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Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey

Founder and president of Probation Challenge/PCC Internet Broadcast Network, Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey was born February 12, 1938 in Chicago, Illinois to Adolphus and Lillian Bailey. He attended Forrestville Elementary School and graduated from Englewood High School in 1957. Bailey continued his education at Wilson Junior College, Central State University, Chicago State University and Governors State University.

Bailey was known from the 1950’s through the 1970’s as the lead singer of the Harold Bailey Singers. The Bailey Singers recorded gospel music with the Rush, HOB and Savoy record labels and appeared on Chicago television’s Jubilee Showcase.

As a Cook County probation officer, Bailey noted that Bailey was concerned about the merry go round of recidivism and the spiraling wave of crime in the African American community. In 1979, he proposed a rehabilitation program for offenders, which was supported by Judge R. Eugene Pincham. The program was implemented as a serious attempt at rehabilitation. Pincham’s courtroom, jury room and office were converted to part time classroom space. Judge William Cousins and Judge Earl Strayhorn also supported Bailey’s efforts. In 1984, then state representative, Carol Mosely Braun and the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus sponsored the Probation Challenge Act. The late Mayor Harold Washington helped Bailey move the program out of the criminal courts building and into Olive Harvey Community College. Unlearned, unskilled, socially deprived, adult and juvenile and electronically monitored clients are mandated to into the program. Probation Challenge is a radio and television broadcast that educates people as they return to society from within the judicial system. The organization was priased by late, federal Judge Prentice Marshall.

Bailey has appeared on ABC-TV’s Good Morning America and CBS - TV’s 60 Minutes. Bailey, the recipient of numerous awards nationally and internationally, continues this valuable work, the only court-mandated program of its kind in the United States continues to work and live in Chicago.

Accession Number

A2004.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/10/2004

Last Name

Bailey

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Organizations
Schools

Englewood High School

Forrestville Elementary School

Kennedy–King College

Central State University

First Name

Harold

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BAI04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Montego Bay, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

All Things Work Together for the Good of Those That Love the Lord and Are Called According to His Purpose.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/12/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens, Bread, Turkey (Smoked)

Short Description

Gospel singer and criminal justice activist Reverend Dr. Harold E. Bailey (1938 - ) is the founder and president of Probation Challenge, a rehabilitation program for offenders, and is best known as the lead singer of the Harold Bailey Singers.

Favorite Color

Black, Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:242030,3304$0,0:231670,2412
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harold E. Bailey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his parents' jobs in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his parents' upbringings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his father's experience in the segregated U.S. Army during World War I

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey remembers experiencing segregation in the South, and his father's reaction

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls growing up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the Church of Christ (Holiness) U.S.A.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his religious influences as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his aunt, Alma Young, and his childhood passion for the Bible

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls his years at Forrestville Elementary School on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his father, Adolphus Jerome Bailey, Sr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes an experience of racial discrimination at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his high school years at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes his years at Woodrow Wilson Junior College in Illinois and Central State University in Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey recalls visitors to Central State University, including Coretta Scott King and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his experience at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the origins of gospel music and its relationship with Negro spirituals

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his time in the U.S. Army, at Chicago State University, and at Governors State University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working for the City of Chicago during a conflict between Mayor Richard J. Daley and Congressman Ralph Metcalfe

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working for the Cook County Adult Probation Department and his ordination as a minister

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working as a probation officer in the late 1960s, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes working as a probation officer in the late 1960s, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains how he provided probation counseling with the help of HistoryMaker R. Eugene Pincham

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the Probation Challenge program in Cook County, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the Probation Challenge program in Cook County, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the prison-industrial complex in Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the prison-industrial complex in Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes racial disparities in the criminal justice system

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes effects of the War on Drugs on criminal recidivism and racial disparities in the criminal justice system

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about the successes of programs like Probation Challenge and political obstacles to their expansion

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains how he became chair of the Cook County Board of Corrections

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey describes the Cook County Board of Corrections, and its conflict with Cook County Sheriff Michael Sheahan

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about positive responses to fighting corruption in the Cook County, Illinois criminal justice system

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey reflects upon his hopes and concerns for the African American community, and on his life and legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey talks about his mother's attitude toward his work, and about his former music career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reverend Harold E. Bailey narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$1

DATitle
Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains the Probation Challenge program in Cook County, Illinois, pt. 1
Reverend Harold E. Bailey explains how he became chair of the Cook County Board of Corrections
Transcript
All right, sir, could you outline the program of Probation Challenge, what exactly do you do?$$Probation Challenge is the first court-mandated program of its kind in the country where we force young men and women to be of a genuine assistance to themselves through the vehicle of education. Simply, it's education or jail. Under the auspices of [HM] Judge [R. Eugene] Pincham, we never had a client to go to jail more than twice before getting the message that it's going to be an education. We selected education because education does bring about awareness, awareness brings on the ability for these young people to think and preferably make rational decisions. Here they get more than a mere GED, they get adult basic education. They can then after graduating from there go into skills for example, multimedia productions is being learned here at no cost to the client, carpentry, computer science on several levels. All these are high paying positions out in the industry and the world--the marketplace, if you will. So why not train them adequately to do what--compete in the job market.$$Now that goes counter to what the penal institution--well the criminal justice system usually does not see--though it seems actually (unclear) if you--if a person is in jail and their sentence is running out, society lets them out without any provision for any education or any retraining, the chances are that they'll do what--go right back.$$Recidivism becomes--let me say this, I'm getting excited, recidivism becomes astronomically high simply because when a young man is filtering through the bowels of the criminal justice system, there is no provisions made for guidelines, there are no provisions made to show him what to do and how to do it. When a John Doe is released out of the prison system with not--with twenty-five, thirty dollars in pocket, the conspiracy when they tell him that now don't you come back here anymore, that's a lie. They want him back because if he don't go back, they no longer have a job and to put a person on a bus absorbs all the money in pocket. When that person reaches here, they have already had their mentalities dealt with by persons who are sitting in judgment over them, correctional officers, if you will, who are placed in communities who are first partakers of those jobs who are not like the complexion of the person whose being housed there. And so what happens is that you've got the Ku Klux Klan [KKK] in Illinois in some places who are being hired to administer judgment, justice over the lives of these young men and women. What are they expected to be like when they come out? I dare say it's a conspiracy that has been well set into place. They cannot retaliate for all of this as they are in the institution but when they come out they do what, they give vent to those persons in the community. And who are those people, the people who live upstairs, next door to them or beneath them or in their own house. Mothers are being damaged, sisters and other brothers, family members are being damaged because all this frustration that they took in prison is now out on the community. It was a conspiracy that was well written for these young people and the young people are now playing out the script and they don't realize what's going on.$All right, tell us about how you became the chair of the Cook County Board of Corrections [Cook County, Illinois]?$$I was approached on the auspices of Mr. O'Grady--Sheriff [James] O'Grady.$$About what year was this?$$I think it was '97 [1997] or '98 [1998]. I was asked to consider becoming a member of the Cook County Board of Corrections. Was not interested because my hands were full with Probation Challenge and after praying about it at two, three a.m. in the morning the Lord spoke to my heart and said I'd like for you to become a part of that board. Thusly, I did, I was obedient and after getting in again here's a second adventure likening to the probation department. Too much given, much is required. Didn't want to do anything but sit there on the board and absorb information and I mean the information was a bit much as it related to African Americans, Hispanics being in that institution and nothing being done to be of a genuine assistance. After praying about that, I was instructed to put my name in for chairmanship. Well the word came down anybody but Bailey and of course it was someone other than Bailey. The second time it came up for a vote, I put my name in again. A lady by the name of Dorothy Drish, who had been on the board since I think '67 [1967] or '68 [1968] or something like that was an old white lady who loved that system and she said that--she said why would you all elect me when there is Reverend Bailey who is concerned about the department. She said I'll tell you what I'm going to do since I'm the chair I have the pleasure of selecting who is going to be the vice chair, I want Reverend Bailey to become the vice chair. I want you to hear this, here I am close, I'm the vice chair. Dorothy Drish did not live but three months after that, she died. Who's the chair?$$Reverend Bailey.$$I inherited the chair and I remember going into the board meeting and the secretary arrogantly said--now here's a new stationary and all the board members are going to be down here and your name is going to be at the top of the board member and such and so. I said no, no, no that's not the case. My name should be here, up here because I am now the acting chair. Oh yes that's true. When it came down for an election, I became the chair and I've been sitting every since. I think I've been chair now eleven, twelve years and I know where the skeletons are buried.

Howard Saffold

Reformer Howard Saffold, a former police officer who has dedicated his life to correcting wrongs in the criminal justice system, was born on January 26, 1941 in Chicago, Illinois to Eva and DeWitt Saffold. Saffold held odd jobs while attending Farragut High School. Upon graduation in 1959, he joined the U.S. Army. He married Carol Randall Saffold in 1960 and completed his military service in 1962. Saffold worked as an expediter for the regional office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs before the Chicago Police Department hired him as a beat officer in 1965.

As a police officer, Saffold faced discrimination and witnessed police brutality, causing him to contemplate resigning. When the Afro-American Police League was founded in 1968 by Renault Robinson, he immediately joined, recruited others and eventually served as the League's president. When a 1976 court decision forced the Chicago Police Department to change its discriminatory hiring and promotional practices, membership soared. In 1978, Saffold co-founded the National Black Police Association, serving as its president as well. In 1979, he co-founded Positive Anti-Crime Thrust with fellow Afro-American Police League leader Renault Robinson; promoting cooperation between police and the communities they serve.

When Harold Washington unsuccessfully ran for mayor of the City of Chicago in 1977, Saffold provided security on a volunteer basis. When Washington ran again and won in 1983, one of Mayor Washington's first official acts was to name Saffold as chief of executive security, making Saffold responsible for selecting, training and assigning personnel. Saffold served in the same capacity for Mayor Eugene Sawyer after Mayor Washington's untimely death.

In 1991, Saffold retired from the Chicago Police Department and resurrected the Positive Anti-Crime Thrust. As CEO, he attempts to stem the flow of young black men into the prison system.

Saffold holds a B.S. in Business Administration from Chicago State University and an M.A. in urban studies from Northeastern Illinois University. He was honored by the Midwest Community Council in 1988, the Peoria Afro-American Police League in 1993 and the South Austin Coalition in 1994. He consults community organizing initiatives and community-based organizations, including prison ministries and public schools.

Accession Number

A2002.091

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/5/2002

Last Name

Saffold

Maker Category
Schools

Farragut Career Academy Hs

Lincoln Park High School

Chicago State University

Northeastern Illinois University

First Name

Howard

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

SAF01

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

To thine own self be true.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/26/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soup

Short Description

Criminal justice activist, nonprofit chief executive, and police officer Howard Saffold (1941 - ) served as the president of the African American Patrolman's League. Saffold was a criminal justice activist and anti-crime specialist.

Employment

A-1 Secretarial Service (Chicago)

Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office

Chicago Transit Authority

Chicago Police Department

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Howard Saffold interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold outlines his immediate family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold shares childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold describes his family members

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Howard Saffold recalls his elementary school years

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Howard Saffold remembers his high school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold recalls the racial atmosphere at Farragut High School

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold explains his poor performance in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold remembers his parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold recounts graduating from high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold discusses his high school gang activity

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Howard Saffold details his army years

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Howard Saffold relates an incident of racial discrimination at the Metropolitan Police Department

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Howard Saffold explains his decision to apply to the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold explains his decision to become a police officer

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold recalls training to become a police officer

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold discusses the relationship of white policemen to the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold illustrates racism and police brutality in the Chicago police department

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold recounts an instance of extreme police brutality during the 1968 King riots

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold recalls racist police brutality by the Chicago Police Task Force

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold details the police brutality during the 1968 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold remembers joining the Afro-American Patrolmen's League

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold recounts the assassination of Fred Hampton and Mark Clark

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold describes the resistance to the Afro-American Patrolman's League

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold discusses African American police organizations

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold details the divisions between officers and communities over race

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold describes how white officers who expose police misconduct are ostracized

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold details his involvement in the Afro-American Patrolman's League

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold recalls the effect of the Jane Byrne administration on the Afro-American Patrolman's League

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold details his career during the Harold Washington administration

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold considers the future of black police organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold discusses his work with the Positive Anti-Crime Thrust

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Howard Saffold considers his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Howard Saffold explains why and how he stood for what he thought was right

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Howard Saffold shares how he'd like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Howard Saffold discusses his future plans

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Howard Saffold recalls his parents' reaction to his career

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Howard Saffold expresses his opinion of The HistoryMakers