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Rebecca "Becky" Love

Elementary school teacher-turned-yoga instructor Rebecca "Becky" Love was born on May 2, 1916, in Buffalo, New York, to Johnetta and Robert Grant. After relocating to Chicago, she married Edison Love, a Chicago politician, in 1942. She took night classes at Northwestern University, earning a B.S. in education in 1951, and went on to study English and psychology there, receiving her M.A. in 1966.

Love taught third-grade students at Doolittle West School, in the Douglas community on Chicago's South Side, for thirty-eight years.

Her fascination with yoga began when Love was just a teenager. However, it was not until she was in her forties that she began formal training. Love studied yoga with Sivananda Yoga Vendanta group and began teaching in the early 1960s. Love conducted master-level training at the Temple of Kriya Yoga. She earned the title master teacher of Hatha yoga in 1972. Since then, she has trained hundreds of yoga teachers at the Temple and has taught classes at the Sears Tower, Harold Washington College, Lawson YMCA, the New City YMCA, Michael Reese Hospital, Neiman Marcus and the Ritz Carlton Hotel. Over the years, she has become one of Chicago's most beloved yoga instructors.

Love has lived in the same home on the South Side for the past sixty years. Her only daughter, Candace Crolley Love, died of kidney problems in the early 1980s at the age of thirty-five. Her husband died several years later.

Love has been featured in numerous local publications and on March 7, 2002, was the focus of Harry Porterfield's "Someone You Should Know" segment on ABC Channel 7. She regularly lectures and conducts workshops on health and nutrition in addition to teaching eleven yoga classes, six days a week.

Accession Number

A2003.058

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/28/2003

Last Name

Love

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

Organizations
Schools

Douglas Elementary School

St. Elizabeth Catholic School

Hyde Park Academy High School

Chicago State University

Northwestern University

First Name

Rebecca

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

LOV05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Greece, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

God's World.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/2/1916

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Yogurt

Death Date

10/18/2013

Short Description

Elementary school teacher and yoga instructor Rebecca "Becky" Love (1916 - 2013 ) was a third grade teacher for thirty-eight years in Chicago.

Employment

Doolittle West School

Favorite Color

Yellow

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Rebecca Love narrates her photographs, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rebecca Love narrates her photographs, pt.2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rebecca Love narrates her photographs, pt.3

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Rebecca Love's interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rebecca Love lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rebecca Love describes how her parents hid the fact she was conceived out of wedlock

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rebecca Love talks about her maternal family history

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rebecca Love describes her paternal family history

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rebecca Love describes her mother, Johnetta Clanton Grant

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Rebecca Love describes her father, Robert Ledley Grant

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Rebecca Love describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Rebecca Love talks about her grade school years and her experience at Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rebecca Love talks about her education, her teaching career, and her start in yoga

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rebecca Love describes learning yoga and being healed by Paramahansa Yogananda

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rebecca Love describes meditation and the various forms of yoga

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rebecca Love describes her history with yoga

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rebecca Love describes being bit by her neighbor's Rottweiler

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rebecca Love describes the former lives of African children as Roman soldiers

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rebecca Love talks about reincarnation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rebecca Love describes her transition from a yoga student to a yoga teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rebecca Love describes integrating yoga into her classroom at Doolittle Elementary School and how the school changed

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rebecca Love describes the influence of yoga on Ghandi and The Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rebecca Love describes highlights of being a yoga instructor

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rebecca Love describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Rebecca Love reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Rebecca Love talks about how she would like to be remembered

Dr. Heloise Westbrook

Anesthesiologist Heloise Demoin Westbrook was born on July 1, 1954 in Buffalo, New York. Her parents, Mary Lue and Quinton Westbrook, moved from Tennessee and raised six children in the colder climate of upstate New York. Westbrook's career has been dedicated to pain management.

After graduating in 1972 from Mount Saint Joseph's Academy in her hometown of Buffalo, Westbrook attended Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. She earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1976 before moving to Carbondale, Illinois to study in the medical education preparatory program of Southern Illinois University. In 1984, with an M.S. in health services management, Westbrook enrolled in the university's doctoral program, focusing on community and public health education, and earning a Ph.D. in 1987. Studying anesthesiology and patient monitoring, Westbrook continued her education at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1987. Completing her second master's degree and certification as a physician assistant in 1989, Westbrook was hired by the Dekalb-Fulton County Hospital Authority and the Emory Clinic as an anesthetist. In 1990, she began working towards an M.D. at Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School. She served as a teaching assistant in the anatomy and neuroscience departments before becoming a Doctor of Medicine in 1994.

Westbrook served as an intern in transitional medicine at the Medical Center in Columbus, Georgia and as an anesthesiology resident at the University of Alabama-Birmingham and the University of Maryland-Baltimore. She stayed at the University of Maryland as an obstetrical anesthesiology fellow and clinic instructor until 1999, when the Pain Management Center of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire offered her a position as a fellow and clinic instructor there. Finally, in 2001, Westbrook became a staff anesthesiologist at Avera St. Luke's Hospital in Aberdeen, South Dakota as well as the director of the Pain Management Center. Westbrook serves as a pilot in the United States Air Force Reserves.

Accession Number

A2002.162

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/14/2002

Last Name

Westbrook

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Weekends

First Name

Heloise

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

WES01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Only if travel is required

Favorite Season

Christmas

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You But What You Can Do For Your Country.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Dakota

Birth Date

7/1/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Aberdeen

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tofu

Short Description

Anesthesiologist Dr. Heloise Westbrook (1954 - ) is the staff anesthesiologist at Avera St. Luke's Hospital in Aberdeen, South Dakota, as well as the director of the Pain Management Center. Westbrook also serves as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force Reserve.

Employment

DeKalb-Fulton County Hospital Authority

Emory Clinic

Columbus Regional Healthcare System

UAB Health System

University of Maryland Medical Center

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Avera St Luke's Hospital

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Heloise Westbrook's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her maternal and paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her mother, Mary Lue Loveless Westbrook, and her father, Quinton Westbrook

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her father, Quinton Westbrook

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her childhood ambition to become a doctor

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes starting as a child to save her allowance for college expenses

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her education from grade school through graduate school

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes herself as a student

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her father's financial support while attending Mount St. Joseph's Academy for high school from 1969 to 1972

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her father's community involvement as a Republican in Buffalo, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes attending Canisius College in Buffalo, New York before attending Boston College in Massachusetts from 1973 to 1976

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending graduate school in health services at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending The Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Services

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her challenges and growth at the Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Sciences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of her career as an anesthesiologist

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her work as an anesthesiologist working in pain management

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the role of acupuncture in pain management

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes how she treats different kinds of pain

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about how different people experience pain

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her philosophical and psychological approach to treating pain

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the challenges of medication misuse in her patients

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes challenging types of pain she manages in her patients

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of being an anesthesiologist

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about overcoming obesity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes living in Aberdeen, South Dakota

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the African American community in South Dakota

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her experiences as a doctor in the U.S. Air Force Reserves

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the challenges she faced as an African American woman pursuing her career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the health issues that affect the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the expansion of her life perspective

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her goals and plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook reflects on her parent's influence on her career

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her contribution to her community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending The Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Services
Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of her career as an anesthesiologist
Transcript
Okay. So that being done, and what, what, what med school did you, you actually go to?$$I eventually went to the Chicago Medical School [Finch University of Health Sciences, Illinois]. I actually got accepted to thirteen medical schools the second time around, and I couldn't believe it. I said, "Wow, got none, now I got thirteen." So it, it was--then I, I had decided on the Chicago Medical School [Illinois].$$Why did you choose Chicago Medical [School, Illinois]?$$Well, I liked the curriculum it had to offer. I've--Cook County [Hospital, Illinois], it just--when I went down to Cook County [Hospital, Illinois], it was just such a large institution. And I felt that if I went to this medical school, it would definitely be an opportunity for me to see a variety of disease processes, which would help me as a clinician once I was out of formal, formal education.$$Okay, well, what was it like? Did it meet your expectations?$$Medical school was interesting. It makes you very humble; it makes you understand that you really have to budget your time, that you can get stressed out, and you have to keep everything under control. And it was the first time in my life that I really had to say, all right, I can only exercise for a few minutes; I have to pick this time to eat; I have to pick this time to sleep, and I--and the other time, I have to study. This was a--'cause it was a ongoing process. Then I realized, as I was getting as--the more I--as the years progressed and the more medicine I studied, I kind of realized that this was gonna be an ongoing lifelong process, that I would never actually stop learning, that it will be continual. And if I wanted to be a good clinician, I had to know what I needed to know to pass my exams. But I also needed to realize that once the process was over, I still need to continually read to gain knowledge so that I grow and keep up.$$Knowledge is always growing in the medical field I guess. And if you stay still, you're gonna be passed by--(unclear).$$I guess it's kind of like you, you develop a certain type of stagnancy, and learning is very dynamic. It's a kind of continuous two-way process: you give something, you take something. And while, as now, as a clinician, I'm not in a formal institution of education, but through meetings, through professional magazines, through various textbooks that I read periodically, it's--I, I realize that there's always knowledge I have to gain.$--Before I went to medical school, I did have the opportunity to get my PhD, so I learned a lot about writing and dissertation writing. So because of that, like I'm able to write in professional journals; I developed that skill, and, and that, and that's--for me it's very rewarding because now I can give something back. And it kind of relates--I can distinctly remember when your parents tell you, you now I want you to go to school because I want you to do something or, or be something. And it's--you know, now it's: you can see it; you're doing it; you're seeing patients; you're doing something for them; you're trying to make your community a better place by delivering health care, the skill, or the, or the education that I've received, now I can actually deliver. Sometimes I can even see where it's been beneficial. Sometimes patients can come back and say, "Oh, well, Dr. Westbrook, thank you very much," and sometimes it's very rewarding. Occasionally when I administer anesthesia, and I participate and help patients that are very ill, that--sometimes it's, it's very difficult for them to undergo a certain surgical procedure. It's very reward, even though sometimes they don't even come back and say thank you. It's just very rewarding that you know you could help them. You can make their life better. They were able to get through this particular procedure, and it was with your help. And, and that is, is, is very rewarding. It's like when you start--when you're ini--when I initially started medical school, no. Did I kind of see where life would lead, or did I see where I would be? Not necessarily. I thought I would deliver health care at--when you first start medical school you really--I mean I could say when I was five I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, but as time developed in medical school, there were so many opportunities. Did I wanna go in surgery? Did I wanna go in obstetrics? Did I wanna go into pathology? All of them were very interesting to me. But then as time progressed, and as I was able to focus on certain areas in medicine, then your focus narrows. Then I wanted to be more specialized. And then when I chose anesthesia, then when I did my residency, I also wanted to be more specialized, which I developed, became involved in pain management. So it's kind of the two, the anesthesia and the pain management. These are my specialties. This is what I have to offer. This is my expertise which I can offer to my community, and it, it--to me it's extremely rewarding. I don't even have to have someone say thank you. I just need to know that based upon the knowledge and the skills that I have, I can do something to ease someone's pain. I can do someone--something--to make their quality of life better.