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The Honorable Terry Hillard

Former Chicago police superintendent Terry G. Hillard was born on August 11, 1943 in South Fulton, Tennessee. One of ten children, Hillard’s family moved to Chicago when he was still young. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1963 and served in Vietnam for thirteen months where he was awarded four medals and a Presidential Unit citation. After returning to Chicago in 1968, Hillard entered the Chicago Police Training Academy. He also attended Chicago’s Loop Junior College where he earned his A.A. degree. He went on to receive his B.S. and M.S. degrees in corrections from Chicago State University in 1976 and 1978, respectively.

Hillard worked his way through the police ranks, becoming a patrol officer after Police Training Academy. He then served as a gang crimes specialist and was shot twice in the line of duty. In 1979, Hillard was chosen to be a member of the Mayoral Executive Security Detail and served under Chicago Mayors Jane M. Byrne and Harold Washington. He was later promoted to Intelligence Division Sergeant, 6th District commander, and became Chicago’s first African American chief of detectives. He then became coordinator of the Chicago Terrorist Task Force. He was serving as lieutenant in gang crimes and narcotics when Mayor Richard M. Daley appointed him as the police superintendent for the city of Chicago where he served for five years before retiring. In 2004, he co-founded and became partner at Hillard Heintze.

Hillard has received several awards for his courage in the police force including the Blue Star Award, the Police Medal, and the Superintendent’s Award of Valor. He holds Honorary Doctoral degrees from Lewis University, Saint Xavier University, and Calumet College of Saint Joseph. In 2005, he contributed to the book Chicago Police: An Inside View – The Story of Superintendent Terry G. Hillard, written about his leadership in the Chicago Police Department.

Hillard lives with his wife Dorothy and their two children, Terri Lee and Dana.

Terry Hillard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 24, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.036

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/24/2010

Last Name

Hillard

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Rosenwald School

Wendell Phillips Elementary School

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Loop Junior College

Chicago State University

First Name

Terry

Birth City, State, Country

South Fulton

HM ID

HIL12

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sun Valley, Idaho

Favorite Quote

Doggone-it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/11/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Police superintendent The Honorable Terry Hillard (1943 - ) served with the Chicago Police Department for thirty-five years before becoming co-founder and Partner of Hillard Heintze.

Employment

Hillard Heintze

Chicago Police Department

Chicago NAACP office

Chicago American

U.S. Marine Corps

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Terry Hillard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terry Hillard lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his neighborhood in South Fulton, Tennessee

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his stepfather's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his birth father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his stepfather's career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers how his mother and stepfather met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers segregation in South Fulton, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls the baseball teams of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the Hopkins Restaurant and Cafe

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers his second grade teacher, Miss Mason

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers playing basketball in South Fulton, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls camping at Kentucky Lake

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his first impressions of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the DuSable High School basketball team

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers his family's first television set

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers Sylvester Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers Robert M. Harness

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers Wendell Phillips Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls men's fashion styles on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his suspension from Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls selling Chicago American newspapers

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls working for the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers his arrest at Rainbow Beach Park in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers Reverend Joseph H. Jackson

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls leaving his family's home

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terry Hillard reflects upon his experience with the NAACP

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his decision to join the U.S. Marine Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the Vietnam War, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the Vietnam War, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls racial discrimination in the U.S. Marine Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the protests against the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his challenges in the U.S. Marine Corps

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his decision to enroll in the Chicago Police Academy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls racial discrimination in the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers working for the Chicago Transit Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his training at the Chicago Police Academy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls his white police partner

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers the leaders of the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls being assigned to the Area Two Task Force

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls policing the Burnside neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Terry Hillard remembers Loop Junior College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Terry Hillard talks about his wife

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
The Honorable Terry Hillard describes his first impressions of Chicago, Illinois
The Honorable Terry Hillard recalls racial discrimination in the Chicago Police Department
Transcript
(Simultaneous) What was your first impression of the street of Chicago [Illinois]? Were you--?$$I remember when my Aunt Rose [ph.] stayed at 44th [Street] and Prairie [Avenue], and the "L" [elevated train] track was right behind it. And the first time that we ever--the "L" came by and this doggone noise--man, it was terrifying. I mean it was, oh, man, you talking about some kids that was--we were scared out of our minds, you know. Because the "L," we never heard noise like that before, you know. That doggone thing up in the air running on those doggone--you know, you got to realize, you know, we didn't have a bus in South Fulton, Tennessee, you know. The only bus we had was to take the kids from--we would--the basketball team would go from Fulton [Kentucky] to Union City [Tennessee], or to Martin [Tennessee] or up in Murray [Kentucky], or what'cha call it, to play basketball. You know, and that was one of them yellow school buses, you know. But then to see a doggone--what you call a train. The only train we'd ever seen was an Illinois Central [Illinois Central Railroad] train, not no doggone train that make this much noise, man. It was deafening, you know, you couldn't hear yourself talk, you know. Then to come up here and just to see how big this place was, you know. A one block area in Chicago was like two or three blocks, what we call blocks, in South Fulton, you know. And we stayed on doggone South Park [South Parkway; Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive], you know, with not only this side, but then with the inner drive with the doggone parkway on each side of doggone South Park. And then there was the inner drive over there on the other side, you know. That doggone street was, even the doggone downtown section wasn't that large, you know. And it was just, it was something. And then to see all the different stores and all the different folks, you know, this many people standing in an area, you know. It was, it was an eye-opener.$Well, let me ask you this. Now, it seems to me that about that time--and we've interviewed some of the other people like [HistoryMaker] Renault Robinson and others--was the Chicago Police Department, you know, pushing to bring more black officers on board during that time period? Because it seems like a lot of people were coming on. Schoolteachers had quit their jobs and joined (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, but it was reluctantly, you know, reluctantly, yeah, you know. It wasn't like they was in the black community, like we did when I was superintendent, recruiting for minorities; but reluctantly, yeah.$$Okay. Because there was some kind of decree, wasn't there?$$Yeah, a consent decree.$$Okay.$$Judge Marshall, yeah.$$Okay.$$And I messed around there and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, Ernest Marshall [sic. Prentice Marshall], right.$$Yeah. And so I messed around there and I went and put my name in. And I just happened to see one of the guys who was a precinct captain for Dawson [William L. Dawson]. He said, "Well, if you want to become a policeman, you need to go down and see the congressman and all that, you know." I said, "Well, why do I need to see the congressman, you know?" "Well, just go see the congressman, you know, and they will--." I said, "Why do I need to see the congressman? I'm just going to take a test, a whatchamacallit, you know." And being naive, just out of the [U.S.] Marine Corps, you know, I didn't realize it at the time. But after a couple of days and I'm telling a couple of people, they say, "Well, how much money you got?" I said, "I ain't got no money. I left the Marine Corps, and I think I must have left there with about three or four hundred bucks [dollars], you know." And they said, "Well, it might be what--." I said, "No, I ain't giving nobody no money for no job. I ain't paying nobody for no job." So, I got on the police department, and I didn't see nobody and didn't ask nobody, you know. But contrary to the popular belief, they said, "Well, they're going to exclude you because you don't have a sponsor." I said, "What do you mean?" I said, "I was in the Marine Corps for four years; I was in Vietnam, you know." "No, you don't have a sponsor. You need a sponsor. And if you don't pass the test," he said, "they're going to get you because of your feet." And what was that, having to do with your arch? You've got (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Fallen arches?$$-fallen arches, you know. I said, "I ain't got no fallen arches." He said, "Well, let the doctor, the medical doctor, you know--." I said, "Man, I ain't got no--." I said, "I got my doggone thing from the Marine Corps." I told him, "I came out in perfect health, you know. And I went through, and didn't nobody ask me--I went through the medical, and they didn't knock me out, you know."$$So, these are the common things they were excluding people for (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, yeah, yeah, man, fallen arches and things. Oh, man, it was just a rash of things, especially when it came down to minorities, you know.

Joseph Henry Beasley

Human rights activist Joseph Henry Beasley was born to sharecroppers on a rural plantation in Inman, Georgia, on December 27, 1936. Beasley received his primary education in a segregated one room school house before moving with his family to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he excelled in the local public schools. It was during this phase of his life that Beasley began to set high expectations and committed himself to a life of service; he ultimately received his B.S. degree in criminal justice from Park College and attended graduate school at Clark Atlanta University.

Beasley’s career began in the U.S. Air Force, from which he retired as a police superintendent after twenty-one years of service. Beasley joined Operation PUSH (People United to Serve Humanity) in 1976 as a member of the Board of Directors of its Kansas City affiliate, and assumed the position of Executive Director of that chapter in 1978. Three years later, Beasley moved to Atlanta where he was named Chapter Coordinator, and in 1995 was named Southern Regional Director.

Under the leadership of the Reverend Cameron M. Alexander, Pastor of Antioch Baptist Church North, Beasley successfully tackled issues of equal justice, eradication of poverty, and economic development around the globe. Beasley worked with the African National Congress to register voters for the 1994 election that swept Nelson Mandela into power; served as a monitor in Haiti during that nation’s second democratically held election in 1995; and made a high impact visit to Zambia after its contested 2002 presidential election. Closer to home, Beasley served as the Georgia Deputy Director for Jesse Jackson’s 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns, and also became engaged in the challenge of redistricting Georgia’s congressional boundaries to increase African American representation in the United States Congress.

Beasley continued to serve as the Southern Regional Director of the National Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, founded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., and as the president of African Ascension, an organization he formed to develop economic and political ties throughout Africa and the African Diaspora. Beasley served as a board member of the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City; Afronet in Lusaka, Zambia; Afrobras in Sao Paulo, Brazil; Christ Institute in Atlanta; and is Chairman of both the Benedita de Silva International Foundation, and the Asian American Center, both in Atlanta, Georgia. The library at Zumbi dos Palmares College in Sao Paulo, Brazil is named in Beasley’s honor.

The bulk of Beasley’s later work focused on the unification of African descendants for economic, political, social, and cultural empowerment. Beasley received dozens of awards and was featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Los Angles Times, and numerous other newspapers, periodicals and magazines, as well as on CNN and other major American television networks.

In addition to his many other blessings, Beasley married and had three children, nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Beasley viewed his life and his numerous accomplishments as a testament to the fruits of spiritual growth, vision and commitment.

Accession Number

A2005.144

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/22/2005

Last Name

Beasley

Maker Category
Middle Name

Henry

Organizations
Schools

New Hope Elementary School

Robert A. Taft Information Technology High School

First Name

Joseph

Birth City, State, Country

Inman

HM ID

BEA06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises

Favorite Quote

The Lord Will Make a Way Somehow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/27/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pig Feet, Ears, Chicken Feet, Chitterlings

Short Description

Civil rights activist, deacon, and police superintendent Joseph Henry Beasley (1936 - ) served as the Southern Regional Director of the National Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, and as the president of African Ascension. Beasley's career was marked by a dedication to human rights in both Africa and the African Diaspora.

Employment

United States Air Force

Operation PUSH

Rainbow/PUSH

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:249360,3458$0,0:4104,84:4650,94:8238,148:8940,202:18144,342:35109,594:35662,602:38190,636:38743,644:45458,767:45932,775:51383,894:51778,900:52331,908:52647,913:65156,1052:65748,1060:71950,1121:73950,1147:75630,1182:78190,1219:78510,1224:83070,1310:83390,1315:85390,1391:92830,1512:101550,1608:101950,1614:104110,1656:116110,1850:116430,1855:119470,1926:119870,1932:134005,2078:134353,2083:139138,2144:139486,2149:140008,2156:145125,2177:145510,2183:148359,2227:149052,2237:156521,2372:158446,2442:158831,2448:171196,2566:171862,2585:173120,2615:177412,2690:181038,2786:181556,2795:182148,2804:182592,2811:186580,2838
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joseph Henry Beasley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about his mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his father, Rozie Beasley

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about how his parents met and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joseph Henry Beasley recalls his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joseph Henry Beasley recounts how the story of the Haitian Revolution inspired him as a child farm laborer

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood in Fayette County, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about his education at New Hope Elementary School in Fayette County, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley reflects upon racialized codes of conduct in the segregated South

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about racial discrimination in the media and the lasting effects of slavery

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about the murder of Emmett Till and U.S. embargoes on Haiti

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about moving to Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his experience at Robert A. Taft High School in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about applying for college and joining the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his service in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about advancing in the U.S. Air Force to become a police superintendent

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about the Cuban Missile Crisis, John F. Kennedy's assassination, and the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his work to expand opportunities for African Americans in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley recalls being in Atlanta, Georgia after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about the leadership of the Civil Rights Movement after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about embracing his African heritage after Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley reflects upon his Pan-African philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about how he came to work for HistoryMaker Jesse L. Jackson at Operation PUSH

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes working as the director of Operation PUSH in Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about the relationship between HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's Rainbow Coalition and Operation PUSH

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes working as the director of Operation PUSH in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley recounts Rainbow/PUSH's legal campaigns against the Coca-Cola Corporation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes Rainbow/PUSH's lawsuits against the Coca-Cola Corporation in the United States and in Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about suing the Boy Scouts of America in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his work to protect African American voting rights in Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes the efforts of HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson and civil rights organizations to combat police brutality

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes working with the Antioch Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia and with Brazilian Senator Benedita da Silva

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about working to combat racial discrimination

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes how he responds to threats

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about reparations for slavery

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his charitable work with the Antioch Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joseph Henry Beasley describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about what he would do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Joseph Henry Beasley reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Joseph Henry Beasley talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Joseph Henry Beasley narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
Joseph Henry Beasley describes working as the director of Operation PUSH in Kansas City, Missouri
Joseph Henry Beasley describes the efforts of HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson and civil rights organizations to combat police brutality
Transcript
Now, before we get you here [Atlanta, Georgia], like, what kinds of things did you all do in Kansas City [Missouri] when you were director of Kansas City PUSH?$$Yeah. Well, we carried on the programs that the national office--we had by--at that time, we had, like, a labor--we had a grant from the Labor Department [U.S. Department of Labor]. I think we learned the lesson, because, you know, some of the, you know--but we had, like, (unclear) forced development and peace that gave us the capacity to have a big office there in Kansas City. I was very concerned about the plight of black men being in trouble, in prison. So we had put together a project to work with--to try and divert young men and women, you know, from the prisons there in--and, of course, we had, which was among the biggest programs was PUSH for Excellence, where we went into the schools and said to the young people, you know, to be excellent in their education; to sign a pledge that you would study, you know, two hours a night. And we encouraged the parents to take your children to school and meet your--the parents, see your children's teachers and exchange phone numbers; then every nine weeks, to go back to school and pick up the report card. And so we were very much involved in education. And, of course, the biggest thing that I think that Operation PUSH was about in doing is the ongoing discrimination that still exists. And so, you know, people would come to us with complaints of job discrimination, you know; unfair firings, and the lack of promotion opportunities. So we took on the struggle for equity in Kansas City. And so it was a very fascinating job. And when I decided to come back home to Atlanta [Georgia], enough time had elapsed, because [HM] Jesse [L. Jackson] had meticulously decided that he would not put a chapter in Atlanta, the headquarters of--well, that's SCLC [Southern Christian Leadership Conference] National Office. But by that time--(simultaneous)--$$To avoid conflict with SCLC?$$Conflict. Right. And, but it was clear there's enough work for everybody to do. And so, I guess in 1981, we opened--organized a chapter of Rainbow--I mean of Operation PUSH here in Atlanta, Georgia. And it was such a great pleasure to work with [HM] Dr. Joseph Lowery and Reverend Osborn, who is one of the leaders. And at that time, people, like Abbott Love, who now is back working with SCLC again full time. And I, you know, always sought to put SCLC involved in everything that we were doing. And then freely acknowledging that you are the parent and we're the children, and we want to learn. We want to work with you. And as we take on these different issues, we're not concerned about who gets the credit for it. Let's knock down some of these barriers together. And then, of course, we agree with the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]. Yes, you're the oldest. You're the biggest. You're the baddest. Having said that, let's work together. Let's work together. And whether Mr. [Kweisi] Mfume or whether Nelson Rivers, who's one of the leaders, if y'all gonna be the first to speak or the last how we gonna do it, let's do it together, 'cause I don't give a rip about who gets the credit, you know. I, for one, am not looking for no accolades from nobody. And if my name is never called, all the better. But I'm gonna be behind the scene doing some work. That's what I'm concerned about.$Now, do you have a hard time--I know one of the functions of the Urban League is to point out discrepancies and, you know, different discriminatory practices. They do a lot of statistical analyses and that sort of thing. Do you have the benefit of, like, work done by the Urban League, say, to help you?$$Oh, yeah. We, you know, and we'll never criticize another civil rights organization. And they have [HM] Marc [H.] Morial now as the young man that's over the Urban League, 'cause he was the Mayor of New Orleans [Louisiana] at one point. And so [HM] Reverend [Jesse L.] Jackson worked closely with the Urban League. We worked closely with the NAACP. Mr. [Kweisi] Mfume's replacement have not been named yet. But with [HM] Julian Bond and others. And, of course, with Mr. [Charles] Steele, who has now assumed the leadership of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference [SCLC]. We're working very closely as a team together. And, you know, we still have all these police killings. Just recently heard that we've joined--and SCLC have taken a lead on the taser gun that is killing a lot of black men and black people all over the country. And we're saying that we need to do away with the taser until more testing is done. And so the SCLC have taken on the initiative in Gwinnett County and said that, because the D.A. [district attorney], when that black man was tasered five times over in forty-five seconds, they killed him. And the D.A., when they convened the Grand Jury, he didn't show them that the tasered incident. He said that they said they didn't want to see it. But it was clear that they murdered the man. And so we're joining forces with SCLC and to stand together in these kind of, you know, incidents and stuff, so.$$So, is there--in a city like Atlanta [Georgia] has had black police chiefs for, I guess, the last twenty years, I guess, or most part of twenty.$$Yeah. Right.$$But you still have a serious police brutality problem here?$$Well, I have great admiration for Chief Pendleton, who is our Chief of Police now. And we got him here from New Orleans. He did a great job in putting a handle on this police misconduct. And so, we're pleased that--while we don't have a utopian situation here, that we have a tolerable situation. And Chief Pendleton know that he is accountable to the people, and he is accountable to the people. And he's responsive to the people. And so, you know, but we still have the rogue cops here in Atlanta. And when we find the rogues, we're gonna run them out of town. And so, we have that commitment to have, because what we've seen historically is that, if anything that could set off a riot is this police misconduct. You know, whether it's Rodney King in Los Angeles [California] or whatever. So we will not tolerate police misconduct here in Atlanta.

Fred Rice, Jr.

Police superintendent Fred Rice was born on December 24, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois to Leola Moseley and Fred Rice, Sr. He was raised in Chicago and attended John Farren Elementary School, Edward Hartigan Elementary School and DuSable Leadership Academy.

After serving in the U.S. Army for two years in Korea in the early 1950s, Rice returned to Chicago and worked for the Chicago Post Office before passing the Chicago Park District Police Department examination in 1955. He later received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Roosevelt University, and graduated from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Executive Institute in Quantico, Virginia.

In 1955, Rice became a patrol officer for the Chicago Park District Police Department, which later merged with the Chicago Police Department. He was promoted to sergeant, and then to the role of civil service captain. In 1983, Rice made history when he was appointed under Chicago Mayor Harold Washington as superintendent of the Chicago Police Department, becoming the first African American to hold the position. During his tenure, Rice ushered in a new era of race relations among the officers and promoted communication between them and the communities they patrolled. He retired as superintendent of the Police Department in 1987 and went on to serve as an adjunct professor of criminal justice at the University of Illinois from 1990 to 2001. He was also a founding member of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives.

Rice passed away on January 10, 2011 at the age of 84. He was married to Thelma Rice and was the father of two children, Lyle and Judith.

Fred Rice was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 27, 2002.

Accession Number

A1993.005

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/27/2002

Last Name

Rice

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Edward Hartigan Elementary School

John Farren Elementary School

Du Sable Leadership Academy

Kennedy–King College

Roosevelt University

First Name

Fred

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

RIC01

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

Tanqueray

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/24/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese Food

Death Date

1/10/2011

Short Description

Police superintendent Fred Rice, Jr. (1926 - 2011 ) was the first African American Superintendent of the Chicago Police Department.

Employment

Chicago Post Office

Chicago Police Department

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Fred Rice interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Fred Rice's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Fred Rice discusses his parents' backgrounds in Alabama and their migration to the North

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Fred Rice lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Fred Rice recalls his childhood community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Fred Rice details elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Fred Rice remembers the Chicago of his youth having few single-parent families and less crime than today

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Fred Rice talks about his favorite subjects in grammar school and high school

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Fred Rice recalls his years at DuSable High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Fred Rice recalls his post-high school years, attending junior college and working at the post office

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Fred Rice details his U.S. Army service in the Korean War

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Fred Rice talks about his experience as a police recruit in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Fred Rice talks about O.W. Wilson's positive effect on the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Fred Rice traces deterioration in police-community relations starting in the mid-1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Fred Rice shares his thoughts on police tactics at demonstrations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Fred Rice remembers his early days as a Chicago Park District patrol officer

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Fred Rice comments on demographics, qualifications and benefits at the Chicago Police Department in the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Fred Rice examines how Irish-Americans came to control local government in northern cities in the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Fred Rice talks about his promotion to sergeant

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Fred Rice discusses the conservative attitude of the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Fred Rice talks about the increase in black supervisors and the creation of the "exempt personnel" catagory at the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Fred Rice recalls policing during riots and civil rights demonstrations of the late 1960s in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Fred Rice tells of his involvement in fighting Chicago's gang activity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Fred Rice talks shares his thoughts on the 1969 shooting of Black Panthers Hampton and Clark by police

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Fred Rice explains the role of the African American Patrolmen's League

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Fred Rice discusses issues the Chicago Police Department dealt with in the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Fred Rice talks about dealing with charges of excessive force

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Fred Rice remembers political scandals involving the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Fred Rice describes how the Chicago Police Department changed after Harold Washington's election

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Fred Rice details his increased responsibility because of various promotions

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Fred Rice recalls political and racial issues that arose during his tenure as superintendent of the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Fred Rice talks of changes he attempted to make during while superintendent

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Fred Rice explains the prominence of unionism in Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Fred Rice details the end of his term under Harold Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Fred Rice comments on community policing in Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Fred Rice talks about the Chicago Police Department's current status

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Fred Rice reflects on his career