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Eleanor Andrews

Civic leader and municipal administrator Eleanor Andrews was born on April 12, 1944 in Los Angeles, California to Jimmie Williams and Muriel Williams Poole. She received her diploma from Compton High School in Compton, California in 1962, and completed courses in general education and public administration at California State University, Los Angeles and the University of Alaska.

Upon moving to Fairbanks, Alaska in 1965, Andrews worked in various part time positions before becoming a youth counselor at the McLaughlin Youth Center for the State of Alaska in 1968. From 1975 to 1979, she served as a union representative and negotiator for the Alaska Public Employees Association. In 1980, she was hired as the union representative and negotiator for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), Local 1547. In this role, she advocated for safety precautions, and fought to preserve the rights of electrical and communications workers, as well as local government employees and health care industry employees. In 1982, Andrews served as manager and director of human resources of the Municipality of Anchorage, where she handled over 3,500 employees. Serving as commissioner of administration for the State of Alaska from 1983 to 1986, Andrews was responsible for managing an annual operating budget of over $250 million, developing policy, and providing administrative support for the state government. In 1987, she established The Andrews Group, which offered assistance to small businesses pursuing U.S. government contracts. Andrews retired in 2007.

In honor of her service, Andrews has received many awards including an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Alaska Anchorage and the ATHENA Society Leadership Award from the Anchorage ATHENA Society. Andrews served as a Chancellor’s Advisor to the University of Alaska, Anchorage from 2000 to 2012, and on the Alaska Judicial Council from 2000 to 2007. She helped found the Anchorage Urban League affiliate unit in 2006, serving as its board chair in 2007. Additionally, she served on boards of the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce, Providence Alaska Foundation and Commonwealth North, Inc. In 2014, she was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame.

Andrews was married to Franklin S. Andrews.

Eleanor Andrews was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.101

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/21/2018

Last Name

Andrews

Maker Category
Schools

Compton High School

California State University, Los Angeles

University of Alaska Anchorage

Enterprise Middle School

George Washington Elementary School

First Name

Eleanor

HM ID

AND17

Favorite Season

Fall, Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

France, Mexico

Favorite Quote

What Are They Gonna Do Send Me To Vietnam?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alaska

Birth Date

4/12/1944

Speakers Bureau Region City

Anchorage

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Civic leader and municipal administrator Eleanor Andrews (1944- ) was commissioner of administration for the State of Alaska from 1983 to 1986. She co-founded the Anchorage Urban League in 2006, and was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame in 2014.

Employment

The Andrews Group

State of Alaska

Municipality of Anchorage

IBEW Local 1547

Favorite Color

Red

Stephen L. Williams

Government administrator Stephen L. Williams was born on June 10, 1956, in Waycross, Georgia to Loretta Williams and Rosebud Smith, Sr. Williams graduated from Waycross High School in 1974, and earned his B.A. degree in sociology and social work from Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama in 1977. He went on to receive his M.Ed. degree from Auburn University at Montgomery, and his M.P.A. degree from Baruch College, City University of New York, through the National Urban Fellowship program.

Beginning in 1995, Williams served as an administrator of public health and deputy director of Travis County’s Health and Human Services and Veteran Service Department in Austin, Texas. He became the director of public health for the Houston Department of Health and Human Services in 2004. Under his administration, the department launched community outreach programs such as Project Saving Smiles, which provided oral screenings to elementary school students; See to Succeed, which partnered with private organizations to provide children with eye exams and glasses; and Assessment, Intervention, and Mobilization (AIM), a door-to-door responsive services program. In 2006, Williams initiated the Hip Hop for HIV Awareness intervention project. He also collaborated with Enroll Gulf Coast to consult Houstonians on accessing health insurance through the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Williams also served as an adjunct professor for the University Of Texas School of Public Health.

Williams served on numerous boards and organizations. He was chairman of the Texas Department of State Health Services Public Funding and Policy Committee, the Coalition of the Homeless of Houston/Harris County and the Harris County System of Hope. He served on the National Commission on Prevention Priorities, the Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health External Advisory Board, the Texas Agri-Life Extension Services Urban Advisory Board, and the Harris County Healthcare Alliance Board. Williams was a member of the National Association of City and County Health Officials, American Public Health Association, Rotary Club of Houston, and the National Forum for Black Public Administrators. Williams also served as president of the Texas Association of Local Health Officials.

Stephen L. Williams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 28, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.117

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/28/2016

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Schools

Huntingdon College

Auburn University

Baruch College

Center Junior High School

Reidsville School

Gilchrist Park Elementary School

Waycross High School

First Name

Stephen

Birth City, State, Country

Waycross

HM ID

WIL77

Favorite Season

Spring and Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/10/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Jamaican Food

Short Description

Government administrator Stephen L. Williams (1956 - ) served as administrator of public health and deputy director of Travis County’s Health and Human Services and Veteran Service Department in Austin, Texas, before becoming the director of public health for the Houston Department of Health and Human Services in 2004.

Employment

Houston's Department of Health and Human Services

Montgomery Area Mental Health Authority, Inc.

Maricopa County Department of Public Health

Austin/Travis County Department of Health and Human Services

Favorite Color

Blue, Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Stephen L. Williams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams describes his mother's occupation and education

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his maternal great-uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his neighborhood in Waycross, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Stephen L. Williams describes the smells and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his closest childhood friend

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Stephen L. Williams describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Stephen L. Williams recalls residential segregation in Waycross, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams describes his early memories of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams remembers holidays with his family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams recalls attending Center Junior High School in Waycross, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams remembers attending Waycross High School in Waycross, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his summer jobs

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams recalls his decision to attend Huntington College in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his prom date at Waycross High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Stephen L. Williams talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Stephen L. Williams remembers the male mentors in his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Stephen L. Williams recalls attending Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his mentors at Huntingdon College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Stephen L. Williams remembers his mentors at Huntingdon College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams recalls working at the Alabama Industrial School for Boys in Mount Meigs, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams remembers working for the Montgomery Area Mental Health Authority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams talks about his first job after college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams recalls attending Auburn University at Montgomery in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams remembers leaving the Montgomery Area Mental Health Authority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams describes the National Urban Fellows program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams recalls working in Maricopa County, Arizona

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Stephen L. Williams remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Stephen L. Williams recalls working in community development for Maricopa County, Arizona

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams describes the public health programs he started in Maricopa, Arizona

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams recalls becoming a public health administrator in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams talks about serving as an executive manager in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams recalls being hired as director of the health department in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams talks about restructuring the Houston Health and Human Services Department

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams describes the Assessment, Intervention and Mobilization initiative

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams talks about the Healthy Families Houston program

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Stephen L. Williams remembers hosting eye screenings with OneSight

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams recalls providing health services for children in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams recalls providing health services for children in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams talks about initiatives to enroll residents in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams talks about improving interactions between the police and mentally ill residents

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams recalls reducing inappropriate emergency calls

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams shares his views on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams describes targeted public health campaigns in Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Stephen L. Williams talks about his focus on chronic disease prevention

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Stephen L. Williams talks about disaster prevention in Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Stephen L. Williams talks about the Harris County Area Agency on Aging

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Stephen L. Williams describes his approach to the My Brother's Keeper initiative in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Stephen L. Williams lists his organizations and awards, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Stephen L. Williams lists his organizations and awards, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Stephen L. Williams talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Stephen L. Williams describes his family

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Stephen L. Williams reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Stephen L. Williams shares advice for future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Stephen L. Williams describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$3

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
Stephen L. Williams recalls providing health services for children in Houston, Texas, pt. 1
Stephen L. Williams recalls working at the Alabama Industrial School for Boys in Mount Meigs, Alabama
Transcript
And then the next thing that happened was that OneSight, during the economic downturn, said they could no longer afford to come here two weeks out of the year and they would only do a week. And so here we have at least seventeen thousand kids probably needing glasses and only one week, which means that we would see, what, maybe twelve hundred kids. And so we created a, we had, in, in the meantime we had created a Houston Health Foundation [Houston, Texas] which is a nonprofit with a separate board that's appointed by the mayor that raises money for certain initiatives within the health department [Houston Health Department], vision happens to be one of those. And we recruited a couple of retired colleagues to come and help us look at how we can respond to that gap in services. And so we formed a public-private partnership with Walmart [Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.], with the Essilor Foundation [Essilor Vision Foundation] which is an international foundation, with Berkeley Eye Center [Houston, Texas], University of Houston school of optometry [University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas], San Jacinto school [San Jacinto College, Pasadena, Texas], to create, to recreate the OneSight model that the folks from Chicago [Illinois] were doing. And we started out the first week doing a trial run and we initially kept the numbers down low and where we could see four hundred kids, we saw four hundred kids that first week. Our, our volunteers and staff were so excited with this that they decided to expand and do another project. And so I challenged my folks, we visited with Chicago, they were seeing like ten thousand kids a year. And so I challenged our folks to figure out how we could build a capacity to see ten thousand kids a year. Not only did we develop the capacity over the years to see ten thousand kids a year, we were able to see over four hundred kids a day. And we do this six times a year, one week at a time. And we have formed a vision collaborative in this community bringing in every, the other partners that are interested in, in vision. 90 percent of the children that we see need glasses. There--the first really touching story that I had heard was of a seventh grader that didn't realize that he had lines in his hands. And we're continuing to do that and we wanna expand that capacity because that number in spite of what we've done has really gotten to twenty thousand kids a year and so we're trying to match that twenty thousand with the kids that we actually see. And we have had interventions where, that were lifesaving in some instances. Our folks saw a, a, a child with a detached retina. Another woman, a teenager, who was pregnant who had vision issues but that was only a symptom of another illness that she had. And so that's something that we want to continue to do as a safety net provider. It would be good if we were able to do this in the regular system but these are kids that may have Medicaid, that for whatever reason their parents don't get them in to be seen. And then another interesting thing is that a lot of the school nurses know the kids that need glasses and have actually been trying to encourage the parents over a couple of years to get these kids in to see them. We like--we work very closely with the school districts to arrange for transportation for these kids to come in to our site but we also have been mobile, we go out to places like Pasadena [Texas] to see these kids because it's funded both by, by our foundation and monies that we raised through foundations.$Okay and so you said three, so Dr. Beverly [ph.], Dr. Stanton [Thomas F. Stanton]--$$And, gosh, I think her name was Miss Anderson [ph.] but I'm not sure. I can see her face, I know her daughter, but I got involved in a program called the University Year for Action. It's kind of like, it's a part of the VISTA [Volunteers in Service to America; Americorps VISTA] program, back in the day. And so this involved me going to school [Huntingdon College, Montgomery, Alabama] but then have a practical work experience and I think that really like turned my life around because at age eighteen or nineteen I went to work at a juvenile prison [Alabama Industrial School for Boys; Mount Meigs Campus] in Mount Meigs, Alabama, where I worked in a drug treatment program, I was a counselor. And the young folks that I was working with, I was only a couple of years older than they were, and I got exposed to things that I didn't necessarily, I wasn't really exposed to before in, in Waycross [Georgia] in terms of, you know, the fact that, you know, kids committed crimes, they got a couple of chances but after a few chances, you know, they went to prison. And we had kids that were in this program that had done major crimes. One kid had actually killed someone. I remember one kid, he was only thirteen but we ended up having to send him to South Carolina because we didn't have a facility in Alabama that could actually hold him. And so I just started to learn about that. And the director of the program, Jim Portavent [ph.], he ended up, you know, hiring me when I was twenty years old because I stayed in the program for more than a year and I think you had to be twenty-one to work but by the time I was twenty I actually had work experience and they knew me and so they hired me even though I was under age. And so that I think opened a lot of doors for me. So it was miss, Miss Anderson, I forget her name, but anyhow he ran that program and really because there were two other guys that went out to that institution with me, I was the only one that actually worked out. One of 'em quit, one of 'em got kicked out. And so I helped to make that program look good and so she was very supportive. But the campus culture with the adults there, is with guys that were supportive, both African American and, and white guys, Portavent was white.$$So, so after working there, how long did you, what, what year was this that you worked there?$$I think it was after my freshman or sophomore year, I'm not really that sure. Actually, it's on my resume.$$Well, it's like 1975 or so; right?$$Probably '75 [1975], '76 [1976]. I--god, it's--it's like the dark ages now since--$$(Laughter).$$--I'm so old.

Jerry Fanion

Civil rights activist and city government administrator Jerry Fanion was born in 1931 and raised by Jesse and Lucille Fanion in Memphis, Tennessee. Fanion graduated from Booker T. Washington High School and began working for the U. S. postal service. As the Civil Rights Movement reached a fever pitch in the South, the Shelby County Community Relations Commission was founded in order to attempt to relieve racial tensions within the Shelby County community. Fanion began serving as director of the commission in the early 1960s, where he worked as a liaison between the Memphis government and the community of Memphis.

During this time, Fanion also played a role in easing the lives of many Civil Rights Movement luminaries, including James Meredith and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., by running errands for them and trying to make them more comfortable as they passed through the city. Fanion constantly worked to smooth tempers and ease relations between people throughout some of the tensest periods in Memphis.

Fanion was involved with the sanitation workers’ strike that took place in 1968, and worked to get the city government to recognize the sanitation workers’ union. He was present at King’s “ I’ve Been to the Mountaintop ” speech and was attacked by policemen during marches and arrested while leaving meetings on several occasions during the strike, in spite of his position in the city’s government. He was also a member of The Invaders, a militant African American political organization associated with the sanitation strikers, which eventually merged with the Black Panther Party in 1969.

After King’s assassination and the subsequent favorable settlement with the sanitation workers by the City of Memphis’ government, Fanion went to work as a salesman for the Chevrolet Corporation, where he remained for the next twenty-three years and received numerous awards for successful salesmanship. Fanion died on July 30, 2010 at age seventy-eight years old.

Jerry Fanion was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 26, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.095

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/26/2010

Last Name

Fanion

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A.

Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

LeMoyne-Owen College

First Name

Gerald

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

FAN01

State

Illinois

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

8/24/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Memphis

Country

United States

Death Date

7/30/2010

Short Description

Civil rights activist and city government administrator Jerry Fanion (1931 - 2010 ) helped organize the historic sanitation workers' strike in Memphis, Tennessee in 1968, and continued to be involved with the Civil Rights Movement throughout his life.

Employment

Shelby County Community Relations Commission

Chevrolet

Marlene Randall

City councilwoman and longtime former educator, Marlene Randall was born on October 18, 1934 in Portsmouth, Virginia to Gladys and James West. After graduating from high school, Randall earned her B.S. degree in elementary education from Virginia State University. She also received her M.A. degree in early childhood education from Columbia University in 1960. Randall continued her education to receive her advanced certificate in administration from the University of Virginia and her advanced certificate in administration and supervision from Old Dominion University. In addition, Randall received her certificate in advanced studies from Nova University.

Randall began her teaching career in the Portsmouth Public School System. She went on to become treasurer for the Church and Community in Action, working to improve the quality of life of citizens in Portsmouth. She also worked as Secretary for Area II of the NAACP which includes Portsmouth, Norfolk, Chesapeake, and Suffolk, Virginia. She also created the pattern for the pairing of schools, staff and students that led to the integration of Portsmouth Public Schools. In 2002, Randall was elected to the Portsmouth City Council where she served three consecutive terms.

In 2008, Randall was a guest speaker at Tidewater Community College’s Black History Month Celebration. She has also been recognized by the National League of Cities for attaining the Platinum level in its Certificate of Achievement in Leadership program. This is the highest level of achievement that one can attain in the state. She has also been the chairman of Virginia First Cities, and appointed by former Governor Tim Cane to the Criminal Justice Services Board.

Randall is married to Vernon Randall and together they have three children, Ricardo, Veronica, and Michelle. Unfortunately, her home was destroyed by fire on December 27, 2010.

Marlene Randall was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 13, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.018

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/13/2010

Last Name

Randall

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Abraham Lincoln Elementary School

Booker T. Washington High School

Virginia State University

Columbia University

First Name

Marlene

Birth City, State, Country

Portsmouth

HM ID

RAN08

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Everything's Going To Be All Right.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

10/18/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Portsmouth

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cabbage

Short Description

City government administrator Marlene Randall (1934 - ) served as an elementary school principal and city council member in the community of Portsmouth, Virginia.

Employment

Highland-Biltmore Elementary School

Lakeview Elementary School

Portsmouth Virginia Central Administration

Favorite Color

Green

DAStories

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marlene Randall describes her experiences of racial discrimination as an educator in the Portsmouth Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marlene Randall remembers working with struggling students in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marlene Randall reflects upon the curiosity of children

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marlene Randall recalls her challenges at Columbia University's Teachers College in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marlene Randall talks about her husband and children

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marlene Randall recalls the start of school desegregation in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marlene Randall recalls her experiences of discrimination at Highland-Biltmore Elementary School in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marlene Randall remembers the support of Rufae Holmes

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marlene Randall describes Rufae Holmes' role in the desegregation of the Portsmouth Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marlene Randall describes her role in the consolidation of the Portsmouth Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marlene Randall recalls becoming the principal of Lakeview Elementary School in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marlene Randall recalls becoming the principal of Highland-Biltmore Elementary School in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marlene Randall describes her achievements at Lakeview Elementary School in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marlene Randall talks about the high school consolidation process in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marlene Randall describes a reprisal against her school integration efforts

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marlene Randall describes the impact of her work on her health

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marlene Randall reflects upon the problems facing today's youth

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marlene Randall recalls her decision to run for the Portsmouth City Council

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marlene Randall talks about her role as the secretary of the Area II NAACP

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marlene Randall talks about her campaigns for the Portsmouth City Council

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marlene Randal describes the economic challenges in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marlene Randall describes the redevelopment plans for Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marlene Randall describes her concerns for the community of Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marlene Randall talks about the Tidewater Community College in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marlene Randall describes her hopes for the Tidewater region of Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marlene Randall reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marlene Randall talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marlene Randall describes her hopes for the community of Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Marlene Randall describes how she would like to be remembered

Maxie L. Patterson

Maxie (Max) L. Patterson was born on June 12, 1944 in Detroit, Michigan to Myra and Harry Patterson. He was active in the science club, the marching band and achieved the rank of Master Sergeant in the ROTC. He graduated from Munford High School in 1962 and enrolled in Ferris State College, which he attended for two years. After leaving college, Patterson worked for the Ford Motor Company.

Patterson enlisted in the United States Army in 1967 and was assigned to counterintelligence. He is a decorated Vietnam War veteran and is retired from the United States Army Reserve with the rank of Chief Warrant Officer.

Patterson returned to college after the military. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees in public administration in 1973 and 1977 from Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. While attending Michigan State University, Patterson worked for the police department. In 1976, he was offered a job as the Police Chief of Albion, Michigan. Three years later, in 1979, he became the Police Chief of Windsor, Connecticut. After seven years, Patterson was persuaded to accept a position as Assistant City Manager of Beaumont, Texas, where he also served as the city’s Coordinator of the Minority Business Enterprise Program until 1989.

Patterson moved to Houston, Texas in 1989 to become Deputy Chief Administrative Officer. In 1991, he was appointed as interim Director of Housing and Community Development. From July 1992 to 1995, Patterson served as the Deputy Director and City Treasurer and ultimately was appointed City Treasurer. He worked as the fiduciary of the city’s three pension systems. In 1997, Patterson was hired as Executive Director of Houston’s Firefighter’s Retirement Fund until 2005 when he became the Executive Director of Texas Association of Public Employee Retirement Systems.

Patterson lives in Houston, Texas with his wife Deborah. They have four children.

Patterson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 9, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.060

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/9/2007

Last Name

Patterson

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Sampson Elementary School

Samuel C. Mumford High School

Hally Magnet Middle School

Michigan State University

First Name

Maxie

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

PAT06

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/12/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ribs

Short Description

Police officer and city government administrator Maxie L. Patterson (1944 - ) served as police chief of Albion, Michigan and Windsor, Connecticut. Patterson was later appointed as the Deputy Director and City Treasurer of Houston, and was ultimately appointed as the Executive Director of Texas Association of Public Employee Retirement Systems.

Employment

Police Department

Houston Firefighters' Relief and Retirement Fund

Texas Association of Public Employee Retirement Systems

Southwest Athletic Conference

Conference USA

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:1771,62:12243,333:13860,366:14553,374:15015,379:15400,385:20713,491:35440,615:49044,780:53368,935:81220,1283:81580,1288:82840,1304:85350,1321:87605,1330:94405,1516:94745,1521:96190,1544:99130,1557:99538,1562:99946,1567:106952,1680:107372,1686:107876,1693:109220,1712:109892,1721:110396,1728:111488,1743:112748,1771:114260,1794:115856,1828:122492,1949:146609,2132:163562,2349:166544,2358:167168,2367:171020,2453$0,0:255,7:850,15:4675,77:8925,209:29290,465:32472,545:32990,553:35210,605:35506,610:37652,735:38096,742:45052,836:46458,862:46976,868:48456,897:50158,933:58790,981:59090,986:61565,1044:62015,1051:62690,1081:86925,1467:87447,1474:97452,1665:110300,1797:111660,1824:112220,1832:112780,1840:115260,1892:115980,1902:117900,1943:128400,2131:134435,2258:144550,2349:144918,2354:145286,2359:145838,2367:152254,2445:154792,2472:155566,2485:156340,2505:160124,2574:161586,2603:162188,2612:162618,2618:163134,2630:177873,2830:185968,2933:188698,2983:193876,3046:194767,3077:196792,3100:200648,3153:206456,3266:207512,3285:207776,3290:213208,3342:221510,3492:226517,3544:232876,3671:234436,3703:234826,3708:237244,3750:240792,3768:241147,3773:246472,3923:249454,3985:265090,4246:265756,4257:266644,4277:267162,4289:269308,4344:270418,4356:270936,4364:271528,4374:275440,4394:275760,4399:283680,4522:284000,4527:288000,4606:288720,4618:298076,4690:298732,4700:305128,4794:306030,4803:306604,4811:318939,4974:320802,5013:325578,5061:325983,5067:326955,5089:327522,5097:327846,5102:330490,5163
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Maxie L. Patterson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Maxie L. Patterson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Maxie L. Patterson describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Maxie L. Patterson lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers shopping with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers the apartment building his father owned

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his schooling in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls P.J.M. Halley Elementary School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his early pastimes

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his elementary schools

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls the Trinity Youth Center band

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers Samuel C. Mumford High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his college aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers Ferris State College in Big Rapids, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls working at the Ford Motor Company

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers leaving Ferris State College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his enlistment in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about his leadership positions

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his role as a counterintelligence agent in the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his basic training at Fort Knox in Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers his father's death

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers leaving the Ford Motor Company

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his decision not to become a helicopter pilot

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers his counterintelligence training

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls his admission to Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his counterintelligence duties in Vietnam

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Maxie L. Patterson describes the U.S. military's Phoenix Program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers his U.S. military promotion

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about the U.S. Army's domestic intelligence programs

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls becoming the police chief of Albion, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers serving as the police chief of Windsor, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his community involvement in Albion, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his religious activities

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about his membership in professional organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls working in the City of Beaumont, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his affirmative action work in the City of Beaumont

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls working in the finance department of the City of Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Maxie L. Patterson recalls managing pension plans for the City of Houston

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about the Enron Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Maxie L. Patterson remembers the Enron Corporation's bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Maxie L. Patterson describes the Texas Association of Public Employee Retirement Systems

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about his interest in singing

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his volunteer activities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about the American Red Cross

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about officiating football games

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Maxie L. Patterson describes his children

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Maxie L. Patterson talks about his awards and honors

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Maxie L. Patterson shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Maxie L. Patterson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Maxie L. Patterson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Maxie L. Patterson remembers his U.S. military promotion
Maxie L. Patterson recalls becoming the police chief of Albion, Michigan
Transcript
(Simultaneous) So you learned to speak Vietnamese very well.$$Well, the, the way the [U.S.] military operates they, they, they lessened it because when I got over there, they gave me an interpreter, and my interpreter was Vietnamese, and he didn't wanna speak Vietnamese, he wanted to learn English, and so I didn't get to use it as much as I really wanted to. And then my last three months, my boss, who was up at division headquarters, called me up and says, he says, "I'm really--." He says, "I hate to do this to you," and he says, "I won't do it if you tell me you don't wanna do it, but--," he says--he was located at the--what they call the division tactical operation center where you're working with--there's a two star generals there and, and, and in the intelligence section, there is usually him and he has a, a junior captain working underneath him, and a couple other people, and he says, "We're outta people. I don't have any more officers up here," and he says, "I need you to help me; come back up and help me." And he says, "I know you got a good deal down there" (laughter), "and I hate to pull you back," he says, "but I won't do it if you don't wanna come." And I says, "Captain, I'll come, no problem." And the guy's name was Captain Miles Cortez, and we have communicated to this day, and he actually took my daughter [Laurel Patterson] in for the summer while she was a student at Colorado State University [Fort Collins, Colorado], 'cause he's an attorney in Denver [Colorado], and we have maintained the kind of relationship from that time way back in '69 [1969] to today. And I came back up, went up to division headquarters, and we finished out three months there and--dodging incoming rounds underneath the table. They had those old, metal, gray government tables, and when the rounds start coming in, you dive underneath the table until there was a break, and then you make a mad dash for the bunker until--and that was a, a daily routine you go through. And so I managed to go through twelve months of Vietnam, stayed intact, never get shot at, and did some crazy, stupid things, and went on operations I didn't have to go on, and went up and down roads I didn't have to go on, and saw how the state department [U.S. Department of State] operates and how (unclear) operates and, and saw how political and how much the civilian side state department influenced the war [Vietnam War], compared to the military side.$You're getting ready to--I think we were at the point where you were getting your master's [degree] from Michigan State [Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan].$$Okay. I was almost ready, getting close to graduation--$$Um-hm.$$--and I had planned on career wise, going into higher education; that's what I wanted to do was work in higher education, and a friend of mine--I was also in a, in a [U.S.] military reserve unit; at the time I came back from Vietnam, I went in the [U.S.] Army Reserve, and it was a criminal investigation unit in Jackson, Michigan and a, and a friend of mine there said that there was an opening as a police chief in Albion, Michigan and I ought to apply for it, and I says, "I don't wanna be a police chief." He said, "You should apply for it," and so, to make a long story short, he talked me into it. And Albion is a small community, about four square miles, population twelve thousand.$$Spell the name of it.$$A-L-B-I-O-N.$$Okay.$$And most notably, if anybody knows about it, it's probably because Albion College [Albion, Michigan] is located there. And so I applied for the job and--thinking that there's no way I--patrolman for six years, I'm not a sergeant, not a lieutenant, and I'm a, you know--but I went on ahead--they talked me into it and they said--the other element he had was they were looking for a, a, a, a minority as police chief. And so as the process went along, I got a call from a friend of mine in Battle Creek [Michigan] who I had gotten to know while I was at Michigan State. When I was at Michigan State, I used to work on what they call police community relation teams, and did a lot in the community, both on campus and in Lansing [Michigan], working on police community relations. And the Battle Creek Police Department hired a civilian who was a retired colonel from the [U.S.] Army who was their police community relations person. Back in those days, there was a need for police community relations because of all the issues going on between community and police. And so he called me up and told me, he said, "I understand you're a candidate for the chief job," and I said, "Yeah, how do you know?" And he says, "That's all right, don't worry about it." He says, "I'm on the selection team." And so, as we continued through the process, to make a long story short, what came down to three finalists, and I found this out after, after I was selected, he told me what had happened and, and basically he says, "When you got down to the three of you--." He said, "The way you made it into the three is," he said, "we were making a short list of the finalists, and" he says, "I confronted the other members of the selection committee," he said, "because (unclear) it was all rigged." He said, "There was a captain, and his lieutenant was one of the candidates," and he says, "that wasn't right." And he says--so he confronted the guy and he said, "If your guy stays in then my guy stays in," so I was left in the pool. And he said this whole thing about hiring a minority was just a ruse; they just wanted to make it look good. He said, "That's why they left you in the first place, 'cause they knew you wouldn't be selected 'cause you didn't have the supervisory." He says, "But I highlighted all of your military training and," and he said, "that made you equally or more qualified than the other ones they were looking at." And so we went in--the three of us went in; the third one was somebody from New York, and he dropped out after they shortlisted the three, and then the city manager picked the other lieutenant from the other department, and they gave him everything he wanted except when they went up to the city council to approve it, he had asked for a contract, and the city council said, "We'll give you everything but we're not giving you a contract." And so he said, "Forget it, I don't want it," and so I got the job by default (laughter). And so I went from patrolman at Michigan State University overnight, to a police chief in Albion, Michigan. And I started out there, and that's about twelve thousand--population is twelve thousand, and they had a host of issues; they had a railroad track that went down the middle of town, they had a history of blacks being on one side of the tracks and whites on the other side of the tracks, the state had a welfare office in town, there was one high school; it had all of the demographics you would want--it had a sizeable Hispanic population, black populations, white; it went from very poor--as poor as you can get, to as rich as you can get with private street, big houses, and the police department, the previous chief had been fired--a number of incidents. The--there was a state civil rights investigation going on, there was a couple of lawsuits against officer abuse that was underway, and it was an old community that went all the way back to the Roaring '20s [1920s] and still had red bricks in the middle of main street, so that's how I started out my career in--as a police chief, and was there for three years. And it'd make another four hours just talking about what had went on there.$$(Laughter).

Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey

Reverend Mary Edith Ivey is an accomplished teacher and principal, government manager, and minister. Ivey was born in Vian, Oklahoma on February 9, 1937, the youngest of five children born to Boyd Henry, a barber and construction worker, and Lucy Henry, a domestic and homemaker. She prepared for a career as a teacher, earning her B.A. degree in 1959 from the College of Oklahoma. She taught for several years in Lawton, Oklahoma and then spent twelve years as an educator in the Kansas City, Missouri Public School System - serving as a teacher, student and family home-school coordinator, head teacher and assistant principal. She attended graduate school at the University of Missouri and earned her M.A. degree in education from the University of Oklahoma.

In 1972, Ivey changed careers, becoming the Director of Program Evaluations for the Model Cities Program in the District of Columbia. She next served as Chief of Mental Health Planning for the District with her final government position being Chief of Long Range Planning for the District, before retiring in 1994.

Ivey prepared for the ministry by obtaining her Master’s of Divinity degree in 2001 from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington and her Ph.D. in divinity from Howard University. She was ordained into the gospel ministry at the historic Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. and at the First Missionary Baptist Church in her home town of Vian, Okalahoma. She served as an Associate Minister at Shiloh Baptist before founding her own church—the non-denominational Church of God’s Love. She is also the founder, President and CEO of Maine Avenue Ministries. Her dissertation for her Howard University divinity degree was published in 2006—entitled Care Giving and Love; Let’s Overcome Violence Everywhere. Ivey’s Maine Avenue Ministries, founded in 1999 in Washington, D.C. is an umbrella for the World of Spiritual Service Leadership Scholarship Awards Program, The Institute for Spirituality, Education and Health and Community Fellowship, the LOVE program (Let’s Overcome Violence Everywhere), and the Long Term Advocacy Program.

Ivey is a widow—her husband, Monteria Ivey, who was an economist, passed away in 2002. She resides in Washington, D.C.

Ivey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 9, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.137

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/9/2006

Last Name

Ivey

Schools

The Douglas School

R. T. Coles Vocational/Junior High School

Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

University of Oklahoma

Wesley Theological Seminary

Howard University School of Divinity

First Name

Mary

Birth City, State, Country

Vian

HM ID

IVE01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I Love You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/9/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

City government administrator, elementary school teacher, and minister Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey (1937 - ) founded her own church, Church of God's Love, and is president and CEO of Maine Avenue Ministries.

Employment

Maine Avenue Ministries

Church of God's Love

Dunbar School

Richardson Elementary School

Booker T. Washington School

Model Cities

Department of Human Services

Favorite Color

Powder Blue

Timing Pairs
429,0:8010,108:9030,122:12413,153:18318,222:18778,228:19238,234:25678,341:26046,346:29266,391:39989,472:41067,488:44609,557:45225,568:45610,574:52848,689:53310,696:53849,704:64863,825:70452,926:71181,939:71505,944:72396,957:72720,962:75312,1004:77499,1046:79848,1086:80172,1091:80496,1096:105228,1495:106020,1509:112080,1529:112440,1536:119640,1739:122670,1757$0,0:1694,43:2178,48:5633,64:6344,74:11400,155:19290,230:20291,244:20928,253:21565,262:29040,333:40064,476:40388,481:40874,488:41198,493:43547,536:43871,541:44438,550:47030,601:49622,644:52133,688:56548,695:56860,700:58108,725:63334,828:63646,833:63958,838:64426,845:74220,939:76245,968:76620,974:81795,1103:83370,1129:83670,1134:89862,1190:90118,1195:90630,1208:91718,1244:97626,1287:102282,1317:103184,1330:105152,1390:111840,1438:116415,1516:117015,1525:118065,1543:118590,1552:122779,1620:130852,1761:132577,1818:132853,1823:133129,1828:133474,1834:134095,1845:135820,1876:136234,1883:136717,1892:140970,1906:141570,1917:142395,1931:142845,1939:143145,1944:143670,1954:153570,2114:162380,2199:164123,2222:170149,2262:170551,2269:176538,2347:183218,2398:183799,2406:184961,2422:185293,2427:186123,2441:187368,2457:187700,2462:190024,2496:190688,2507:192265,2531:192597,2536:196482,2553:196778,2558:197148,2564:198184,2586:200626,2637:200922,2642:201218,2647:202550,2671:207276,2712:207552,2717:208035,2726:211278,2810:221988,2939:222541,2947:223331,2959:223647,2964:226096,3005:272182,3759:272721,3768:273337,3777:276340,3824:276725,3831:277110,3837:279882,3891:287054,3953:289022,3985:290006,4001:290580,4009:292138,4032:292466,4037:296156,4093:296566,4100:297304,4110:304250,4160
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her mother's education and employment

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her father's employment and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her childhood home in Vian, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her childhood neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls growing up as the youngest of five children

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes the role of religion in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her family's holidays and entertainment

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her elementary school education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her childhood mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her disposition as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls briefly living in Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her parents' employment in Kansas City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her high school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls the Oklahoma College for Women

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls obtaining a teaching position in Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her career at Richardson Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls her promotions to assistant principal and principal

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls joining the Model Cities program, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls joining the Model Cities program, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls the loss of funding for the Model Cities program

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her career at the Department of Human Services

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey recalls meeting her husband at Shiloh Baptist Church

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey remembers retiring from government in 1994

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her calling to the ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes the process of ordination

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her first sermon

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey remembers the Howard University School of Divinity

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey talks about her book, 'Care Giving and Love'

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey talks about founding Maine Avenue Ministries

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her mission at Maine Avenue Ministries

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes the Let's Overcome Violence Everywhere program

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey talks about founding the Church of God's Love

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes the National Association of Minority Political Families

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey talks about her organizational involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey talks about The HistoryMakers project

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

11$7

DATitle
Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her earliest childhood memory
Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey describes her calling to the ministry
Transcript
What are your earliest, farthest back memories as a child? How far back can you remember as a child? What incidents and situations do you remember?$$I remember going to school [Douglas School, Vian, Oklahoma] when I was about three years old. My [paternal] grandmother, Mary [Mary Henry], also kept teachers who were--single teachers who were boarding and she had one teacher named Edith Jenkins and my middle name is for her. And Ms. Jenkins was unmarried and so she made her--I was like her little toy girl. So, she taught me to read--to read by the time I was three years old. And she made reading fun to me, and I bless the Lord for her to this day because, because of her, I've always enjoyed reading. It is my passion now. If I could get rid of some of the books I have, I could (laughter)--yeah, but anyway, I remember that. And I always--and I used to like to dance when I got older. And I just like fun and people. I'm very outgoing and very gregarious and so if it was fun--and then when I was a little girl, I used to go--I wanted to go to the fields and work and make some money. And I was perhaps the only girl my age or the youngest in town catching the trucks going to the fields to pick tomatoes, pick strawberries, cut spinach and all of that. And my mother [Lucy Ballard Lacy] would say, "Now, don't you get up there on that truck and get hurt and fall off." And everybody in town were saying, "Why do they let her go?" But I would cry to go. I would beg to go because I was always independent, always wanted my money, always liked shoes and my mother would let me buy a pair of shoes with my money (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) You still like shoes?$$--and go to the fair. Yes, I still like them. I have far too many.$You're known today and we want to begin to talk about the--your religious leadership and your ministries and a number of other organizations that you have founded and, and all related to human services and so on. Tell us how you began to move into the field of ministry. This happened after you retired or before or?$$Yes, after I retired, and I, I shared with you a little earlier that both my mother [Lucy Ballard Lacy] and my husband [Monteria Ivey, Sr.] were ill, and I just didn't know which way to turn, and I would often times come right in this room, in the living room, and get on my knees before the sofa or in front of a chair and just pray. And that's--was during the time that I felt that I was called to the ministry and that's during the time I was telling God, "I don't see how I can do this. I just--," and then some things began to be revealed to me. I went to a person's home who was on her death bed, so to speak, that I took my husband by to visit with her, and her name was Gertie Mae Turner [ph.]. She ended up leaving Shiloh Baptist Church [Washington, D.C.], a lot of her property and the building that they use for the office building, and some units in the same block of the church as well. But she said to me that day, she said, "The Lord wants you to speak for Him," and I had not mentioned to anybody but my mother, and my mother never knew her, and my mother was in Oklahoma and my husband about the ministry call. They both had encouraged me to do it but I hadn't really done anything about it. And so that was shocking to me. I knew my husband had not spoken to her because by that time, he couldn't dial the phone by himself. And I knew she was very sick, and I knew he had--so that shocked me. And I told Reverend Smith [Wallace Charles Smith] when I went to here and he said that often happens in life (unclear). So, different things began to happen to me, that I was asking God to show me some signs and what have you if--and I would say this, don't ask to be shown if you don't know what you're going to be shown because some of the things were frightening to me that happened, but I realized that God was doing what I had asked God to do. And so when my mother died, I said to a minister in Oklahoma, another female minister, that I was called to the ministry but I had not acknowledged it and that I felt empty inside. And, you know, it was a painful feeling and she said that, "You're going to always feel that way if you don't declare God publicly." Because she said, "I've been through it. The same thing happened to me." She said, "And once you declare it and begin, then you will feel different," and she was telling the truth. That was true. So I came back and actually we were at a Lott Carey [Landover, Maryland] meeting and I was co-chairing something for the Lott Carey for Reverend Smith and I just broke down--we were at the Shoreham Hotel and started crying. And he thought someone had said something to me or done something, so he said, "Well, what's wrong?" And we ended up going into a room talking, and I told him what had happened and he, he kids now and he says, publicly, he said, "I nearly fell out when Mary [HistoryMaker Reverend Dr. Mary Ivey] told me (laughter)." But, anyway, he told me to come to his office and talk, and I went to his office and talked. And he was teaching a class or two at Wesley Theological Seminary [Washington, D.C.] at the time and so the first thing he said to me, he said, well, "We gotta get you before the board, gotta do a trial sermon, and then also we gotta get you in Wesley." And that's how I happened to go to Wesley Seminary. He just said, "Wesley," and I went to Wesley and I really enjoyed it, but I also was ordained in Oklahoma before I finished Wesley by the same woman's husband who told me that I would feel empty. Her husband was the pastor of the church that my mother attended. And he invited me to be ordained at that church since my mother had been one of his closest friends in there. And he's dead now, but I went there and I was ordained, and then when I graduated from seminary, I was ordained here at Shiloh also.

Larry Dingle

Larry Dingle was born in rural Dillon, South Carolina, on June 26, 1949. Dingle was an agent of change in his hometown of Dillon, South Carolina; he desegregated the high school closest to his home. From there, Dingle attended Morehouse College to pursue his undergraduate education; he transferred to Georgia State University, where he was awarded his B.A. degree in 1974, and his J.D. degree in 1987, enabling him to practice law.

Dingle was a police officer for the City of Atlanta and then worked for the City of Atlanta from 1969 to 1990 as a department head and Clerk of Council. It is in this capacity that Dingle gained the confidence and support of then Mayors Maynard Jackson and Andrew Young as a civil servant of considerable talent. From 1990 to 1997, Dingle worked as a partner at the law firm of Peterson, Dillard, Young, Asselin and Powell. Dingle later became a partner at Wilson, Brock, and Irby, L.L.C., where he earned great prestige through his representation of clients such as Sax Fifth Avenue.

Dingle served on the Board of Directors of Southeast Energy; the Bank of North Georgia; Central Fulton Senior Services; and Georgia State University’s Board of Visitors. Dingle was a member of the Georgia Bar Association for twenty years. In 1990, Dingle co-authored Major Land Use Laws in Georgia, which was published by the National Business Institute, Inc. Dingle earned distinction in the City of Atlanta as a civil servant and attorney and was recognized nationally for contributions to the practice of law.

Accession Number

A2005.178

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/1/2005

Last Name

Dingle

Marital Status

Married

Schools

Latta Elementary School

Morehouse College

Georgia State University

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Dillon

HM ID

DIN03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Casa De Campo

Favorite Quote

I'm Doing Okay For A Farm Boy From South Carolina.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/26/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Calamari

Short Description

City government administrator and administrative lawyer Larry Dingle (1949 - ) served as Clerk of Council for the City of Atlanta, and became nationally known for his activities as a civil servant and attorney.

Employment

City of Atlanta

Wilson Brock & Irby, L.L.C.

Dillard, Westmoreland and Wilson

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2119,35:2443,40:4630,90:24648,381:25240,469:36984,611:37552,619:40543,677:43240,731:43588,736:45415,768:46024,776:46459,782:47503,796:52075,838:69230,1112:82615,1263:83140,1272:94067,1428:99739,1484:100307,1493:100662,1499:101017,1505:106058,1611:120400,1791$0,0:108700,1529
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larry Dingle's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle describes Carolina S, one of his ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle recalls his earliest memories of growing up in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle recalls childhood summers in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle recalls his childhood street in South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle recalls desegregating Latta High School in Latta, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle recalls his childhood mentor

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Larry Dingle recalls seeing Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on TV

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Larry Dingle describes integrating his high school and struggling with reading

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Larry Dingle describes his childhood church

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Larry Dingle recalls an exchange with a high school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Dingle talks about playing basketball at Latta High School in Latta, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle talks about his extracurricular activities as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle describes aspiring to become a lawyer

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle talks about his decision to attend Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle talks about his initial impressions of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle talks about leaving Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and becoming a police officer

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle talks about negotiating with Mayor Maynard Jackson as an Atlanta police officer

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle talks about attending Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia for undergraduate and law school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle talks about his exit strategy after finishing law school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle talks about his family and offers advice on parenting

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle talks about law connections he made over the years

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle talks about memorable court cases

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Dingle talks about voting rights

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle reflects on rights and the importance of voting

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle talks about his passion for elderly and youth issues

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his life

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle offers advice for those interested in pursuing law careers

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle talks about his hopes for the future

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle reflects on what he would do differently

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle talks about rap music

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his values

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle reflects on lessons for his children and the importance of history

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle describes his role as Clerk of Council in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle recalls memories of former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Larry Dingle describes aspiring to become a lawyer
Larry Dingle talks about negotiating with Mayor Maynard Jackson as an Atlanta police officer
Transcript
So let's say that junior [year] of high school, at that point, were you beginning to know what you wanted to be? Did you have any particular ambitions?$$I had always professed starting at the age of fourteen or fifteen that I was going to be a lawyer. And the interesting reason or the interesting thing about what motivates you, I can't remember the, the man's name, but he had attended Howard University [Washington, D.C.] from Dillon County [South Carolina]. And Howard at that time, and I still think today, is an extraordinary institution, but then, that was about the only place that I knew of that an African American could get a law degree. And this fella had been accepted into How--into Howard's law school. And the talk around the tobacco barn for the several weeks preceding his acceptance at Howard was just phenomenal, that people spoke of him as almost, almost as if he were god-like. You would've thought he were Apollo, you know, and so I just thought, well gee whiz, if being a lawyer is that some--is a type of thing that causes these women around this tobacco barn to be so filled with that much adoration, it's gotta be something I gotta do. And I hung--that idea hung with me for a long time, that it was just a concept of creating a sense of academic self that would be worthy of adoration. And coming off to Atlanta [Georgia], as we mentioned earlier, I met some extraordinary people who were in that profession, The Honorable Clarence Cooper, federal district court judge here, one of those who encouraged that, [HM] Marvin Arrington, [HM] Carl Ware, a host of other people who encouraged that--the pursuit of that goal. But, you know, back then it was just the idea of having my grandmomma [Charity Dingle] and the folks around the barn think highly of me.$And that was definitely a, a very vital moment in Atlanta's [Georgia] history. Mayor [Maynard] Jackson definitely was a trailblazer. What were your experiences or your interactions with him like?$$Well, the first time I met him was in 1968 when he was running for [U.S.] Senate, he came onto Morehouse College [Atlanta, Georgia] campus, very handsome, very eloquent, very bright man. And the second time I was able to meet him was as a police officer; this was I think around 1970. He had been elected vice mayor of the city and we were engaged in I guess combat, if you will, with the police administration about the absence of fair testing in the police department, the absence of the advancement of African Americans within the Atlanta core. And a group of us got together. I can't remember all of the people, but the two leaders of the group or one of the leaders of the group, well two I'd say, were Floyd Reeves and C.C. Mitchell [ph.], the late C.C. Mitchell. And we decided we'd go to Maynard's home at two o'clock in the morning. He lived on 2nd Avenue or off 2nd Avenue in southeast Atlanta, not exactly the greatest time to knock on somebody's door to make a--an impression, but we knocked on his door at two in the morning. He answered it. He talked to us for an hour and a half, made promises to us, every one of which he kept, and to this day is one of my, I think, a hero to a lot of people because he just believed in doing what was right and causing to be done what was right under those circumstances.

Sidney L. Rushing

Sidney Lanier Rushing was born August 20, 1930, in Carthage, Mississippi. After graduating from Jordan High School in 1948, Rushing earned a B.S. degree in political science from Mississippi Valley State University and an M.Ed. degree from Southern University. Rushing taught social studies in the Gulfport, Mississippi, city schools from 1958 to 1971.

In 1972, Rushing worked for the Department of Housing and Urban Development. In 1974, he was invited by a friend to apply for a management training position with Gulfport's Hancock Bank. Rushing was hired, and despite the discrimination he experienced, he rose from loan officer to vice president. As a bank official, Rushing opened up banking opportunities for other African Americans. Moreover, he used his knowledge of the community to inform his business decisions and the community supported him.

Civic-minded and service-oriented, Rushing serves on the boards of the Mississippi Resource Development Corporation, the PTA, St. Marks United Methodist Church, the Gulfport Planning Commission and is a member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. He was appointed to the Mississippi Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges and is president of the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning. Rushing and other Gulfport activists recently formed the John C. Robinson Brown Condor Association to honor Robinson, a Gulfport native and aviation pioneer.

Accession Number

A2002.203

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/12/2002

Last Name

Rushing

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Organizations
Schools

Leake Country Agricultural High School

Jackson State University

Mississippi Valley State University

First Name

Sidney

Birth City, State, Country

Carthage

HM ID

RUS03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

California

Favorite Quote

Always Do The Best You Can And That Is All That Will Ever Be Required Of You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Mississippi

Birth Date

8/20/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Gulfport

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Catfish

Short Description

City government administrator Sidney L. Rushing (1930 - ) has lived a life in service to the community of Gulfport, Mississippi, and is now the President of the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning of Mississippi.

Employment

Gulfport Public Schools

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Hancock Bank

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:18660,204:19070,210:91105,1268:91480,1274:91930,1281:107427,1468:108350,1484:108634,1489:123293,1726:123983,1738:127640,1860:127916,1865:130883,1940:147080,2102:147640,2160:150600,2210:170520,2485:170895,2491:173820,2543:174720,2559:187814,2744:190340,2759:191315,2774:192890,2822:200315,3066:229210,3445$0,0:30800,420:69042,875:76464,934:76884,940:77388,960:92146,1133:100886,1273:104290,1345:119350,1442:121458,1490:125674,1564:126218,1573:130538,1614:131066,1623:133442,1660:134234,1675:137666,1767:138524,1789:146550,1855:149358,1907:152490,1992:156378,2054:161571,2110:170512,2263:170944,2271:171232,2276:185750,2539:187010,2565:192240,2609
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sidney Rushing's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sidney Rushing lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sidney Rushing talks about his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sidney Rushing describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sidney Rushing describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sidney Rushing talks about his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sidney Rushing describes his mother's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sidney Rushing describes his mother's career as a teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sidney Rushing describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sidney Rushing describes his experience attending Leake County Agricultural High School in Walnut Grove, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sidney Rushing describes the makeshift buses that he rode to high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sidney Rushing describes a teacher who affected him

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sidney Rushing talks about the importance of Jeanes supervisors

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sidney Rushing talks about gathering to listen to Joe Louis fights on the radio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sidney Rushing describes the curriculum at Leake County Agricultural High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sidney Rushing describes the size of Leake County Agricultural High School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sidney Rushing describes his graduation from Leake County Agricultural High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sidney Rushing describes his experience at Jackson State University in Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sidney Rushing talks about his experience as a physical education major at Jackson State University in Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Sidney Rushing describes his enlistment in the United States Air Force during the Korean War

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sidney Rushing describes being stationed with the United States Air Force during the Korean War

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sidney Rushing describes his expertise in maps at the Eastern Air Defense Base in New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sidney Rushing describes his experience in the United States Air Force during the Korean War

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sidney Rushing describes attending Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sidney Rushing describes becoming a teacher at 33rd Avenue High School in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sidney Rushing talks about the poll tax in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sidney Rushing talks about the cultural differences between upstate Mississippi and the Gulf Coast region

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sidney Rushing talks about Mississippi teachers not being allowed to join Civil Rights organizations

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sidney Rushing describes meeting Medgar Evers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sidney Rushing talks about his decision to become a teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sidney Rushing describes his experience as a teacher in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sidney Rushing describes being hired to work at Hancock Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sidney Rushing describes his experience working at Hancock Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sidney Rushing talks about his success as the only black loan officer at Hancock Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sidney Rushing describes the civic organizations where he is a member

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sidney Rushing recounts the career of John C. Robinson

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sidney Rushing recounts the career of John C. Robinson, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sidney Rushing talks about his plans to build a monument for John C. Robinson in Gulfport, Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sidney Rushing describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sidney Rushing reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sidney Rushing talks about how he'd like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sidney Rushing narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

9$5

DATitle
Sidney Rushing describes meeting Medgar Evers
Sidney Rushing talks about his success as the only black loan officer at Hancock Bank
Transcript
I think you, you mentioned off camera something called the State Sovereignty Commission. Now what, what was that about, and how did they--did they play a role in backing people up from being involved in Civil Rights?$$Oh yes. Now, the State Sovereignty Commission was a watchdog commission, and it, it, it, it watched people that were involved in, in civil rights act--activities, and these people were, were, were targeted. For example, Medgar Evers, the, the--whom I've known all my life, just about all my life, if, if, if you were associated with him in any kind of way, you would likely--you would most likely be, be targeted--Dr. [Felix H.] Dunn, who has a, a very huge file in, in, in the Sovereignty Ca, Ca--Commission, and there are many other people that I can name. And I even got a small file in the Sovereignty Commission, and I, I guess I may have gotten it in there because I knew Medgar Evers. And every time when he was Gulfport [Mississippi], I'd always make it my business to try to talk to him.$$Okay, now what kind of a person was Medgar Evers?$$Oh, he was just a wonderful person. I remember, I remember him from the days at, at, at Jackson State [University in Mississippi]. It was Jackson College then for Colored Teachers then. He, he would always come on the campus out there, and, and he, he would be telling us stories about segregation. Yeah, he'd be talking about it his experiences in the Army, and, and, and, and he would talk about, he would talk about, you know, the inhumanity of, of the white race against the black race. And sometimes it was, it was, it, it, it created quite an awareness of what are those things that are going along. You can see these things. Unless there's somebody to create awareness, you just go access--accept them as a matter of fact. And he was--but he, but he was the kind of person that would do that. But he'd come on the campus, and when he would come on the campus, oh, my, the boys would just crowd around him. Now this is his--he's gonna tell these, the, these, these, these (unclear) stories, and listened to things that he had to say. But then, then the president put out word, "Now any, any, any, any you boys seen, seen around Medgar Evers out there, you gonna be sent home."$$Really, that's, that's pretty strong.$$Yeah, and so, so, so, so pretty soon, you, you're gonna suffer the consequences. It's gonna be some consequences for, for, for, for, for this. And, and of course, the, the, the crowd around Medgar Evers seemed to diminish a little bit because of this warning that was put out. Now, now, now we don't know whether he put out the warning himself. He didn't say it himself.$$Right.$$But somebody else said it. And so we assumed that it came from--the assumption was that it came from him.$$All right, okay, so the president didn't actually sign his name to any kind of thing, just--(simultaneous)--$$No, no, but the word was just out there. We just--$$Where it kind of leaked out.$$Un-huh, that we don't want you around--you gonna be in trouble if you hang around--$$Did they--did they try to ban him from campus at all?$$Oh yes, and he--$$Did they actually tell him that he couldn't--he's not welcome or--$$I, I believe they did, but I'm not quite so sure. I'm not quite so sure, but I, I know he was not a reputable person on the campus there. He, I mean he certainly wasn't a reputable person. He was persona non grata (laughter).$So were you able to--now, here you are, you're a black loan officer at Hancock Bank, and there hasn't been any other black loan officers around here. Lots of black people have--need loans and want loans. And they look at you and you're the only in there. I mean what was--I mean did--I mean were you able to improve the condition of the community by, by being a loan officer at the Hancock Bank, do you think?$$Yeah, what I mean--well, let me go back and say this. My, my, my loan portfolio was not a totally black portfolio. I was able to serve any customer that came in, in, in the bank. It may have been the, the level of respect that they had for me. I hope that's what it (laughter) was, was. And, and then my, my, my portfol--portfolio was--crossed all class lines and all economic lines. I was able to serve all, all, all, all kinds of people. But, but, but basically, I, I think my--it was the majority wa--was with black people came to see, came to see me, they wait, wait in lines for--and I'd feel sorry for 'em a lot of times, and, and in lines for half a day just, just to see me. And, and, and I was able to help people I know that otherwise would not have been able to, to, to, to be helped. And they knew, but they were getting--they felt, too, that they were getting this help because, because of my presence in the bank. And, and I, I did have a very loyal customer base. And they did not want me to fail, the black community for the most part, so they made certain. They paid me when they might have, might have neg-neg-neglected somebody else. But, but they wondered--everybody wondered about the secret of my success, "Why people pay you back. You--what do you have, any special magic or something (laughter)?" No, I think it's because of the mutual respect that we had for each other.$$And that's something I think people in the community need to--that's the kind of story we need to hear more of. I think we get--oftentimes the black communities are maligned for not sticking together or not wanting to help one another become successful. And with the story you just told, it's kind of the opposite of what we, we, we hear so much of, you know, but it's a good, it's a good story, you know, the--$$Well, they made, they made me feel that way, and I, you know, I would tell 'em, I said, "Don't embarrass me (laughter)." And, and I, you know, I want you to become a good customer of the bank. So we had the--and, and, and a lot of these things you can overcome with communication and with, with, with, with really earnest communications. Communicate from the heart.

Ulysses Ford

Ulysses Grant Ford, III was born September 28, 1943 in Charlotte, North Carolina to Roberta and Ulysses Ford, II. Ford graduated from West Charlotte High School in 1961. Moving to Talladega, Alabama to attend Talladega College, Ford pursued his interest in mathematics and received a B.A. in 1965. That year, he married Beverly Odom Ford, who now owns the consulting firm ASM & Associates. They have three sons.

From 1965 until 1968, Ford worked as a math teacher and basketball coach at Charlotte Catholic High School. In 1968, Ford became an accountant and worked for Allstate Insurance and Equitable Life Insurance. In 1972, he began his career in civil service as an administrative assistant for the public works department of the City of Charlotte. In 1978, Ford left Charlotte to become the Director of Solid Waste Management for the City of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Ford went on to hold the title of Director of City Services for seven years in Fort Worth, Texas. Then he moved to Houston and served as Director of Public Works until 1992.

At this point in his career, Ford moved from government service to business and became responsible for marketing as the Vice President of Waste Management, Inc., a post he held for six years. In 1998, Ford founded SDC Consulting, Inc. in Macon, Georgia. SDC represents private companies, helping them increase their access to local governments across the country and thus combines the two main areas of his life's work.

Ulysses Ford, III has been a member of 100 Black Men of America since 1998 and served as president of the Municipal Waste Management Association of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Ulysses Ford passed away on March 20, 2012.

Accession Number

A2002.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2002

Last Name

Ford

Maker Category
Schools

West Charlotte High School

Fairview Elementary

Northwest School Of The Arts

Talladega College

First Name

Ulysses

Birth City, State, Country

Charlotte

HM ID

FOR03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alaska, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do The Things That You Fear And The Death Of Fear Is Certain.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/28/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Macon

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard Greens

Death Date

3/20/2012

Short Description

Business consulting chief executive Ulysses Ford (1943 - 2012 ) was the president of SDS Consulting.

Employment

Charlotte Catholic High School

Allstate Insurance Company

Equitable Life Insurance

Charlotte Department of Public Works

City of Ann Arbor, Michigan

City of Forth Worth, Texas

City of Houston, Texas

Waste Management

SDC Consulting

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:14636,204:30030,378:30435,384:31731,418:48524,667:58806,838:80090,1142$0,0:7781,115:47218,585:57265,781:71594,1020:79312,1484:138217,2211:161685,2695:178030,2872
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ulysses Ford's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford describes his maternal grandfather's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford describes his maternal grandfather's first job

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about his maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford describes the difficulties his family faced after his father left

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ulysses Ford talks about his household chores

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's personality, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's personality, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ulysses Ford describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Ulysses Ford describes his segregated childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Ulysses Ford describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at the Little Rock A.M.E. Zion Church

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience as a Boy Scout, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at West Charlotte High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience as a Boy Scout, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford describes his pride at receiving his Eagle Scout badge

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's and grandfather's reactions to his receiving his Eagle Scout badge

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford talks about his childhood athletics

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford describes receiving a scholarship to Talladega College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ulysses Ford describes being a good student

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ulysses Ford talks about deciding to attend Talladega College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's interest in his athletics

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about growing up without a father

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about his mentor and teacher at West Charlotte High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford remembers his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford remembers meeting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his Civil Rights activism, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his Civil Rights activism, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's reaction to his Civil Rights activities

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses his grandfather's reaction to the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about overcoming his fears about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford describes meeting his wife at Talladega College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford describes his wife Beverly Ann Odom's personality

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford talks about looking for jobs after college

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes becoming a high school teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his experience teaching at Charlotte Catholic High School in North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford talks about being hired as an underwriter for Allstate Insurance Company

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience as an underwriter for Allstate

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford discusses the racism he encountered at Allstate

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses becoming an insurance salesman

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford discusses his alcoholism

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford discusses starting work for the Public Works Department in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford discusses someone he inspired

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience in the Public Works Department, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience in the Public Works Department, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford discusses recovering from his alcoholism, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses recovering from his alcoholism, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford discusses leaving the Public Works Department of Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experiences in the Public Works Department in Fort Worth, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about the difference between a strong mayor and council manager forms of government

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford discusses privatizing garbage pickup in Fort Worth, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford discusses his growing reputation in Public Works Departments

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his grandfather's passing

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford discusses his move into the private sector

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at Waste Management

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about launching SDC Consulting

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his motivations and mentors

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford discusses books that have inspired him

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford narrates his photos

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Ulysses Ford remembers meeting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Ulysses Ford talks about launching SDC Consulting
Transcript
But the momentous occasion in my life was when Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] came to campus. And again, as luck would have it, or fate, or whatever you want to call it... The three rooms that we would have for male guests on campus were in my dorm. And the one Dr. King was in was on my floor, right across the hall from... our doors faced each other across the hall. [HM] Jesse Jackson came with him, it was the first time I met Jesse. And I know if Dr. King were alive, I don't see a reason why he would remember me, as I don't see a reason why Jesse would. But I did get to meet them. And I can remember--because Dr. King came back a couple times--that we would sit in his room on his bed and talk till daylight. He was talking about all kind of things. He was very knowledgeable about what other things were going on in the world, whether it was sports or politics or whatever. And I can remember--not just me, I mean there were three or four of us. It was Tracy, my roommate at that time, and we sat there and talked with Dr. King. And sure enough, the day finally came, in the spring of '62' [1962], still my freshman year.$And then in October... Well, I formed my company in August of '98' [1998]. In October of '98' [1998], I began to work it. And those relationships that I had developed over the thirty years just did it for me. What I do is represent private companies desiring to do business with local governments. So, if you've got a good or a service that you want to market to anybody--to any city or county in the country--then I'd like to be on your team, to help you get that business. I mentioned getting to know the staffs of these professional organizations. I remember a client saying that they wanted to go to Salt Lake City [Utah], because the Olympics was coming. And they financed airport work, and they knew from Atlanta [Georgia] that Salt Lake City would be doing a lot of work at their airport, and they wanted to be the bond financier of it. And I said to myself, "I don't know anybody in Salt Lake City. I never... to my knowledge, I've never met a Mormon." (Laughter). So I said, "Um." So, I called the Executive Director of the U.S. Conference of Mayors [Tom Cochran]. I said, "Tom, who do I know in Salt Lake City?" He says, "You know Deedee." Deedee Corradini was the mayor. I said "Well, I know Deedee to speak, and she may know me to speak, but we don't know each other. You know, we're not buddy-buddy." "Oh yeah, you do." He said, "Hang around." About thirty minutes later, Tom calls back. He says, "See, I told you Deedee knows you, she's waiting on your phone call." Sure enough, I call up Deedee, take my client out, and we got the business. (Laughter). So, those kind of relationships worked, as well as me being able to pick up the phone and call a Solid Waste director, or a Public Works director. I remember when I was with Waste, and we were going after the city of St. Louis, and another company had the business. And supposedly the city, the Solid Waste director, really liked the other company, and wasn't interested in changing. The other company had had the business for 15 years or something. We put our bid on the table, and we were high bid. Not high, we were the second high bid. But we came in and did our presentation. And I'll never forget when we walked in to do our presentation, there was Steve sitting there. And he said, "Oh, hell, Waste Management has got to be serious now. They done brought that damn Euly Ford here." Well, I had forgotten Steve was a Solid Waste director in St. Louis. I'd flat-out forgotten. Steve and I had been on the Education Foundation for eight years; we had some real war stories to tell. (Laughter). You know, we got the business. And people say when we left that night, Steve was the one that converted everybody to vote for Waste Management. So, those relationships have come in very, very handy for me. And now, I'm able to help my clients that in turn help me.