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Dr. Joseph A. Pierce, Jr.

Anesthesiologist Dr. Joseph A. Pierce, Jr. was born on August 13, 1935 in Marshall, Harrison County, Texas to Joseph A. Sr., and Juanita George Pierce. He attended Oglethorpe Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia. Pierce graduated from Jack Yates High School, in Houston, Texas in 1952. He joined Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and Beta Kappa Chi National Scientific Honor Society in 1955 at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas where he received his B.S. degree in chemistry in 1957, and his father Joseph Pierce, Sr. served as dean of the graduate school in 1952; and later, president in 1967. He earned his M.D. degree in medicine in 1961 from Meharry Medical College of Medicine, in Nashville, Tennessee. Pierce completed his internship at GW Hubbard Hospital of Meharry College of Medicine.

Pierce entered the United States Army in 1962. He completed a residency in anesthesiology at Brooke General Hospital/Fort Sam Huston in San Antonio in 1967, where he rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel and he completed a tour of duty in West Germany from 1967 to 1970. Then, in 1970, Pierce received his Texas State medical license and entered into private practice with Anesthesia Consultants in San Antonio, and joined the American Medical Association.

Pierce and his wife, Aaronetta, co-founded the San Antonio Ethnic Arts Society in 1983 to increase the awareness and understanding of visual art of African American ancestry. They also started Premier Artworks, Inc., specializing in the marketing and sale of artwork and books by African Americans. Pierce amassed a collection of roughly 8000 books by African American authors, including mostly first editions. Pierce was also a part owner of the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs basketball team from 1974 to 1988.

Pierce was a life member of the NAACP. His other memberships include the Texas Society of Anesthesiology, the San Antonio Society of Anesthesiology, Bexar County Medical Society and Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity. Pierce was inducted into the Prairie View Interscholastic League Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2008.

Pierce and his wife, Aaronetta, have two sons, Joseph and Michael.

Dr. Joseph A. Pierce, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 8, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.121

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/8/2018

Last Name

Pierce

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Oglethorpe Elementary School

Jack Yates High School

University of Michigan

Texas Southern University

Meharry Medical College

First Name

Joseph

Birth City, State, Country

Marshall

HM ID

PIE04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

8/13/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Anesthesiologist Dr. Joseph A. Pierce, Jr. (1935- ) served in private practice for Anesthesia Consultants in San Antonio, Texas and was the co-founder of San Antonio Ethnic Arts Society in 1983, and Premier Artworks, Inc. in 1990 with his wife Aaronetta.

Employment

Anesthesia Consultants

U.S. Army

Favorite Color

N/A

Emery N. Brown

Statistician, anesthesiologist and neuroscientist Emery N. Brown was born in Ocala, Florida to Benjamin Brown and Alberta Brown. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1974, Brown enrolled at Harvard College and went on to earn his B.A. degree in applied mathematics in 1978 before spending one year as an International Rotary fellow at the Institut Fourier des Mathèmatiques Pures in Grenoble, France. Brown returned to Harvard University and graduated in 1984 with his A.M. degree in statistics, his M.D. degree in anesthesiology from Harvard Medical School (HMS) in 1987 and his Ph.D. degree in statistics in 1988.

Brown completed his internship in internal medicine in 1988 at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and his residency in anesthesiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in 1992. Following completion of his residency he joined the anesthesiology staff in the Department of Anesthesia at MGH and the faculty at Harvard Medical School as an instructor. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Division of Health Sciences and Technology at HMS. In 2005, Brown was named a professor of computational neuroscience and professor of health and sciences technology at MIT. In 2006, he became the Massachusetts General Hospital Professor of Anesthesia at HMS; and, in 2008, he was named the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia at HMS. Brown was internationally recognized for using statistics in the development of signal processing algorithms in order to study how systems in the brain represent and transmit information and for his use of functional neuroimaging to study in humans how anesthetic drugs act in the brain to create the state of general anesthesia. He has developed statistical methods to: study learning and memory formation; design algorithms for neural prosthetic control; improve signal extraction from fMRI imaging time-series; localize dynamically sources of neural activity in the brain from electroencephalography (EEG) and magneto-encephalography (MEG) recordings; measure the period of the circadian pacemaker (human biological clock) and its sensitivity to light; characterize the dynamics of human heart beats in physiological and pathological states; and de-noise two-photon in vivo imaging data.

Brown has been recognized for his work throughout his career. In addition to being one of the most cited African American mathematicians, in 2000, Brown won the National Science Foundation (NSF) Minority Career Advancement Award, a National Institute of Mental Health Independent Scientist Award, and in 2007, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Pioneer Award. He has been named a fellow of several prominent professional organizations including the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Brown is also a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

Emery N. Brown was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2013.

Accession Number

A2017.125

Sex

Male

Interview Date
08/10/2017
Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Middle Name

N.

Organizations
First Name

Emery

Birth City, State, Country

Ocala

HM ID

BRO64

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martinique

Favorite Quote

Nothing is supposed to work.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/20/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cambridge

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Statistician, anesthesiologist and neuroscientist Emery N. Brown the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anesthesia at Harvard University Medical School, and is one of the most cited African American mathematicians in academic journals.

Favorite Color

Blue, to wear, black

Dr. Heloise Westbrook

Anesthesiologist Heloise Demoin Westbrook was born on July 1, 1954 in Buffalo, New York. Her parents, Mary Lue and Quinton Westbrook, moved from Tennessee and raised six children in the colder climate of upstate New York. Westbrook's career has been dedicated to pain management.

After graduating in 1972 from Mount Saint Joseph's Academy in her hometown of Buffalo, Westbrook attended Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. She earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1976 before moving to Carbondale, Illinois to study in the medical education preparatory program of Southern Illinois University. In 1984, with an M.S. in health services management, Westbrook enrolled in the university's doctoral program, focusing on community and public health education, and earning a Ph.D. in 1987. Studying anesthesiology and patient monitoring, Westbrook continued her education at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1987. Completing her second master's degree and certification as a physician assistant in 1989, Westbrook was hired by the Dekalb-Fulton County Hospital Authority and the Emory Clinic as an anesthetist. In 1990, she began working towards an M.D. at Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School. She served as a teaching assistant in the anatomy and neuroscience departments before becoming a Doctor of Medicine in 1994.

Westbrook served as an intern in transitional medicine at the Medical Center in Columbus, Georgia and as an anesthesiology resident at the University of Alabama-Birmingham and the University of Maryland-Baltimore. She stayed at the University of Maryland as an obstetrical anesthesiology fellow and clinic instructor until 1999, when the Pain Management Center of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire offered her a position as a fellow and clinic instructor there. Finally, in 2001, Westbrook became a staff anesthesiologist at Avera St. Luke's Hospital in Aberdeen, South Dakota as well as the director of the Pain Management Center. Westbrook serves as a pilot in the United States Air Force Reserves.

Accession Number

A2002.162

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/14/2002

Last Name

Westbrook

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Weekends

First Name

Heloise

Birth City, State, Country

Buffalo

HM ID

WES01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Only if travel is required

Favorite Season

Christmas

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You But What You Can Do For Your Country.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Dakota

Birth Date

7/1/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Aberdeen

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tofu

Short Description

Anesthesiologist Dr. Heloise Westbrook (1954 - ) is the staff anesthesiologist at Avera St. Luke's Hospital in Aberdeen, South Dakota, as well as the director of the Pain Management Center. Westbrook also serves as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force Reserve.

Employment

DeKalb-Fulton County Hospital Authority

Emory Clinic

Columbus Regional Healthcare System

UAB Health System

University of Maryland Medical Center

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Avera St Luke's Hospital

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Heloise Westbrook's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her maternal and paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her mother, Mary Lue Loveless Westbrook, and her father, Quinton Westbrook

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her father, Quinton Westbrook

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her childhood ambition to become a doctor

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes starting as a child to save her allowance for college expenses

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her education from grade school through graduate school

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes herself as a student

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her father's financial support while attending Mount St. Joseph's Academy for high school from 1969 to 1972

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her father's community involvement as a Republican in Buffalo, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes attending Canisius College in Buffalo, New York before attending Boston College in Massachusetts from 1973 to 1976

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending graduate school in health services at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending The Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Services

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her challenges and growth at the Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Sciences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of her career as an anesthesiologist

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her work as an anesthesiologist working in pain management

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the role of acupuncture in pain management

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes how she treats different kinds of pain

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about how different people experience pain

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her philosophical and psychological approach to treating pain

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the challenges of medication misuse in her patients

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes challenging types of pain she manages in her patients

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of being an anesthesiologist

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about overcoming obesity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes living in Aberdeen, South Dakota

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the African American community in South Dakota

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook describes her experiences as a doctor in the U.S. Air Force Reserves

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the challenges she faced as an African American woman pursuing her career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the health issues that affect the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the expansion of her life perspective

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her goals and plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook reflects on her parent's influence on her career

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about her contribution to her community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about attending The Chicago Medical School, Finch University of Health Services
Dr. Heloise Westbrook talks about the rewards of her career as an anesthesiologist
Transcript
Okay. So that being done, and what, what, what med school did you, you actually go to?$$I eventually went to the Chicago Medical School [Finch University of Health Sciences, Illinois]. I actually got accepted to thirteen medical schools the second time around, and I couldn't believe it. I said, "Wow, got none, now I got thirteen." So it, it was--then I, I had decided on the Chicago Medical School [Illinois].$$Why did you choose Chicago Medical [School, Illinois]?$$Well, I liked the curriculum it had to offer. I've--Cook County [Hospital, Illinois], it just--when I went down to Cook County [Hospital, Illinois], it was just such a large institution. And I felt that if I went to this medical school, it would definitely be an opportunity for me to see a variety of disease processes, which would help me as a clinician once I was out of formal, formal education.$$Okay, well, what was it like? Did it meet your expectations?$$Medical school was interesting. It makes you very humble; it makes you understand that you really have to budget your time, that you can get stressed out, and you have to keep everything under control. And it was the first time in my life that I really had to say, all right, I can only exercise for a few minutes; I have to pick this time to eat; I have to pick this time to sleep, and I--and the other time, I have to study. This was a--'cause it was a ongoing process. Then I realized, as I was getting as--the more I--as the years progressed and the more medicine I studied, I kind of realized that this was gonna be an ongoing lifelong process, that I would never actually stop learning, that it will be continual. And if I wanted to be a good clinician, I had to know what I needed to know to pass my exams. But I also needed to realize that once the process was over, I still need to continually read to gain knowledge so that I grow and keep up.$$Knowledge is always growing in the medical field I guess. And if you stay still, you're gonna be passed by--(unclear).$$I guess it's kind of like you, you develop a certain type of stagnancy, and learning is very dynamic. It's a kind of continuous two-way process: you give something, you take something. And while, as now, as a clinician, I'm not in a formal institution of education, but through meetings, through professional magazines, through various textbooks that I read periodically, it's--I, I realize that there's always knowledge I have to gain.$--Before I went to medical school, I did have the opportunity to get my PhD, so I learned a lot about writing and dissertation writing. So because of that, like I'm able to write in professional journals; I developed that skill, and, and that, and that's--for me it's very rewarding because now I can give something back. And it kind of relates--I can distinctly remember when your parents tell you, you now I want you to go to school because I want you to do something or, or be something. And it's--you know, now it's: you can see it; you're doing it; you're seeing patients; you're doing something for them; you're trying to make your community a better place by delivering health care, the skill, or the, or the education that I've received, now I can actually deliver. Sometimes I can even see where it's been beneficial. Sometimes patients can come back and say, "Oh, well, Dr. Westbrook, thank you very much," and sometimes it's very rewarding. Occasionally when I administer anesthesia, and I participate and help patients that are very ill, that--sometimes it's, it's very difficult for them to undergo a certain surgical procedure. It's very reward, even though sometimes they don't even come back and say thank you. It's just very rewarding that you know you could help them. You can make their life better. They were able to get through this particular procedure, and it was with your help. And, and that is, is, is very rewarding. It's like when you start--when you're ini--when I initially started medical school, no. Did I kind of see where life would lead, or did I see where I would be? Not necessarily. I thought I would deliver health care at--when you first start medical school you really--I mean I could say when I was five I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, but as time developed in medical school, there were so many opportunities. Did I wanna go in surgery? Did I wanna go in obstetrics? Did I wanna go into pathology? All of them were very interesting to me. But then as time progressed, and as I was able to focus on certain areas in medicine, then your focus narrows. Then I wanted to be more specialized. And then when I chose anesthesia, then when I did my residency, I also wanted to be more specialized, which I developed, became involved in pain management. So it's kind of the two, the anesthesia and the pain management. These are my specialties. This is what I have to offer. This is my expertise which I can offer to my community, and it, it--to me it's extremely rewarding. I don't even have to have someone say thank you. I just need to know that based upon the knowledge and the skills that I have, I can do something to ease someone's pain. I can do someone--something--to make their quality of life better.