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Bishop T.D. Jakes

Bishop T.D. Jakes, Sr., was born on June 9, 1957, in South Charleston, West Virginia, to businessman and entrepreneur Ernest, Sr. and educator Odith. The youngest of three children, Jakes was known in his community as “the Bible boy.” However, due to his slight lisp, he was told he would never preach. When Jakes was ten years old, his father developed kidney failure. Jakes and his mother cared for him until his death in 1973. Jakes preached his first sermon in 1976 and was officially ordained in 1979. He met his wife Serita Ann Jamison while guest preaching at her neighborhood church. In 1981, the two were married. In 1980, at the age of 23, Jakes established the Temple of Faith Church in Montgomery, West Virginia, a storefront church with only ten members. Jakes worked simultaneously at the Union Carbide to keep his ministry afloat. Friends International Christian University awarded Jakes his B.A. degree in biblical studies in 1985, his M.A. degree in biblical studies in 1990, and his D.Min. in 1995.

In 1987, Jakes was ordained into the Bishopric, and in 1992, he first preached Woman, Thou Art Loosed, a sermon that addressed the pain of women. The next year, Jakes launched a weekly television broadcast on the Trinity Broadcasting Network, catapulting himself into the world of televangelism. In 1994, he began his weekly broadcasts on Black Entertainment Television, and that same year, he initiated the first ManPower conference, designed to motivate men in their relational and community roles. In 1996, after moving his congregation from small town to small town in West Virginia, Jakes moved his family and fifty other church employees to Dallas where they established the Potter’s House. The first church service drew more than 2,000 people, and since then, the membership has grown to more than 30,000. In 1998, Jakes founded the Metroplex Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and established Clay Academy in the heart of Capella Park, a mixed-use, “new urbanism” community.

One of PBS Religion and Ethics Newsweekly’s “Top 10 Religious Leaders” in 2000, Jakes holds a place in the Black Americans of Achievement series, The Encyclopedia of African-American Christian Heritage, as well as the Who’s Who Among African Americans. In 2000, Jakes served as the keynote speaker at the annual conferences of the National Council of Black Mayors, the National Black Police Association, and the 2000 Congressional Black Caucus. In 2001, Time magazine and CNN distinguished Jakes as America’s Best Preacher, and the next year, Savoy magazine named him one of the “Top 100 Powers That Be.” In 2009, President Barack Obama asked Jakes to deliver the morning service before the historic Presidential Inauguration. Bishop Jakes, having spent over thirty years in the ministry, is also the author of more than twenty books and a Grammy-award winning gospel musician. Currently, Bishop Jakes lives in Dallas with his wife, Serita. They have five children and two grandchildren.

Jakes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 25, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.106

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/25/2010

Last Name

Jakes

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

D.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Vandalia Elementary School

Weberwood Elementary School

First Name

T.

Birth City, State, Country

South Charleston

HM ID

JAK01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

West Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

You'll Win If You Don't Quit.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/9/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef Stroganoff

Short Description

Bishop Bishop T.D. Jakes (1957 - ) was a leading televangelist and the pastor of The Potter's House megachurch in Dallas, Texas.

Employment

Greater Emmanuel Apostolic Faith Tabernacle

Greater Emmanuel Temple of Faith

‘Get Ready with T.D. Jakes’

The Potter's House

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop T.D. Jakes' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop T.D. Jakes lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his paternal family's roots in Petal, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his neighborhood in Charleston, West Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes the sights, sounds and smells of his neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about the coalmining industry in West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers the black barbershops of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes downtown Charleston, West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his speech impediment

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls the assassinations of the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his father's illness, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his father's illness, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes the impact of his father's illness

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about his parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his father's funeral

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls his initiation to the Pentecostal church

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his neighbor, Bobbie Tolliver

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers his calling to the ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his early career as a minister

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes the structure of the Pentecostal church

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers the congregation of the Greater Emmanuel Temple of Faith in Montgomery, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls the inspiration for 'Woman, Thou Art Loosed!'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about his television show, 'Get Ready with T.D. Jakes'

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his family

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers the need for 'Woman, Thou Art Loosed!'

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his success

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls the growth of his ministry

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers building The Potter's House in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop T.D. Jakes remembers the death of his mother

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls his invitation to the White House

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about his position as a megachurch pastor

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls the creation of the ManPower conference

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about MegaFest

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his relationship with his mother

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his career

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bishop T.D. Jakes talks about his relationship with President George Walker Bush

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his role in President George Walker Bush's administration

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Bishop T.D. Jakes describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Bishop T.D. Jakes reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

12$7

DATitle
Bishop T.D. Jakes describes his neighborhood in Charleston, West Virginia
Bishop T.D. Jakes recalls the inspiration for 'Woman, Thou Art Loosed!'
Transcript
Now, you, let's--you were describing the house that you grew up in. Can you describe the neighborhood?$$Absolutely (laughter), yeah, I can see it in my mind right now. We lived on, in an area called Vandalia [Charleston, West Virginia]. The main thoroughfare, if you were to call it that, would be Mountain Road. It was a two lane, winding road that brought up on the mountain on one side and back down on the other side. And there were several little alleys in between that people lived on. And one of them was Page Street and there were several others, Clinton Road [sic. Clinton Avenue] and others. And you'd walk around the road to the church. It was a very close knit neighborhood. Everybody knew everybody and everything about everybody (laughter). And, but it was a great place to raise kids. It really was. There was a white side of the hill and all the white people lived on one side of the hill. And there was, everything past the water tanks was black. Everything on the other side of the water tanks was white. And my brother [Ernest Jakes, Jr.] went to school during the first years of integration, and there was great conflict when he went to school. By the time I went to school, it was a little bit more normal, and we were on the school buses. The busing thing had existed, and we interacted with Caucasians in a way that at the time they fought more than we did. It was, it was a very, very interesting time in the community. Everything was very segregated and the residue still existed down to my generation. Residuals in terms of, very seldom did you see white families migrate beyond the water tanks. It started to happen, but not to a great degree. And it's still largely African American today. And gradually, some blacks would move on that side of town, but that was a slow process. It was just an unspoken line in the sand. But things were very simplistic. I can remember walking around Mountain Road on Sunday mornings and hearing a lady named Mrs. Dean [ph.] singing on Sunday morning. And it was something. She had this amazing voice, and I would love to hear, just walk around the road and just hearing her singing. And out of her screen door, you could hear her singing every Sunday morning. And I ended playing the piano for the church there. And as a little boy, at eleven years old, I was playing for the church and the choir. And it was just interesting to experience that neighborhood. There was a recreation center there that the kids began to play at. There was finally some federal funding for entertainment for minority communities. I can remember vividly big debates over, gosh, I can almost think of the name of the swimming pool. It might have been White Rock Lake pool, I think--no, not White Rock, Rock Lake Pool [South Charleston, West Virginia], when they first allowed blacks to come in the swimming pool, and there were big fights about it and all of that. So it was, even down there--as I think about it more and more, even down to my age, it was still some racial struggles there. West Virginia is less than 5 percent African American even now. So we were extremely minority. And I can remember, I can remember when we went to Detroit [Michigan], I was just astonished to see that many black people (laughter). I was just (laughter) was so fascinated because I grew up in an environment where I went to school around with and worked with and all I ever saw was white people. And I was awed to be in a city where there were really that many black people. I didn't know that many black people existed, existed, and it was just a very interesting perspective for a little boy.$And then I moved to Charleston [West Virginia]. And I moved to Charleston because I was drawing more people from Charleston who drove like maybe an hour away than I was drawing out of the community I was in [Montgomery, West Virginia]. I thought, the tail is wagging the dog and you're getting older, and you need to make a move. And I made that switch and went to Charleston and started preaching in South Charleston [West Virginia], actually, across from the Row City Cafeteria, the little building there. And when I came there, that's when I did the Sunday school class called Woman, Thou Art Loosed! and about forty-six women in the Sunday school class, and I didn't finish that Sunday and I carried--I didn't finish that Sunday and I carried it over a second week and twice as many women came. (Laughter) So after twice as many women came, I didn't wanna finish. I said (laughter), "Let me (unclear)." (Laughter) 'Cause this is going somewhere. And after a while there were women standing outside to hear me talk about this Woman, Thou Art Loosed! I didn't even call it that at the time. I didn't even have a name for it.$$That's what I'm wondering. How did it, how did it even come to you to do this or to speak--I mean I'm just--$$It was inspired because I counseled women who had secrets and suffered with secrets that I wanted to help. I related to their pain. I related to their suffering, and I thought there are biblical answers that would help you with this and I wanted to share it. And I thought if I brought them all together in one place and I started teaching on this, maybe I could really make a difference. And it was, it was amazing because I did it for about four weeks, and it was crazy. And I had these tapes, and I developed these tapes. And I called a friend of mine named Archie Dennis [Archie L. Dennis, Jr.] who lived in Pittsburgh [Pennsylvania], and I told--actually, in Monroeville, Pennsylvania at the time, and I told Archie, I said, "Archie, I'm teaching this class for women and they're going nuts about this class." And he said, "Oh, tell me about it." So we're on the phone and I'm preaching all this stuff to him over the phone. And he said, "Well, you need to come up here and share that." And I said, "Really?" And I said, I said, you know, "I'll come." So I said--he said, "So what are you gonna call it?" I said, "I don't know." I said, "Let's call it Woman, Thou Art Loosed! 'cause that's what the Bible said, 'Woman, thou art loosed [Luke 13:12].' Let's just call it that." And he said, "Okay." So he did it, and he advertised it and so many women signed up he had to move it from his church to the hotel. And I went there, and, and taught on it and got four more tapes. Now, I had eight tapes to the series. Next thing I know, somebody was talking to me about doing a book. So they took all my tapes and they transcribed them and tried to make a book of it, but I hated it because between what the author was writing and you speak differently than you write. So it doesn't sound good when you write it. And then by the time he was rounding it off, it was like, "What women ought to do is, you know," and, "what's wrong with women today." And I thought, none of this, it's not in the spiritual. I went in there to try to fix it and ended up rewriting it all together to protect the brand of what I wanted to say. And then I couldn't get anybody to publish it. They wanted me to pay to publish it ['Woman, Thou Art Loosed!,' T.D. Jakes]. And I almost walked away from it because it was gonna cost fifteen thousand dollars to publish it. And that was all the money we had in the world. And we were trying to get a house. There wasn't church money. That's my money (laughter). And we were trying to get a house, but my wife [Serita Jamison Jakes] and I talked about it, and, and I did it. I went ahead and put the money into it, and the book exploded. I've never had a book ever do any better. And the rest was history.

Bishop Sedgwick Daniels

Bishop and pastor Sedgwick Daniels was born the second youngest of eight children on August 16, 1959 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to John and Kathleen Daniels. He became City of Milwaukee Plan Commissioner and the first Protestant board member of the Catholic Central City Schools. Daniels joined Antonio Riley and the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority on several projects, assisting in developing a housing complex for seniors and developing Milwaukee home ownership.

In 2001, Daniels was elevated to the role of Bishop by Bishop Gilbert E. Patterson and the Church of God in Christ General Board. Daniels’ jurisdiction covered more than 105 Institutional Church of God churches in Wisconsin and northern Illinois. During Daniels’ tenure as Bishop, his own church, Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ, became a multi-million dollar operation that addressed both the educational and social service needs in the Milwaukee community.

In 2002, the Bush Administration began conferences for faith-based groups. President Bush and David Kuo, then-deputy director of the Office of Faith-Based Initiatives, visited Daniels’ Holy Redeemer Church. A political independent and close friend of Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr., Daniels took a controversial stand two years later, endorsing George W. Bush primarily on the basis of his faith-based initiative. Daniels continues to serve as Pastor of Milwaukee’s Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ.

Bishop Sedgwick Daniels was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 28, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.333

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/28/2007

Last Name

Daniels

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Thirty-Fifth Street Elementary

Addison Elementary

Custer High School

First Name

Sedgwick

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

DAN05

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

If God Can Do Anything, God Can Do Everything. There Is Nothing Too Hard For God.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Birth Date

8/16/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pork Chops, Ham

Short Description

Bishop and pastor Bishop Sedgwick Daniels (1959 - ) was the pastor of Milwaukee’s Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ. He is a former City of Milwaukee Plan Commissioner and was the first protestant board member of the Catholic Central City Schools. As Bishop, Daniels oversaw more than 105 Institutional Church Of God churches in Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

Employment

City of Milwaukee

Catholic Central City Schools

Church of God in Christ

Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Sedgwick Daniels' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls his family's move to Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels talks about his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls his responsibilities as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes the demographics of his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls the role of religion in his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers the deaths of his father and maternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers Custer High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers his popularity at Custer High School

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his early aspirations

Bishop Vashti McKenzie

Bishop Vashti Murphy McKenzie was born on May 28, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland, to Ida Murphy Smith Peters and Samuel Edward Smith. McKenzie attended Robert Brown Elliot School, School #18, and Garrison Junior High School. She was also one of the six black students who attended Eastern High School. She graduated from Eastern High School in 1965. After spending a summer at the Blair School of Journalism, McKenzie enrolled at Morgan State University where she majored in history. She went on to attend the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland, where she earned her B.A. degree. McKenzie went on to earn her MDiv degree in divinity from Howard University Divinity School in 1985.

After graduation, McKenzie began working for her family newspaper and wrote her own column, “The McKenzie Report.” McKenzie joined Bethel A.M.E. Church, her family’s original church, in 1976. In 1978, Cathy Hughes and Dewey Hughes contacted McKenzie about a position at WYCB Radio, and she began working there. McKenzie hosted an afternoon drive Gospel show on WYBC Radio in 1981, and later rose to the position of program director. McKenzie also worked for WJZ-TV doing a segment on a program called Evening Magazine. McKenzie rotated between working at WYCB, WEBB, and WAYE as an on-air personality, program director, general manager, and as Corporate Vice President of Programming of Mortenson Broadcasting Company. McKenzie was made an itinerant deacon in 1981 and commuted between Bethel A.M.E. in Cecil County and Ebenezer A.M.E. churches. McKenzie was ordained by the A.M.E. Church in 1984. In 1990, McKenzie joined Payne Memorial A.M.E. in Baltimore as pastor. In 2000, while serving as chief pastor of the 18th Episcopal District in southeast Africa, McKenzie was elected and consecrated as the 117th bishop of the A.M.E. Church at their General Council. McKenzie and Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry were the first women to become A.M.E. bishops. In 2005, McKenzie again made history as the first woman to become titular head of the A.M.E. Church. She subsequently became presiding prelate of the 13th Episcopal District in Tennessee and Kentucky

McKenzie was the National Chaplain for Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and a lifetime member of the NAACP. McKenzie received honorary doctorates from Howard University, Wilberforce University, Central State University in Ohio, Morgan State University, and Goucher College. In 1997, a poll of national leaders selected McKenzie for Ebony magazine’s “Honor Roll of Great African American Preachers.” McKenzie has authored four books: Not Without a Struggle, Strength in the Struggle: Leadership Development for Women, A Journey to the Well and Swapping Housewives.

McKenzie and her husband, Stan McKenzie, live in Dallas, Texas. They have three children: Jon-Mikael, Jasmine, and Jo-Marie.

McKenzie was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 14, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.088

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/14/2007 |and| 03/17/2017

Last Name

McKenzie

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Eastern High School

Public School No. 18 Franklin D. Roosevelt School

Public School No. 104, Robert Brown Elliott School

Garrison Middle School

Morgan State University

United Theological Seminary

First Name

Vashti

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

MCK12

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

Commit Thy Way Unto The Lord. Trust Also Unto Him And He Will Bring It Onto Pass.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

5/28/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken Wings

Short Description

Bishop Bishop Vashti McKenzie (1947 - ) became the first woman to become a titular head of the A.M.E. Church; she presided as prelate of the 13th Episcopal District in Tennessee and Kentucky.

Employment

WYCB Radio

WEBB Radio

A.M.E. Church

Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper

Arizona Republic

Shady Grove Music Fair

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Vashti McKenzie's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her family's leadership of the Baltimore Afro-American

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her family's defiance of racial and gender barriers

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her father's track career

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her likeness to her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers Public School No. 104 in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her experiences of school integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her guidance counselor at Eastern High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her maternal family's prominence

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her activities at Eastern High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her experiences of racial discrimination at school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers meeting civil rights leaders

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls attending the March on Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the public high schools in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her college aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers studying African American history at Morgan College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls attending the Blair School of Journalism in Blairstown, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers marrying Stan McKenzie

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers moving with her husband to Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls writing for the Arizona Republic newspaper

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her modeling career

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes race relations in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her return to Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls the start of her public relations career

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her graduation from the University of Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her advice to students

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her master's degree program

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her family's religious background

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her doubts about Christianity during the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers joining the Bethel A.M.E. Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls working at WYCB Radio in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her calling to the ministry

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her commute to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers the Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes what she learned at the Howard University School of Divinity

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the stigma against female pastors

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the female ministers in the Bible

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the inclusion of women as leaders in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her ordination as a deacon

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her first pastoral assignment

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her experiences as a pastor in Chesapeake City, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her accomplishments in Chesapeake City, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers the birth of her third child, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers the birth of her third child, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls pastoring the Oak Street A.M.E. Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her transition to the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls how she was received at the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the ministries of the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the ministries of the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her success at the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls the growth of the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church's job training programs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the mission of the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the value of small churches

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers writing 'Not Without A Struggle'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her calling to the episcopacy

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her campaign for bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her campaign strategies

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her election as a bishop

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her assignment as the bishop of southeast Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers her emphasis on education in southeast Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the problem of HIV/AIDS in Africa, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the problem of HIV/AIDS in Africa, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her ministries in southeast Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes how she was received in Africa as a female bishop

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the gender roles in southeast Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her experiences as a female bishop in Africa

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Vashti McKenzie's interview, session 2

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her duties as bishop of the Thirteenth Episcopal District

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the offices of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers founding Believe, Incorporated

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the educational legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the creation of historically black colleges

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about historical figures from the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the founding of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about historical figures from the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the importance of historically black colleges

Tape: 9 Story: 11 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the history of African American publications

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the publications of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her publications

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the biblical story of Jacob, Rachel and Leah

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her sources for books and sermons

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the interpretations of the Bible, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the interpretations of the Bible, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her assignment to the Tenth Episcopal District

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about Paul Quinn College in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her achievements as the bishop of the Tenth Episcopal District

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the tradition of community service in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the social justice efforts of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the international operations of the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her book, 'The Big Deal of Taking Small Steps and Moving Closer to God'

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about the importance of a relationship with God

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie shares her advice for ministers and congregants

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about reaching the millennial generation

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her oratorical style

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 11 Story: 10 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the advancements for women in the ministry

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers meeting U.S. Senator Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie remembers working on the My Brother's Keeper program

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie recalls her sermons to President Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie reflects upon her life

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie talks about her family

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$6

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes her family's leadership of the Baltimore Afro-American
Bishop Vashti McKenzie describes the ministries of the Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church, pt. 2
Transcript
And the family is the family who found the Afro-American Newspapers [Baltimore Afro-American; Afro-American Newspapers] in Baltimore [Maryland] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes, so, the family legend and the family story is that my great-grandfather, John Murphy [John H. Murphy, Sr.], published the Sunday School Helper, which was a newspaper that was published in the basement of Bethel A.M.E. Church in Baltimore. There was a failing press and he borrowed two hundred dollars of his wife's [Martha Howard Murphy] butter and egg money, and brought the printing press and began the Afro-American newspaper. Growing up we were told he founded the paper so that his children would always have a place to work and would always have employment. He was a white washer prior to going into the publishing business, and also he wanted a place where he would not be called by his first name; in other words, he would have the dignity and integrity that was missing for so many African Americans at that time. He put the newspaper together at a time only, I believe, one, one half percent of African Americans could read, so that was really a risky venture.$$Okay. Are there any other stories from that side that are passed down?$$About that time?$$Yeah. That's pretty rich so far, but (laughter)--$$Well, my grandfather [Carl J. Murphy] didn't have any sons, so in a large family my great-grandfather had ten children and my grandfather was the youngest of ten, and everyone was expected to work somewhere in the family business, and each of the sons had a particular department. Some of them were in advertising, in marketing, some were in the lighter type and, you know, the physical printing of the newspaper with the printing press, there were those who were in addressing, the addressographs; in other words, getting the newspaper out in circulation. Others were in the editorial side of the family, so my grandfather took over when his father told him to come home. My grandfather was teaching German, of all things, and at the Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. That's where he met my grandmother, Vashti [Vashti Turley Murphy], and you know, in 1918, you're talking about the end of World War I [WWI], and teaching German is not necessarily a popular class to be taught in the United States at that time. His father told him to come home and to help manage the family business and he did, and took over as publisher and chairman of the board. So, he was on the editorial side. One of the, with no sons, (cough) excuse me, (cough) from my great-grandfather, all of the people, all of the sons worked in the business but the women didn't, all right? For the most part. And so now here's my grandfather with five daughters looking at no one necessarily following him in the business. So, he didn't treat his daughters with this is only women's work. This is the only thing that you can do. You mind the home fires and we'll leave the rest of the business and work world to the men. No, each of the five daughters worked in the business. Betty [Elizabeth Murphy Moss] was on the editorial side. My mother [Ida Murphy Peters] was in advertising. Carlita [Carlita Murphy Jones] was a schoolteacher, but she was also in the writing and editorial side. Frances [HistoryMaker Frances L. Murphy, II] was on the editorial side. Of course, she became the publisher and the chairman of the board later on, so everybody worked in the business. My mother talks about how when she graduated from the University of Wisconsin [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin], which was pretty extraordinary because there were very few African American students at the University of Wisconsin. She was a journalism major, graduated, and began her career at the Afro-American, making thirty-five dollars a week. That was a lot of money back in, you're talking about in the '30s [1930s], this is the late '30s [1930s], like 1939, and, you know, worked her way from advertising and retired from that and then went into the editorial side.$So, we got the kids in, and then the first year, after the first year we had a free summer camp program, because kids are on the street. They're not doing anything. Parents are at work. You know, the drug dealers are recruiting left and right. So, we had a free summer camp from nine to two [o'clock] every day. We fed them lunch, gave them a snack, and then had extended stay for those who were really too young to be at home, until their parents came home at five o'clock. And, we used the school teachers that were in our church to be the teachers and to put the curriculum together, and we had a good balance between fun and education. In other words, they had an educational lesson somewhere. It was either reading, writing, or arithmetic that was grade appropriate, and then they swam, they had roller skating to do, arts and crafts, karate. So they came because they were going to go swimming and they were going to go roller skating, and then you sneak in a little reading lesson or English lesson to keep their skills up in the summer. After that first summer, I just really couldn't let the kids go, because I knew after school we were going to send them back to the street, so we began our after school program. That's when our after school program began and the kids would come to us every day. They'd walk up the street from the school and we did homework. We gave them something to eat, soup and sandwich, you know, along that line, spaghetti and meatballs, those kind of thing, and we would have volunteers who would come to the church, many that were seniors, and we hired students from Morgan [Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland] to come in to help with homework, because, you know, like I didn't go to school during the new math, and I don't think you did either, so this new math equation, you know, is beyond us so we hired a couple of college students to come in, which was great, because here you had neighborhood kids sitting next to college students, and the interchange is always so fun, like, "Do you have any children?" "No." "How old are you?" "Nineteen." "You don't have any children?" "No." "Well, I thought everybody at nineteen had children." "No." "You're in school?" "Yeah." "You go to college?" "Yeah." "Real college?" "Yeah." "Your parents rich?" "No." "Well, how do you get to go?" "I'm working. Here [Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church, Baltimore, Maryland]." (Laughter) "I'm working on the weekend. That's how I go to college." So, it's a wonderful experience to show kids that you don't have to be rich to go to college, and you can be nineteen and not have any kids. So, I mean, it was great and because were, we were having all these activities, we just interrupted the whole drug process. They couldn't, they can't sell, they can't sell until the nighttime, and then when we come to bible study, we had nighttime activities. Then, it interrupted the problem--then that became the problem. Then, we started the take back the streets campaign to enlist the neighbors. Look, y'all, we cannot let the drug dealers rule our neighborhood. Let's clean up the neighborhood, let's plant, let's paint, let's get it all beautiful and wonderful. We had outdoor services, this was in the summertime, outdoor services, and so the drug community said, "Now look, you gotta stop all this." So, we campaigned with several of our churches, other brothers and sister churches. A lot of the pastors, people who were pastoring, were the same people I went to school with at Howard [Howard University School of Divinity, Washington, D.C.], and so I called my friends and I said, "Look guys, we all have the same problem. Let's have rotating revivals. We'll go to your church on this night and your church on this night, and we're gonna interrupt this drug traffic. Let's get the city involved." [HistoryMaker] Kurt Schmoke was the mayor at the time. Park Heights [Baltimore, Maryland] was really the tough area, so we were a week in Park Heights. I remember he came and he says, "Aren't you afraid?" I said, "Hadn't thought about it."$$Now, did you get direct threats from gang members?$$No. Filtered threats. Direct threats, you can go to the police (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I heard that they're going to do, rather than them saying hey, if y'all don't--okay.$$Right, right. I really hadn't thought of it. Really hadn't thought of it. We just wanted the neighborhood back. We wanted it safe. You know, when you have drug traffic, you have people who can't afford it, so we had seniors who were robbed, houses broken in because they have to hawk stuff in order to get the money to do that, so seniors are easy prey. People that work, homes are empty, that becomes easy prey. So, we had members who were afraid. If they drove up to the church and the dealers were on the corner, they didn't stop. They kept right on going. It was kind of tenuous to tell young girls who were members of the congregation and young girls of the neighborhood, don't talk to this man and you don't have to do that, when they're living next door to a prostitute and that's a quick way of making money. So, we're having great confusion here, so we had to work with the city. Y'all need to clear this apartment out. This is Section 8. Y'all need to clear this out and you need to partner with us to help get the drug trafficking off the corner. So, we were, we were successful because we were taking care of the needs of the people. That's ministry.

Bishop Barbara Harris

Bishop Barbara Clementine Harris was born on June 12, 1930 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Harris grew up in Germantown, a neighborhood of Philadelphia. Her mother, Beatrice Price Harris, played the organ for St. Baranabas Church and her father, Walter Harris, was a steel worker. While attending Philadelphia High School for Girls, where she excelled in music, Harris wrote a weekly column called High School Notes by Bobbi for the Philadelphia edition of the Pittsburgh Courier, an African American newspaper. After graduating from high school in 1948, she attended the Charles Morris Price School of Advertising and Journalism. She earned a certificate from Charles Morris Price in 1950. In later years, Harris would study at Villanova University and the Episcopal Divinity School.

As a member of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity (ESCRU) since the late 1950s, Harris served on a number of diocesan committees. In the 1960s, she helped to form the Union of Black Clergy and Laity which was subsequently called the Union of Black Episcopalians (UBE). She was a member of the St. Dismas Fellowship and served on the board of the Pennsylvania Prison Society. During the summer of 1964, Harris volunteered with Delta Ministries in Greenville, Mississippi, educating and registering voters. In 1974, she advocated for the ordination of the “Philadelphia Eleven,” a group of women who had been ordained priests, but were labeled "irregular" by the Anglican Communion. By 1976, the church began to admit women priests and, in October 1980, Harris was ordained as a priest. After her ordination, she served as priest at St. Augustine of Hippo Church and as chaplain of Philadelphia County Prison.

In 1984, Harris was appointed executive director of the Episcopal Church Publishing Company, molding the social direction of the Episcopal Church. Known for her strong advocacy for social justice, Harris was elected in 1988 as the consecrated Suffragan Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, becoming the first female bishop in the Anglican Communion. She served as bishop until 2002 when she retired at the age of seventy-two. Harris is the recipient of numerous honors including an honorary degree from Yale University's Divinity School and the 2007 Wisdom Award from the National Visionary Leadership Project. After suffering a stroke in 2010, Harris made a full recovery and still advocates for social change.

Bishop Barbara Harris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 12, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.062

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/12/2007

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

Philadelphia High School for Girls

Thomas Meehan Elementary School

Edwin A. Finter Elementary School

Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Junior High School

Austin Meehan Middle School

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

HAR24

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/12/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Short Description

Bishop Bishop Barbara Harris (1930 - ) was the first woman to be ordained to the episcopate in the worldwide Anglican Communion.

Employment

Joseph Baker Associates

Sun Oil Company

St. Augustine of the Hippo Church

Philadelphia County Prison

Episcopal Church Publishing Company

Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:665,8:3895,62:4275,67:5415,96:6175,108:9506,121:9914,126:10832,137:11954,153:13076,166:13688,174:15830,190:16850,201:22008,220:23988,235:27564,255:28084,261:29020,271:29540,277:30164,284:36900,308:38440,313:42730,321:46330,340:47474,355:48442,375:53220,408:54004,416:54900,427:56580,442:57140,448:60010,458:60322,463:60712,469:61180,476:61570,482:64732,503:65670,511:68860,524:74460,544:75013,553:76040,568:76988,581:83000,608:84404,624:92785,646:95480,715:96096,725:96635,733:97097,740:106590,772:107297,781:108004,789:113550,808:113920,814:114216,823:114734,831:117950,843:118582,853:123896,877:124664,884:125176,889:126328,901:126968,907:132580,929:134060,940:137828,955:145510,986:145870,991:152337,1033:153240,1042:154788,1056:160130,1071:161194,1081:163090,1089:163578,1094:167650,1105:169904,1132:173441,1159:173936,1165:174332,1170:175025,1178:175520,1184:176015,1190:177203,1205:178985,1227:181280,1252:182640,1277:184605,1295:185269,1307:186431,1326:187261,1342:188091,1358:188672,1366:192890,1396:193640,1405:194390,1418:195065,1430:196565,1452:198916,1461:200730,1466:202790,1481:203510,1491:205040,1513:207590,1543:216480,1741$0,0:6690,58:26210,158:28450,172:30336,185:31498,208:31913,214:32660,225:32992,230:34984,255:35731,265:41284,297:42676,305:47390,310:48650,319:53344,331:54163,365:58642,385:58994,390:60842,421:61546,430:62250,440:62690,445:68970,454:71670,499:72270,504:75492,515:77060,524:80825,538:82384,548:84320,573:90932,608:91412,614:91796,619:92180,624:96388,650:97766,666:99038,680:100628,718:108118,804:108706,812:109098,817:118968,889:120940,932:121348,939:123900,949:130958,1001:131503,1006:138500,1081:139034,1088:139390,1093:140547,1109:143054,1128:144652,1150:145028,1155:147219,1182:148325,1204:149115,1216:158766,1285:162872,1350:164048,1366:164888,1378:165812,1391:166484,1400:167324,1412:167744,1418:168164,1425:169592,1442:171104,1469:171524,1475:178310,1578
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Barbara Harris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her maternal grandparents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her mother's musical talent

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris shares a story about her father, Walter Harris

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls the congregation at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers her column, High School Notes by Bobbi

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers Negro History Week

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her experiences at Edwin H. Fitler School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her experiences of integrated education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes the racial discrimination at the Philadelphia High School for Girls

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her early musical aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers her childhood heroines

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks her educational experiences after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls how she was hired at Joseph V. Baker Associates

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her role at Joseph V. Baker Associates

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers Joseph V. Baker

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her month working at the Delta Ministry in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her experience with the Delta Ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls police intimidation during the Civil Rights movement

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls the 1964 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her involvement in Episcopal organizations, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her involvement in Episcopal organizations, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her early role in the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her role in the ordination of female Episcopal priests

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers her calling to the ministry

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls studying for her ordination examinations

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris explains her role as a deacon in the Episcopal Church

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her ordination to the priesthood

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her nomination to the episcopate

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her fellow nominees to the episcopate

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls African American bishops who preceded her

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes the electoral process for bishops

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris remembers the response to her election as bishop

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about Leontine T. Kelly

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes the objections to her consecration as bishop

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls lingering resistance to her status as bishop

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about the role of the Episcopal Church in Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Bishop Barbara Harris recalls her travels to South Africa as bishop

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about South African Anglicans

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her theology of inclusivity

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bishop Barbara Harris reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bishop Barbara Harris reflects upon her career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bishop Barbara Harris reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about her retirement and family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bishop Barbara Harris reflects upon the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bishop Barbara Harris talks about the divisions with Christianity

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Bishop Barbara Harris describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Bishop Barbara Harris narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
Bishop Barbara Harris remembers her calling to the ministry
Bishop Barbara Harris recalls African American bishops who preceded her
Transcript
We hear people often say they were called to ministry, but in your case, what happened to you?$$Well, I was exercising a very active lay ministry at the time. I was part of this St. Dismas Fellowship that went into the county prisons primarily, and I, I spent virtually every Sunday afternoon in the county jail because most of the inmate population was black. And all the volunteers were white. And so I thought that there needed to be a black volunteer that maybe people could relate to. And so I started going to the women's wing of the House of Correction for Philadelphia County [Pennsylvania], and occasionally, I would go to the group that met together in Holmesburg Prison [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], which was another county facility for men. And I, I did that for several years and had been doing that for several years. And there was something tugging at me saying that there was a wider dimension to ministry that I was feeling pulled towards. And I spent a lot of time talking to my parish rector about it, and about my strengths and weaknesses and trying to discern this call. And finally, we had a marathon conversation in my den one night that started about seven o'clock in the evening and went 'til about two in the morning when we stood and prayed together. And he said, "When shall we go to the bishop?" And I said, "I see no further reason to delay." And in the morning, later in the morning, he called the bishop and said, "I have someone whom I think you need to consider as a candidate."$$Now, who is this that you had the marathon--$$The Reverend Paul Washington who was my rector [at the George W. South Memorial Church of the Advocate, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay.$Now, just to set the stage for this, were there any black bishops at that point?$$Yes, there were several. Some were retired, but in the months prior to the Massachusetts election, in October of '88 [1988], Frank Turner had been consecrated as suffragan bishop in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]. I guess a year prior to that, Orris Walker [Orris G. Walker, Jr.] had been consecrated in Long Island [New York], and was the diocesan bishop in Long Island. Herbert Thompson [Herbert Thompson, Jr.] had been elected in southern Ohio, and, in fact, his consecration was the day that I was elected. So there--and there were some active black bishops--oh, Walter Decoster Dennis in New York [New York], the suffragan in New York.$$Was Primo [Quintin E. Primo, Jr.], was he one of the first--$$Bishop Primo had died by that time, I think (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay, all right.$$I think Bishop Primo had died by that time. I'm a little hazy, but there was Bishop Hucles [Henry Boyd Hucles, III] in Long Island, Bishop Martin [Richard Beamon Martin] was retired. [HistoryMaker] Bishop John Burgess who had been the bishop of Massachusetts, Bishop John Walker [John T. Walker] of Washington, D.C., the diocesan in Washington, D.C., who was one of my co-consecrators, Bishop Clarence Coleridge [Clarence Nicholas Coleridge] who was the suffragan in Connecticut and ultimately, became their diocesan bishop. So there were a number of active black bishops.$$Okay. But there were no women at this point, right?$$None at all, no.$$None at all, whatsoever. Okay.$$No women at all.

Bishop John Hurst Adams

Bishop and college president John Hurst Adams was born November 27, 1927 in Columbia, South Carolina to Charity Nash Adams, a homemaker and Reverend Eugene Avery Adams, an African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) minister and educator. Adams graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in Columbia, South Carolina and in 1947 earned an A.B. degree in history from Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina. Subsequently, he earned his Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.) degree and Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) degree from Boston University School of Theology in 1952 and 1956, respectively. Adams also studied at Harvard University and Union Theological Seminary, as well.

As a seminary student, Adams was assigned to the pastorate of Bethel A.M.E. Church in Lynn, Massachusetts. Upon graduating, he served on the seminary teaching faculty at Payne Theological Seminary, Wilberforce University in Ohio. In 1956, Adams was selected to serve as President of Paul Quinn College, Waco, Texas during which time he also served as campus pastor to all the students. In 1972, Adams was selected as the 87th Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church after a prophetic ministry at First A.M.E. Church in Seattle, Washington and Grant A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, California. At the time of his retirement in 2004/2005, Adams had served as Bishop of five separate Episcopal Districts to include his home district of South Carolina from 1992 to 2000. He was Senior Bishop of the A.M.E. Church from 1988 until his retirement.

Adams served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC), Allen University, Edward Waters College and Morris Brown College. In addition, he served as transitional Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Atlanta University Center. He founded and was the Chairman Emeritus of the Congress of National Black Churches, Inc. (CNBC). Moreover, Bishop Adams is the initiator of Executive Management Training for Black Church Leaders and Chairman of the Institute of Church Administration and Management (ICAM) Board of Trustees. He was active with the Joint Center on Political and Economic Studies, Transafrica, National Black United Fund, King Center Development Board and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

Adams was the husband of Dr. Dolly Deselle Adams of New Orleans, Louisiana. They had three adult children and eight grandchildren.

Adams passed away on January 10, 2018 at age 90.

Accession Number

A2005.249

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2005

Last Name

Adams

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Hurst

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Wilberforce University

Johnson C. Smith University

Boston University School of Theology

Case Western Reserve University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Columbia

HM ID

ADA08

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

We Pray Much Your Strength.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

11/27/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Death Date

1/10/2018

Short Description

Bishop Bishop John Hurst Adams (1927 - 2018 ) served as Bishop for the African Methodist Episcopal Church for thirty-two years and rose to national prominence as a religious and civil rights leader.

Employment

Bethel AME Church

Payne Theological Seminary

Paul Quinn College

First A.M.E Church

Grant Memorial A.M.E Church

87th Bishop, African Methodist Episcopal Church

Tenth Episcopal District

Second Episcopal District

Sixth Episcopal District

Seventh Episcopal District

Eleventh Episcopal District

Emory University Candler School of Theology

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:12913,180:13804,191:14200,196:14596,201:15289,209:15784,215:29733,508:31629,545:32814,566:33525,576:58702,903:63880,949:66080,1010:67280,1031:70480,1116:79644,1191:81084,1213:93340,1283:94220,1292:100702,1348:101626,1369:102466,1380:104230,1413:105826,1435:115294,1564:133220,1768:134210,1781:135470,1803:136100,1811:137000,1825:154020,2004$0,0:270,9:1080,21:2160,35:4950,117:6570,155:7920,188:9270,209:13320,302:14040,311:22354,354:22930,361:29902,408:32750,434:34350,467:36030,493:36590,501:37230,512:38030,525:38670,536:40030,552:40350,557:40670,562:46928,595:48814,616:49470,626:49798,631:50946,648:52012,662:52340,667:52750,673:53078,678:55923,693:56602,702:57184,709:57863,718:63004,795:64944,822:72075,850:73215,864:79480,925:83330,969:83990,976:89332,1001:90366,1015:90930,1022:92998,1051:94032,1064:94784,1074:95348,1081:113648,1280:114485,1294:119319,1360:119814,1366:121200,1384:121596,1389:125259,1434:127338,1456:131510,1465:134950,1548:135430,1555:137430,1593:143670,1698:143990,1703:152670,1716:159572,1805:166346,1933:167048,1944:167594,1952:168140,1961:170090,1986:174300,2006:176794,2030:179804,2072:181438,2093:184104,2139:184792,2149:192920,2203:196528,2260:208852,2366:221466,2455:221826,2461:225325,2486:227890,2507:229047,2522:229759,2530:230471,2539:232518,2569:233052,2576:241323,2658:243645,2676:244548,2684:251290,2738:254095,2811:254775,2823:255285,2831:258005,2869:258345,2874:263180,2905:263612,2913:264620,2928:264908,2933:265628,2948:274567,3006:277542,3051:296960,3221
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop John Hurst Adams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his family's land ownership

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about his family name and his ancestry

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his wife and family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his father's confrontation of the Ku Klux Klan

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers hearing Thurgood Marshall argue a case

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his childhood in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes notable individuals from Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the Waverly neighborhood of Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the changes to the Waverly neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Waverly Elementary School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early interests

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Carver Junior High School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early employment

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls Booker T. Washington High School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his activities at Booker T. Washington High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Johnson C. Smith University, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Johnson C. Smith University, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his decision to attend Boston University School of Theology

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his decision to attend Boston University School of Theology

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls notable theologians at Boston University School of Theology, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls notable theologians at Boston University School of Theology, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early experiences as a pastor and teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his election as president of Paul Quinn College in Waco, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as a pastor at Paul Quinn College

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers his civil rights activism in Waco, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the history of activism in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his pastorate of First A.M.E. church in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers the Central Area Civil Rights Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his pastorate of Grant A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his ministry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his election as a bishop

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as bishop of the Tenth Episcopal District, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as bishop of the Tenth Episcopal District, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the Congress of National Black Churches

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers the Vietnam War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about the military industrial complex

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls serving as bishop to the Second Episcopal District

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his time as bishop of the Sixth Episcopal District

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Allen talks about biblical history, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about biblical history, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers serving as bishop of the Seventh Episcopal District, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers serving as bishop of the Seventh Episcopal District, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about female clergy in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of technology in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls serving as the bishop of the Eleventh Episcopal District

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers his retirement as a bishop

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst describes the Institution of Church Administration and Management

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about The HistoryMakers project

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his values, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams shares advice for those pursuing the ministry

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his missionary work in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about affirmative action and civil rights

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of religion in the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of sports in the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his values, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams shares a message to future generations

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers hearing Thurgood Marshall argue a case
Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his ministry
Transcript
And of course, one of my other sparkling memories was that when he [Adams' father, Eugene Avery Adams, Sr.] and others--and I give Columbia [South Carolina] credit. They had some clergy who were real serious about justice issues. My father, there was a Reverend Carl Klug [ph.] who was a C.M.E. [Colored Methodist Episcopal; Christian Methodist Episcopal], and Reverend Rita [ph.] who was a Baptist. There was a Reverend Jenkins [ph.] who was a Baptist, and a Reverend Hinton [James M. Hinton] who was in addition to being a preacher was the president of Pilgrim Insurance Company [Pilgrim Health and Life Insurance Company].$$Okay.$$And they had stuff going on. And they brought Thurgood Marshall to Columbia to file two suits. One was for equal teachers pay in the State of South Carolina. And the second one was for the right of blacks to vote in the Democratic primary. When Thurgood Marshall came to argue those cases, there was a Yankee judge who moved to Charleston [South Carolina] who heard the cases. His name was Judge Waring [Julius Waties Waring]. I remember all this like it happened yesterday, because it was, it was a pivotal part of my growing up experience. And my father took me out of school and took me to the court, because he wanted me to hear and see Thurgood Marshall argue the cases for equal teachers pay and the right to vote in the Democratic primary in South Carolina. Both cases he won, because Judge Waring ruled in his favor. And of course, the appeals court held it up.$$Praise God.$$Now, those are the kind of memories which I was privileged to have, not because of me, but because of my parents, my father in particular, and the kind of community in which I lived. Because he was one of many clergy and activists in that community at that time who sort of created this ferment, which influenced me greatly. So, if you want to explain why I'm branded as a militant, it's because of these childhood events (laughter).$$We thank God for your childhood events.$What are some of the highlights of your pastorate at Grant A.M.E. [Grant A.M.E. Church, Los Angeles, California] and First A.M.E. [First A.M.E. Church] in Seattle [Washington]? After all, these two pastorates would propel you to be the eighty-seventh bishop in the A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal] church.$$Well, I think the focus of my ministry has always been on two things. One is the empowerment of people. I'm not much of a builder of buildings, although I have shared in doing that several times. But that was not what I was about. I tried, more than that, to build opportunities for people, and to equip people to take advantage of the opportunities that might come their way. So, that has always been the focus of my ministry. Even the focus of my ministry as a bishop has been the enabling and empowering of young pastors to achieve as much as their talent and nerve would allow them to achieve. And so at both places, the second focus of my ministry has always been causes that are not unique to the church community, but unique to the community in which the church functions. Let me illustrate what I mean by that.$$Yes, sir.$$In Los Angeles [California], the church I pastored was at 103rd and South Central--105th [Street] and South Central [Avenue]. We took a survey of our membership, only to discover that within a mile of our church, in every direction, we had only three families that attended our church. Our church was a commuter church. Watts [Los Angeles, California] was the port of entry into Los Angeles. And as the people came and succeeded, they moved out of that area to nicer areas, allegedly nicer areas. I found nothing wrong with the Watts area--nice houses, nice people. But, that troubled me. Now, there's something wrong with this church if we're sitting in this residential community and none of the residents attend our church but two or three. There's something, something missing. So we designed a program which we call the Saturday ethnic school. And we went that same mile in every direction around our church and recruited children between the ages of four and twelve to come to the ethnic school on Saturday--$$Okay.$$--from nine to one [o'clock]. Now, first of all, we were providing parents with first-class babysitting services. So, the parents of these children could have four hours of free time on Saturday to shop, to run their errands. Secondly, we taught three subjects--reading, arithmetic, and black history. So the Saturday ethnic school taught competence and African American history, in supplement to the Sunday school, which taught Hebrew Christian history.$$Yes.$$And we couched it in how to teach black pride without teaching white hate.$$Okay.$$And that was designed to respond to what I thought was an important need for us--the need for the children to have an affirmation of their ego and know who they were, and to be prepared to do well in school. At the same time, it was a recruiting device for their parents to bring them to that church they went to on Saturday.$$Yeah.$$And both worked.$$Amen.$$So, the business of reaching for people at the point of their need is sort of the kind of emphasis my ministry had, both as a pastor and as a bishop.

Bishop Arthur Brazier

Bishop Arthur M. Brazier, pastor of the Chicago’s Apostolic Church of God, was born in Chicago, Illinois, July 22, 1921. The son of Robert and Geneva Scott Brazier, Brazier grew up on Chicago’s South Side during the Great Depression. Brazier attended Frances E. Willard and Stephen A. Douglas elementary schools; he dropped out of Phillips High School after a year of attendance to begin working. Drafted into a segregated United States Army in 1942, Brazier became a staff sergeant serving in India and Burma; after being discharged in 1945, he met his future wife, was baptized, and joined her church in 1947.

In 1948, Brazier began a twelve year career with the United States Postal Service. During this time, Brazier studied at Moody Bible Institute and became pastor of the Universal Church of Christ in 1952. In 1960, Brazier merged his congregation with the Apostolic Church of God in Chicago’s Woodlawn community. Brazier became the spokesman for the Temporary Woodlawn Organization (TWO), organized by Nicholas Von Hoffman of Sol Alinsky’s Industrial Areas Foundation. Brazier successfully led TWO against the expansion of the University of Chicago in 1963. With Bill Berry of the Chicago Urban League, Brazier also formed the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations which fought segregation in Chicago’s public schools; he resigned in 1965, but was active with Al Raby in Dr. Martin Luther King’s visit to Chicago in 1966.

As pastor of the Apostolic Church of God, Brazier’s congregation grew from 100 members in 1960 to over 18,000. In 1976, Brazier became diocesan bishop of the 6th Episcopal District of the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World. Brazier also founded the Woodlawn Preservation and Investment Corporation, and the Fund for Community Redevelopment and Revitalization; he officially retired from the pulpit and addressed his congregation for the last time on June 1, 2008. In addition to his church activities, Brazier enjoyed a career as a teacher and lecturer and authored Black Self-Determination, Saved By Grace and Grace Alone, and From Milk to Meat. Brazier and his wife Isabelle raised four children.

Brazier passed away on October 22, 2010 at age 89.

Accession Number

A2005.003

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/7/2005

Last Name

Brazier

Maker Category
Middle Name

Monroe

Occupation
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Frances E. Willard Elementary School

John J. Pershing West Middle School

First Name

Arthur

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BRA05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Praise The Lord.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/22/1921

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Linguine, Shrimp

Death Date

10/22/2010

Short Description

Pastor and bishop Bishop Arthur Brazier (1921 - 2010 ) served as diocesan bishop of the 6th Episcopal District of the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, in addition to his work as pastor of the Chicago’s Apostolic Church of God.

Employment

Apostolic Church of God

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:350,7:630,12:1120,20:12179,88:12511,93:13258,103:15665,155:26158,272:26668,278:30571,327:31780,343:32152,348:32710,355:36750,360:37650,371:44678,472:45290,483:62520,645:63480,724:68020,788:79840,901:87564,1056:118990,1267:119302,1419:132850,1590$0,0:28550,282:29530,297:30370,310:31140,323:40180,411:43930,457:52585,663:57274,727:83796,989:84164,997:85544,1017:91258,1091:100100,1192:113240,1356:114962,1379:120290,1448:123892,1477:126610,1495:142145,1638:147300,1703:153590,1836:161130,1931:164105,1989:184734,2258:211754,2633:212586,2642:236011,2873:242329,2970:253065,3106:262040,3220
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Arthur Brazier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Arthur Brazier lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls his childhood church experience

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his household

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers attending the Chicago World's Fair

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls his school experience in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers his favorite teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls working after dropping out of Wendell Phillips High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood in the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers social movements from his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls not attending church and perceptions of blackness overseas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers his U.S. Army service during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls the segregation he encountered in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers segregation he encountered in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls jobs he held after his discharge from the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls meeting his wife and returning to church

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes becoming a pastor

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers his involvement with the Greater Woodlawn Ministers Alliance

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls learning about community organizing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes the Puerto Rican community's involvement in The Woodlawn Organization

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers lessons about power in organizing

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes the success of The Woodlawn Organization

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls founding the Coordinating Committee of Community Organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his hopes for leadership in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes problems in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes the message of the Apostolic Church of God in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop Arthur Brazier reflects upon his ministry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes the impact of political organizing on church attendance

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop Arthur Brazier talks about the importance of voting

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes programs at Chicago's Apostolic Church of God

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop Arthur Brazier reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop Arthur Brazier reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop Arthur Brazier describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop Arthur Brazier talks about his family

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
Bishop Arthur Brazier remembers lessons about power in organizing
Bishop Arthur Brazier recalls founding the Coordinating Committee of Community Organizations
Transcript
And we also learned that you--there was a limitation to power, that the organizing, the most important thing that you needed to deal with was probably too much at that early organizational stage. You had to win some victories or the organization would fall apart. So we would tackle small things to try to get victories from small things to give people more courage to face the power structure which was very new in the early '60s [1960s] when African Americans are now facing the white power structure, that was something that had never been done before and the white power structure didn't exactly know how, how to deal with that so, but we were very careful as who, as to who would be our target when we dealt with the city. We never attacked ever the mayor directly. The mayor at that time was [Mayor] Richard J. Daley, who had supreme power, different than today, although the mayor today is still very powerful, but Richard J. Daley was not only the mayor of the City of Chicago [Illinois], but he was also the chairman of the Democratic Central Committee and there was tremendous amount of patronage in those days and there were only six black alderman who all in Mayor Daley's camp, we called 'em silent six because they didn't do no talking. So when we were dealing with urban renewal and the Department of [City] Planning, and the Department of Urban Renewal [Community Development Commission], we would never attack the mayor. We would always attack his underlings so that we would always be in a bargaining position with the mayor because we never attacked him personally.$But then Bill Berry, Edwin C. Berry, his name is Bill Berry who was at that time the president of the [Chicago] Urban League and I met, and we indicated we thought we ought to have a citywide organization to help combat segregated, segregation and education and Bill and I formed a group call the Coordinating Committee of Community Organizations [Chicago, Illinois], the CCCO and we organized it, I became the president of it and we had a lot of community groups all over the West Side [Chicago, Illinois] and the South Side [Chicago, Illinois]. The West Side Organization [(WSO), Chicago, Illinois], The Woodlawn Organization [(TWO), Chicago, Illinois], other churches, other smaller groups to combat school segregation; at that particular point in time Benjamin C. Willis was the general superintendent, the African American schools, the schools in the black community were, were overcrowded. Kids were on triple shifts, some schools they used the auditorium for classrooms, they had four or five classes in the school auditorium, where you can image the din that created. While white schools had empty classrooms and we began using CCCO as the new vehicle to attack school se- what we called de facto segregation as opposed to de jure, and we wanted to bus kids into these white schools where there were empty classrooms. Some schools, half of the schools the classrooms were empty. Well, obviously the white neighborhoods were opposed to that, so in order to counter that they started building prefabricated classrooms on school playgrounds, we called those Willis Wagons and we refused to accept that and they started building schools in the black community. So actually building schools to keep black people in the black community, so we had a lot of, we started making a lot of demonstrations. It was that period of time that my life was threatened and the police--I don't know by who 'cause the police they told me that my life was threatened and for a while I had had two police bodyguards that went with me everywhere. But I was still the pastor of the Apostolic Church of God [Chicago, Illinois], and I was the president of The Woodlawn Organization, and the president of the CCCO, which was really a bit too much for me. So it was then that I decided to resign from the CCCO as the president.$$Now did you have to quit the post office before this?$$Oh, I had quit the post office in 1960.$$Okay all right.$$Yeah, I had quit the post office in 1960, and a man named Al Raby [Albert Raby] who was my vice president--Al Raby became the president of the CCCO and it was under Al Raby's leadership that CCCO had its greatest impact, and it was under Al Raby that we invited [Reverend] Dr. Martin Luther King [Jr.] to come to Chicago [Illinois], and Dr. Martin Luther King came to Chicago in 1966.$$Okay so you left CCCO in 1960.$$I didn't leave it, I just left the presidency.$$Well okay.$$Presidency, but I stayed there, I stayed there yeah.$$Okay, so what year was it when you, when you resigned?$$I left the, as the president I think probably in '65 [1965].$$Okay.$$Because Al Raby was president when they invited Dr. King to come to Chicago.$$That was 1966 right (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes.

Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry

Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry was born in Jackson, Mississippi on August 25, 1935. As a child, she attended St. Matthew Baptist Church for grade school, where eight grade levels were taught in a single classroom. After high school, Tyler Guidry earned her associate’s degree from J.P Campbell College in Jackson, and later studied economics at Tougaloo College. In 1977, she graduated from Los Angeles Bible School and she received her master’s of theology from Fuller Theological Seminary in 2004.

After she completed her A.A. degree, Tyler Guidry began working for the NAACP, where she was the women’s voter registration chair. In 1972, she and her husband, Kerry Tyler, drove across country to California, where she was hired by the Security Pacific Bank. The following year, she left the bank as she answered her calling to the ministry. After graduating from the Los Angeles Bible School, Tyler Guidry became the pastor of the First A.M.E. Church in Indio, California, where she remained for the next six years. In 1983, she moved to Bakersfield, California, where she led the congregation at Cain Memorial A.M.E. Church until 1989. That year, she was appointed to Walker Temple A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, making her the first female to be appointed to a major metropolitan church in the A.M.E. Church. In 1994, Tyler Guidry was appointed to be the first female presiding elder in the Fifth Episcopal District. On July 5, 2005, Tyler Guidry was elected to become only the second female bishop in the A.M.E. Church.

In addition to her ministry, Tyler Guidry has been involved with a number of other organizations. She has served as the secretary of the board of the John F. Kennedy Hospital in Indio, president of the Riverside County Board of Mental Health and treasurer of the national board of One Church One Child, among many other groups. She is also a contributor to the fourth edition of “Those Preaching Women.” Her first husband, Kerry Tyler, passed away in 1988. She and her husband Don Guidry reside in Los Angeles. She has six children, twelve grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Accession Number

A2004.192

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/5/2004 |and| 11/15/2004

Last Name

Guidry

Maker Category
Middle Name

Tyler

Occupation
Schools

Mary C. Jones Elementary School

Brinkley High School

Los Angeles Bible Training School

Tougaloo College

First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Jackson

HM ID

GUI01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bermuda

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ That Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

8/25/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Bishop Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry (1937 - ) was the first woman to be appointed a major metropolitan charge when she was assigned to Walker Temple in Los Angeles, California. Guidry was later elected a bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, becoming only the second woman to hold that title.

Employment

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

Security Pacific Bank

First A.M.E Church

Cain Memorial A.M.E. Church - Bakersfield, California

Walker Temple A.M.E. Church

Fifth Episcopal District of the A.M.E. Church

A.M.E. Church

Favorite Color

Sky Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:868,11:1312,19:6048,174:14188,313:14854,325:17666,380:26205,438:26600,444:27469,457:35606,613:35922,618:37660,650:41294,724:44375,785:55640,891:58664,949:59168,957:59672,965:64712,1043:66440,1062:67952,1087:73266,1131:74450,1157:76522,1191:76892,1197:77188,1202:86038,1289:91410,1349:92594,1365:95970,1422$0,0:2849,119:3388,142:3773,149:6545,195:6930,201:8085,219:9779,244:10164,250:10703,258:22083,388:22580,412:23006,419:24781,457:25633,470:26130,478:28047,510:28331,515:30816,570:31100,575:32094,591:32591,599:35999,659:36283,698:48660,868:50688,907:51156,915:51468,920:53886,957:54276,963:59108,1007:60026,1023:60536,1029:65024,1075:65840,1085:68084,1121:82214,1327:89236,1409:89606,1415:90198,1425:94831,1483:95216,1489:109613,1670:111114,1694:111509,1700:113089,1726:114037,1740:114432,1746:116486,1789:116960,1796:117434,1804:124290,1901:127420,1933:128995,1974:129970,1992:130420,1999:132745,2045:133120,2050:134695,2086:137545,2139:138145,2149:139420,2170:139870,2177:140920,2194:145230,2205:145790,2214:146280,2223:147890,2261:148660,2274:151025,2305:155870,2334:157570,2368:161540,2433:161915,2439:162290,2445:162890,2456:163415,2465:170502,2572:170758,2577:171334,2589:171782,2598:174598,2662:175110,2669:175558,2677:178221,2696:178760,2704:179299,2712:181994,2757:182379,2762:182918,2771:183688,2786:184612,2803:187076,2840:189309,2887:189617,2892:190772,2910:191388,2921:195110,2936:195677,2944:202481,3095:202886,3100:205010,3108
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes where her mother grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry shares a story about her maternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers her family life as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about her relationship with her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry lists the family members in her household growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her early educational experiences in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about the application of the separate but equal doctrine in Jackson, Mississippi schools

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls segregation in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers the trial and execution of Willie McGee in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls the day World War II ended

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes the radio shows she listened to with his family as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes what she liked to read as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about secretly being taught African American history at Mary C. Jones Elementary School in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about the teaching of African American history after the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes Brinkley High School in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes what she was like as a student

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about attending church as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes meeting her first husband

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls being courted by her first husband

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her marriage to her first husband

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls the reason she went back to school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her first husband's educational background

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry explains how she became involved in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls the death of Medgar Evers

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her awareness of the crimes committed against African Americans during her youth in Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls 1964's importance in Mississippi's history

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers the Freedom Summer of 1964 in Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls her ten-year-old son being jailed with demonstrators in 1964

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about Robert Parris Moses

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about HistoryMakers Joyce Ladner and Dorie Ladner

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers Civil Rights activists in 1964

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry talks about moving to Los Angeles, California and working at Security Pacific Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her experience at Los Angeles Bible Training School in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her experience as pastor of First A.M.E. Church in Indio, California

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls her time pastoring in Bakersfield, California and the impact of her first husband's death

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls the movement to elect the first woman bishop in the A.M.E. church

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry remembers the election of the first woman bishop in the A.M.E. church in 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls her election as the second woman bishop in the A.M.E. church

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes the challenges she faces as bishop of the A.M.E. church

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry explains the history of activism in the A.M.E church and her personal theology

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry reflects upon her life and her career as a minister

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry narrates her photographs, pt.1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry recalls her ten-year-old son being jailed with demonstrators in 1964
Bishop Carolyn Tyler Guidry describes her experience as pastor of First A.M.E. Church in Indio, California
Transcript
Did you go door to door in those days or were you mainly in the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] office in '64 [1964] or--$$No, we actually went door to door to register people. I was a block captain where we actually knocked on doors to get people to register to vote. During some of the demonstrations when the city [of Jackson, Mississippi] decided to use a garbage truck to pick people up who were being arrested for demonstrating, my ten year old son, was one of those picked up and we had to go get him out of jail.$$They picked him up in a garbage truck?$$Yeah, um-hm. They used the, the dump truck to put people in to take them off to jail. And the jail was not large enough to hold all the people so they took 'em to the fairgrounds, the county fairgrounds where they locked people up. And that, I remember we had to go and get our son out of that, no charges, he was ten years old. So there were no charges brought against him and as parents we went down and we got him and so he was okay but that was, that was supposed to be a form of intimidation. And I think in the past when blacks have been lynched, that it put fear in blacks and so maybe they were assured that black folk wouldn't rise up. And I think even the whites were, were surprised themselves that it didn't work anymore, you know, these folk were crazy now, they don't behave the way they're supposed to.$So you're in Indio, California (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) For six years.$$--you know this small church--for six years?$$Uh-huh. When, when I went there the church was so small they could raise about twenty-five dollars a Sunday, and so three Sundays they paid the pastor the twenty-five and the fourth Sunday was trustee Sunday they paid the light and gas and telephone bill with that offering. And the second Sunday I was there, the leader of the congregation decided that since I was gonna be there they needed to pay me a decent salary, so he determined how much each one of the present members would give so that they could pay me seventy-five a week, which they did. But, of course, when it came time to pay the bills he had to give each one of the members one of the bills, somebody got the light bill, somebody got the water bill, and they would pay, that's how they paid their bills. So, when it came time to other obligations, the women would have chicken dinners to raise the money and this went on my first year. And then I--the man who was the leader would not sell any dinners, wouldn't help the women and I said to them look ladies, look at who's doing the work, you don't need to do this. We can do this a better way. And I began to teach tithing and stewardship. And I remember we had this, this three month program where we had Bible study on tithing and we had set a goal the first Sunday in August was going to be our first tithing Sunday. And the first time we did it, and they raised $1200, they could not believe it they'd raise that much money. But it was sort of the turnaround in the congregation. The congregation was growing numerically, we now had young people, we had a choir of about thirty, young people in the youth choir, the adults were coming back to church, and they had a $1200 offering on a Sunday when they couldn't raise twenty-five [dollars] before. And so we began to, to grow and the church became important. I used to go to the school board and give the invocation. I'd go to the city council and give the invocation. I joined the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, black and white preachers, and became president of the alliance. Anything that was going on in the city I made sure that First A.M.E. Church [Indio, California] was superimposed. When the fair would come and we had a booth, so that we were there, our presence was there. So much so that six years later when I was about to leave Indio, something happened on the [city] council and one of the members was dismissed and the charter says that if the council, remaining council can agree on an individual they don't have to have a special election. And the council members came to me and asked if I would serve on the city council, they could all agree on me as a person. And it was tempting, my ego said, ah ha, be on the city council, but I had been told by my bishop that I was being moved to another congregation to pastor. And I had to remind myself that God had called me to preach and that I was a pastor and I had not been called to serve on the city council.

Dr. Horace Earl Smith

As a pediatric hematologist and oncologist at Children's Memorial Hospital and pastor of the Apostolic Faith Church on Chicago's South Side, Dr. Horace E. Smith has treated the bodies and souls of Chicagoans for more than two decades. Born in Chicago on December 10, 1949, Smith lost his mother at age ten and, with his grandmother's guidance, turned to the church to fill the void left by her loss.

Smith earned his B.A. degree with honors from Chicago State University in 1971, before entering the University of Illinois Medical Center. Smith completed residencies and fellowships in pediatric hematology and oncology before becoming an attending pediatrician at Rush Presbyterian Medical Center in 1980. From 1986 on, Smith served as the director of the Comprehensive Sickle Cell/Thalassemia Program at Children's Memorial Hospital, and became recognized worldwide as a leader in his field.

In addition to his career as a pediatrician, Smith became a pastor in 1980 at the Apostolic Faith Church, which he had attended since youth. In 1983, Smith became a district elder, and in August 1997, was elevated to the status of bishop. Smith remained active through his church, assisting with its Boy Scout chapter, helping redevelop the historic Wabash YMCA, leading a $3.3 million church renovation project, and helping reshape the surrounding inner-city neighborhood.

In 1976, Smith married Susan Davenport; the couple had three daughters.

Accession Number

A2003.150

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/8/2003

Last Name

Smith

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Earl

Schools

Oakenwald Elementary School

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Robert Lindblom Math & Science Academy High School

Chicago State University

University of Illinois College of Medicine

Benjamin W. Raymond Elementary School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Horace

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

SMI06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Your best days are ahead of you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/10/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Pediatric oncologist and bishop Dr. Horace Earl Smith (1949 - ) serves as the director of the Comprehensive Sickle Cell/Thalassemia Program at Children's Memorial Hospital, and is a recognized leader in his field. In addition to his career as a pediatrician, Smith is a bishop in the Apostolic Faith Church.

Employment

Children's Memorial Hospital

Apostolic Faith Church

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Horace Smith interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Horace Smith's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Horace Smith details his family's history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Horace Smith remembers his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Horace Smith describes his father, a Chicago police officer

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Horace Smith reflects on his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Horace recalls his grandmother's influence on his religious exposure

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Horace Smith describes his experiences in grammar school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Horace Smith describes a mentor from his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Horace Smith describes the positive influence of his childhood pastor

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Horace Smith discusses the difficulties of attending a predominantly white high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Horace Smith talks about the social aspects of his high school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Horace Smith remembers his efforts to earn a college scholarship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Horace Smith describes how his undergraduate experience led him to medical school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Horace Smith explains why he was discouraged from actively participating in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Horace Smith describes the dark moments of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Horace Smith describes the rigorous study required in medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Horace Smith describes his experience at medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Horace Smith talks about overcoming adversity and succeeding in medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Horace Smith tells of his initial interest in researching sickle cell anemia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Horace Smith discusses public misperceptions about sickle cell anemia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Horace Smith discusses the treatment of sickle cell anemia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Horace Smith talks about possible cures for sickle cell anemia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Horace Smith talks about the mortality rate of sickle cell anemia victims

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Horace Smith reflects on his successful career as a hematologist oncologist

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Horace Smith explains why he became a pastor

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Horace Smith talks about the challenge of balancing his pastorship with his medical practice

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Horace Smith shares his beliefs regarding faith, medicine, and science

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Horace Smith shares questions that challenge his faith

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Horace Smith discusses the role of faith in medicine and healing

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Horace Smith talks about the balance between being a doctor and being a pastor

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Horace Smith shares his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Horace Smith discusses his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Horace Smith has no regrets about his life

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Horace Smith shares how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Photo - Publicity photograph of Horace Smith, ca. 1993

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Photo - Horace Smith's grandmother, Alberta Pryor

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Photo - Horace Smith's high school graduation picture from Robert Lindblom Technical High School, Chicago, 1967

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Photo - Horace Smith, his siblings Albert Jr. and Geraldine, and an unidentified woman celebrate his completion of medical school, Chicago, 1975

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Photo - Horace Smith, his daughters (left to right) Rachel, Emily and Lauren and his wife, Susan Davenport, 2001

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Photo - Horace Smith and his wife, Susan Davenport with their wedding party, Chicago, 1976

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Photo - Horace Smith, his daughters (left to right) Rachel, Emily and Lauren and his wife, Susan Davenport in Hawaii, ca. 1990

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Photo - Horace Smith and (left to right) daughters Rachel and Lauren, wife Susan Davenport, and daughter Emily at the Great Wall of China, 2002

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Photo - Horace Smith with his grandfather and father, Albert Smith, Sr. at Apostolic Faith Church, Indiana Ave., Chicago, 1980-1981

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Photo - Horace Smith and his wife, Susan Davenport, at his ordination as pastor of the Apostolic Faith Church, Chicago, 1980

Tape: 4 Story: 19 - Photo - Horace Smith's parents, Albert Smith Sr. and Shirley Rhone Smith, on their wedding day ca. 1947

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Photo - Childhood portrait of Horace Smith with his oldest brother Albert Smith, Jr., 1951

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Photo - Horace Smith and his siblings with Santa Claus ca. 1957

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Horace Smith graduation portrait from Wendell Phillips Upper Grade Center, Chicago, 1963

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Horace Smith at a reception after completing medical school at the University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, 1975

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Horace Smith with his siblings, his niece and an unidentified girl, Chicago, ca. 1956

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Horace Smith preaching at the Apostolic Faith Church in Chicago, 1980

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Horace Smith and his wife, Susan Davenport at his ordination as Bishop of the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, Inc., Indianapolis, 1998

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Horace Smith with family friends in Hawaii, not dated

Bishop John Burgess

Bishop John Burgess was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on March 11, 1909. He attended the University of Michigan, earning a B.A. in 1930, and an M.A. in 1931. Burgess went on to the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduating in 1934, and he became an ordained minister in 1935.

He began his career by serving the African American working classes of Michigan and Ohio after World War II. He started at his home parish of St. Phillip's Church and was later given charge of St. Simon of Cyrene, a mission church that served a Cincinnati neighborhood in abject poverty. In 1946, Burgess became the Episcopalian chaplain of Howard University, where he served for ten years. In 1951, Burgess was named a canon at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. During his five years there, he often spoke of civil rights issues, using the national pulpit to his advantage. After leaving Howard and the National Cathedral, Burgess went to Boston, where he took a post as archdeacon of the city's missions and parishes and worked to improve the urban ministry of the church there. In 1962, Burgess was made a bishop suffragan, and in 1970, he became the first African American bishop of the Episcopal Church. Under his leadership, he instituted a number of programs that sought to make the church more inclusive of minorities and give the congregations more of a voice, and he established the Joint Urban Fund, which gives money to local groups fighting poverty. He retired in 1975.

After his retirement, Burgess was honored with more than a dozen honorary degrees, and he went to Yale's Berkeley Divinity School to teach and serve as interim dean. He also served as chairman of St. Augustine's College in North Carolina.

Burgess passed away on August 24, 2003 at age of 94.

Accession Number

A2003.180

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/12/2003

Last Name

Burgess

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Grand Rapids

HM ID

BUR05

Favorite Season

None

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/11/1909

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

8/24/2003

Short Description

Bishop Bishop John Burgess (1909 - 2003 ) was the first African American Episcopalian Bishop, was the chaplain of Howard University, and was named a canon at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Burgess also worked extensively with urban ministry in Boston.

Employment

St. Phillip's Church

St. Simon of Cyrene

Howard University

National Cathedral

Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts

Yale Divinity School

Favorite Color

None

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Bishop John Burgess' photographs are narrated by his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop John Burgess' interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop John Burgess talks about his immediate family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop John Burgess describes his childhood in Grand Rapids, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop John Burgess talks about his experience attending college at the University of Michigan and his favorite professor

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop John Burgess talks about the early days of his ministry in Grand Rapids, Michigan and Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop John Burgess talks about being the Episcopal chaplain at Howard University in Washington, D.C. and being installed as a bishop in 1970

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop John Burgess talks about the University of Michigan Club in Washington, D.C. and being a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop John Burgess talks about Howard University president Mordecai Johnson and the length of his tenure at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop John Burgess talks about his family and reflects upon his legacy