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James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III

Music producer and songwriter James “Jimmy Jam” Harris, III was born on June 6, 1959 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Harris grew up in Minneapolis where he met Terry Stevens Lewis while attending a college preparatory program on the University of Minnesota campus. Harris and Lewis formed a band called, “Flyte Tyme,” which later changed its name to, “The Time.”

In 1981, Harris began touring with music artist Prince as his opening act. As a member of The Time, Harris contributed to three of the group’s four albums including The Time, What Time is It, and Pandemonium. Then, in 1982, Harris and Lewis met Dina R. Andrews, who would later assist the duo in establishing Flyte Tyme Productions, a business entity. Flyte Tyme Productions joined with A & M Records in 1991 to create Perspective Records, which, from 1993 to 1996, released most of A & M Record’s urban acts. In 1998, Perspective Records closed its doors and Harris and Lewis opened the Flyte Tyme Recording Studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They signed a three-year, joint venture with Arista Records in 2000, and then, in 2004, the duo relocated their recording studio to Santa Monica, California and renamed it Flyte Tyme West. On January 30, 2013, Harris and Lewis signed an exclusive worldwide publishing administration agreement with Universal Music Publishing Group.

Harris and Lewis have produced more number one songs and award winning albums than any other songwriting and production team in history. They have been credited with over one-hundred Billboard top ten songs, twenty-six number one R & B hits and sixteen number one Hot 100 hits with artists such as Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey, Boyz II Men, and Johnny Gill. In addition, Harris and Lewis have received five Grammy awards and one-hundred ASCAP awards for songwriting and song publishing. In 2005, they became the first recipients of the Heritage Award who were producers as well as songwriters. Harris and Lewis were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2010, and the duo was inducted into The Soul Music Hall of Fame at SoulMusic.com in December of 2012.

James “Jimmy Jam” Harris, III was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 19, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.353

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/19/2013

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Eugene Field Community School

Bryant Junior High School

Washburn High School

Justice Page Middle School

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

HAR46

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Favorite Quote

Better To Have It And Not Need It Than To Need It And Not Have It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/6/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Hamburgers

Short Description

Music producer and songwriter James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III (1959 - ) , along with partner, Terry Lewis, has garnered more awards than any other music producers in history. The recipients of five Grammy awards, Harris and Lewis were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2010.

Employment

The Time

Flyte Tyme Productions

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his parents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls his early neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls the demographics of his early community

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his elementary school music program

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls attending Bryant Junior High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers meeting Prince at Bryant Junior High School

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers meeting Terry Lewis

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about developing a musical relationship with Terry Lewis

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers attending Alexander Ramsey Junior High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls performing with his high school bands

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his early musical interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls recording with Mind and Matter

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls his decision to leave high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers his rivalry with Terry Lewis

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls joining Flyte Tyme

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the close knit music community in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about the 1970s music scene of Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers his first tour with Prince

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes working with Prince

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls his touring experiences with Prince and The Time

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about performing live with The Time

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers deciding to travel with Terry Lewis to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his experiences in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls Prince's reaction to his work with Terry Lewis

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers the start of his working relationship with Clarence Avant

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls being fired by Prince, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls being fired by Prince, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls being fired by Prince, pt. 3

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about leaving The Time

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the careers of The Time's band members

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers Jerome Benton, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers Jerome Benton, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the relationship between Prince and The Time

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers his first gold records

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers meeting music executive John McClain

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his first project with Janet Jackson, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his first project with Janet Jackson, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about the inspiration behind Janet Jackson's album 'Control'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his partnership with Terry Lewis, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his partnership with Terry Lewis, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about using technology as a producer, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about using technology as a producer, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers writing the song 'Tender Love'

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the relationship between an artist and songwriter

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers working on 'Rhythm Nation 1814,' pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers working on 'Rhythm Nation 1814,' pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his goal as a producer

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about being recognized as a celebrity

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris III remembers winning his first Grammy Award, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers winning his first Grammy Award, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls reuniting with The Time

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about establishing a partnership with A&M Records

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers working with The Human League

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls his attempt to buy the Minnesota Timberwolves, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls his attempt to buy the Minnesota Timberwolves, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers Kirby Puckett

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his projects in the late 1990s

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls producing Yolanda Adams' 'Open My Heart'

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers producing the NBA theme music

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes meeting his wife Lisa Padilla Harris, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes meeting his wife Lisa Padilla Harris, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers working with Arista Records

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about the 2002 Grammy Awards

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls moving to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers the Janet Jackson album 'Damita Jo'

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes the Flyte Tyme Productions, Inc. studio in Santa Monica, California

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers working with Chaka Khan

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about Chaka Khan's singing talents

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls playing with The Time for the 2008 Grammy Awards, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls playing with The Time for the 2008 Grammy Awards, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers reuniting with The Time in Las Vegas, Nevada

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls forming a deal with Universal Music Publishing Group, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III recalls forming a deal with Universal Publishing Group, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his children, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III talks about his children, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

4$9

DATitle
James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III remembers Jerome Benton, pt. 2
James "Jimmy Jam" Harris, III describes his first project with Janet Jackson, pt. 2
Transcript
So, of course, we get in there and start rehearsing, and the first thing that happens is, "Man, I'm thirsty, man. Can I get some of that juice, man?" "Hey, man, don't mess with that juice machine." It's like, "Naw, naw, Weaver [ph.] ain't going to know. He ain't going to know." Next thing you know, we've drank like all the juice like down to about that much. So, now Jesse [Jesse Johnson] is taking water and trying to pour water in to fill it up so it looks like it's all filled up again. So, as we're rehearing and during, during the rehearsal and stuff, Prince comes to, Prince comes to one of the rehearsals. And, in a couple of the songs Morris [Morris Day] says, "Somebody bring me a mirror," right. So, Prince is watching. Morris says, "Somebody bring me a mirror." Out of nowhere, Jerome [Jerome Benton] grabs this big mirror. And, I'm talking about a big, like a wall mirror, off the wall, right. Yanks it off the wall, knocks over a titty lamp, brings it in front of Morris, Morris turns around and looks at him a goes, and starts primping. Prince falls out of his chair on the floor. He say, "Oh, my god! That's it, we got to add that to the act. We got to add that to the act." So, Jerome was a roadie no more. He was Morris' valet, at that moment, right. So, anyway (laughter), Jerome now goes, after--now the rehearsal's over. Jerome's coming now, he's trying to tape the titty lamp back together, right. So, he puts it and he kind of hides it, and you can see like a little crack. But, he kind of tilts it just a little bit so, you know, you can't see it, right? In walks Weaver. Weaver walks in. He goes, "How's it going guys?" We're like, "Hey, good Weaver. Great man, great." He walks in. (Pause), "Man, who been in my juice machine? Man, somebody been in my juice machine." We started cracking up. We said, "What are you talking about, man?" "I told you not to go in my, in my juice machine." And, then he looks around and goes, "My titty lamp! Somebody broke my titty lamp." We were kicked out of there. We, we didn't rehearse, we had no more rehearsals at the YAASM, man. It was, it was over, you know, 'cause did the--you broke the sacred trust, man. The juice machine and the titty lamp, you can't break it. So, that was it. We started rehearsing in a warehouse [in Minneapolis, Minnesota] after that. But, anyway, I tell that story because that, first of all, I tell that story 'cause that was, that was just kind of summed up the group [The Time], right. But, also, 'cause that's how Jerome became Jerome the valet. Because he was Jerome the roadie, you know. But, in that instance when he pulled that mirror off the wall, and I don't know whether, I haven't asked him to this day, had he thought about that before or was it just because he had watched us run the show so many times. He just one day say, "I'm just going to take that mirror off the wall." And, the mirror was so huge (laughter). It was a joke. We said, "We got to get you a proper size mirror, man." It was so crazy.$And, so, finally, on like the fifth day she says, "When are we going to get to work?" And, we said, "Oh, we're working. We're working." And, we whipped out the lyrics to "Control." And, she said, "Wow." She said, "This is what we've been talking about." And, I said, "Yeah." And, she said, "So, wait a minute. So, the album's ['Control'] going to be just whatever we talk about, that's what the album going to be?" And, we said, "Yeah." Well, it was like a lightbulb went off in her head. Because if--on her two albums before, she just went in and sang. Somebody gave her lyrics. Somebody gave her a song. Nobody asked her her opinion. The albums weren't personal, right. All of a sudden she realized that, wait, we can make a personal record here? It's like, "Yeah." So, then there was a thing at the club, we went to one of the clubs. There was these guys talking to her. They were bothering her. She kept looking over at us like, come rescue me. And, you know, some of our friends were like, "Hey, go help Janet [Janet Jackson]." We're like, "She's fine. We're standing right here. Ain't nobody going to do nothing. This is Minneapolis [Minnesota]. Nobody's going to do nothing to her," right. So, afterwards she comes over, and she said, "Did you see those guys talking to me?" And, we said, "Yeah." She said, "Those guys were nasty." We said, "Really?" "Yeah. Why didn't you come help me?" And, we said, "Well, you're standing here now, so obviously you were fine, handled yourself just fine." She said, "Oh, yeah, I guess I did, didn't I." So, it got her out of her shell, you know, out of her kind of insulated shell that she had grown up in. And, we, you know, we were ourselves around her too. We'd like, cussed. She'd charge us twenty-five cents every time we cussed, you know. We'd say, "Hey, Janet, oh yeah, oh fuck that Janet." She'd go, "Oh, twenty-five cents, twenty-five cents," like she was the police. It was like okay, cool. But, we had a great relationship. And, so, the thing that happened at the club with the guys turned into "Nasty," into the song "Nasty." And, that was sort of the way the recording of the record happened. She was engaged. She was excited about it. And, it was a different Janet than--we were fortunate because the Janet we got was a Janet who was now excited about singing and about creating as opposed to, "I'm just doing this 'cause my dad [Joe Jackson] wants me to do this." This was the first time she was doing it 'cause she was passionate about it. So, we, we were good to be a part of that. I mean, we, we were fortunate. So, at the end of the project, we figured that we're done with the project, right. And, I always have a saying about A and R [artists and repertoire] people. A and R people, at record companies, basically the only thing they ever do, is they come in and they always say, "I just need one more," right. That's--so, John McClain, so we're riding around--no, we're not riding around with John McClain. John McClain comes to the studio [of Flyte Tyme Productions, Inc.], we play him the whole record 'cause we've recorded in Minneapolis so nobody's interfered with us. We play John the whole record, and he says, "Man, I really love the record. I just need one more." And, we said, "Oh, here we go. What do you need, John?" "Man, I don't know man, I just, it's really great. I just need one more." So, we said, "Okay, cool, John. Okay, fine. All right. Well, we'll figure out what that is." So, I remember we were riding around in the car, and we said, "John, hey, you know, me and Terry [Terry Lewis] are working on our own album." And, he said, "Oh, that's cool. Can you play some stuff?" Said, "Yeah, yeah." So, we started playing him tracks from what's going to be me and Terry's album. And, one of the tracks comes on and it comes on (singing). And, John goes, "Wait a minute. What is that?" And, we said, "Oh, just a song. We don't know what it's going to be yet." He said, "That's the song I need." We said, "No, no, no, no, no, no. That song is for our album." He said, "No, no, no. That's the song. I swear to God. That's the song I need. That's the song I need." So, after we argued about it a little while, we said, "Okay, here's, here's what we're going to do, John. When Janet comes to the studio tomorrow, we're going to just play the record. If she likes it, she can have it. If she doesn't say anything about it, we're going to keep it." And, so, she's sitting on a couch out in the room, we put the record on, she walks in the room, she goes, "Who's that for?" And, we said, "You, if you want it." And, she said, "I want it," "What Have You Done for Me Lately," first single.

Michele Norris

Journalist and National Public Radio (NPR) host Michele Norris-Johnson (known as Michele Norris on NPR) was born on September 7, 1961, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Belvin and Elizabeth Norris. As a youth, Norris was encouraged by her parents to read the newspaper and watch the evening news. In 1979, she graduated from Minneapolis’ Washburn High School where she participated in the InRoads Program.

Norris went on to enroll at the University of Wisconsin to pursue a career as an electrical engineer. After completing three and a half years, Norris was encouraged by a dean to take political science courses. In 1982, she transferred to the University of Minnesota and majored in journalism and mass communications. There, she also wrote stories for the Minnesota Daily and was later hired by WCCO-TV as a beat reporter.

Throughout the 1980s, Norris worked as a reporter for the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and the L.A. Times. During her stint with the Washington Post, Norris wrote a series about a six-year-old who was living in a crack house. The story was reprinted in a book entitled Ourselves Among Others. Then, in 1993, she was hired as a news correspondent for ABC News and as a contributing correspondent for the “Closer Look” segments on World News Tonight with Peter Jennings. While serving as a reporter for ABC, Norris received an Emmy Award and a Peabody Award for her contribution to the coverage of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

After working for ABC, in 2002, Norris was selected out of 100 candidates to be the host of All Things Considered, the nation’s longest-running radio program on NPR. In this capacity, Norris became the first African American female host for NPR.

In 1990, Norris won the Livingston Award for young journalists. She is a four-time entrant for the Pulitzer Prize. In 2006, she received the University of Minnesota’s Outstanding Achievement Award, and the National Association of Black Journalists’ Salute to Excellence Award. In 2007, she received Ebony magazine’s eighth annual Outstanding Women in Marketing & Communications Award.

Norris lives in Washington, D.C. with her husband Broderick Johnson and their three children.

Accession Number

A2008.078

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/2/2008

Last Name

Norris

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Washburn High School

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Eugene Field Community School

St. Joan of Arc Catholic Elementary School

Justice Page Middle School

Susan B. Anthony Junior High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michele

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

NOR05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Always Write Your Future In Pencil.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/7/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Mangoes

Short Description

Radio host and television news correspondent Michele Norris (1961 - ) was the host of National Public Radio's (NPR) "All Things Considered". Norris also served as a correspondent for ABC News, where she won an Emmy Award and a Peabody Award for her coverage of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Employment

ABC News

National Public Radio

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michele Norris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michele Norris lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michele Norris describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michele Norris describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michele Norris remembers her neighborhood in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michele Norris describes her maternal grandmother, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michele Norris describes her maternal grandmother, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michele Norris describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michele Norris talks about her father's move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michele Norris describes her father's service in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michele Norris talks about her father's move to Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michele Norris describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michele Norris describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michele Norris remembers her father's frugality

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michele Norris describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michele Norris recalls her experiences during the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michele Norris describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Michele Norris remembers her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Michele Norris remembers an influential elementary school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Michele Norris recalls the mentorship of Principal Roland R. DeLapp

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Michele Norris describes her experiences at Washburn High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Michele Norris recalls her early interest in news publications

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

6$7

DATitle
Michele Norris describes her maternal grandmother, pt. 1
Michele Norris describes her earliest childhood memories
Transcript
My [maternal] grandmother [Ione Hopson Brown] was, was very--she was a community activist and she was very, very, very, active in traveling around the city, and advocating for better housing, advocating for senior rights, there was a group a community organization called You Need Us [ph.], and she was the head of this organization, I remember as a child, she was given a key to the city. She was very, very, well known, and was a agitator in her own way, in sort of a Minnesota way, you know, and was very active in the Sabathani Community Center, on the south side of Minneapolis [Minnesota]. I'm kind of fidgeting because there's a story that is part of our history, but I'm kind of going back and forth here because my mother [Elizabeth Brown Norris] is, is--in the family they're split about whether the story really should be told, and I'm gonna share it with you because for the sake of history, and I apologize to my mother right now for doing this, because she's said tell that story when I'm gone, but I think that it's part of our history. My grandmother, was, had a certain standing in the community, and was very much looked up to and I didn't always understand where that came from and it--I discovered, really only recently, because my family only recently started to talk about it, and again, there's my Uncle Jimmy [James Brown] who's doing all this research, just discovered a lot about this and we'll talk about this and other parts of the family, except, please don't talk about that. My grandmother had earned a bit of a name for herself, and was able to earn money and put aside money for herself, and start a life traveling as a--she would do demonstrations, and it's--the background there is that it was several grain companies, in Minnesota, Pillsbury [Pillsbury Flour Mills Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota], General Mills [General Mills Inc.]--$$Yeah, and (unclear)--$$--she was a traveling Aunt Jemima, and she would travel throughout small towns, at a time when pancake mix, the idea of just adding water and eggs, and whipping up pancakes, was, was, new and different, and you used to, you know, you'd have to do all this by scratch, and she'd travel around and wear a kerchief on her head, and demonstrate how you could do this. And she would do this in rooms full of people, through small towns all across Minnesota, and I think she traveled to Iowa, and the Dakotas and she became very well known, and apparently, there were other traveling Aunt Jemimas around the country who were doing this--$$I've heard this, this kind of story before, and it may have been in Minnesota.$$Yeah.$$There's somebody, who may just be related to you. We'll talk about this after, (laughter). I'll try and think of who it is.$$Oh really, no, because this is--my mother hates this story.$$But there, there's, I heard this, yeah (unclear).$$And you know what, it's interesting, because it's--and it's not because of any kind of shame, my mother--I don't want you to think that she was ashamed of this at all, but it's very painful, because, I mean, you know the stigma associated with Aunt Jemima, but at the same time, you know, what a wonderful thing, that my grandmother was able to travel at a time when African Americans, in particular, African Americans didn't travel, and see the country, and receive a certain amount of accolade, and respect and was able to earn money, you know, doing this. And I think it set her on a path to becoming the community leader and the wise elder that she became in the community, so that's part of our, our, story too (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Now, I've heard different stories--$How many siblings do you have?$$I have two sisters [Cindy McGraw and Marguerite McGraw], yeah.$$Two sisters, okay. And where do you fall in the order?$$I'm the youngest, by ten years.$$Okay.$$They're ten and twelve years older than me. My mother [Elizabeth Brown Norris] was previously married to Donald McGraw [ph.], and my two sisters, were the product of that marriage, so (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Okay. All right, do have, have an earliest childhood memory?$$I don't know what my earliest childhood memory is, I have, I have several. I, I, remember playing dress up, you know, they kept a big dress up box for us, and, well a lot of it was my sisters' cast off clothes, 'cause you know my sisters were the coolest people on earth, we had a rec room in the basement, and you know, they had the hair tape, that they would curl right here, and I used to, used to sit in the basement and watch them dance to James Brown records, and I just thought they were the coolest people in the land.$$What's the gap between you?$$Ten and twelve years.$$Ten and twelve years. Okay, okay, so they were like--yeah (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So, you know, I was an eight year old watching them--a six year old watching them, at sixteen and eighteen, and eighteen and twenty and they just, they were the personification of hip you know, to me. I remember Halloween, my father [Belvin Norris, Jr.] was a baseball fanatic, would watch baseball on television but listen to it on the radio, and I do remember on Halloween, I remember this very clearly, I wanted so badly to be--you know, the Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.] catalog would come with all of the Halloween costumes, and I wanted something that had tiaras and wands and I wanted to be a fairy princess, because all the other little girls in the neighborhood, were going to be like fairy princesses, my father dressed me up as Tony Oliva, and it was this Sears costume, you know, you would get, you know, the baseball costume, that doubled as pajamas, so, you know, you'd and then, I had to wear the Tony Oliva costume for months afterward (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) The, the great baseball player for Minnesota [Minnesota Twins] or something?$$Yes, yes (laughter), who, who is still spends time in Minnesota, 'cause, my sister and her husband, Tim [ph.], say that they went indoor to the Mall of America [Bloomington, Minnesota] to see him, at a local eatery or something, but yeah, I do, I have, distinct memories of that, and I remember going down to Birmingham [Alabama] a lot. I remember the summers in Birmingham, and spending time with my [paternal] grandparents [Fannie Walker Norris and Belvin Norris, Sr.], and all the cousins would be down there. I remember my grandfather, drove this gigantic car with suicide doors. The doors that opened up like this, instead of one door opening, it would open up so that the whole of the car was, sort of open, and he would drive, after he worked in the steel mills, and he would--after he retired, and most of his sons worked in the steel mills, my father never did, he moved up to Chicago [Illinois], right out of the [U.S.] Navy--he would drive back and forth to Bruno's [Bruno's Supermarkets, LLC] which was a grocery store, a chain down there, and I do remember driving, and I would love sitting in this gigantic car with my grandfather, who was also a very big man, big hands, big shoulders, and he would drive a woman back and forth to Bruno's. And I remember that, and we had sort of a lending system in the neighborhood, in Birmingham, and I also remember being there and they, they--and I guess that at the time, they couldn't use the library, the public library, so they had this sort of lending system, within the neighborhood in Ensley [Birmingham, Alabama], and I actually do remember, running books back and forth, and they kept a list of who had what book, and someone would want a book next, and I remember that when I was a kid also, was running the books all over. Those are some of my earliest memories.

James Breeden

James Pleasant Breeden was born on October 14, 1934 in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Florence Beatrice Thomas, a secretary and homemaker, and Pleasant George Breeden, a railroad dining car waiter. He was raised by his mother and stepfather Noah Smith and attended Harrison Elementary School and Lincoln Junior High School, both in Minneapolis. In 1952, Breeden graduated from North High School in Minneapolis and attended Dartmouth College.

In 1956, Breeden graduated cum laude from Dartmouth College with his B.A. degree. Two years later, he married Jeanne Marie Savoye in Geneva, Switzerland. The following year, Breeden obtained a certificate from the University of Geneva in connection with his work at the Ecumenical Institute World Council of Churches in Bossey, Switzerland. In 1960, Breeden graduated from Union Theological Seminary with his M.Div degree and moved to Boston, where he joined the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts.

From 1960 until 1965, Breeden was a member of the Episcopal Diocese as a deacon, priest and canon at St. James Church and St. Paul’s Cathedral. He became an advisor to Bishop Anson Phelps Stokes in the area of civil rights. During this period, Breeden was heavily involved in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1961, he participated in the Freedom Rides and was arrested in Jackson, Mississippi for “action likely to cause a riot.” He and others were later freed when the case was dismissed. In 1963, Breeden helped organize the first “Stay out for Freedom” event in Boston protesting the city’s lack of quality public education for African American students. The following year, Breeden was involved in rent strikes against landlords who were taking advantage of their tenants.

Breeden joined the National Council of Churches’ activist leadership in 1965, where he would remain for two years coordinating non-violent mass protests. In 1967, Breeden became the Director for the Commission on Church and Race for the Massachusetts Council of Churches during the time of the Boston race riots. In 1969, Breeden joined the faculty at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and in 1972 he earned his Ed.D. degree from the school. Breeden moved to Tanzania and became Professor of Education at the University of Dar Es Salaam in 1973, where he set up a master’s degree program in education administration.

Breeden returned to Boston two years later, joining the Citywide Coordinating Council in 1976 and monitoring the Boston Public Schools’ compliance with the federal order to desegregate. In 1980, Breeden became a Senior Officer for Planning and Policy at Boston Public Schools. Breeden became a dean at Dartmouth College in 1984 of the William Jewett Tucker Foundation. In 1994, Breeden became a visiting scholar at the Howard Graduate School of Education, and in 2001 joined the School for International Training as adjunct faculty.

Breeden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.258

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2007

Last Name

Breeden

Schools

Dartmouth College

William H. Harrison Elementary School

Abraham Lincoln Junior High School

North High School

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Union Theological Seminary

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

BRE02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

If You Do Anything Significant In History, It’s Because Many People Were Working On It Before You; Or, If Anything Comes Out of It, It Will Be Because There Will Be Many People Working On It After You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/14/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Greenfield

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Curry

Short Description

Civil rights leader, academic administrator, and priest James Breeden (1934 - ) became a dean at Dartmouth College in 1984. In 1994, Breeden became a visiting scholar at the Howard Graduate School of Education, and in 2001 joined the School for International Training as adjunct faculty.

Employment

Diocese of Massachusetts

St. James Episcopal Church

Cathedral Church of St. Paul

University of Dar es Salaam

Citywide Coordinating Council

Boston Public Schools

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Howard University

School for International Training Graduate Institute

Favorite Color

Fall Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:11463,104:12473,118:18080,151:18520,156:25022,213:27090,246:37006,395:37852,406:51145,503:57635,553:67600,637:73190,691:75936,706:76331,712:94084,926:95585,947:97876,997:99693,1075:100799,1094:107450,1138:108230,1153:108490,1158:109075,1169:109595,1179:113537,1214:114265,1224:117788,1248:125430,1301:126442,1313:128282,1340:129202,1351:134434,1397:148184,1567:159310,1706:165350,1764:166520,1782:174023,1856:174646,1865:177356,1891:179520,1909$0,0:0,6:320,11:640,16:960,28:3680,93:4960,109:5440,116:13676,164:15608,185:16160,192:17080,203:20790,217:21170,222:22405,263:24590,302:26812,314:27586,326:28790,343:29736,355:30596,367:31542,381:32058,388:36150,399:36510,404:39050,421:40562,441:41654,456:43082,474:43586,481:48002,494:52600,518:54532,534:57476,572:57844,577:60972,613:61800,623:62536,633:67715,651:69125,663:78428,741:78800,746:83391,763:84103,773:84459,781:85082,790:91110,821:92034,836:92790,847:93294,860:93966,870:95898,904:96402,912:97410,930:97830,936:102366,1014:109574,1081:111275,1107:111842,1116:113057,1238:113786,1249:114758,1264:115163,1270:123270,1346:125830,1355:126478,1365:126766,1370:131780,1416:133205,1432:134345,1446:135200,1453:135865,1462:136340,1468:140115,1491:143810,1529:146870,1565:147590,1574:148760,1589:159958,1668:165040,1805:165348,1810:166349,1828:167196,1844:168274,1861:168736,1871:169352,1883:170122,1894:171662,1919:175820,1929:176450,1938:176810,1943:177530,1953:185255,2039:185579,2044:186065,2052:197737,2191:207924,2303:213850,2348:215140,2356
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Breeden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Breeden lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Breeden describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Breeden describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Breeden describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Breeden talk about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Breeden describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Breeden describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Breeden describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Breeden talks about the politics of Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Breeden describes his home life

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Breeden recalls the role of religion in his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Breeden describes his involvement in the Boy Scouts of America

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Breeden recalls the entertainment of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Breeden remembers William H. Harrison Elementary School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Breeden recalls Abraham Lincoln Junior High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Breeden describes North High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Breeden remembers the World Scout Jamboree in Austria

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - James Breeden describes his social life at North High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - James Breeden remembers graduating as salutatorian

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - James Breeden describes his experiences at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Breeden describes the political climate at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Breeden recalls his experiences of racial discrimination at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Breeden remembers the Dartmouth Christian Union

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Breeden recalls his mentors at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Breeden recalls his induction to the Palaeopitus Senior Society

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Breeden recalls the Union Theological Seminary in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Breeden talks about Operation Crossroads Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Breeden recalls his trip to Nigeria with Operation Crossroads Africa

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James Breeden reflects upon his experiences in Nigeria

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Breeden remembers his wedding in Switzerland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Breeden talks about his travels in Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Breeden recalls his mentors at the Union Theological Seminary in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Breeden remembers the Civil Rights Movement in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Breeden recalls his involvement in the Freedom Rides, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Breeden recalls his involvement in the Freedom Rides, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Breeden describes his role in the Civil Rights Movement in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Breeden remember Bishop Anson Phelps Stokes III

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Breeden recalls the civil rights issues in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Breeden recalls organizing rent strikes in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Breeden remembers the Highlander Folk School in New Market, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Breeden talks about his training as a community organizer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Breeden recalls his role in Massachusetts Governor John A. Volpe's election, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Breeden recalls his role in Massachusetts Governor John A. Volpe's election, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Breeden describes the school desegregation crisis in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Breeden talks about the activist community in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Breeden reflects upon the desegregation of schools in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James Breeden reflects upon the legacy of desegregation in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James Breeden describes his role at Harvard Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James Breeden recalls teaching abroad in Tanzania

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James Breeden remembers Charles Willie

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James Breeden recalls the William Jewett Tucker Foundation in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James Breeden talks about The Dartmouth Review

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James Breeden remembers his retirement

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James Breeden talks about a former student

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James Breeden describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James Breeden reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James Breeden reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James Breeden reflects upon his family

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James Breeden talks about the black experience

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James Breeden describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James Breeden narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

6$9

DATitle
James Breeden recalls his involvement in the Freedom Rides, pt. 2
James Breeden recalls the civil rights issues in Boston, Massachusetts
Transcript
We were immediately arrested and taken to Jackson city jail [Jackson, Mississippi]. We stayed there six days 'til the trial occurred. One of the guys from Washington, D.C. was a very dark with short cut hair and when they asked him his race, he said, "Human." And so they interrogated him for about an hour to try to figure out which cell to put him in (laughter) and they finally figured out, correctly, that he was white (unclear) so they got him into the right cell unit. We were put on trial; the judge was an Episcopalian. He read to us from the prayer book about how we were supposed to obey the civil authorities. And found us guilty of, in some kind of weird thing, like behavior that was--that might cause civil disturbance or something like that, very vague kind of thing. And, anyway, there wasn't anybody there to disturb the civil (laughter) whatever, so we got bailed out, two stayed in. We got bailed--the rest got bailed out, several went to Detroit [Michigan] to the General Convention [General Convention of the Episcopal Church LX] to try to get some energy around some motions in the Episcopal--for the Episcopal church to take some positions, which was successful. They stopped off at a suburb of Detroit, which was a no blacks, probably no Jews, quota suburb, and probably significant number of Episcopalians to illustrate northern, you know, behavior of the Episcopal church. We stopped--I can't remember if it was that trip or not, but there had been a big controversy at Sewanee University [The University of the South], the Episcopal school in Tennessee [Sewanee, Tennessee] that had a theological unit to it. And all the theological faculty had resigned because the, the university wouldn't change its policies on race. We went there and visited with the, with the whatever rector or president of that, but at any rate, that was part of the, of the, of a kind of continuum.$Well, what were some of the issues here in Boston [Massachusetts] that you--$$Well, the, the biggest one was school desegregation. And twice I was to serve at the center of a a--an--a effort successful effort to get kids from the Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts] schools, these would be the segregated schools, to stay out of school and go to alternative schools and churches, and social centers to call attention to the quality and lack of integration of schools in Boston Public Schools. So that was a big one. In housing, I paid most attention--my, I should say is a more general thing. My--I saw myself as primarily trying to figure out how to make things public and nonviolent and big so that I, I was always trying to figure how to make something larger enough so that it could be seen. So, for instance, when, when there was started to show up that there was trouble with landlords not taking care of their houses, and there were the housing that they were renting to people and so that housing was not meeting code. It was--there were, you know, vermin infesting it. People, women, who I knew from our parish [St. James Episcopal Church; St. John and St. James' Episcopal Church, Boston, Massachusetts], would be telling me stories of staying up all night with a, with a cast iron pan to hit a rat before it would bite one of their children something like that. And so, I learned that, you know, that these codes are just were not being, were not being enforced either out of laziness or bribery or whatever. So, what we did was adopt a--I think it actually started in New Jersey, rent strike. And the money would--for the rent would come to me and I would deposit it somewhere and then and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So you'd hold it in escrow for them--$$Yes, exactly right. And then that way we'd get leverage on the landlords to get them into court. And eventually that, that resulted in a state law that was much easier to enforce and made it legal. It was illegal to hold rent in escrow when we started it, that made it legal to do that so you could come into court and say the reason I haven't paid rent in X number of months is that there's this, you know, electricity cord is frayed or there're vermin in the apartment or whatever. And gave quite a considerable lev- leverage to, to people and, you know, to, to renters.

Marcia Cantarella

Corporate executive and school administrator Marcia Elaine Young Cantarella was born on October 31, 1946, in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Margaret Buckner Young and late civil rights leader Whitney M. Young, Jr. Cantarella attended Bryn Mawr College and graduated with honors in 1968 after earning her B.A. degree in political science. For two years, she audited American Studies and law courses at the University of Iowa before moving to New York City in 1972.

Cantarella began working for Avon Products, Inc. in public affairs as a manager, focusing on minority and women’s affairs and issues of affirmative action. In 1973, she joined the board of directors for the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies and became chair of the Committee for Board and Service Volunteers. A year later, Cantarella joined the Women and Foundations Group, became a member of the Association of Black Foundation Executives and joined the nomination and health maintenance organization committee for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Greater New York. She would remain active in all four organizations until 1980.

In 1976, Cantarella was promoted by Avon Products, Inc. to Director of Public Affairs, where she would remain for four more years. During her tenure, Cantarella revamped the Avon Products Foundation in order to focus on women’s issues and moved the organization past monetary donations to focus on volunteerism. In 1980, she was again promoted by Avon, becoming Director of Special Markets, where she spent two years working with minority markets.

In 1985, Cantarella left Avon Products, Inc. and became a work and family issues consultant. Her major clients included New York University and Catalyst, Inc., an organization that works to further the roles of women in the workplace. In 1988, Cantarella was named Executive Director of the National Coalition for Women’s Enterprise, a women's self-employment and advocacy organization. In 1989, Cantarella returned to school and in 1996 earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in American Studies with a concentration in American Business from New York University.

Cantarella became Director of Academic Enhancement Programs at New York University at the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1999, Cantarella was named Assistant Dean of Princeton University, where she was responsible for the Mellon Minority Undergraduate Fellowship Program. In 2002, Cantarella was named Vice President for Student Affairs at the Metropolitan College of New York and in 2005, became Acting Associate Dean for Student Opportunities at Hunter College. Cantarella continues to serve in leadership roles on not-for-profit boards and committees.

Marcia Cantarella was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2007 and July 20, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.152

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/20/2007 |and| 7/20/2007

Last Name

Cantarella

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

Middle Name

Young

Schools

Oglethorpe Elementary School

New Rochelle High School

University of Iowa

New York University

Simmons College

Bryn Mawr College

Lothrop Magnet Center

First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

CAN04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

France, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/31/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Foundation chief executive Marcia Cantarella (1946 - ) started her career with Avon Products, Inc. and then became executive director of the National Coalition for Women’s Enterprise. She served as the acting Associate Dean for Student Opportunities at Hunter College.

Employment

Hunter College

Metropolitan College of New York

Princeton University

New York University

National Coalition for Women's Enterprise

Avon Products, inc.

Rabat American School

Robert F. Kennedy's Office

National Urban League

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:455,7:910,13:1365,19:4277,63:5369,82:6916,112:10374,196:18748,313:24388,397:24858,403:52188,718:54738,777:60660,889:70625,1022:72005,1040:73385,1056:74765,1076:76950,1096:77640,1101:87543,1216:89867,1257:90199,1262:92772,1316:97620,1352:98324,1361:100876,1396:101228,1402:108884,1578:114756,1615:115302,1623:116316,1637:116628,1643:117408,1657:117954,1666:118422,1673:120138,1698:120684,1710:122946,1745:123336,1763:123648,1768:124038,1774:124350,1779:124974,1810:127236,1832:134618,1937:135058,1953:138795,1993:139555,2004:142215,2040:146470,2073:156348,2209:157288,2223:161142,2309:164150,2364:169696,2449:170260,2456:171200,2467:173268,2523:174208,2534:178391,2548:179636,2572:180134,2579:180549,2585:181296,2595:181877,2604:182707,2616:185446,2673:186442,2688:194110,2734:194950,2743:196510,2759:202808,2806:206820,2863$0,0:356,7:1046,19:1391,25:6948,176:12676,243:13278,251:14826,276:15514,286:16718,306:17320,314:18008,323:19040,337:26866,456:28328,479:29188,489:29704,496:40042,600:40452,606:41846,632:45846,651:46566,668:54702,835:61470,978:62622,996:68571,1007:69039,1012:69624,1018:70443,1028:75123,1121:80780,1184:81084,1189:82984,1236:84884,1277:85188,1282:85644,1290:89744,1324:93956,1381:97880,1419
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Cantarella's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's upbringing in Lincoln Ridge, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's decision to pursue social work

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her experiences in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella talks about the integrated community of Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Oglethorpe School in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Oglethorpe School in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's civil rights activities in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes segregation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's involvement with the Unitarian church

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella talks about her family's move to Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her time in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her family's move to New Rochelle, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella describes her early involvement with the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her decision to attend Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her opposition to the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her family's opposition to the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the National Urban League's Council of Board Members

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her internship with Robert F. Kennedy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's work with President Lyndon Baines Johnson

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her involvement in the presidential election of 1964

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the assassinations of 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella recalls the civil rights organizations at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's stance on equality and opportunity

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the portrayal of working women in films

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her mentors at Bryn Mawr College

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's work in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the male mentors in her life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her social life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her experiences at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her father's death and her divorce

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers lessons from her father

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes how she came to work for Avon Products Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella recalls joining Corporate America in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella describes the challenges she faced at Avon Products Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Cantarella's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes the leadership of Avon Products Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her role at Avon Products Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the changing corporate culture of the 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her work as a business consultant

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the role of women in business

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her decision to attend New York University in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella remembers Leslie Grossman and Mary Murphree

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella describes her experiences at New York University

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her mentors at New York University

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Academic Achievement Program at New York University

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes the influence of the Unitarian Universalist church

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes her career at New York University

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her role at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Audrey Cohen College in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her position at the Audrey Cohen College in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella describe her role at New York City's Hunter College

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon her family's work

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Trickle Up program, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Trickle Up program, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the status of women in business

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the obstacles facing entrepreneurs of color

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella talks about the increasing diversity in the United States

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Marcia Cantarella describes her father's civil rights activities in Atlanta, Georgia
Marcia Cantarella recalls her opposition to the Vietnam War
Transcript
During those early years do you remember what was happening at home? Who were the people that were visiting the home?$$Um-hm.$$Was your father [Whitney Young] becoming extremely active within the southern civil rights community (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm, um-hm. We lived in a, in a sort of complex of other faculty, you know, separate homes but we were, it was a little kind of like a gated community. And one of our neighbors who was a good friend was Horace Mann, Horace Bond [Horace Mann Bond], and his son Julian, Mr. Julian Bond [HistoryMaker Julian Bond], who I thought was just adorable, (laughter) that was when I was a little girl, he was much older, and, and his brother, James [James Bond], and sister, Jane [HistoryMaker Jane Bond Moore]. Jane I adored because she gave me all her books as she, you know, out grew her books she just passed them on to me, which was wonderful. James was a pain, yeah, yeah, yeah, he was just a bother. But, you know, so, you know, my father was certainly, you know, working with that family and, and others. You know, I became aware of the fact that as, as the sit-ins started, you know, daddy wouldn't be home for dinner 'cause he was bailing students out of jail, you know. There--$$Do you remember your first sit-ins, do you remember what the conversations were at home and what your father's specific role was (unclear)?$$Not really. I mean, it's not, you know, again, I'm, I was, you know, ten or eleven (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Eight, yeah, and okay.$$Yeah, so, so this was kind of all going over my head. It really wasn't until, you know, I was getting into my teens that, that he and I began to really engage and I, I began to form my own activism. So, but, you know, I was aware of the fact that there were meetings that took place.$$And that the sit-ins were happening and that your father was late--$$Right, right.$$--coming home because he was dealing with it?$$Right, exactly, exactly. But I, and, and, and the piece that I did because it, it absolutely hit home, that I remember was the boycotts because the, we weren't allowed to go to stores that we used to go to. The department (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now when did the boycotts take place?$$The, the, the boycotts took place in, I'd say probably '55 [1955], '56 [1956] thereabouts, around lunch, lunch counters and the fact that the major department stores had segregated lunch counters. So you could shop at Rich's Department Store [Atlanta, Georgia] but you couldn't eat at Rich's Department Store. And so everyone, you know, the entire black community began to boycott the major stores. And so as a kid, you know, it was like why can't we go to that store anymore? And, and being, you know, told the reason and, and supporting the reason. So, you know, that was, that was certainly, you know, a crystallizing experience.$So the issues were civil rights and, and the war [Vietnam War]. Those were the big issues. And, so (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And how did your father [Whitney Young] feel about the war?$$Well, it was interesting. He had to ride the fence because there were so many young black men fighting in the war that he couldn't really take a position. He didn't feel he could take a position overtly in opposition. So he let me be the firebrand on the war. And there was one night we were at a dinner together and he was sitting on the dais with McGeorge Bundy, and he proceeds to tell McGeorge Bundy all about what his daughter thought about the war. And after the dinner there is a reception and daddy brings McGeorge Bundy to me and introduces me as this is the person who's, you know, I was telling you well, what, what she thinks. And then daddy walks off and leaves me with McGeorge Bundy and me being all of like nineteen, continued to mouth off on my views of the war to the undersecretary of state. And many years later, my husband [Francesco Cantarella] and I met McGeorge Bundy at a dinner and reminded him of this story and McGeorge Bundy said, "And history proved you right." Very gracious of him, I must say, (laughter) it was really remarkable. But, you know, my, by this time my father trusted my judgment enough that he could throw me out there and assume that I would probably equip myself reasonably well.

Marion McElroy

Marion McElroy, born on March 16, 1922, was the third of four children born to Ruth Jordan-Majors and Andrew Majors in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she resides today. McElroy has given many years in service to her Twin Cities community.

She has been a member of the NAACP, the Urban League, the Minneapolis Socialites, U Meet Us and the American Association of Retired persons (AARP). She was one of six people chosen to oversee activities of the 635,000-member AARP Minnesota, where she has served as a Diversity Outreach Specialist and has been a member since 1984. She was a board member for 20 years at the Phyllis Wheatley Community Center, the oldest African American institution in the Twin Cities, where she has been involved for most of her lifetime. McElroy has also served as the Youth Employment Director for the National Alliance of Businessmen, on the Minnesota Board on Aging, as the Wallin Scholarship Coordinator for the Friends of North High School, as the secretary to the Minneapolis Socialites, and has been an active parishioner at the St. Peter's A.M.E. Church for 42 years. From 1969 to 1986, McElroy worked for Northwestern Bell, for whom she coordinated the continuing Corporate Minority Business Exchange event to promote minority owned and operated businesses.

McElroy passed away on January 22, 2017 at age 94.

Accession Number

A2002.156

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/10/2002

Last Name

McElroy

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Marion

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

MCE01

Favorite Season

None

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Minnesota

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/16/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Minneapolis/St. Paul

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

1/22/2017

Short Description

Diversity specialist Marion McElroy (1922 - 2017 ) is an equal employment opportunity officer in Minneapolis

Favorite Color

Aqua Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2392,45:22163,302:35618,511:57415,846:59030,873:59790,884:60455,895:76148,1122:80875,1150:88450,1298:88750,1303:89275,1314:104708,1511:106640,1540:144640,2126:156925,2330:157201,2337:157753,2346:163650,2381:195757,2802:213460,3012$0,0:6392,97:26470,387:32575,443:41410,490:49150,582:55362,616:150476,1775:242540,2839
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marion McElroy's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marion McElroy lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marion McElroy describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marion McElroy describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marion McElroy describes her parents, Ruth Jordan-Majors and Andrew Majors

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marion McElroy describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marion McElroy talks about the history of the Phyllis Wheatley Community Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marion McElroy talks about the activities offered at the Phyllis Wheatley Community Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marion McElroy describes her elementary education at Sumner Elementary and Junior High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota in the 1930s

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marion McElroy talks about her experience as an African American at Sumner Elementary and Junior High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marion McElroy describes studying her favorite subject, English literature, at North High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marion McElroy describes walking to North High School in harsh winter conditions in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marion McElroy talks about her lack of encouragement at North High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marion McElroy describes her social life at Phyllis Wheatley Community Center during high school from 1937 to 1940

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marion McElroy talks about the various African American community centers in the Twin Cities in Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marion McElroy talks about her social and political activities at Phyllis Wheatley Community Center during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marion McElroy talks about the founder of the Phyllis Wheatley Center, W. Gertrude Brown

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marion McElroy describes the jobs she took after graduating from North High School in 1940

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marion McElroy talks about her first marriage to Chester Johnson in 1945

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marion McElroy talks about working as the first African American at Strutwear Knitting Company in 1947

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marion McElroy talks about her domestic work before her being hired to work at Strutwear Knitting Company in 1947

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marion McElroy talks about purchasing and building a boarding house in 1947

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marion McElroy describes her marriage to Walter McElroy and relocating to Cleveland, Ohio in 1951

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marion McElroy describes living in Cleveland in the 1950s as a realtor

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marion McElroy describes working for the Government Employees Mart, Munsingwear Knitting when returning to Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1959

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marion McElroy talks about working at Northwest Bell in 1969 and as the Youth Director of the National Alliance of Business in 1974

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marion McElroy talks about developing political relationships as the Youth Director for the National Alliance of Business from 1974 to 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marion McElroy talks about her experience as the Coordinator of the Minority and Women's Business Enterprise Program at Northwestern Bell in 1977

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marion McElroy talks about traveling across the country working at Northwestern Bell from 1974 to 1986

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marion McElroy talks about her family's college careers.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marion McElroy talks about the history of the black community in Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marion McElroy reflects on how her mother helped her succeed as an executive

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marion McElroy describes what she wants her legacy to be

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marion McElroy talks about how she wants to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marion McElroy talks about visiting Las Vegas, Nevada and Chicago, Illinois, and those she knows there

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marion McElroy talks about Insight News and the Minneapolis Spokesman, two African American newspapers in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marion McElroy narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marion McElroy narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marion McElroy narrates her photographs, pt. 3

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marion McElroy narrates her photographs, pt. 4

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marion McElroy narrates her photographs, pt. 5

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

6$8

DATitle
Marion McElroy talks about her social and political activities at Phyllis Wheatley Community Center during high school
Marion McElroy talks about her experience as the Coordinator of the Minority and Women's Business Enterprise Program at Northwestern Bell in 1977
Transcript
Okay now, now you were involved in--you took leadership in a number of volunteer activities at Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center], right? And just, just tell us about some of the things you did as a high school student at Phyllis Wheatley in terms, terms of clubs and other things.$$Well I can't say that I was you know one of the great leaders, but I was always involved at Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center]. And still you know, I have an association with an alumni organization. But I played, you know, basketball I think until I fell and got water on the knee. But always involved. But I guess I didn't consider myself as the, you know, the leader, but always part of the-$$What other, what organized groups I mean were you part of there at Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center] doing, doing different things?$$Well I told you about our camp activity. We'd go to camp every year. And that's where we learned to cook, that's where we learned to, to tap dance. I mean we had all those kinds of classes. Sewing, learned to sew, you know. Just--there was everything available. If you wanted to learn, you could learn. I don't know if you remember Hilda Simms was an actress, was from Minneapolis [Minnesota]. She started out in Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center]--was a girl's worker down there. We always looked up to her, you know. And she went on to be 'Anna Lucasta' was a play on Broadway for I guess many, many years, whatever. She came out of Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center]. And a number of, of people went on from Phyllis Wheatley to become, you know, very, very prominent. Roy--this is the home of Roy Wilkins. And who is the Urban League-$$Whitney Young?$$Whitney Young, Whitney Young. I remember when Whitney Young came here, he was with the Urban League, I remember when he came here. But all those people were very much, you know, involved with the Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center]. In, in the old days, everything that happened, happened there. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if that isn't where the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]--you know the original here in Minneapolis [Minnesota] was formed, and the Urban League. There was just no place else to go. I remember they would have a weekly forum. My mother would attend that and be involved in that. Speakers would come and I'm looking back on some of the issues that they--remember the "Scottsboro boys" and something Herndon. I can just remember these names. But those were the issues that they would discuss, you know at those forums. And certainly later on you know when the war effort came along, they had PWA [Public Works Administration] projects over there, WPA [Works Projects Administration]. My mother worked on some of those projects. I think they were sewing. And my brother worked on WPA building sidewalks and whatnot at the area parks. So anything that was of importance was discussed and the function took place at Phyllis Wheatley [Community Center].$What, what would you consider the highlight of your career at Northwestern Bell?$$Okay. I guess that experience as Youth Director was one. But when I returned [1977] to Minneapolis [Minnesota], I got the position as Coordinator of the Minority and Women Business Enterprise Program. And at that time, the thought was that there weren't any successful entrepreneurs, black especially, that could supply Northwestern Bell with, with products that they would need. For instance they would need contractors for underground cable, you know, to install underground cable, things like that. They brought everything, I mean the company buys everything, you know, all kinds of supplies. So I made it my job to go out and beat the bushes to find minority suppliers. So the first directory that I put out, and it was the first in the Bell, in Northwestern Bell Company. I put together a directory, had thirty-three pages of minority suppliers. Was it just--I think I had other than blacks, I had you know, Indians, American Indians and Hispanics. But it was a directory of minority suppliers. And the next year it, it grew, you know to more pages. I have one to show you. And, and that was 1977. Well in 19--I think the first part of 1979, Northwestern Bell sent me to a trade show, a minority trade show in Chicago [Illinois]. And I liked the concept they used at their, at their trade show. They had minority suppliers stationary with corporate buyers coming in, stopping at their booths, and talking about the possibility of contracts. Prior to that in Minneapolis [Minnesota], the minority suppliers would have booths, those few that they--there were, as I said there weren't that many. They would be in booths and the buyers would come. Maybe they'd stop, maybe they wouldn't. But not that many contracts were written. So on September 15th of 1979, with the help of the Metropolitan Economic Development Association, MEDA, and the Minnesota Minority Purchasing Council, we combined our efforts and put on, and I coined the name, Corporate Minority Business Exchange, September 15th, 1979. And I think at that--I can't remember. I think we had over six hundred people to attend the first one. And we had it at our Training Center out on Wayzata Boulevard [Minneapolis, Minnesota]. There was--it wasn't the best situation, but the corporate buyers were in offices. It was on a Saturday, so that they had access to the offices that were in that building. And then the minority suppliers would circulate and talk with these corporate buyers. And we got a contribution from the corporate community, an amount where we could give them a luncheon that day. That event has continued. It'll be in October of this year. So I consider that one of my--the highlights of my career.$$Okay. We're gonna change right here.$$Okay.

Shirley Hughes

A corporate executive, compensation specialist and technology expert, Shirley J. Hughes is Senior V.P. of Human Resources at Minneapolis-based Ceridian Corp. of Minneapolis, a $1.2 billion information services company serving human resources and transportation markets. Born on December 6, 1945 in Minneapolis, Hughes was one of four children. Her father, a skycap at what became Northwest Airlines also worked as a professional golfer. Her sister, Joyce Hughes, is a law professor at Northwestern University School of Law.

Hughes graduated from Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa with a B.A. in Political Science in 1966. She began her corporate career in 1967 as a compensation administrator and systems integrator at Control Data. Leaving in 1989 as V.P. of Human Resources, she spent a year at Seagate Technology. She returned in 1991 to the company that had now been reformed as Ceridian Corp., as V.P. of Human Resources and Information Services. She then headed up Trinity Health (formerly Mercy Health Services) in Bloomington Hills, Michigan, a $2.3 billion integrated health care provider, returning to Ceridian in 1998.

Civic-minded and dedicated to the idea of giving back to the community, Hughes is active in many civic and business organizations. She is on the National Association of Manufacturers' Board of Directors and sits on the boards of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Twin Cities, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Minnesota and Minneapolis Downtown Council. She is a member of the Minnesota Women's Economic Roundtable. Hughes also has been a member of the Drifters, an African American women's civic organization and the Minneapolis Urban League.

Accession Number

A2002.141

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/9/2002

Last Name

Hughes

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Central High School

Coe College

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Shirley

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

HUG02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

Barbados, Coronado, California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Minnesota

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/6/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Minneapolis/St. Paul

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Corporate executive Shirley Hughes (1945 - ) is the senior vice president of Ceridian Corporation in Minneapolis and is a member of the Minnesota Women's Economic Roundtable.

Employment

Control Data

Seagate Technology

Ceridian Corporation

Trinity Health

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:17044,222:18032,239:18488,248:19096,260:24786,319:32106,406:33036,421:33904,438:35640,491:66550,846:67068,855:70028,911:70324,920:72396,951:72840,958:73284,966:84509,1110:88154,1200:111590,1586:119930,1673$0,0:10224,251:15408,336:23838,411:25054,419:29338,438:31450,487:35740,556:36862,575:37522,588:40558,650:41152,662:41746,672:49362,757:49717,763:50001,768:51492,793:53693,837:54403,849:58843,887:59633,902:60265,911:65796,966:70216,1141:88657,1226:91139,1275:95446,1339:97490,1382:98147,1392:98512,1398:99315,1411:109550,1544:113706,1606:120514,1747:120884,1756:121772,1776:122142,1782:127230,1824
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Shirley Hughes' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Shirley Hughes lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Shirley Hughes describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Shirley Hughes describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Shirley Hughes talks about her father's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Shirley Hughes describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Shirley Hughes talks about her paternal uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Shirley Hughes talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Shirley Hughes describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Shirley Hughes talks about visiting Alabama as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Shirley Hughes describes her childhood interests and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Shirley Hughes describes her childhood community in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Shirley Hughes describes her experiences in school

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Shirley Hughes talks about the mentors who influenced her as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Shirley Hughes describes her involvement as a student at Minneapolis Central High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Shirley Hughes describes her career aspirations as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Shirley Hughes describes her social life in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Shirley Hughes talks about why she enrolled at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Shirley Hughes describes her experiences attending Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Shirley Hughes talks about the professors who influenced her as a student at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Shirley Hughes talks about researching the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as a student at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Shirley Hughes describes her activities and involvement at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Shirley Hughes talks about starting and leaving graduate school at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Shirley Hughes talks about being hired to write training contracts for Control Data Corporation

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Shirley Hughes talks about Control Data Corporation

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Shirley Hughes describes her responsibilities working for Control Data Corporation

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Shirley Hughes describes how the human resources field has evolved

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Shirley Hughes describes how human resources has evolved at Control Data Corporation

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Shirley Hughes describes how Japan influenced American human resources culture

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Shirley Hughes describes her role as Senior Vice President of Human Relations at Ceridian Corp.

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Shirley Hughes talks about Ceridian Corp.'s community partnerships

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Shirley Hughes reflects upon her success

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Shirley Hughes describes her human resources philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Shirley Hughes talks about increasing productivity in the workplace

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Shirley Hughes comments on organized labor

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Shirley Hughes describes how union agitation has benefitted the American workforce

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Shirley Hughes notes how labor agitation and advocacy has evolved

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Shirley Hughes describes how her race and sex shapes her perspective of Corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Shirley Hughes talks about the importance of minorities in Corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Shirley Hughes talks about her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Shirley Hughes describes her civic involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Shirley Hughes talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Shirley Hughes talks about her family

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Shirley Hughes narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

16$12

DATitle
Shirley Hughes describes her career aspirations as a youth
Shirley Hughes describes how human resources has evolved at Control Data Corporation
Transcript
Okay. So, when, when it--around graduation time then did you have a sense of what you wanted to do with the rest of your life?$$No, I knew I'd go to college. In our family it wasn't a question of, of if we were going to college. It was always a question of where. I mean, that had been either hardwired--somehow it just was never--there was never anything thought that we wouldn't go to school. And I think maybe at first when I got ready to go off to school I thought I wanted to be a shrink and that I would be a bio major and a psych minor and go to medical school and then spend four years learning to be a shrink, but I changed that later on.$$So you were really in--interested in--$$I was interested in psychology and also interested in chemistry at the time, did not take a lot of bio in highs school; in fact, I took bio one summer, which is probably one of the reasons I'm alive today. I had two guys who were very good friends in high school that we were running buddies, and they used to like to go canoeing. They were both good swimmers; and in fact, they would canoe at a lake not far from where we are today. I would be sitting in the middle of the canoe just running my mouth, when I think about it, of no (laughter), no benefit. I wasn't doing any rowing. I was just kind of talking. Anyhow, unfortunately both of them drowned that summer, and had I not been in summer school in biology, I'm sure I probably would have been with them. But yeah, at the time I liked chemistry. And I was interested in psychology and kind of what makes people tick and why do people act the way they do, and what have you. I just thought people were fascinating.$Control Data's history--the founder of Control Data was an engineer, and he happened to hire a very bright young man out of grad school, out of Minnesota's [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota] IR [International Relations] department, who became not, not only his right arm, but who ended up becoming deputy chairman of the company. So the function was an exceedingly powerful function within that company because of, of who started the HR [Human Resources] function in, in Control Data. And also, for a while we had a ton of HR people. And that was at a time where it was hard to find engineers, and then it was hard to find software people, and companies were doing a lot of acquisitions. And people finally figured out it was people that would make acquisitions work or not work, and so they needed a function to help people with managing change in getting businesses integrated and everyone working as a team. And then later on, they eventually needed an HR function to help in terms of figuring out how they could have a more elastic workforce when times got bad.$$Meaning that they could, they could be used for more, more than one thing other--or--?$$Well, or how they could have, have, have different relationships. So, let's say that maybe part of your workforce was part time; part may have been full time--but that you wouldn't have this, this standard workforce where everyone was working full time and then crash, bang, all of a sudden if times got bad that you're laying off a bunch of people, I think companies started trying to figure out how they could, could change the skills mix and the working hours and the complement of their workforce, so they didn't have these big ups and, and downs, you know, hiring a bunch of people and then two years later laying off a bunch of the same folk.