretary in July 1979. He was named assistant general counsel in 1984, general counsel in 1989, and senior vice president in 1996. With a twelve-lawyer staff, he supervises the paper’s litigation, copyright, and intellectual property issues and oversees acquisitions.

Watson has championed the cause of Vietnam War veterans exposed to Agent Orange. He was a member of the advisory board of the Agent Orange Settlement Fund, which was established to distribute funds to about ten million affected people. It was the largest class action settlement at its time. Watson was a participant in President Clinton’s Call to Action to the Legal Profession for Racial Equality and Pro Bono Services.

Watson served as chair of the Dinner Committee of the American Jewish Committee’s 1998 Judge Learned Hand Award Dinner and that same year he received the Pioneer of the Profession Award from the Minority Corporate Counsel Association. In 1999, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Greater New York Chapter of ACCA. He is a member of One Hundred Black Men, Inc. and the Anglers’ Club of New York. In 2002, Watson was awarded the National Equal Justice Award by the NAACP League Defense and Educational Fund in honor of his professional accomplishments, commitment to public service and legal excellence. Watson is an avid saltwater fly fisherman.

Accession Number

A2005.245

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/27/2005

Last Name

Watson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Brown

Schools

Woodstown High

Harvard Law School

Howard University

First Name

Solomon

Birth City, State, Country

Salem

HM ID

WAT07

Favorite Season

Fishing Season

Sponsor

Brenda Gaines

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts
Key West, Florida

Favorite Quote

Always The Same, Never Changing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/14/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate general counsel Solomon Brown Watson, IV (1944 - ) led the legal department of the New York Times. Watson is a Vietnam War veteran who has championed the cause of veterans exposed to Agent Orange.

Employment

Bingham, Dana, and Gould

New York Times Company

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
192,0:832,13:1088,18:4810,80:7200,90:15348,175:17191,208:22031,242:26032,318:33570,401:39102,456:39948,466:45174,522:51919,651:59900,769:60376,797:62008,813:62416,820:62756,826:63164,833:63436,838:63844,846:64932,866:72431,972:76957,1061:77395,1068:81862,1097:82246,1104:82758,1114:86854,1216:88006,1243:88710,1257:89670,1279:94598,1412:99971,1452:100555,1462:101066,1484:102015,1513:105957,1590:106395,1597:107709,1621:108001,1626:108439,1634:111060,1639$0,0:400,4:8880,283:10640,312:11200,320:13040,352:13760,363:14720,383:16960,423:18320,441:18800,449:25120,466:25989,481:28994,510:29384,517:30398,550:35624,632:36404,643:38276,687:43346,807:49171,849:50249,869:51404,886:52020,895:52790,906:53252,913:64276,1109:65032,1121:66124,1135:67216,1152:69400,1192:71080,1230:72256,1245:77690,1274:79894,1303:81414,1332:83846,1394:85898,1416:86658,1427:94440,1512:94800,1518:96816,1565:97176,1571:100181,1621:100811,1633:101441,1647:102134,1672:102386,1680:113330,1848:114380,1873:116930,1955:121055,2060:122330,2088:123830,2127:124130,2132:126005,2165:126905,2182:131960,2196:132464,2204:132968,2213:135540,2238:136206,2251:136946,2262:138426,2293:138944,2301:140720,2328:141386,2338:141682,2343:142274,2352:144864,2370:145566,2380:148188,2421:152400,2506:153696,2524:158700,2572:159342,2580:159770,2585:160198,2590:162124,2614:165983,2641:166830,2656:167446,2666:168524,2681:169063,2690:170141,2705:171065,2724:180721,2802:184123,2855:190703,2918:191493,2933:192520,2946:193863,2964:194337,2971:195048,2981:195601,2989:197440,2998
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Solomon Brown Watson, IV's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers segregation in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his Aunt Mildred

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his hometown of Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes the churches in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the economic divide between churches in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers discrimination at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls attending a newly integrated elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers his childhood teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers the impact of Emmett Till's murder

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the de facto segregation of Woodstown High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls writing for his high school newspaper

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his freshman year at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the Civil Rights Movement at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers studying English at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his prospects upon graduating from Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers Military Police Officer Basic School at Fort Gordon, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his response to Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s objection to the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls receiving his orders to Vietnam

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes race relations in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers jailing a friend while serving in Vietnam

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes deciding to attend law school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, recalls his decision to attend Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls adjusting to life at Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls African American students at Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls hearing of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers the news of his brother's death

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first position upon graduation from Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls joining The New York Times Company legal staff

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls discrimination suits brought against The New York Times Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first promotion at The New York Times Company

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls Myron Farber case

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the Judith Miller case

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the dismissal of Jayson Blair

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about The New York Times Company legal department

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls New York Times Co. v. Tasini

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV comments on journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls how he afforded Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls attending the executive graduate program at Tuck School of Business

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his promotion to general counsel of The New York Times Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes The New York Times' acquisition of The Boston Globe

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his diverse legal work as general counsel

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV comments on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls working on strategy for The New York Times Company

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about diversity at The New York Times

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his position at The New York Times

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about intellectual diversity

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the Agent Orange Class Assistance Project

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mentors at The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about other minority general counsels

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about affirmative action at The New York Times Company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his mentorship of others

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his first wife, Bernadette Aldridge

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his success

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his organization memberships

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his awards

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about fly fishing

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

6$6

DATitle
Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers jailing a friend while serving in Vietnam
Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first promotion at The New York Times Company
Transcript
What was the most difficult thing about you being there in Vietnam?$$I, I had a couple of interesting incidents. Once my, my driver--guy name Owens [ph.]. I think Owens was from Newark [New Jersey] or East Orange [New Jersey]. Owens was a good MP [military police]. He was big, he was black, he looked just like a black Mr. Clean, good guy. Used to love riding around with Owens, but Owens had a weakness for marijuana, and he was found to have--or a marijuana pipe was found in his, in his--near his bunk, so he was convicted of having marijuana that violated Article--it wasn't Article 15 but violated a rule, and he was sentenced to Long Binh Jail [Long Binh, Vietnam]. Long Binh [Long Binh Post] was a base camp, I think, west of, of barrack at--maybe ten or fifteen miles, or maybe ten miles away, and that's where people were sent to jail who'd violated rules. And I'm not sure about this, but I was asked to drive Owens to jail. Now, I'm not sure if it was because I was duty officer that day the duty officer takes care of that stuff or whether people wanted to test whether I was strong enough to drive my own driver to jail. That was kind of interesting. I thought that was kind of a test of, of some type. Whether it was intended as a test or not, it was a test. Now, the reality is I'm the kind of guy, if someone says, "Rosie has violated the rules," then Rosie goes to jail, and I'd be happy to drive her there. I'm the best person to drive her there. So, while somebody may have been testing me on that, not a problem, gotta top--you got what's a tough job for anyone else, give it to me and I'll make it easy.$So, what caused you to be promoted in '76 [1976]. From '74 [1974] to '76 [1976]? You'd only been here [The New York Times Company, New York, New York] for two years. What were you doing that stood out for them to recognize you (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) There are, there are, there, there are a number of factors which come into play in, in the success or failure of anyone's career, and by-and-large, most of these factors have been ones of success for me. Early on in my career, I had an occasion to make a presentation before the board of directors on a law which had recently come into effect, and the presentation went relatively well. I--$$But tell me the story because I know you were a junior lawyer, it wasn't common that juniors present, yeah (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It--I was a very junior lawyer, the newest guy on the block, it was a new complex law, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, signed into law by President Ford [President Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr.] on September 2nd, 1974. All the lawyers in the department were smart; I was the new guy, I'm the guy that had to read the law, explain it to my bosses, one of whom used to sit in this office, and we had to come up with an administrative process for handling pension plan issues and welfare plan issues, medical, dental plan issues, and my bosses and I came up what we thought was--with what we thought was a reasonable structure, or scheme, as the English would say, and someone had to present it to the board because it involved the establishment of a new board committee. I, of course, thought that one of the senior guys would do it. They, of course, thought that it would be, be good for me to do it, and I remember one of my bosses--mentor--I just love this guy, said, "Sol [HistoryMaker Solomon Brown Watson, IV], okay, we're gonna practice, we're gonna do this; don't worry, it'll be okay, don't worry." I said, "Mike [Michael E. Ryan], just relax, there's no one shooting at me in there, you know? I'm a Vietnam [Vietnam War] vet, I can do this." But Mike, who was a great mentor and supporter was--he was more nervous about it than I was. So that was--it was helpful to me because later on when there was the need, because of a structural change in the organization, to promote someone up the ladder, the directors were familiar with me; I became corporate secretary, which led to my sitting in on board meetings, so they became very comfortable with me, and as there were corporate organizations and reorganizations, I was--I had the reputation of being a very hard worker, a very reliable worker, and when vacancies came up in the legal and administrative chain of command, I was able to, either by virtue of luck, or some--how can I say--admixture or mixture of luck and, and managing the process, influencing the process, I was able to, to be promoted--$$To assistant secretary--$$I went up from assistant secretary to secretary, I then became assistant general counsel--

The Honorable Deval L. Patrick

Deval Patrick was born in Chicago, Illinois on July 31, 1956. His father, a musician, left the family while Patrick was young. Patrick was raised by his mother near the Robert Taylor Homes on Chicago's South Side. While in the eighth grade, Patrick was recruited into a program called A Better Chance, which provided scholarships to inner city students. After attending an elite private school, Milton Academy outside of Boston, Massachusetts, Patrick was accepted to Harvard University, where he earned his A.B. degree in English and American literature in 1978.

After graduating from Harvard, Patrick was awarded a Rockefeller Fellowship, where he worked for the United Nations, traveling and living in the Sudan. He returned to the United States in 1979, and enrolled in Harvard Law School, and earned his J.D. degree in 1982. After working as a clerk in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Los Angeles for a year, Patrick moved to New York City and joined the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. There, he met, and filed a lawsuit in a voting rights case against then Governor Bill Clinton He remained with the NAACP until 1986, when he joined the Boston law firm of Hill & Barlow, P.C. as a partner. He continued his civil rights work, and in 1994, President Clinton appointed Patrick to the position of assistant attorney general in charge of the Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division. In this role, Patrick worked to ensure that federal laws banning discrimination were enforced. He also oversaw an investigation into a series of church burnings throughout the South.

In 1997, after three years with the Clinton Administration, Patrick returned to private practice with the Boston law firm of Day, Berry & Howard, where he focused his efforts on major commercial litigation and civil rights compliance issues. Patrick then joined Texaco in 1999 as vice president and general counsel, and in 2001, he became executive vice president, general counsel and secretary to the Coca-Cola Company, where he was responsible for the corporation's worldwide legal affairs. Patrick left Coca-Cola in December of 2004.

Patrick serves on the board of directors of Reebok International, Inc, Coca-Cola Enterprises, and A Better Chance, Inc. He is a trustee of the Ford Foundation, and sits on the board of overseers of Harvard University and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Patrick is also the recipient of numerous awards and seven honorary degrees.

He and his wife, Diane Beamus Patrick, have two children.

Accession Number

A2004.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/14/2004

Last Name

Patrick

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Du Sable Leadership Academy

Martha M. Ruggles Elementary School

Mary Church Terrell Elementary School

Milton Academy

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Deval

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

PAT02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Berkshires, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

To Hew Out Of The Mountain Of Despair A Stone Of Hope.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/31/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Corporate general counsel and governor The Honorable Deval L. Patrick (1956 - ) was appointed by President Bill Clinton to be assistant attorney general in charge of the Civil Rights Division. Patrick has since served as general counsel to Texaco, as executive vice president, general counsel and secretary to The Coca-Cola Company, and as the 71st governor of the State of Massachusetts.

Employment

United States Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Legal Defense Fund

Hill & Barlow, P.C.

United States Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division

Day, Berry & Howard

Texaco

Coca-Cola Company

State of Massachusetts

Bain Capital

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating for The Honorable Deval L. Patrick's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his father's gift for listening

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his grandfather's job at South Shore Bank in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the apartments he lived in as a child in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his childhood neighborhood of Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences in elementary school in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the origin of his first name

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his childhood interests and aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on his influences from his childhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about growing up near the Robert Taylor Homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls gang activity from his childhood in Washington Park, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls the effect of civil strife in the 1960s on his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about why he chose to leave Chicago, Illinois for high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the history of Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his scholarship and involvement with A Better Chance

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the process of adjusting to Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the influence of his English teacher, A.O. Smith, at Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls returning to Chicago, Illinois while on breaks from boarding school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the impact that attending Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts had on his life

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes the educational standards of Milton Academy in Milton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about how he came to attend Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls his experience attending Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about receiving a Rockefeller Fellowship to live in Sudan

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experience working for a job training program in Sudan

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick remembers traveling in Egypt during his year abroad

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes applying to Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts while living in Sudan

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about his summer jobs in corporate law while attending Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick explains his reasons for working at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his job as a clerk for Judge Stephen Reinhardt on United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on what he learned as a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls memorable cases from his tenure at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about joining the law firm Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his rise to partner at Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his responsibilities at Hill and Barlow in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about being considered for the position of United States attorney for Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls being nominated as United States assistant attorney general for civil rights

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls being confirmed as United States assistant attorney general in 1994

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his experiences as United States assistant attorney general in the Clinton administration

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls accompanying President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton to a commencement at Gallaudet University

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about advising President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton on the appointment of Justice Stephen Breyer

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes forming the National Church Arson Task Force

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his work advising on affirmative action as United States assistant attorney general

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick recalls President Bill Clinton's speech on affirmative action at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the effects of serving as United States assistant attorney general on his personal life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure working for Texaco

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his tenure as general counsel for The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the responsibilities for African American leaders whose careers symbolize success and progress

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describe some of the challenges faced by The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about the duties of a general counsel at a major corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects on the progress made by African Americans in the corporate realm

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Deval L. Patrick reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

1$8

DATitle
The Honorable Deval L. Patrick describes applying to Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts while living in Sudan
The Honorable Deval L. Patrick talks about advising President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton on the appointment of Justice Stephen Breyer
Transcript
You took this year off. You get back, right? And--$$I decided while I was over there that I wanted to go to law school.$$Okay.$$And in the true, sort of, you know, Harvard College [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts] keeping all your options open behavior, I had brought in my backpack one application to one law school (laughter). And when I knew that, that we were going out to western Sudan, and there would be no mail or phone service, I decided to, that night, the night before we left Khartoum [Sudan], to go out and fill out this application and send it in. So I went out behind this little hostel where I was staying, and I made a big--and there was no electricity--made a big mound of sand. And I took my fat flashlight and put that on top of the mound of, of sand so I would have, you know, light on my work surface, which was on the ground. And I filled out this application by hand. It was a mess. I'm (laughter) sure it was covered with bugs I swatted and all that. And then I gave it the next morning before we left to somebody who knew somebody who was going to London [England] where they would mail it, because the mail service thing was a little more reliable from London. And in fact, I mailed it to Jim Vorenberg [James Vorenberg], and I said, "If you think I should, then please submit this application." And when I got to Khartoum months later, and I collected all my mail from the poste restante, there was a telegram for me saying, and it was from my mother [Emily Wintersmith Patrick] actually saying congratulations, you've been admitted to Harvard Law School [Cambridge, Massachusetts].$The faculty's all lined up in the kitchen to process out to the graduation [at Gallaudet University, Washington, D.C.]. And the president [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] starts shaking hands, one at a time, every single faculty member's hand. Still don't know what I'm supposed to do, so the aide says, "Come stand down here," and she puts me down at the end of the receiving line. The president shakes the last hand, and then turns. And the aide says, "Mr. President, here's [HistoryMaker] Mr. [Deval L.] Patrick." And the president says, "Oh, Deval." He said, "I hoped you would be here." And then at just that moment somebody else says, "Right this way, Mr. President." They hold open the doors to the men's room. So he strolls, strides into the men's room. There are two Secret Service on the other side of the door. And just as the door is closing, he grabs the door, and he looks out at me, and says, (finger motions to come here). So in he goes and I go; it's just the two of us in the men's room. He's at the urinal. He starts talking to me, and he says, look. He said, "I've got this vacancy on the [U.S.] Supreme Court," he says, "and I've got to fill it." And I said, "Oh yeah, I've been reading about that." And he said "Well, I'm down to three finalists, but I'm really only focused on two of 'em. And I want to ask you," he said, "you know this guy, [Justice Stephen] Breyer, don't you?" And I said, "Oh yeah, I've known him for years. I've worked with him. I've appeared before him and so on." He said, "Well, what do you think? Would he do a good job?" And I said, "Mr. President, I think he'd be a fine, a fine justice. And I think, frankly, he'd be great on our stuff in the civil rights division because he's fair and because he's respectful of precedent." And I said, "And I'd be proud to say that publicly if that's what you need." I said, "But sir, if you're asking me, (laughter) I'd say you've already made up your mind." He said, "No, no, I've really gotta decide." So, he said, "But I'd heard you'd say good things about Breyer, but I'm struggling." And he began to talk about some of the others that he was thinking about, including about a judge from Arkansas, federal judge from Arkansas. And at that point, the valet had come in with his cap and his gown and was getting him together. And I said, "Well, Mr. President, I'll just give you some advice." I said, "If you do choose Judge Breyer, say to the press why you chose Judge Breyer, not why you didn't choose the other ones who are being speculated about. The press, the public doesn't need to know your whole reasoning. Just focus on him." He said, "Well, that's good advice." Of course, he didn't take it, but that's good advice. So off we go. He does the procession. He finishes the speech. We all pile back into the cars, get back to the White House [Washington, D.C.], and then I have to hustle off to the airport because I had something in Boston [Massachusetts] that night. And I'm coming from the airport through the tunnel, and the radio is on in the taxi. It's about five o'clock, and the, and the announcer says we interrupt the broadcast to go to the White House South Lawn for a special announcement. And the president says I'm pleased to announce the nomination, my intent to nominate Stephen Breyer to the Supreme Court. I thought, oh my goodness (laughter), this just happened. So, I had to get back to Washington [D.C.] that night because the next day, the next morning, I was going with the president to I think it was Indianapolis [Indiana]. So, I go out to Andrews [Air Force Base; Joint Base Andrews, Maryland], up to Air Force One. These are all first experiences for me. And Air Force One is a series of sort of living rooms. And I'm given a seat in one of these living rooms, and there are TV monitors all around the walls. And it's all broadcasting news about Stephen Breyer's nomination. The plane starts to move, which means the president gets on. You have to be on beforehand, and as soon as he's on it starts going. And he comes striding into this living room where I am. And of course, I'm the only one in my seatbelt with my tray table in its upright position, and my (laughter) seatbelt locked. Everybody else is walking around. The plane's moving. And he comes in, and he shakes my hand. And he points up at the monitor, and he says, "You see that, Deval?" He said, "You did that." And I thought, wow.

Leroy C. Richie

Born on September 27, 1941, in Buffalo, New York, to Mattie and Leroy C. Richie, the younger Leroy C. Richie graduated as valedictorian of his class at the City College of New York in 1970. After earning his law degree from New York University in 1973, Richie worked in private practice for the New York law firm of White & Case until 1978. Richie then entered government service when he was appointed to serve as director of the Federal Trade Commission's New York office.

In 1983, Richie entered corporate America as assistant general counsel to the Chrysler Corporation under the reign of Lee Iacocca. Given some key assignments, Richie quickly rose to vice president and general counsel; he was the only African American in the top ranks of the giant Detroit automaker at that time. In 1992, Richie made history again by becoming the first African American to serve as general counsel to the Executive Committee of the United States Golf Association. In 1997, Richie was elected to the organization's board of directors.

Richie was active in promoting diversity in the legal profession; he frequently spoke on that issue at conferences and on panels. Richie was also secretary of Detroit's Museum of African American History and served as an officer for the Detroit Black Chamber of Commerce. Additionally, Richie served as a board member for Marygrove College; St. Joseph's Hospital in Pontiac, Michigan; and the Detroit Bar Foundation. Richie and his wife, Julia C. Thomas, were married in 1972; the couple raised two children, Brooke and Darcy.

Accession Number

A2003.152

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/9/2003 |and| 1/31/2005

Last Name

Richie

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Organizations
First Name

Leroy

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

RIC07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Naples, Florida

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

9/27/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Corporate general counsel Leroy C. Richie (1941 - ) has been a pioneering executive lawyer at the Chrysler Corporation and at the United States Golf Association.

Employment

White & Case

United States Federal Trade Commission

Chrysler Corporation

United States Golf Association

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leroy Richie interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie remembers his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie discusses his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie shares early childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leroy Richie describes his childhood environs

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leroy Richie describes life as the oldest child

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leroy Richie recalls his early school life

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leroy Richie describes his early participation in a gang

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leroy Richie remembers an influential figure from his early life

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie continues to discuss his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie describes a memorable adolescent prank

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie details his early aspirations of becoming a lawyer

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie describes his early intellectual prowess

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie recalls his mother's response to his interracial relationship in college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leroy Richie begins to detail his military stint

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie talks about his experiences learning German while in the military

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie recounts being the subject of a racially-motivated arrest in Buffalo, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie recalls his experiences at Bronx Community College where he met his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie talks about his aspirations to teach philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie details his arrest while trying to help his brother

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie talks about his experiences in law school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie recalls his first jobs working for law firms

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie remembers his experiences working for the New York law firm, White and Case

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie discusses White and Case's policy on projecting the corporate image in the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie gives a brief background of the New York law firm, White and Case

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie shares a story about a client he represented at White and Case

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie remembers a mentor at White and Case and discussses their client, Prudential Financial Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie discusses his decision to leave White and Case

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie talks about his decision to work at the Federal Trade Commission

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie recalls his experience at the Federal Trade Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie recalls his decision to retain all his workers as director of the Federal Trade Commission's New York office

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie describes the working environment at the Federal Trade Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie reflects on his years at the Federal Trade Commission and his decision to leave

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie discusses the ethical challenges he encountered at the Federal Trade Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie talks briefly about his transition to the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Second slating of Leroy Richie interview

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie talks about his departure from the Federal Trade Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie discusses his wife's postponement of her political aspirations

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie details the restructuring of the Chrysler Corporation during the 1980s

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie talks about his duties at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie recalls the negotiations between the United Automobile Workers union and the Chrysler Corporation, Part 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie recalls the negotiations between the United Automobile Workers union and the Chrysler Corporation, Part 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie talks about challenges he encountered on the job at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie details his promotion at the Chrysler Corporation, part 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie details his promotion at the Chrysler Corporation, part 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie recalls the African American community's response to his promotion at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie details a falling out with his former supervisor at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie explains his working relationship with Vice Chairman Gerald Greenwald at Chrysler

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie describes the personality differences between his two supervisors at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie talks about the development of the Minority Counsel Demonstration program

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie details the activities of the Minority Counsel Demonstration Program

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie talks about the limits placed on his position at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Third slating of Leroy Richie interview

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie discusses his promotion at Chrysler and pairing minority lawyers with those in the auto industry

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie details his relationship with Detroit mayor Coleman Young while at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie talks briefly about his meteoric rise at Chrysler

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie recalls negotiating a dispute between the Chrysler Corporation and a government agency

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie explains his negotiation strategies

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie gives his management philosophy

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie discusses product liability at the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie talks about black leadership within the automotive industry

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie details his efforts to create diversity in the field of corporate law

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie talks about the relationship between Chrysler and the law firm of Lewis & Munday

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie comments on the Minority Corporate Counsel Association

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie discusses handling the odometer fraud scandal at Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie talks briefly about Chrysler's success in the 1980s

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie details Lee Iacocca's retirement and the takeover attempt of the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie discusses his role within Chrysler after Lee Iacocca's retirement

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie talks about his decision to leave the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie explains his role as legal counsel to automobile dealers while at Chrysler

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie shares a story about post-apartheid South Africa

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie recalls his meeting with Nelson Mandela

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie talks about Chrysler establishing black-owned dealerships in South Africa

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Leroy Richie details his career activities since leaving the Chrysler Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Leroy Richie talks about his children and gives advice on being a good lawyer

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Leroy Richie comments on his legacy and his relationship with his wife, Part 1

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Leroy Richie comments on his relationship with his wife, part 2

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Leroy Richie talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Leroy Richie discusses his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Reynaldo Glover

Attorney Reynaldo P. Glover was born in Chicago, Illinois, on March 2, 1943, the second of six children. After graduating from high school, Glover went to Nashville, Tennessee, to attend Fisk University. In 1965, he enrolled in Harvard Law School, earning an LL.B. degree in 1968.

One of the galvanizing moments in Glover’s life came in 1965, while taking the Selective Service exam, when the examiner refused to believe that Glover was attending Harvard University. Glover realized that no amount of education that he had could dissuade some people from their prejudices. Following his graduation, Glover went to work for the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council, where he became the national executive director. By 1976, Glover had left New York for Chicago, and was a general partner at the law firm of Isham, Lincoln & Beale, where he remained until 1987. He left to become a partner at Jenner & Block, and in 1991 joined the firm of Miller, Shakman, Hamilton. He became counsel to Piper Rudnick. Glover left Miller, Shakman, Hamilton in 1994 and became vice president and general counsel to TLC Beatrice International Holdings in New York, and in 1999 became president of the renamed TLC-LC.

Under the leadership of Glover, TLC-LC saw substantial profit growth, and he was responsible for all of the firm’s worldwide legal activities. He served as the chairman of the Board of Trustees of the City Colleges of Chicago, was a member of the Economic Club of Chicago and the American Scuba Divers Association.

Glover and his wife, Pamela, have four children.

Glover passed away on November 27, 2007 at the age of 64.

Glover was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 27, 2003.

Accession Number

A2003.035

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/27/2003

Last Name

Glover

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Theodore Roosevelt College and Career Academy

Fisk University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Reynaldo

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

GLO01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

TLC Beatrice, LLC

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Farms in Michigan

Favorite Quote

Never Give Up, Never Surrender

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

3/2/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chili

Death Date

11/27/2007

Short Description

Corporate chief executive and corporate general counsel Reynaldo Glover (1943 - 2007 ) was president of TLC-LC and has been counsel to Beatrice and Piper Rudnick.

Employment

Law Students Civil Rights Research Council

Isham, Lincoln & Beale

Jenner & Block

Miller, Shakman, Hamilton

Beatrice Foods Company

Trinity Lutheran Child Learning Center

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Sky Blue, Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reynaldo Glover's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reynaldo Glover describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reynaldo Glover describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reynaldo Glover describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reynaldo Glover describes his maternal grandfather going bankrupt

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reynaldo Glover describes his family's move back to Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reynaldo Glover describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reynaldo Glover describes his childhood experiences in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reynaldo Glover describes what type of student he was in grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reynaldo Glover describes his early interest in African American history

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Reynaldo Glover talks about attending Peter's Rock Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reynaldo Glover talks about attending Peter's Rock Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover talks about how his grandfather's bankruptcy affected his family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his ambition to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience playing football at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience playing basketball at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience playing basketball at Gary Roosevelt High School in Gary, Indiana, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his decision to attend Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reynaldo Glover describes enrolling at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reynaldo Glover describes playing basketball at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Reynaldo Glover describes being challenged to become a good student at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reynaldo Glover describes the teachers and students who inspired him at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover describes the teachers and students who inspired him at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reynaldo Glover reflects on the intellectual environment at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reynaldo Glover describes an epiphany he had at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reynaldo Glover describes his decision to attend Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reynaldo Glover describes the competitive environment at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reynaldo Glover describes the competitive environment at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reynaldo Glover describes the difference between analytical thinking and creative thinking

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reynaldo Glover describes graduating from Harvard Law School in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his father

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience as Executive Director of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his naive understanding of the Civil Rights Movement in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reynaldo Glover describes witnessing an election in Bolivar County, Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reynaldo Glover describes witnessing an election in Bolivar County, Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reynaldo Glover describes leaving civil rights law to focus on corporate and commercial law

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his experience as one of the few black corporate lawyers in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his volunteer organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience working with the City Colleges of Chicago in the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reynaldo Glover talks about the importance of black businesses in creating social change

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover talks about developing a commercial infrastructure to support African American leadership

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reynaldo Glover describes how helplessness and fatalism prevent social change

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his commitment to supporting future generations, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reynaldo Glover talks about his commitment to supporting future generations, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reynaldo Glover talks about providing financial security for black leaders

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Reynaldo Glover describes his role as president of TLC Beatrice International Holdings

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Reynaldo Glover describes TLC Beatrice International Holdings

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Reynaldo Glover describes his experience with TLC Beatrice International Holdings

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Reynaldo Glover reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Reynaldo Glover describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Reynaldo Glover narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$3

DAStory

7$4

DATitle
Reynaldo Glover describes his role as president of TLC Beatrice International Holdings
Reynaldo Glover describes his experience at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Transcript
Now tell me about TLC Beatrice [International Holdings]?$$[Reginald] Reg Lewis and I went to law school together [Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts]. And my two-year stint in New York [New York City, New York], a young lady by the name of Loida Nicolas [Loida Nicolas-Lewis] came to work me as my secretary [at Law Students Civil Rights Research Council], who-- and Loida was a lawyer. I didn't know it at the time I hired her. But she was, and I introduced Reg to Loida on a blind date. And they got married. And I left New York and came to Chicago [Illinois]. Reg stayed in New York to practice law and eventually started doing transactions, mergers and acquisitions. And in 1987, acquired all of the international operations of Beatrice Foods that he designated as TLC Beatrice International. So at that time, he must have had, I don't know, maybe 90 companies in 40 or 50 countries around the world. None--he had no businesses here in the U.S. Reg took over that enterprise, and, unfortunately, he died in 1992. Loida became initially Chairman of the Board of the business. Reg owned 51 percent of the company. Loida became Chairman of the Board in '93' [1993] and decided in 1994 that she was also gonna become CEO. And in the course of that transition in their lives, she was also having written the book, Reggie's story of "Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun?" And Blair Walker, who was the author of that book, Loida wanted him to talk to me, to interview me about both my experience with Reg in law school and the experience of having introduced the two of them together. And I let Blair interview me. And then Loida invited me out to spend the weekend talking about what she was doing, and what I was doing and eventually asked me to become one of her personal lawyers. Within a matter of months, she then asked me to become one of the lawyers for the company. And then within a matter of another few months, she asked me if I would come in and serve as General Counsel to the company. And I agreed to do so on the condition that I would stay for a year, help stabilize things, and then I'd come on back to Chicago to my own life. And I've been there now for ten years (laughter). And it has, it was just--it had every element of a major soap opera that one could fathom, intrigue, treachery, money, big time international business. I mean I've done deals all over Europe, and a significant part of Asia, at the highest level, at the lowest level. I've trekked through factories. I've trekked through castles. I mean it has been just an amazing experience professionally and personally. And back in 1999, Loida and the other shareholders decided it was time to create liquidity for all of the shareholders. So the company voted on a voluntary liquidation. So I think to date, we've distributed to the shareholders about $470 million with a few more pennies that we're trying to squeeze out. And I was invited to serve as president of the company, starting in 1999.$How did you end up going to Harvard [Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts]? What did you do after Fisk [University in Nashville, Tennessee]? Did you go right away or--$$Yeah, I went straight, I went straight from Fisk to Harvard. Harvard came down to the University, the law school came down to Fisk looking to recruit some African American students. And my history professor, Theodore Currier, really encouraged Harvard to take me as one of the applicants. And so that out of my graduating class at Fisk, I think there were three of us. There was the Phi Beta Kappa, smarty, smarty guy. There was a guy who was, he had good grades and who was a government type. And I had, as an athlete, I had good grades, and I was an athlete type. So that as a practical matter, Harvard was, I assume, unsure of what type of blend of talents and abilities would survive and do well at Harvard. I mean so they took all of us. I mean, and my first-year class at Harvard, I think there were 11 or 12 of us. And if you look at, kind of the, the comp--who we were and what we were, we were all very different.$$And these were black students?$$Black students, that's right.$$Out of how many?$$Right--(simultaneous)--$$In law school?$$Maybe 500. And as it turned out, all of us graduated. All of us did fairly well. And, again, that was a--from Gary, Indiana to Fisk was a quantum leap. From Fisk to Harvard was a quantum leap, but the leap from [Gary] Roosevelt [High School] to Fisk was more of a quantum than my leap from Harvard--from Fisk to Harvard in part because by that time, I had learned how to be a student. I had learned how to study. I had learned how to approach academia, but it was an awesome experience. I mean it was tough. I mean, and all of the stories you hear about the law school are true. I mean it was vicious environment where they took no prisoners, where they beat you up a lot, and if you ask anybody who went through that experience, coming out of the law school, you came away believing, "I can do anything if I can endure that". And I remember my very first class at the law school--many of us hadn't even bought our books yet. We walked into a class, and the professor walked, opened the book, called on a student. And he was so nervous that he threw up and got up, got up to leave and the professor said "If you leave, don't ever come back." I mean, and that was my first academic exposure at the Harvard Law School. I mean it was a tough environment. It was tough, and I lived in the dormitory my first year, and if some guy down the hall got a book, the whole floor went and got that book. And if some guy down the hall stayed late, everybody stayed late. I mean so the notion of sleep, the notion of rest was an anathema. I mean it was all, it was all gong ho and being sure that you never allowed anybody to know more than you or to work harder than you. And I learned the lesson of relativity in law school. I was, I lived across the hall from a guy by the named [Emanuel] "Manny" Rouvelas who was a good friend. And Manny and I were sitting around one day, and he said--he was Greek, he said, "You know, I'm flat broke." And he was sitting at his desk working on his finances. And I had $20.00 in my pocket, and I figured okay, Manny, I'll lend you 10 [dollars]. Then he says, with his back to me, I'm down to $1,100 in my checking account. And I'm thinking, you know, that's interesting 'cause I've never seen $1,100 (laughter). I mean the notion of being broke with $1,100, I mean somehow that just struck me as very bizarre. But then I began to understand that much of life is all about what your experiences are and your base. So that for Manny, $1,100 was being broke. Eleven hundred dollars for me would have been more money than I'd ever seen in life. So that in a real sense, I began to, to organize and have a sense that relativity is very much a part of who and what you are.