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Sidney Green

Basketball player and college basketball coach Sidney Green was born on January 4, 1961 in Brooklyn, New York. He starred on his high school basketball team at Thomas Jefferson High School. In 1979, Green, a graduating senior, was a McDonald’s All-American selection and named the New York City Player of the Year. He chose to attend the University of Nevada at Las Vegas with a four-year athletic scholarship where he played under head coach Jerry Tarkanian. In 1983, Green was an NCAA All-American selection and he graduated that year with his B.A. degree in sociology. Green was the all-time leading rebounder and second all-time scorer in the history of the UNLV men’s basketball team.

Green was the fifth pick in the 1983 NBA Draft, where he was chosen by the Chicago Bulls to play power forward and played alongside basketball super star Michael Jordan. Green had a successful career in the NBA and went on to play for the Detroit Pistons, the New York Knicks, the Orlando Magic, the San Antonio Spurs, and the Charlotte Hornets before retiring from the league in 1993. In 1995, Green returned to basketball as head coach of the men’s basketball team at Southampton College in Long Island, New York. Despite inheriting a team that had won just six games the year before, Green led his team to twenty-nine wins and twenty-seven losses during his two years as head coach. In 1997, Green went on to coach at the University of North Florida, where he increased the team’s winning percentage by more than thirty percent. Florida Atlantic University hired Green as its head coach in 1999. He took his team to the first Atlantic Sun Conference championship in 2002, where he was named the A-Sun Coach of the Year. Green was hired as an assistant coach at the University of Indiana in 2005 and in 2009, the Chicago Bulls named him the team ambassador.

While in college, Green co-founded Shoot for the Stars Foundation in Las Vegas, Nevada. During his time with the Knicks in New York, Green participated in Governor Mario and Matilda Cuomo’s Mentor Program as a spokesperson in public schools. He also founded Sid’s Kids in Orlando, Florida while he played with the Orlando Magic. In 1989, Green received the NBA National Spirit of Love Award, given to the NBA player who has contributed significant time and energy to the community. Green’s jersey was retired by the UNLV basketball team, and he was inducted into the UNLV Hall of Fame in 1994.

Green and his wife, Deidra, have two children, LaShawn and Taurean. Taurean has also played in the NBA.

Sidney Green was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 18, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.115

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/18/2012

Last Name

Green

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Thomas Jefferson High School

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

P.S. 158 Warwick School

I.S. 302 Rafael Cordero School

P.S. 64

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sidney

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

GRE15

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Palos Verdes, California, Ft Lauderdale, Florida

Favorite Quote

The Pain Of Discipline Is Much Less Than The Pain Of Regret.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/4/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Basketball player and college basketball coach Sidney Green (1961 - ) played in the NBA for ten years. After retirement, he head-coached several college teams before being appointed ambassador for the Chicago Bulls.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Southampton College

University of North Florida

Florida Atlantic University

University of Indiana

Chicago Bulls

Wynn Las Vegas

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sidney Green's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sidney Green lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sidney Green describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about his relatives in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sidney Green describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sidney Green talks about his father's experiences in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sidney Green remembers his parents' education and occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sidney Green describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about his family's move to Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sidney Green describes his upbringing in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sidney Green remembers his childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Sidney Green describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sidney Green recalls the racial divide in the East New York section of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sidney Green describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers the influence of his older siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about Jim McMillian

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sidney Green remembers his brother's murder

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls his early interest in basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sidney Green remembers James "Fly" Williams

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sidney Green talks about the basketball culture in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sidney Green remembers his favorite elementary school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about the assassinations of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Sidney Green recalls the start of his basketball career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes his neighborhood baseball teams

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls an incident that led to his interest in basketball

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers his basketball mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sidney Green remembers his growing pains

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sidney Green recalls Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sidney Green remembers the guidance of his high school basketball coaches

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sidney Green recalls his decision to attend the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sidney Green describes basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sidney Green recalls missing his high school prom to play in the McDonald's All-American Game

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Sidney Green remembers the players at the 1979 McDonald's All-American Game

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Sidney Green talks about the prominent basketball players of New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Sidney Green describes his discipline as a student athlete at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes Coach Jerry Tarkanian's basketball practices

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sidney Green remembers his physical training and diet regimen

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sidney Green talks about his basketball experiences at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sidney Green describes the National Invitation Tournament game

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sidney Green talks about his college basketball statistics

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sidney Green recalls being drafted by the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sidney Green describes his first year with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sidney Green remembers his teammates on the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sidney Green recalls Michael Jordan's first year with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sidney Green talks about his experiences with the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sidney Green recalls being traded from the Chicago Bulls

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sidney Green remembers playing for the Detroit Pistons

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sidney Green recalls buying a home for his mother in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about the accomplishments of the New York Knicks

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sidney Green remembers his strongest basketball opponents

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sidney Green describes his teammates on the New York Knicks

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sidney Green describes his relationship with his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sidney Green recalls playing for the Orlando Magic

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sidney Green remembers being traded to the San Antonio Spurs

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sidney Green remembers coaches Larry Brown and Jerry Tarkanian

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls being traded to the Charlotte Hornets

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers Alonzo Mourning

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sidney Green talks about his retirement from the NBA

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sidney Green recalls his jersey retirement ceremony at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sidney Green talks about his philanthropic foundations

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sidney Green recalls coaching at South Hampton College in South Hampton, New York

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sidney Green talks about his coaching experiences at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sidney Green describes his coaching experiences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Sidney Green describes his coaching experiences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sidney Green describes the 2002 March Madness competition

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sidney Green recalls watching his son play for the University of Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sidney Green remembers becoming the Chicago Bulls team ambassador

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sidney Green shares his analysis of the 2012 Chicago Bulls

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sidney Green talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sidney Green describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sidney Green reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sidney Green reflects upon his life and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sidney Green narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$5

DAStory

11$5

DATitle
Sidney Green describes his upbringing in Brooklyn, New York
Sidney Green remembers his strongest basketball opponents
Transcript
What was life like growing up for you? I mean can you describe where you lived, and then what were some of the sights, and sounds, and smells of growing up?$$Well, it was wonderful, you know. My--I lived in a six--well, let me start from scratch. Moving from Harlem [New York, New York] to Brooklyn [New York]--remember, we lived on Jerome Street in Brooklyn--East New York section of Brooklyn. We lived on Jerome Street for about a, a year, and then my mother [Lucretia Simmons Green] found a bigger apartment--bigger home for us--for nine of us that was living--well, it was ten of us that was living in a apartment; she found a six room apartment right around the corner on Pitkin Avenue, and I remember the story she told me. She, she was walking and the then landlord was doing some work outside the apartment, and he had a sign, you know, "Apartment for Rent," and she inquired about it and he asked her how many kids she had, and she said this is the only time she ever had to tell a different story--I don't wanna use the other word but, but she said she had to because she needed a bigger place, so he asked her how many kids that she had, and she said four (laughter), and he said, "Okay." And a few weeks after that, when we moved in, he noticed all the kids (laughter). It was four plus six more, and he was like--saying something in Spanish; he said she did not wanna hear what he was asking her in Spanish 'cause he didn't speak English. But his--the landlord wife told her, you know, that, you know, "I thought she said she only had four, and she bringing all these kids." (Laughter) But he accepted her, but one thing my mother always did is she always paid her rent on time, and she always kept a clean apartment and kept us in a respectful way. And after he saw my mother's characteristics on how she was raising us, he accepted her, and we wound up living there for seventeen years--eighteen years in that, in that apartment.$$Now this is--this is quite a job, you know, when you really think of--you know, when you reflect back on something like that. There is someone who's working as a domestic--$$Um-hm.$$--and she's gotta feed what--nine children? I mean she's got (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It was ten of us.$$Ten, yeah.$$Yeah, it was ten (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And--$$And my sister, my oldest sister [Essie Mae Walton], was living in the Bronx [New York]; she was married--she got married at that time (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay, so she wasn't there to help.$$She wasn't there, no, so it was ten of us.$$So, this is, this is really a, a--she did a--you know--a job!$$I think she did a phenomenal job, the best that--she always said she did the best she could and, as I've told my family, you know, to this day, it was up to us to take it to another level for her, to make it better. Unfortunately, some didn't--some decided to go a different route but, you know, she did a phenomenal job under the circumstances.$$Right. And this is New York City [New York, New York] where you don't necessarily have like the, the village kind of, you know, situation you might have in South Carolina or someplace where there are other relatives always around, and people you know (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) No, she, she did it--she did it on herself with her character, integrity, and she was able to win a lotta people over in regards on how she tried to raise us, and keep us all together. And our, our closest friends was our landlord--the ones who--and also the one--the, the residents who lived on the sec- we lived on the third floor. And also the surrounding neighborhood was, you know, a lotta Puerto Ricans, you know; they were our friends. They really brought us in and, and accepted us and made us feel like, you know, we were part of their family as well.$$Okay, okay. So, it was a lotta Puerto Ricans in the neighborhood where you grew up?$$That is correct.$$Okay, all right. Did you learn how to speak Spanish?$$Oh, yeah. I have a brother, I think, who--I wanna make sure (laughter)--Wilbert [Wilbert Green] is a--totally converted, and my brother Wilbert, he worked in a grocery store right downstairs and they, they brought him in like, like he was their family 'cause they liked him, and he wind up working in a grocery store, and learned how to speak Spanish better than how everyone else was speaking Spanish in the neighborhood, and to this day, we still, you know, say--kid him that he's a fully converted Puerto Rican, yeah so.$$(Laughter).$$It's in, it's in his blood wholeheartedly.$So, who is your--when you were playing, who was your toughest opponent that you faced, do you think?$$Individually?$$Well, as a team and as individual players, you know. Who were the toughest (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Celtics [Boston Celtics].$$The Celtics? Really?$$Kevin McHale was one of the toughest players I ever had to defend. He was so uncanny, he was so imposing; he had unbelievable post moves--up and under--just so, so good; he was just so good no matter, you know, our scout report was to be aggressive with him and deny him from his position on the box that he wanted, he always found a way to get there with his footwork, and long arms and--you know; it was like pick your poison playing against the Celtics 'cause you have--try to stop Kevin McHale from doing--and Parish [Robert Parish] doing their thing, and you have, of course, Bird [Larry Bird] out there, and you have a great point guard in Dennis Johnson, God bless him--his soul. It was tough, but they were one of my toughest teams that I've ever had to play against. I mean all--every team in the NBA [National Basketball Association] is tough, but in that year--those years with Bird and (unclear). And then, of course, the Lakers [Los Angeles Lakers], you know, with Magic [Magic Johnson], and Kareem [Kareem-Abdul Jabbar], and Worthy [James Worthy], and Jamaal Wilkes and, you know.$$Now here's Kareem; you--that, that must have been something to play against him--somebody that you've watched as a kid.$$Oh, yeah, oh, yeah (laughter). I remember my first year playing against Kareem was my rookie year; he--you know, I got in the game to defend Kareem and he, he knew I was in awe by him and, you know, first couple a possessions, you know--bang, bang, bang, and one time--next possession he--I went up for a rebound and he tried to go over me; went over my back and hit me on my head with his elbows and that woke me up quick, you know (laughter). That awe that I had of Kareem just evaporated after that hit, and I said, "Okay, I'm in a war now," (laughter) you know, so I always--when I see him, I always kid him about that experience I had with him on that, on that, on that game. But he was a remarkable player.$$Now, is he--do you think--I've often thought--now this is just me look--well, watching--I was at a game once with the Bulls [Chicago Bulls] and the, and the Lakers when they had Artis Gilmore, and if Artis Gilmore was 7'1", how tall was Kareem? Kareem seemed like he was taller--much taller than Artis Gilmore.$$I think they say he was 7'2"; he was about a inch taller than him.$$Yeah, but I don't know; seem like he was much taller, but I don't know if that's (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Kareem, his physique was long and, you know--long, and Artis had a, you know, bigger body width wise.$$Okay.$$Yeah, width wise.$$Maybe just a optical thing--$$Correct.$$But, yeah, he looked a lot longer. He is made long, so he has longer arms and everything else--$$Um-hm.$$--so, yeah. So he just looked gigantic. I said, "Now, how in the world," (laughter). They're not even close to the same--they looked like they were close to the same size, you know, walking around, you know.$$Both great players.$$Yes, right.$$Both great players.$$And Gilmore was gone from the--he, he was--he was not playing with the Bulls anymore; he had just left, I guess, right (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, he was with--he was with the Spurs [San Antonio Spurs].$$Right, right.$$With the Spurs, yeah, I think it was--yeah.$$Okay. Now, now, do you get a chance--when you're, when you're playing an opposing team, do you get a chance to know the players on the other teams in the NBA? Do y'all ever eat together after the game, or do they--or do, do the (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The game is so--you know--well, certain players on certain teams you probably know from, you know, the summer, or going on your NBA trips during the summer, you know, but--yeah. Yeah, but it's--you know, it's part of the professional sports. As far as embracing and hugging and figuratively kissing each players before games, you know, I never unders- you know, my objective was to, to beat you.$$Okay. Now, I always wondered--we, we see certain teams play, and the guys come out and they act like they're, they're greatest friends in the world, you know. I just wonder if they hang out after the game, or what, you know--how, how well the--your team knows the opposition, you know; that's what--$$Yeah, I, I (unclear) now--I didn't wanna warm our hearts up to my opponents too much. If I knew somebody on the opposing team I just--I say, "Hi," but just leave me alone, 'cause I gotta focus on what I gotta do for my team.

Harrison B. Wilson

University President and College Basketball Coach Harrison B. Wilson was born on April 21, 1925 and is a native of Amsterdam, New York. Wilson is the fifth of seven siblings. His mother was a school teacher and his father worked in construction. Wilson served in the United States Navy from 1945 until 1947, when he enrolled at Kentucky State University at the age of nineteen. There he received his B.S. degree, was an honor student and a star athlete in basketball, football, baseball and track.

In the early 1950s Wilson received his M.A. degree and his D.H.S. in health science and administration from Indiana University. Between the ages of twenty-three and thirty-nine, Wilson worked as a professor, administrator and coach at Jackson State College (now Jackson State University). Wilson was the head basketball coach from 1951 to 1960. He then became chairman of the Department of Health and Physical Education from 1960 until 1967. Additionally, he became chairman and professor of health and physical education at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee that same year as well. Wilson then briefly worked at Fisk University as the assistant to the President of Fisk before being named President of Norfolk State University in 1975. During Wilson’s term at Norfolk, which spanned over three decades from 1975 until 1997, Norfolk State University’s annual budget increased from $14 million to $86 million, enrollment increased from 6,700 students to 8,100 students, and the number of faculty and staff has grown from 377 to 412, with a student-faculty ratio of twenty-two-one. The University also added fourteen new buildings and acquired fifty-one acres of land during Wilson’s tenure.

Upon his retirement in 1997, Wilson was honored by Old Dominion University as one of their Strong Men and Women Excellence in Leadership series. Wilson is active in a number of boards and organizations, including the board of directors of Virginia National Bank, the lay advisory board of DePaul Hospital, the Virginia State Advanced Council on Vocational Education, and the board of directors of the Virginia Health, Welfare, and Recreation Planning Council. Wilson is also a member of the Alpha Kappa Mu fraternity.

Wilson is married to Dr. Lucy Wilson, and he is the father of six children.

Harrison B. Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 11, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.012

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/11/2010 |and| 5/13/2010

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Organizations
Schools

Kentucky State University

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Harrison

Birth City, State, Country

Amsterdam

HM ID

WIL51

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saratoga, New York

Favorite Quote

God Bless America.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

4/21/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chesapeake

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ham, Chicken

Short Description

University president and college basketball coach Harrison B. Wilson (1925 - ) was president of Norfolk State University in Virginia. He was also on the board of directors of Virginia National Bank.

Employment

Jackson State University

Tennessee State University

Fisk University

Norfolk State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1860,21:2400,29:13260,183:15220,262:19575,292:19900,298:22286,331:30750,483:31170,490:31520,496:32010,505:35160,572:35650,580:36770,590:37190,599:39150,688:39920,703:41740,743:42440,778:47738,819:48054,824:48370,829:50661,887:54848,968:56270,1003:64446,1064:66326,1118:68206,1137:71918,1169:72380,1180:72688,1185:78260,1231:78592,1236:78924,1241:80003,1262:82645,1282:85360,1297:86618,1324:92538,1447:94018,1469:100140,1519:100770,1528:102765,1551:103185,1556:106800,1567:107262,1575:107526,1580:108186,1593:115050,1709:115370,1714:115930,1723:116330,1746:125018,1832:128915,1882:130229,1911:135634,1971:141166,2041:142654,2067:143119,2073:147154,2100:149848,2131:151430,2149:154844,2179:158436,2208:160637,2220:162281,2240:164768,2302:176699,2408:177007,2415:179884,2458:181158,2476:182068,2487:184622,2498:185980,2506:186400,2519:186890,2527:187590,2540:188010,2547:188360,2553:188640,2558:188920,2563:194274,2608:195066,2617:198754,2633:205334,2711:205880,2719:207752,2753:209468,2786:214628,2858:216266,2898:219886,2931:220616,2944:220908,2949:221730,2959$0,0:1540,75:10638,193:19162,337:29942,542:33568,597:33960,602:38930,643:41102,665:44885,735:46631,776:57239,884:58360,910:59186,937:63480,989:63820,994:65350,1045:67390,1079:67815,1085:69260,1136:69600,1141:71130,1209:80356,1315:84951,1345:85644,1362:87030,1380:87471,1392:87723,1397:90380,1411:94748,1483:97590,1496:109696,1606:110116,1612:110704,1621:115324,1719:115996,1734:133155,1945:133755,1982:137880,2027:138855,2044:140130,2079:140505,2085:141330,2099:146205,2228:152810,2283
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harrison B. Wilson's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal great-grandfather, pt. 3

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his paternal grandfather's life after the Civil War

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's inheritance

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his mother's family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his paternal uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his father's move to Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early years in Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson describes the president's house at Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his father

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls Theodore Roosevelt Junior High School in Amsterdam, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers the influence of Joe Louis

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls boxing throughout his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his father's discovery of his boxing activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his reckless teenage behavior

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his competition with classmate Rocco Petrone

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers being denied from the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls joining the U.S. Navy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about serving at Naval Station Pearl Harbor in Hawaii

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his service as a corpsman

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers working as a surgical assistant

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers visiting the South, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers visiting the South, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Kentucky State College for Negroes in Frankfort, Kentucky

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Jackson State College

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers meeting a Chicago Bears football player

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how his college work prepared him for Mississippi

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about changes in Mississippi collegiate sports

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about Medgar Evers

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being arrested in Mississippi

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes Medgar Evers' personality

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls the civil rights activities in Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls leaving Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers becoming reacquainted with Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers becoming reacquainted with Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls proposing to Lucy R. Wilson

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers marrying Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about Walter S. Davis

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers marrying Lucy R. Wilson, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls negotiating his wife's salary, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls negotiating his wife's salary, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his work at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers the speakers at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University and Fisk University

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his duties at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State University

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers buying his home in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers buying his home in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls being hired at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his first impression of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his work at Fisk University

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls the support of his wife

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his challenges at Fisk University

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls his interviews for university president positions

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his qualifications for university president

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers vying for the presidency at Norfolk State University, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers vying for the presidency at Norfolk State University, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his leadership of the Norfolk State University board

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his friendship with Virginia Governor Mills Godwin

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his father's legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early work as president of Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the president's home at Norfolk State University

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his political moves as Norfolk State University president, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his political moves as Norfolk State University president, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the L. Douglas Wilder Performing Arts Center in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson remembers improvements he made at Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the athletic facility at Norfolk State University, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson recalls building the athletic facility at Norfolk State University, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his life

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Harrison B. Wilson reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Harrison B. Wilson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Harrison B. Wilson describes how he would like to be remembered, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Harrison B. Wilson talks about his fighting background

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Harrison B. Wilson narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Harrison B. Wilson remembers his early years in Amsterdam, New York
Harrison B. Wilson recalls the support of his wife
Transcript
Now, can you kind of tell us what the neighborhood--you, you said you grew up in an Italian neighborhood basically in Amsterdam.$$Yeah.$$Yeah what, what kind of housing was there and what was the neighborhood like.$$(Laughter) Well that's, that's an interesting story. They were usually the worst house in that community. We--my mother [Marguerite Ayers Wilson] had to, and I'm growing up I'm a little kid, I'm, I'm living wherever, wherever we moved to. But what I found that my mother would take the house whatever it was and beautify it (laughter).$$So you lived in several different places?$$Several, you had to move when they (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And this is, just so people viewing this will understand this is during the Depression right when you were--?$$Right, during the Depression.$$Yeah, you were five years old, old I guess--$$Well, let's say--$$--or four or five when the Great Depression hit.$$Yeah.$$Yeah.$$And, and you have to look at, look at what I'm seeing through my eyes too; that's the other thing. And what I'm seeing is my father [Harrison Wilson, Sr.] being respected in that community, Italian community where you had Italian people who were just over from Italy. They were immigrants. They were clannish. They were friends. They were Catholics, and they would have a vineyard that they'd build like they had in Italy and on Sundays the old guys would get under there and drink their wine that they, that they made. They made wine. And they had a Italian spaghetti, and what you call pizza today was a poor man's food because what they did the mother would, would bake bread and they had vegetables and she'd cook tomatoes and she'd throw whatever they had on that piece of bread and the kids ate that. We used to laugh at them when I first saw that, and then I got nerve enough to taste it and it was good. It was good. And then later, you know years later, that was pizza. You know, I don't know how many will admit that, but that's, that's, that's the Amsterdam, New York, story. And anyway, my father had the great respect of, of the Italian people, and I can tell you why because he worked hard, he loved his family and protected them, and loved my mother. My mother ran, ran the house. My father thought he was in charge, but my mother was always in charge. And it was amazing how he changed. Even my father changed from being somewhat--coming from a family where he had everything to having a family during the Depression years. My father, people won't believe this, but my father would walk five miles in snow to catch a ride to go to a job thirteen miles away. My father was a bricklayer. He was a plasterer. He was, he, he cleaned up. He started with a job, if it was a matter of working on the foundation he did that. And when, if the matter--you needed a man to plaster he could do that. He could lay brick. They didn't have unions then. And then he'd clean up the area around it.$Lucy [Wilson's second wife, HistoryMaker Lucy R. Wilson] helped me with my speeches. Matter of fact she wrote my speeches for me and, and when, when, when I got to be president of the univer- here [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, Virginia] she wrote all my speeches. Of course, I paid her, I paid her. I, I got somebody to mop the floors and did all that and so she didn't have to do that, that was my way of paying her and I'm joking for the sake of the record (laughter). She would kill me if I left here, but I wouldn't. No she's, she's steady the, the woman behind me. I, and I would tell people. I'd give a speech and tell them about her and how she came to my aid. A lot of people thought all the children were hers. They thought we'd been married all those years, and I, I didn't, I didn't feel right not letting them know what, what I did or what we did, and they shocked. Every Sunday we were at our church that we went to, we took a whole pew. And when this little baby girl [April Wilson Woodard] came, I had those four boys and one bigger girl that was three years old [Jennifer Wilson], but I had that little baby girl I had to carry it in, in the church, not to the church, in the church and I'd hold her for a few minutes, and when she'd started crying I'd give her to her mother. But anyway it was, it was, if I'd ever had any bad luck or any, any, anybody had ever done anything that was distasteful or hateful to me growing up or any, anywhere in my life, I felt like my, the Lord, and I, and I believe in God, pointed out who I should marry. I didn't know--you know, you never know for sure, but I'm telling you she--and I embarrass her a little bit saying this--but she was, she was just something special. She, the only way I could say it as if she was 6'9" and you were counting on her to make the NBA [National Basketball Association] and in her first year she made the All-Stars and, and took you to the national championship or, or the pro championship, well that was Lucy.$$She's the Magic Johnson of marriage (laughter).$$She, she was Magic Johnson of my life.$$Okay.$$And because--$$Now, now, now let's see, let me--$$All right go ahead.$$--let me get you to--$$And I'm gonna try to talk a little, little less and answer quickly and stop.

Katherine Bennett

Women’s sports pioneer and educator Katherine Howard Bennett was born on October 17, 1922 in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. She was raised by a single mother who worked as a sorter and mender in a laundry. In 1940, Bennett earned her high school diploma from P.W. Moore High School, where she was a member of the debate team, band and drama club.

From 1940 until 1944, Bennett attended North Carolina A & T University where she encountered her first female athlete. Intrigued by the world of sports she immersed herself in athletics. Bennett, along with twins Mable and Inez Scott, were A & T’s first majorette team. She was also a member of the drama club, band, debate team, volleyball, tennis and gymnastics teams. Bennett also joined the Women’s Athletic Association and participated in “National Sports Day,” a weekend of sports for black, female college students. In 1944, Bennett earned her B.S. degree in English and health & physical education. She later returned to school, receiving her master’s degree in health education in 1947 from New York University and earning her doctorate in 1977 in physical education from Virginia Polytechnic University.

After earning her B.A. degree, Bennett taught physical education at Rosenwald School in South Mills, North Carolina. From 1947 until 1953, she worked as a health and physical education professor at Hampton Institute. In addition to teaching, Bennett also coordinated the women’s athletics program. In 1953, her husband was hired as the head football coach at Virginia State University; she followed him and began working as a professor of health and physical education. That same year Bennett created and established the Officiating Board and Women’s Officials at VSU. In the late 1950s, Bennett created guidelines that would ultimately lead to incorporating women’s athletics into to the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association or CIAA. In 1968, Bennett coached the first competitive women’s basketball team at VSU, and in 1975 she directed the first CIAA women’s basketball tournament at Virginia State. In 1977, Bennett was appointed chairperson of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation at VSU, the first woman to hold this post. That same year, Bennett became the first coordinator for women’s sports at Virginia State. In 1989 she was inducted in the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame. Bennett retired from Virginia State in 1992.

Bennett passed away on December 20, 2009 at age 87.

Accession Number

A2004.200

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/13/2004

Last Name

Bennett

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Howard

Schools

P.W. Moore High School

Northeastern High School

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Katherine

Birth City, State, Country

Elizabeth City

HM ID

BEN03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

10/17/1922

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Ettrick

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

12/20/2009

Short Description

Academic administrator and college basketball coach Katherine Bennett (1922 - 2009 ) was a pioneer in women’s athletics, coaching the first competitive women’s basketball game, integrating women’s athletics into the CIAA and becoming the first female chair of the department. She was recognized by the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame for her accomplishments in women's sports.

Employment

Rosenwald School - South Mills, North Carolina

Hampton Institute

Virginia State University

Favorite Color

Pink, Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:3744,54:4056,59:4446,65:6552,121:7332,134:8502,160:12090,348:19038,416:21739,485:22469,506:53866,1066:54594,1075:72098,1293:75836,1350:97333,1578:98334,1590:119280,1826$254,0:2516,193:3062,201:4076,227:7508,305:8132,314:8834,324:17951,404:18535,413:21510,443:25200,494:25920,504:27450,532:37260,761:43740,844:49560,887:50190,900:50442,905:52638,928:52934,933:53822,953:62406,1092:62998,1101:66772,1156:72134,1184:75091,1209:75479,1214:76837,1237:81580,1263:82700,1275:92190,1414:93300,1425:98168,1505:99432,1538:102276,1572:102671,1578:112338,1753:123080,1862:123480,1868:124360,1881:134139,2037:134431,2042:147613,2224:157640,2407
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Katherine Bennett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett talks about living with her extended family while growing up in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes childhood memories from Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett recalls her experiences at Banks Street Elementary School in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett talks about attending St. Stephen Missionary Baptist Church in Elizabeth City, North Carolina as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Katherine Bennett recalls her experiences attending P.W. Moore High School in Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Katherine Bennett describes her experiences at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett describes her favorite extracurricular activities from high school and college

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett talks about playing sports at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett talks about her first jobs after graduating from Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina in 1944

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett talks about how she met her husband, HistoryMaker William Maurice Bennett

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes her tenure working in the physical education department at Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett talks about joining the physical education department at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett describes her experiences as a referee and teacher at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett recalls the results of the implementation of Title IX on women's sports, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett recalls the results of the implementation of Title IX on women's sports, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett talks about the increase in popularity of women's sports after Title IX

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett describes the leadership roles she took later in her career at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett talks about whether Title IX has caused funding issues in college athletic departments

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett reflects on the success of Title IX

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett describes her proudest achievements as a professor at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett talks about achieving an Ed.D. at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about the National Sports Day Association

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett describes her involvement with cotillions for the Beaux-Twenty club in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett shares her thoughts about the growth of professional sports for women

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett describes her tenure as head coach of the women's basketball team at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett talks about being inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association Hall of Fame

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Katherine Bennett reflects on the progress of women's sports

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Katherine Bennett describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Katherine Bennett talks about running the majorette squad at Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Katherine Bennett describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Katherine Bennett reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Katherine Bennett narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Katherine Bennett narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Katherine Bennett talks about achieving an Ed.D. at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia
Katherine Bennett talks about playing sports at Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina
Transcript
In 1977 you also got your doctorate degree, we didn't talk about that.$$Yes, right.$$Your Ph.D. [sic. Ed.D], why did you decide to do that?$$I got mad with the chairman of the department [of health, physical education and recreation, Virginia State College; Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia], we had an argument and I said, "You can have this department," I said, "you know what, I don't have to stay here." We had some guy who came in and we had disagreed on a lot of things, and I didn't think he was competent, and in fact I found out he was not really--I think he may have had the background, but he didn't know how to deal with us, and I said I don't have to deal with this. My husband [HistoryMaker William Maurice Bennett] said, "I think you need to take a year off or something," and I said, "Well, I'm going to go to grad school and get my doctorate." There was a guy that was at Virginia Tech [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia] who was a friend of my husband's, and he and my husband used to room together even though segregation was still in effect. I can't think of this guy's name now who was chairman of the department of health and physical education at Virginia Tech. He used to say--so my husband called him and he said, yeah I need somebody here, tell her to send me her resume and all that and come on up. So I immediately got tired, and the chairman who was here, we had an argument, and I said "You can have this job," and I went on and applied, and Virginia Tech gave me a stipend, and I got a scholarship from the southern association for education, and I went on up to Virginia Tech. And came out and got my doctorate and came on out here in two years, and I came on back, and next thing I know I was chairman of the department (laughter).$When you were in college [Negro Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina], you had mentioned earlier that you saw all of these sports and activities for women and that's how you decided you wanted to be a physical education teacher.$$Well, we had what they called in our school was called a WAA--Women's Athletic Association, which had gotten started and I used to be in that. They had groups coming in from all colleges. All the colleges had--not all of them but several of them like Virginia State [College; Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia] was part of it and Hampton Institute [Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia]--it was called Hampton Institute then and they had what they called the WAA--Women's Athletic Association because they didn't have sports for women, that was the only thing that we had. So that started then and so when I got there I was active in that.$$So what did the WAA offer to women?$$Sports, so that you could play, and then we had all the other colleges that were part of it we had women's sports association meeting and it rotated from college to college.$$And what sports did you play in college?$$Volleyball, and tennis, and gymnastics.$$Did you enjoy those sports?$$Oh yeah, and I think you'll see in one of those pictures over there where I'm sitting on a boy's shoulders, that was in the gymnastics squad.$$What did your mother [Annie Howard] and your grandmother [Annie Howard] think back home?$$Oh they thought--well first place when they saw my picture--we had a paper called the [Norfolk] Journal and Guide [New Journal and Guide]. You ever heard of it? The Journal and Guide was a black paper that was put out, and Norfolk, Virginia was the base and the Journal and Guide handled all black stuff about black colleges and universities [HBCUs]. So when my picture came out, oh everybody wanted to know, how did she learn how to do that, 'cause we didn't have any of that in our high school [P.W. Moore High School, Elizabeth City, North Carolina].$$Your picture from being a majorette came out?$$Yes and I still have that picture right now. It's one of those that came out in the paper and they had listed in there that where I went to high school. And see, everybody was shocked. "How did she learn how to do that," so a lot of envy (laughter).

Ricardo Patton

College basketball coach Ricardo Maurice Patton was born on October 23, 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee to Juanita Patton and Leroy Reed. After his 1976 graduation from Nashville's Hume Fogg High School, where he lettered in basketball, Patton attended Belmont College in his hometown and studied physical education. He earned two athletic letters and was named a small college All-American during his senior year, paving the way for his induction into Belmont's Sports Hall of Fame. Patton earned his bachelor's degree in 1980 and went to work as a studio cameraman at Nashville's CBS affiliate, WTVF-TV. In 1985, his passion for sports began to blossom into a career when he accepted a coaching position at Two Rivers Middle School and Hillwood High School, both in Nashville.

Moving into the arena of college basketball, Patton served as assistant coach for Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee for two seasons between 1988 and 1990. He obtained an M.A. in Administration and Supervision from Trevecca Nazarene College in 1989. In 1990, Patton accepted a post as assistant coach at Arkansas-Little Rock University, but returned to Tennessee in 1991 to assist head coach Frankie Allen at Tennessee State University. Patton achieved the title of head coach at the University of Colorado in 1996. In his first season, he led the Golden Buffaloes to win 22 games - their most wins ever - resulting in their first NCAA Tournament since 1969. The team has continued to play extremely well under his direction, and the recognition Patton earned gained him the title of head coach for the 2000 Big 12 All-Star Team during a tour of Austria. However, Patton prizes good character and determination above basketball skills. To encourage these qualities, he requires his team to take an etiquette class prior to each season.

Patton golfs avidly and holds a fifth-degree black belt in Tae Kwan Do. He is a member of the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Patton and wife Jennifer have two sons, Ricardo, Jr. and Michael.

Accession Number

A2002.118

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/18/2002

Last Name

Patton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Hume-Fogg Academic Magnet High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ricardo

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

PAT01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Golfing

Favorite Quote

We're All About The Same.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

10/23/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

College basketball coach Ricardo Patton (1958 - ) was the head coach of the University of Colorado basketball team.

Employment

Middle Tennessee State University

University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Tennessee State University

University of Colorado

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ricardo Patton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton describes his parents' backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton shares his Baptist church experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton talks about attending Glen Elementary School

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about his struggles during childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton describes his personality as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton describes growing up in poverty

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ricardo Patton describes his childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton recalls his first jobs in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton talks about playing basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton recalls his self-growth at Hume Fogg High School in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton describes his basketball career at Hume Fogg High School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton recalls changing his attitude while attending John C. Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton talks about attending Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about quitting the basketball team at Belmont College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton recalls his basketball career at Belmont College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton recounts meeting his wife and leaving Belmont College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton describes his jobs after graduating from Belmont College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton describes coaching at the collegiate level

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton describes his recruiting technique

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton shares his advice to basketball players

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton talks about his transition to head coach at the University of Colorado at Boulder

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon the community response to his coaching position

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton describes how his childhood affected his coaching style

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton describes his coaching strategy

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton talks about the challenges he has faced as a coach

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ricardo Patton describes his players' recent injuries

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ricardo Patton talks about factors that influence the strength of his team

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ricardo Patton talks about his future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon the joys and pressures of coaching basketball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ricardo Patton talks about what college basketball players need to know

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ricardo Patton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ricardo Patton talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ricardo Patton talks about his two sons

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ricardo Patton describes what being a HistoryMaker means to him

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ricardo Patton narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Ricardo Patton talks about practicing taekwando
Ricardo Patton talks about his coaching techniques
Transcript
Okay, now you also took up taekwondo too, right?$$I started practicing martial arts, Taekwondo, in the ninth grade. And I'd come home every afternoon and watch the "Green Hornet" and fell in love with Bruce Lee at that point and had to start practicing martial arts. And fortunately we had a Taekwondo school which was in walking distance, probably three or four miles, but that was, that was walking distance for me and was able to go to, to practice with Master Shin Young Kong.$$Now did--were you able to pay for this yourself or?$$You know, at the time, we had to sign a contract. I had to sign a contract and I'm sure as a young kid. I'm not familiar with all the legalities of contracts, and I just remember not paying and, and receiving a notice from a collection agency that I owed this money. And my instructor never said anything to me. I guess he had just kind of turned delinquent bills over to the collection agency, and they sent the letters. But I finally ended up paying him later on, and he's still a very dear friend to me now, and he's still my instructor.$$What's his name again?$$Shin Young Kong, S-H-I-N, Y-O-U-N-G, K-O-N-G.$$And he's, he's a Korean, right?$$He is from Korea. He is a ninth degree master, a grand master actually, and he's one of the few in the United States. And he has really helped shape my attitude about a lot of different things and, and, and certainly I think my players now see some martial arts background in, in just kind of the way I, I do things and some of the philosophies I have about how we work.$$What, what, what's the most important part of that philosophy that you use in your basketball coaching?$$Well, I think--you know, the thing I remember most that my instructor said to me when I received my black belt was, to become a black belt means you should become a better person. And that's one of the philosophies I've, I've tried to hold onto and pass along to, to my guys. A few years ago here--a couple of years ago, the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union] attacked me because we were having prayer on the court after practice, after games, and they thought that I was trying to force religion on the guys. And, and I explained to them that by no means am I trying to force religion on any of my guys. All I'm asking them to do is have a good heart and be a good person. And I think that, that goes hand in hand with what my instructor said to me years ago: To become a black belt means you should become a better person.$$Okay, that's--I like that, but do, do you think that there's a way that you could, you know, pass those values on outside of the context of prayer, you think or?$$I think certainly; I think just in the way that you conduct yourself. I think that my players have to see the, the type of values that I'm preaching, they have to see them in me first, because I think they can, they can quickly identify someone that's being not true to, to what he's, what he's talking about or what he's preaching. And so I think first they have to see those values being displayed by, by my actions, and if they do that, then, then I think they will believe that what I'm saying is something I truly believe in.$Now I know you're, you're--have a reputation as an intense coach. And when you--what, what are some of the techniques that you use to get your team ready for a game? I know I was reading about--I think the first time you all played the University of Kansas you kind of locked them in or something, right?$$Well, well, you know, one of the things we did was I was looking--I was tossing and turning. This was my first game as an interim coach and it's against Kansas, the number four team in the country. They're coming here, and it's gonna be a packed house. So I'm tossing and turning the night before, thinking of how can I motivate these guys to come out and lay it on the line, give all they have and because at that point they hadn't done that yet. And so I finally came up with, you know, I think we ought to just sleep in the gym. Until we learn to protect our home court, we ought to just sleep in it. So then I'm tossing a little bit longer, and I'm thinking, well, we can't do that. So I wake up the next morning and I still have this deal about, you know, we ought to just sleep in the gym until we learn to protect it. So I, I, I, I talk to the athletic director about it. And, and I said, you know, the one thing I don't want it to be--become is a gimmick. I don't want the media to get a hold of it, because I don't want it to appear like it's a gimmick. This is something I truly believe in, and a lot of that stems from a martial arts background, the discipline that it teaches. So he said, "Ricardo, if you wanna do it, you can do it." So I called the local hotel. It was--it's a Ramada now. It was a Holiday Inn. I called them and got some rollaway beds, and so we, we camped out. We came to, to, to the girls' game that night. We went to the girls' game, watched them play for a half. Then we went in our locker room and watched the movie "Glory," and, and then we camped out that night. And we lost by one or two points to the number four team in the country. And I think the fans realized that things were gonna change, and they did change.$$But did the players live up to your expectations?$$They did, and that was the same group--that year was a struggle. Again, we only had six games, and I think we won probably--probably went five hundred in those games. But that was better than they had, had been, 'cause we finished the year nine and eighteen. And again, I, I coached the last six games, and we won three of those. But the following year that same group took us to the NCAA tournament.$$And that's the year you, you had Chauncey Billups.$$Chauncey Billups; had another McDonald's All-American by the name of Martice Moore, who had transferred in from Georgia Tech, who had been a freshman a year in ACC [Atlantic Coast Conference] a few years before. And so, and then we had four other seniors that were quality reserve players for us. And so they did; they lived up to the expectations. We worked extremely hard. There was some discipline in the program, and it was a good group to coach.