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Argelia Rodriguez

Nonprofit executive Argelia Rodriguez was born on May 12, 1959 in Havana, Cuba to Argelia Velez-Rodriguez and Raul Rodriguez. In 1962, Rodriguez immigrated to the United States with her mother and brother, Raul Rodriguez, Jr. After graduating from the Ursuline Sisters Academy in Dallas, Texas in 1976, Rodriguez went on to receive her B.S. degree from Stanford University in 1980, and her M.B.A. degree from the Harvard Business School in 1984.

In 1980, Rodriguez worked for the International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) as an engineer and later for Texas Instruments, Inc. She then was hired by Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. in New York City, where she worked on strategic planning technology and mergers and acquisitions. After Rodriguez received her M.B.A. degree in 1984, she returned to Booz Allen Hamilton, before starting her own independent consulting firm in Washington, D.C. There, she worked for the District of Columbia Public Schools to increase STEM education among minority students. In 1997, Rodriguez served as the deputy director of product marketing and educational outreach for President Bill Clinton for the 1997 Presidential Inauguration. Then, in 1999, Rodriguez was appointed president of the D.C. College Access Program (DC-CAP), which partnered with D.C. schools to provide counseling and financial assistance to underserved students in the D.C. area. In 2007, Rodriguez launched the Alpha Leadership Program (ALP) for DC-CAP, an initiative that relies on community volunteers who serve as mentors to young men in five D.C. public and charter high schools. The following year, DC-CAP held their first annual DC-Capital Stars Gala Competition which showcased the artistic abilities of college-bound students from the D.C. area.

Rodriguez served on the board of trustees at Trinity Washington University and was elected to the Harvard University Board of Overseers in 2013. In 2010, she delivered the commencement address at Trinity Washington University and received an honorary degree. That same year, she received the Bert King Award for Service from Harvard Business School and was named a Murdoch Community Hero by News Corp in 2014.

Rodriguez resides in Bethesda, Maryland.

Argelia Rodriguez was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.002

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/21/2019

Last Name

Rodriguez

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Ursuline Sisters Academy

Stanford University

Harvard Business School

First Name

Argelia

Birth City, State, Country

Havana

HM ID

ROD07

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Cuba

Favorite Vacation Destination

London, England

Favorite Quote

Results Without The Drama

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/12/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Roasted Pork

Short Description

Nonprofit executive Argelia Rodriguez (1959 - ) served as president of the D.C. College Access Program (DC-CAP).

Employment

International Business Machines (IBM)

Texas Instruments, Inc.

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc

D.C. College Access Program

Favorite Color

Red

Carlos Handy

Physicists Carlos Handy was born on October 18, 1950, in Havana, Cuba, to a Cuban mother and an American father. His father, W.C. Handy, is known as “Father of the Blues.” Growing up in New York City, Handy attended George Washington High School where he was a top math student. In 1972, Handy earned his B.A. degree in physics from Columbia College in New York. He then continued his studies at Columbia university, earning is M.A. degree in physics in 1975 and his PhD degree in theoretical physics in 1978.

From 1878 to 1981, Handy worked as a postdoctoral research associate as Los Alamos national Laboratory focusing on the use of moment representations to relate large scale to local scale features of strong coupling problems. A related approach to this led to Wavelet analysis, as developed by others (i.e. Grossman, Morlet, and Daubechies). In 1983, Handy was hired by Clark Atlanta University as an associate professor of physics. During his time there, he received grant money from the National Science Foundation (NSF), which led to his discovery of the Eigenvalue Method (EMM) technique.

With a second grant from the NSF, Handy established the Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems at Clark Atlanta University, a research and student mentoring center. In 2005, Handy left Clark-Atlanta University and became the head of the physics department at Texas Southern University where assumed full responsibility for the development of the physics program.

Throughout his career, Handy published numerous research articles. The most recent of these was an extension of EMM to determining the symmetry breaking regime of an important pseudo-hermitian system, and application to Regge pole scattering analysis in atomic and molecular physics. His professional concerns include the need for modern facilities in physics education as well as student’s early mastery of calculus. Carlos Handy works in Houston, Texas.

Carlos Handy was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on [mm, dd, yyyy]

Accession Number

A2012.194

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/17/2012

Last Name

Handy

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

R

Schools

Columbia University

George Washington High School

Los Alamos National Laboratory

First Name

Carlos

Birth City, State, Country

Havana

HM ID

HAN04

Favorite Season

May

Favorite Vacation Destination

Costa Rica

Favorite Quote

Greatness comes from within.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

10/18/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

Cuba

Favorite Food

Condensed Milk, Rice

Short Description

Research physicist and physics professor Carlos Handy (1950 - ) is the founder of the Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems at Clark Atlanta University, and the first Physics Department Chair at Texas Southern University.

Employment

Texas Southern University

Clark Atlanta University

AMAF Industries

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:740,33:1845,45:3715,79:6952,122:18406,364:19236,376:24465,482:25876,510:26291,516:32939,528:35144,572:35396,601:35963,613:37916,646:38231,652:39239,664:39554,670:39995,679:41570,710:42263,723:42830,734:48124,771:50100,813:50708,825:52456,876:60121,978:60590,987:60858,992:65883,1113:66352,1122:66821,1131:73789,1266:79364,1296:79692,1301:85924,1421:86498,1429:87072,1437:87400,1442:91008,1528:101247,1651:107058,1730:114196,1921:124550,2007:132458,2158:137148,2258:138287,2284:146126,2474:152324,2514:164360,2652:164612,2666:165053,2713:165431,2742:168896,2807:169337,2817:170030,2831:174231,2858:177542,2925:182162,3016:182547,3022:191038,3105:193978,3184:197674,3269:198850,3281:201580,3405$0,0:5950,117:10213,180:34409,451:34967,459:37292,491:37850,498:41058,545:41488,551:52584,694:53010,701:53862,715:54359,724:57057,801:59684,856:61885,902:62382,915:62879,924:73996,1043:75772,1076:76068,1081:76512,1088:78510,1146:78954,1154:83394,1278:84356,1299:85244,1313:94882,1384:96194,1406:98654,1460:100048,1481:100458,1486:103000,1543:103574,1552:111085,1639:112789,1669:114706,1713:115274,1719:121384,1780:129640,1906
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carlos Handy's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy talks about Cuban patriotism

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy talks about his mother's early life in the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes his childhood experiences of going back and forth between the United States and Cuba

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy talks about his mother's growing up in Cuba

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carlos Handy describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carlos Handy talks about his grandfather, W.C. Handy, a famous blues musician

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy describes his memories of his grandfather, W.C. Handy

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy talks about his paternal family's musical talents

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy talks about his father's growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy talks about his father's career as a businessman

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy describes how his parents met and got married

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy talks about his siblings and his childhood household

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carlos Handy describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carlos Handy describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in New York City and Cuba

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy talks about being brought up by a Cuban mother

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy describes his childhood neighborhood in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy describes his experience in elementary school and junior high school in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy describes his experience at George Washington High School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy talks about representing his high school on the NBC program 'It's Academic'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes his freshman year at Columbia University and his work with Martin Gutzwiller at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy describes the challenges that he faced during his freshman year at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy describes his experience as a physics major at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy talks about physicist Martin Gutzwiller

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy talks about his parents' separation and his decision to pursue graduate studies at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy describes his experience as a first-year Ph.D. student at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes the challenges that he faced during his doctoral studies at Columbia University - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy describes the challenges that he faced during his doctoral studies at Columbia University - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy describes his doctoral dissertation research in the field of gauge theories, at Columbia University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy describes his disappointing experience in the physics department at Columbia University and the lack of mentoring

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy talks about the broad applicability of a doctoral degree, and the problem with stringent expectations in academia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy describes the way he was treated in the physics department at Columbia University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy describes his work on the moment problem at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes race relations in New Mexico

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy talks about getting married, and moving to AMAF in Baltimore, Maryland, and to Clark-Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy describes his research on the moment problem at Clark Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy describes his research collaboration with physicist Daniel Bessis - part one

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy describes his research collaboration with physicist Daniel Bessis - part two

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy describes his research with Daniel Bessie, on the neutron star problem

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy describes his work with Hermitian operators at Clark Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy describes his research at the Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems at Clark Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy describes his decision to accept a position at Texas Southern University

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carlos Handy describes his experience as chair of the physics department at Texas Southern University, and the status of HBCUs in the state of Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carlos Handy describes the demographics of Texas Southern University

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carlos Handy describes his involvement as chair of the physics department at Texas Southern University

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carlos Handy describes the challenges faced by the physics department at Texas Southern University

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carlos Handy discusses the graduation rate of African American students in the STEM fields in the Texas university systems

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carlos Handy reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carlos Handy reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carlos Handy describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carlos Handy talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Carlos Handy talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$1

DAStory

3$5

DATitle
Carlos Handy describes his research collaboration with physicist Daniel Bessis - part two
Carlos Handy talks about his mother's early life in the United States
Transcript
So, [Daniel] Bessis [physicist], this is now January of '85 [1985], comes back from his Christmas break. And he says, he says, you know, I tried to, I tried to solve this problem, but I, I couldn't come up with a solution. I said, well, I solved it. He says, what do you mean you solved it? Yeah, I solved it. So I showed him what I did. And his jaw dropped because not only had I solved the problem, I did something else. It turns out--and this is the other irony, it turns that he and Barnsley, a few years before, had tried it--because the method I came up, not just gave you an answer. It gave you an answer in a very special way. I could tell you, I could tell you that the true answer had to be between this number and that number. And depending upon how much I wanted to go, I can make those two shrink, and those are called lower and upper bounds. So I can tell you that the true answer must be between this and this, and I can make this arbitrary type. And they had been looking for a method like that. And, in fact, Barnsley came up with something called the "bathtub," "Barnsley's bathtub theorem" which is really a variation of something called the Barta's Bounds for ener--, for, you know, for eigenvalues, well, it's really for the ground state, the Barta Bounds. But that method can give you estimates, but there's no way to shrink 'em down. I could shrink 'em down, and so Bessis gets very excited because even though that's not what I was looking for, that's what I discovered. And then he says that there's a very famous problem, called the Quadratic Zeeman Effect for super strong magnetic fields. What is means is basically, you know, the earth's, the magnetic field of the earth is like, you know, one gauss or .4 gauss [unit of measurement of a magnetic field]. It's very, very small. But if you go on the neutron star, the magnetic field can be a billion, I mean huge, (unclear) billion gauss, very strong. And so what astronomers wanna do is, they'll measure the energy emitted by these hydrogen-looking atoms, and by doing the spectro-analysis, they can actually measure in magnetic fields. So it's a, you know, it's an involved, it's an inverse process. So if you have, if you have good--if you can accurately measure the energy levels from a hydrogen atom, you can then determine what the strength and magnetic field (unclear) neutron star. So it's an important pract--theoretical and practical problem. But the problem is that, this quadratic Zeeman effect is a strong coupling problem, all right. The boundary layer I think I told you, it's a strong coupling problem. And when people try to solve that problem, they, because the methods are not, they're not robust, they're not accurate enough, they can give answers that vary all over the place. But here I am coming with a solution that can tell you that the, what the true (unclear). There's no uncertainty. So, I remember in '85 [1985] Bessis looking at me, and, and you have to understand Bessis is the first collaboration I ever had in my life, okay, not at Columbia, not at Los Alamos, the first collaboration I ever had in my life. So I remember in '85 [1985] Bessis saying, we wrote a paper, a 'Physics Review Letters'[journal] paper which is the top publication still [C. R. Handy and D. Bessis, `Rapidly Convergent Lower Bounds for the Schrodinger Equation Ground State Energy', 1985].$Okay. Now, when she [Handy's mother, Leonor Maria Cartaya] was raised up, did she have a chance to go to, to finish school?$$Well, she, at the time, she, she--in fact, she met my father, she was, I think, in a doctoral program in pedagogy, but never finished, but she was close to getting a doctorate in education.$$Okay, was she in the United States or in Cuba?$$Well, she, she came on an academic, she came on an excursion in 1947. I guess it was like an academic excursion. She toured Howard University [Washington, District of Columbia], other places like that. And then she fell in love with the United States and stayed behind, rented an apartment and in that building, my father was living with his kids from his first wife. He was a widower.$$Is this in New York?$$In New York City.$$New York City.$$Okay, and little by little, they started a relationship, and, you know, one thing led to another, and they got married in 1950. So or 1949, 'cause I (laughter), heck, so I don't know. They married in 1949 or 1950, but I do know that, that we were, we popped up nine months after (laughter). So--.$$So, they, your mother had moved back to Cuba for a minute, I guess when you were born?$$Yeah, 'cause she taught. She was a school teacher.$$Okay.$$So she would go back and forth. She would fly--my mother hated to fly, and my father never flew. So my mother would fly from Havana [Cuba] to Miami [Florida] and then take either the train or the Greyhound Bus up the East Coast. And I do remember, she would, she, you know, she tells me that the bus driver would tell her, well, you know, you folks in the back. And so she says that on one occasion she said, or the only occasion she said, "Me no speak English," okay, so she stayed put. And my mother was of the character that she would not bow down. You know, she would find a way to (laughter) stay where she wanted to be, so--.$$Okay.

Minnie Minoso

Baseball legend Minnie Minoso was born Saturnino Orestes Arrieta Armas Minoso in Havana, Cuba on November 29, 1925. The outfielder and third baseman played for 17 seasons on four different teams and ended his Major League playing career in 1980.

Known as the "Cuban Comet," Minoso was the first Chicago White Sox player to break the color barrier in 1951. In his first time at bat in his White Sox debut May 1, 1951, Minoso hit a home run in a game against the New York Yankees. He finished his rookie year as the American League leader in stolen bases and triples, and led the American League in stolen bases each year from 1951 to 1953.

While with the Chicago club, Minoso ushered in the era of the "Go-Go Sox." Although he was not present for the Sox' 1959 pennant win, they gave him an honorary championship ring.

Following stints with the Indians and Senators, Minoso batted .302 in 1958 and 1959 before the Sox reacquired him in 1960, when he led the American League in hits. While he retired from baseball in 1964, the Sox brought him out of retirement in 1976. He coached for the Sox in 1976-78 and retired in 1980. The club's president named him "Mr. White Sox" before his number "9" was retired in 1983.

Minoso was a seven-time American League All Star and a three-time Gold Glove outfielder. He was elected to the Chicago Sports Hall of Fame in 1984 and the World Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. Since his retirement from the game, he served as an ambassador for baseball and a Sox community relations representative. In 2002, he was inducted into the Shrine of the Eternals.

Minnie Minoso passed away on March 1, 2015 at the age of 89.

Accession Number

A2002.084

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/7/2002

Last Name

Minoso

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Search Occupation Category
First Name

Minnie

Birth City, State, Country

Havana

HM ID

MIN01

Favorite Season

All Seasons

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/29/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

Cuba

Favorite Food

Steak, Fish, Spanish Food

Death Date

3/1/2015

Short Description

Baseball player Minnie Minoso (1925 - 2015 ) was an all-star player with the Chicago White Sox known as "Mr. White Sox."

Employment

Chicago White Sox

Favorite Color

Brown, Green, White

Timing Pairs
0,0:5214,76:8840,409:57325,1062:84540,1339:113181,1664:150919,2075:191590,2455$0,0:976,44:4092,120:32120,483:80940,1047:98888,1314:108538,1429:137326,1745:137758,1786:138046,1791:154110,1924
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Minnie Minoso's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso talks about his birthdate and how he deals with critics

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso talks about his father and his birthplace, Perico, Cuba

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Minnie Minoso talks about playing baseball as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Minnie Minoso talks about his grade school years

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Minnie Minoso describes his mother and his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Minnie Minoso talks about racial discrimination in Cuba and in the United States

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso talks about Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso talks about Cuba's baseball teams

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso talks about realizing his dream of playing professional baseball

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Minnie Minoso describes how he was signed by the Cleveland Indians

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Minnie Minoso remembers batting a .525 at Hudson Field with the Dayton Indians

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Minnie Minoso describes a misunderstanding at bat

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Minnie Minoso shares stories of racial discrimination on the road

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Minnie Minoso talks about mentoring youth

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Minnie Minoso talks about joining the Cleveland Indians after they won the World Series in 1949

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Minnie Minoso describes joining the Chicago White Sox and becoming Chicago's first black player

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Minnie Minoso talks about his first time at bat with the Chicago White Sox in 1951

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso talks about his friendship with Chico Carrasquel

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso describes his first season with the Chicago White Sox

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso talks about the role of baseball players as entertainers

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Minnie Minoso talks about how he dealt with beanballs at the bat

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Minnie Minoso describes defending himself against brushback pitches and beanballs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Minnie Minoso talks about the increase of home runs in baseballs

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Minnie Minoso talks about his baseball injuries

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso talks about his all-star years and ongoing rapport with fans

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso names Ted Williams and Willie Mays as the best baseball players in history

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso talks about the openness of baseball today

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Minnie Minoso explains why he was with the Cleveland Indians when the White Sox won the pennant in 1959

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Minnie Minoso talks about his return to the Chicago White Sox in 1960

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Minnie Minoso talks about his coma

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Minnie Minoso reflects on his six decades long career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Minnie Minoso talks about his career in Mexico and his induction to the Mexican Professional Baseball Hall of Fame

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Minnie Minoso talks about his return to the Chicago White Sox in 1976

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Minnie Minoso talks about his reception in his homeland Cuba and his American citizenship

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso talks about his relationship with Cuban ballplayers and his friendship with Joe DiMaggio

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso talks about his relationship his father

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Minnie Minoso talks about his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Minnie Minoso shares his advices for today's youth, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Minnie Minoso shares his advices for today's youth, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Minnie Minoso narrates his photographs, pt.1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Minnie Minoso narrates his photographs, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Minnie Minoso narrates his photographs, pt.3

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Minnie Minoso narrates his photographs, pt.4

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Minnie Minoso narrates his photographs, pt.5

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
Minnie Minoso talks about playing baseball as a youth
Minnie Minoso describes his first season with the Chicago White Sox
Transcript
And, yeah, you were talking about helping out on the ranch.$$Right, so, and after that I used to help a few guy to have a obligation with (unclear) a father and to working. So I used to go over there and help to anyone, to needed to be free, like a Saturday and Sunday that we play. So if he--they do the duty, they'd be able to go over there and play. And I was the manager of the team, and I was the guy that built the team. And I used to be the pitching manager and they all listened to me. We was young, maybe about twelve, thirteen years old. And this is what, thirteen to fourteen. So I used to be the leader. And so then I would say, wait a minute, everything that you try and for your interests, you make it. You never listen to make it to the time you find it out your own self. And those guys used to follow me. They said, we have started to play the game, to the time, I remembered the one guy told me, look, Minnie, (unclear), I think if I was you, you giving up being, pitching. I said, why? Said, because you see you have a good arm. You're a good hitter, you're a good runner, you're a good fielder, and you intelligent. You're the best young kid playing the whole country here. And I said, gee, what is--you know why? I said, no, because, you know, you can go high. But if you stay pitching, and you hurt your arm, and if--to come back, it's gonna be tough. In [on] the other hand, if you play a different position, you can be a (unclear) (loaner?), and you can be, play as long as you want to. And you strong, and you're a good hitter. That's okay, I'm gonna pitch those two games. Then I have to face those guys. And after that, I give it up. So those teams, they used to beat my team when I went to Havana because my mother would pass, and I went to Havana, and I stayed there one month or two. And my team play against those two teams, and they beat (unclear) ('em?). And they started making fun out of it, they say, oh, we (unclear) come back. So when I come back, I say what happened. They said, they beat us. I said, well, great, we (unclear). So I went over there the first thing, I beat it, thirteen to one. And the second team we beat it, five to three. And I said, that's it. I retire like a pitcher, and I used to come out and play third base. And that's what I used to come out later on, third base to the time I come to the big leagues. And they changed me to play, Cleveland to left field.$So, your first season, you're rookie of the year. Now, what did--how did--was it a hard season? Was it a tough, tough that first season for you?$$No, the toughest season was for the second one. The first one, seemed like everything I do, everything I do. If I want to hit it behind the runner, (unclear), Paul Ritchie (ph.) used to look at me, point with his finger, hit behind the runner, he (unclear) first base (unclear). Man at third, and me to go for double and the man is scored. They give me a bunt, with two men on base, and I want, going to third because most of the time with two men on base, you're going to third because the first base can't judge too close. Foul, two strikes, run the play back. So I just keep the bunt, you know, but I used (unclear) now, like run past the ball, the pitcher. If you past the pitcher, you safe. Both the bases loaded, a ball with two strikes. Oh, those pitchers used to cuss me. Oh, they say so many thing to me, but I always laugh. I no say anything. So really, everything I would do, come like it's God protect me, everything I do. So I had a good year. I'm helping the ball club a lot. Sometime I make a mistake. I was a green light to steal and seemed like I get in everybody heart. The people fall in love with me, and I fall in love with the people till now. And I still in love with the people. They seem like they love me. So where else can I go? And what else can I do? If (unclear) said, God bless, God bless America like everybody said, and we were here. And God bless the people here, and God bless the baseball game. I enjoy very much to be the first guy who would play black, who played for the city [Chicago], and I love it very much to be dealing with the people for so many years and seem like I have some more years, seem like I'm gonna be--where God take me, so they gonna be taking me, talking to the people and be with the people.