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The Honorable Doris Bunte

State representative and city official Doris Bunte was born on July 2, 1933 in New York City to Evelyn Johnson Brown and Herbert Brown. She attended Food Trades Vocational High School, but left before receiving her diploma. In 1953, she moved to Boston, Massachusetts with her three children, and earned her G.E.D. in 1968. Bunte enrolled in Harvard University in 1978, where she earned a certificate in environmental studies from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and her M.A. degree in education in 1982.

Upon her arrival in Boston, Bunte joined the Barcolene Company. She moved to the Orchard Park Housing Projects, where she joined the maintenance management council and co-founded the Boston Public Housing Tenants Policy Council. In 1969, Bunte was nominated to the Boston Housing Authority board, making her the first public housing tenant to serve. She was dismissed from the Boston Housing Authority board in 1971 by Mayor Kevin H. White, but was reinstated by the Massachusetts Supreme Court. In 1973, she was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives, becoming the first African American woman to serve in the Massachusetts legislature. There, Bunte helped found the Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus and the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators. After twelve years as a representative, she left the Massachusetts legislature to become the director of the Boston Housing Authority, where she headed public housing integration efforts. Bunte left the Boston Housing Authority in 1992, and began working for the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and the Boston University School of Public Health, where she continued tenant-focused activist work. Bunte retired in 2010.

She held positions on the National Rent Board and in the National Tenants Organization. She also served on the Critical Minority Affairs Committee and the National Association of Housing and Development, as well as the Citizens Housing and Planning Association. Bunte received recognition for her contributions, including being featured in a mural at the historic Alvah Kittredge House and in an exhibit called “Portraits in Black: Gaining Ground, Holding Office” in the Museum of African American History, Boston and Nantucket in 2004.

Doris Bunte was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 19, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.105

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/19/2016

Last Name

Bunte

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Food Trades Vocational High School

Harvard Graduate School of Design

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Boston University Metropolitan College

University of Massachusetts Boston

First Name

Doris

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

BUN05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Being Poor Is Not The Result Of A Flaw In Character.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/2/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

State representative and city official Doris Bunte (1933 - ) was the first African American elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives, where she served for twelve years. She was also the director of the Boston Housing Authority for seven years.

Employment

Massachusetts State Government

Boston Housing Authority

Northeastern University

Knowledge is Power Training Program

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
0,0:948,17:1501,27:2291,38:3476,52:4898,80:10406,194:10774,199:14738,244:15794,278:18434,314:19138,324:20370,342:21074,352:22394,371:23714,394:25034,417:30148,429:31028,440:31908,456:41726,564:49764,605:50244,611:51108,621:53628,635:58204,670:58552,675:66814,764:75295,846:83992,926:84510,934:85028,943:88404,988:94274,1052:104980,1141:108070,1173:108482,1178:109306,1189:109718,1194:110748,1210:117170,1267:119900,1287:127460,1344:127780,1349:128500,1359:128820,1364:129220,1370:130420,1401:151992,1627:157780,1676:163467,1736:164606,1758:165477,1775:166080,1785:173078,1818:192050,1961:197382,2037:206620,2093:207050,2099:207480,2105:208168,2116:210490,2154:211006,2161:213500,2207:224725,2338:237273,2418:238164,2443:239379,2465:247448,2566:250304,2606:250640,2611:251060,2617:251984,2630:262550,2680:263340,2691$0,0:5162,85:15590,362:21276,423:22204,433:35723,622:54037,739:56578,790:57271,802:60351,858:61891,883:82504,1085:83777,1107:84045,1112:86517,1124:86922,1130:87489,1141:88866,1226:102843,1426:107246,1449:112044,1511:124680,1625:125080,1631:125400,1636:135080,1758:135360,1763:142310,1848:150890,1929:153830,1961:154460,1968:157740,1998
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Doris Bunte's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about her mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her community on the East Side of New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about the increase of crime in East Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her experiences at Food Trades Vocational High School in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers the music and entertainment of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls her mother's connection to Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers leaving high school to care for her children

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls how she came to work at the Barcolene Company

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers reuniting with her children

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls moving to the Orchard Park Housing Projects in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls volunteering at the Hattie B. Cooper Community Center in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls her start as a tenant organizer in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers earning her GED

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers joining the board of the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls firing the executive director of the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers her legal battle with Mayor Kevin White

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls her later interactions with Mayor Kevin White

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers her first campaign for the Massachusetts Legislature

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers the founding of the Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls the struggle to elect an African American to the Massachusetts Senate

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about the white politicians in Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte reflects upon her success as a politician

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers the busing crisis in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers the busing crisis in Boston, Massachusetts, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls cofounding the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers studying at the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about her life partner

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about her focus on housing issues

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers her admission to the Harvard Graduate School of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte talks about her doctoral thesis

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls her appointment as director of the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls her challenges as director of the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers prioritizing maintenance of public housing facilities

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her encounters with the media as director of the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Doris Bunte remembers the desegregation lawsuit against the Boston Housing Authority

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her experiences at the Center for the Study of Sport in Society

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls founding the Community Committee for Health Promotion at Boston University

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her concerns for public housing, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Doris Bunte describes her concerns for public housing, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Doris Bunte reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Doris Bunte reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Doris Bunte narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls firing the executive director of the Boston Housing Authority
The Honorable Doris Bunte recalls cofounding the Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators
Transcript
So here you are, this is a tremendous opportunity. What did you start to do in that position (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Okay. So, so, so this is an important part of my life. So this is what happened. I was put on the board. So Julie Bernstein [Julius Bernstein], who already availed himself of tenants' needs and desires is on the board and John Connolly, the first tenant is on the board and, so I make a majority of interested parties who are interested in the needs and desires of the residents. So finally our dream has come true, we have a tenant oriented majority. And, so we churn out these different policies, and nothing changes. And we churn out more policies, and nothing changes. And, so (laughter) I'm dealing with the tenants at night when I go home who are saying, "What the heck are you guys doing? We thought now that we had you--," and of course, don't let me understate the fact that we are dealing with six unions as board members, but we're still the majority of the board. So we finally--when I, when I was elec- when I was appointed to the board, the mayor [Kevin White] said--well, he didn't say but what he told the group was that he'd like us to hire this man as our executive director. His name was Dan Finn. And, so our first action when I went on the board was the hiring of Dan Finn, so when we kept coming up with these policies and we didn't see any changes, we call in Dan Finn and we say, "Dan, what the heck is going on? We don't see any wonderful changes in things at the public housing level." And this goes back and forth. We fight off and on with Dan for close to a year. And then we called the mayor and tell the mayor we're going to fire Dan Finn. Well, we didn't say it that way. We said we needed him to do something about Dan Finn. He called Julie Bernstein into his office and he said to Julie, I recognize this is hearsay today, "If it's too hot, get out the kitchen." But he didn't call John Connolly in because John is a gubernatorial appointee, not a mayoralty appointee, so he calls me in, and this is what he said, among other things, he said, "People think I'm not political enough because I don't take twelve blacks out on the corner and flog them each day."$$That's his actual--$$No, those were his words, honest to God. Those were his words. And then he said, "Look kid, do me a favor. Help me out on this, fight me or resign." And that meant keep Dan Finn even though he wasn't changing the policies. Well, that wasn't going to happen. And, so the next day, we had a scheduled board meeting with the media present to talk about spending the money. And instead I fired Dan Finn forthwith on television.$So all this has been, this drama that's going on--in '75 [1975], you were one of the founders of the Caucus of Women Legislators [Massachusetts Caucus of Women Legislators], right?$$Yeah, it took a little longer to have the women's caucus than it did the black caucus [Massachusetts Legislative Black Caucus; Massachusetts Black and Latino Legislative Caucus]. People of co- of color--I mean, the ties that bind people of color are different than the ties that bind women. And, so it was not a question for the black caucus to become the black caucus. But with the women--and we tried to do it the same year we did the black caucus or our first year there. But with the women, there's this business about class and (laughter)--I don't know, all kinds of things. I mean, people have to look at one another and then they have to decide, you know, is this person of a class that I would want to be--I mean, women find such crazy ways to look at one another, far less now than they used to. Back then, it was a very big deal and, so we've--and then there were some issues where even people of color can't come together or black people. I mean, there may be some issue. I don't know what it would be, but there may be some issue where we don't agree. I don't, I don't--can't tell you one, but with women, there are definitely issues where you just can't agree and, so you'll use that as a reason not to come together as a group. One such issue could be, for example, the death penalty. Another such issue might be abortions. So I mean, there are things that divide women, and I can't think to tell you the truth of an issue that might divide the bl- members of the black caucus. There may be an issue we don't agree on, but I can't think of an issue that might divide us. But with women, it's different and, so it took a while. We had to find enough issues we could work together on so that, you know, we would have an opportunity to work together on things that were positive and we did.

John W. Mack

Civic leader John Wesley Mack was born on January 6, 1937, in Kingstree, South Carolina, to Abram Mack, a Methodist minister, and Ruth Wynita, a school teacher. Shortly after he was born, Mack’s family moved to Darlington, South Carolina. Mack attended North Carolina A&T State University, where he earned his B.S. degree in applied sociology in 1958. As a student, Mack was the head of the college’s NAACP student chapter. The following year, Mack was married to Harriett Johnson, an elementary school teacher he met through his college roommate; the couple went on to have three children together.

In 1960, Mack co-founded and became vice-chairman of the Commission on Appeal for Human Rights, an organization that incorporated members of Atlanta University, Morehouse, and Spelman Colleges, including such noted figures as Marion Wright Edelman, Julian Bond, and Reverend Otis Marsh. That same year, the students held sit-ins at Rich’s Department Store. During this time, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested. 1960 was also the year that Mack obtained his M.A. degree in social work from Clark Atlanta University.

Shortly afterward, Mack and his family moved to Oxnard, California, as part of a social work fellowship established for him at Camarillo Hospital by his mentor Whitney Young. In 1964, upon completing his work at the Camarillo Hospital, Mack moved to Flint, Michigan, where a year later he became Executive Director of the Flint Urban League. It was in Flint that Mack focused on fair housing and voter registration issues.

In 1969, Mack became President of the Los Angeles Urban League, where he would serve until his retirement in 2005; the longest tenure of anyone in this position. With Mack as president, the Los Angeles Urban League became one of the country’s most successful non-profit organizations, generating an annual budget of $25 million while promoting issues of employment, education and economic development.

In 1977, Mack became co-founder and co-chair of the Los Angeles Black Leadership Coalition on Education, and in the early 1980s, he was appointed vice president of the United Way Corporation of Council Executives. In the late 1990s, Mack served as a Fellow in Residence at Harvard University, where he led a study group entitled “The Future of Urban America: Finding Solutions Through Strategic Partnership and Policy Advocacy.” In 2005, Mack was appointed President of the Board of Police Commissioners of the Los Angeles Police Department by Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa; he held this position for two consecutive years before being elected to the office of Vice President in 2007. Over the years Mack has been awarded by numerous different institutions, including Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund Black Women of Achievement, Operation Hope, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the California Afro American Museum.

Mack passed away on June 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2007.139

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/15/2007 |and| 11/18/2013

Last Name

Mack

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Schools

Mayo High School for Math, Science, and Technology

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

Whitney M. Young, Jr. School of Social Work

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Kingstree

HM ID

MAC02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Palm Desert, California, Maui, Hawaii, Aruba

Favorite Quote

Marathon Runner For Justice And Equality.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

1/6/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soul Food

Death Date

6/21/2018

Short Description

Civic leader, nonprofit chief executive, and city government appointee John W. Mack (1937 - 2018 ) was a former president of the Los Angeles Urban League; co-founder of the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights; co-founder of the Los Angeles Black Leadership Coalition on Education; and an executive member of the Board of Police Commissioners of the Los Angeles Police Department.

Employment

Camarillo State Mental Hospital

Urban League of Flint

Los Angeles Urban League

Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
0,0:1959,29:14848,106:16384,125:16864,131:18770,138:19500,144:26880,187:28635,240:60830,638:67172,765:68030,787:74577,826:78894,855:82614,919:83265,928:96025,1066:112722,1276:113640,1286:121185,1347:133868,1629:137744,1704:153997,1945:154508,1953:157866,2018:159399,2039:159764,2045:162757,2100:164801,2137:165166,2143:178089,2370:178623,2377:179157,2384:187830,2496:188730,2513:201630,2800:201970,2805:202990,2829:208576,2873:214838,2957:221940,3034:229770,3219$0,0:13590,142:14050,148:15246,171:15890,176:16534,184:18098,208:18834,218:19662,228:29596,342:30208,349:31534,364:39960,432:40264,437:40720,445:41176,453:41632,460:52038,570:54252,607:56794,647:73650,807:77860,816:89730,978:90420,990:100840,1099:111810,1252:117830,1367:118776,1389:119120,1394:119808,1404:120238,1410:124320,1419:124688,1424:125700,1437:126344,1445:127540,1461:136175,1584:146636,1728:148044,1749:150684,1793:154692,1830:155412,1843:157670,1867:158055,1873:158440,1879:163780,1927:167672,1952:169581,1983:175142,2098:176802,2122:177632,2133:179292,2165:182630,2186:192589,2312:193156,2320:193804,2344:208703,2615:212350,2624:221502,2753:234700,2874:235060,2879:237130,2898:240280,3023:244150,3073:245860,3103:250444,3125:251888,3145:255080,3184
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John W. Mack's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John W. Mack lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John W. Mack describes his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John W. Mack remembers his mother's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John W. Mack describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John W. Mack talks about his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John W. Mack lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John W. Mack describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John W. Mack talks about his early years in Darlington, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John W. Mack remembers his teachers in Darlington, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John W. Mack describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John W. Mack recalls racism in Darlington, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John W. Mack describes the Buddy Johnson concerts in Darlington, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John W. Mack recalls his decision to pursue a college education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John W. Mack remembers dentist and social activist William Gibson

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John W. Mack recalls attending the Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John W. Mack describes his civil rights work at the Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John W. Mack recalls the alumni of the Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John W. Mack remembers meeting Whitney Young

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John W. Mack remembers his father's death

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John W. Mack remembers his first exposure to Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John W. Mack talks about his mentor, Whitney Young

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John W. Mack describes civil rights leaders in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John W. Mack talks about the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John W. Mack remembers Atlanta newspapers' coverage of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John W. Mack describes protests organized by the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John W. Mack remembers the importance of nonviolent resistance

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John W. Mack remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John W. Mack recalls marrying his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John W. Mack remembers protesting Rich's Department Store in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John W. Mack describes reactions to the protest at Rich's Department Store

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John W. Mack remembers a three-pronged protest, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John W. Mack remembers a three-pronged protest, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John W. Mack recalls a white student's involvement in the Atlanta Student Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John W. Mack recalls a trip to Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John W. Mack recalls a meeting at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John W. Mack remembers the national media coverage of the Atlanta Student Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John W. Mack describes the role of the NAACP in the Atlanta Student Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John W. Mack recalls the role of Atlanta churches in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John W. Mack talks about CORE's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John W. Mack recalls moving to California

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John W. Mack remembers addressing the 1960 Democratic National Convention platform committee, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - John W. Mack remembers addressing the Democratic Convention platform committee, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - John W. Mack reflects upon leaving Atlanta, Georgia in the 1960s

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of John W. Mack's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - John W. Mack describes his experiences in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - John W. Mack talks about the mission of the National Urban League

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - John W. Mack talks about the role of the Big Six in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - John W. Mack remembers joining the Urban League of Flint in Flint, Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - John W. Mack recalls attending the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - John W. Mack remembers the reaction of Flint, Michigan to Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - John W. Mack talks about his Los Angeles Urban League predecessors

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - John W. Mack recalls his efforts to desegregate schools in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - John W. Mack describes his conflicts with the Los Angeles Police Department in California

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - John W. Mack remembers the Los Angeles civic organizations' response to the Rodney King incident

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - John W. Mack describes protocol changes for the appointment of the Los Angeles police chief

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - John W. Mack talks about community policing in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - John W. Mack describes issues within the Los Angeles Police Department

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - John W. Mack remembers leading the Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - John W. Mack reflects upon institutional change at the LAPD

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - John W. Mack remembers Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard Parks, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - John W. Mack remembers Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard Parks, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - John W. Mack reflects upon the Rampart scandal in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - John W. Mack describes his philosophy of activism

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - John W. Mack remembers his work with the Los Angeles Urban League

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - John W. Mack recalls the first Whitney M. Young, Jr. Awards Dinner in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - John W. Mack remembers Whitney Young

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - John W. Mack talks about the legacy of Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - John W. Mack remembers his conflicts with Daryl Gates, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - John W. Mack remembers his conflicts with Daryl Gates, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - John W. Mack recalls an assassination threat from skinheads

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - John W. Mack reflects upon his tenure as police commissioner in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - John W. Mack remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - John W. Mack remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - John W. Mack describes Johnnie Cochran

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - John W. Mack recalls advice about William Bratton

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - John W. Mack describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - John W. Mack reflects upon his life

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - John W. Mack reflects upon his career

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - John W. Mack talks about his mentorship in the National Urban League

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - John W. Mack describes his family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - John W. Mack describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

4$7

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
John W. Mack remembers a three-pronged protest, pt. 1
John W. Mack describes his conflicts with the Los Angeles Police Department in California
Transcript
But the demonstration of all demonstrations, we had--this was in the spring of 1960. We wanted to attack segregation at the local level, state level, and federal level. And three of us headed, Lonnie King [Lonnie C. King, Jr.] headed one group, I headed another group, and I'm trying to recall who had--I think it was Johnny Parham [Johnny E. Parham, Jr.] maybe who headed a third group. One was on the Fulton County Courthouse [Atlanta, Georgia] that was to attack at the state, the, the, I mean, at the county, local level. Another group went to the state capitol [Georgia State Capitol, Atlanta, Georgia]. So then I led the group that demonstrated at the Peachtree cafeteria [ph.]. Peachtree cafeteria was a federal--it was, it was occupied by the federal government but it was leased from a local entrepreneur. And that was the focus of, of my group was to go at the, the federal government for, for being a party to discrimination and segregation. And we, the way we strategized it, all three demonstrations occurred at the same time, high noon, on the same day (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$And just, and needless to say it just, it created all kinds of media attention. And at this stage of the game we had really gained a lot of momentum and there was tremendous community support for, you know, for what we were doing. And the--and while our administrators had to be careful they didn't endorse us or, you know, just being out of school and that kind of thing but certainly, I mean, Whitney [Whitney Young] was there with us and Carl Holman [M. Carl Holman] and people like that were supportive of us. And--$$And what was Carl Holman's role there?$$Carl, Carl was, at that time he was an instructor at, at Spelman [sic. Clark College; Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia].$$Okay.$$And but he too was, you know, very supportive of what we were doing. And, and, and one of the advisors, one of the people who, who was very closely aligned with the students and what we were, and he was a part of those adult advisors there with us.$$Right.$$And who were there to support us but also there to help us strategize and think through our, our, our plans.$$Okay.$$And, and, of course, he went on to head the National Urban Coalition, I think as--$$Right.$$--many would, of your viewers would know.$$Right. And [HistoryMaker] Marian Wright Edelman.$$And Marian Wright Edelman. Marian was a student at Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia].$$Okay.$$And she was, you know, a part of the, the group. We--$$[HistoryMaker] Julian Bond at that time.$$Julian Bond, Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] yep.$$He was a student at More--$$He was a student Morehouse, yep.$$At that time.$$And part of the group, yeah.$$Okay.$$Yeah. And the, you know, they were both members, very dedicated and committed members. And, and Julian has great writing skills and he would write, he would do quite a bit of our journalistic, you know--$$Work.$$--work. As I mentioned before, he went on to actually, once the, our group subsequently decided we needed to establish our own newspaper, Julian became the first editor of that newspaper.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$The Inquirer [Atlanta Inquirer].$$Yes, yes, right.$The police department. Now what, what were some of the issues?$$LAPD on, on the advocacy side this is where I spent more of my time than any place else. You know, other than running programs, you know, job training, education programs, and that kind of activity. We still had those programs going but, but the Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Police Department for decades had the, the, you know, the, was recognized as probably the most racist, brutal, police department in America. And, of course, the late Daryl Gates, he epitomized the worst. I mean, he wasn't the only one, but he was, he was the one where so many of my battles and, and my colleagues battled him tooth and nail. We--as I, as I reflect back, we had an incident, a, a woman named Eula Love, a black woman, who owned a, who owed a gas bill for around twenty-five dollars that she had not paid. And for some weird reason, which doesn't even make sense as you think about it, after the gas company tried to collect the money, and she didn't pay it because she wasn't able to pay it, they said cops went to her home and demanded payment. She didn't pay it, 'cause she didn't have the money, and they end up shooting and killing the woman. And, you know, that needless to say, was just the, the, it was a mind boggler. It made no sense in so, in so many different levels. I mean, but it was an example of how it was open season on black people. LAPD operated for several decades like an occupation force in the African American community. Now, it was user friendly in the white communities so it was hard for white residents of Los Angeles [California] to even begin to understand and appreciate the, the, the fact that this department was just, had no regard for the civil rights of the, or, or, or frankly, the, the basic worth--you talk about respect, there was no respect, and especially among young black men. Then we had the chokehold incident, where you had twenty-one young African American men who died as a result of the application of the chokehold, and Daryl Gates had the gall to say it was because there was something medically and physically wrong with us that made us more susceptible to dying from the application of the chokehold. In that instance, the late Johnnie Cochran, who we worked very closely together with, Johnnie Cochran at the time was serving on the Urban League board [Los Angeles Urban League, Los Angeles, California]. There was another African American, Dr. Madison Richardson, a very prominent physician who chaired the board, and we held a press conference at the Urban League. And Johnnie Cochran attacked LAPD and Gates, you know, from a legal standpoint, Dr. Madison Richardson from a medical standpoint, just dissected and totally, totally destroyed Gates' argument and rationale, and I from a community and civil rights perspective. And we went on to make demands before the police commission [Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners], the city council [Los Angeles City Council], the mayor at the time Tom Bradley, and we were able to ultimately, ultimately as a result of the pressure cause LAPD's policy to change in terms of how the chokehold was applied.

The Honorable Basil Paterson

Lawyer Basil Alexander Paterson was born on April 27, 1926, in Harlem, New York. Paterson’s mother Evangeline Rondon was a secretary for Marcus Garvey. Paterson received his high school diploma in 1942 from De Witt Clinton High School in the Bronx neighborhood of New York City. After working for six months, Paterson entered St. John’s College from which he received his B.S. degree in biology in 1948, having spent two years in the Army. Paterson entered St. John’s Law School and received his J.D. degree in 1951. Paterson then began his professional career as a lawyer in Harlem where he became law partners with Ivan A. Michael and former New York City Mayor David Dinkins. Paterson and Dinkins became heavily involved in Democratic politics in Harlem, along with former Manhattan Borough President Percy Sutton, and Congressman Charles Rangel.

Paterson was elected to the New York State Senate in 1965 where he remained until he won the primary to be the Democratic candidate for Lieutenant Governor on a slate headed by Arthur Goldberg in 1970. The ticket lost to incumbent Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. Paterson's son, David Paterson, was elected Lieutenant Governor in 2006; in 2008 he became Governor when Eliot Spitzer resigned. Paterson became the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Institute for Mediation and Conflict Resolution in 1972; he remained in that position until 1977. Paterson was the first elected African American Vice Chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 1972. In 1978, Mayor Ed Koch appointed Paterson to the position of Deputy Mayor of Labor Relations and Personnel. In 1979, Governor Hugh Carey appointed Paterson to the position of New York Secretary of State, making him the first African American to hold that rank. In 1989, Paterson became a commissioner of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a position he held until 1995.

Paterson chaired the New York City Mayor’s Judiciary Committee for four years, and the New York State Governor’s Screening Panel for the Second Department for eight years. Paterson also served for ten years as a member of the Board of Editors of the New York Law Journal. In 2003, Paterson was appointed to the Commission to Promote Public Confidence in Judicial Elections. That same year, Paterson was elected Chairman of the KeySpan Foundation Board of Directors. Paterson served as Co-Chairman of the New York State Governor’s Commission on Determinate Sentencing, and the New York State Commission on Powers of Local Government. Paterson received numerous awards including the Humanitarian Award from Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, and the St. John’s University Medal of Excellence. Paterson practiced law at the law firm of Meyer, Suozzi, English and Klein where he served as co-chair of the firm’s labor practice.

Accession Number

A2007.016

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2007

Last Name

Paterson

Maker Category
Schools

DeWitt Clinton High School

St. John's University

St. John's University School of Law

First Name

Basil

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

PAT05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

Get Outta Here.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/27/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hot Dogs

Death Date

4/16/2014

Short Description

Lawyer, city government appointee, state government appointee, and state senator The Honorable Basil Paterson (1926 - 2014 ) was appointed Secretary of State for New York, and was a New York State senator.

Employment

Levy and Harten

Paterson and Michael

New York State Senate

Meyer, Suozzi, English and Klein

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Basil Paterson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson explains why his parents came to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon police conduct in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers African American police officers

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his decision to pursue law

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his time at DeWitt Clinton High School

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers being encouraged to pursue college

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon his primary education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about educational inequality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls experiences at St. John's College

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon the impact of desegregation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the gentrification of Harlem

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers serving in the segregated U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the importance of protest

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls St. John's College School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the history of black lawyers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers founding his law firm

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes what he learned by practicing law

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers how he became a labor rights advocate

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls the New York City transit strike of 2005

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Basil Paterson talks about the Transport Workers Union

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls moving his law firm to his Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers other lawyers in the community

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls becoming involved in politics

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes the Harlem Clubhouse

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Robert Wagner and Robert Moses

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his early interactions with David N. Dinkins

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Adam Clayton Powell Jr.'s support

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon the progress of the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Basil Paterson recalls his first political campaigns

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes fraternity life in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Basil Paterson describes his siblings

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
The Honorable Basil Paterson reflects upon police conduct in New York City
The Honorable Basil Paterson remembers Adam Clayton Powell Jr.'s support
Transcript
At that time do you remember--I mean, just thinking on the street, were, were there the same kind of tensions between the police and the black community in Harlem [New York, New York] that exists or has existed in the past?$$I've tried to think about that at different times, because growing up I had trouble with the cops. I always had trouble with the cops, and one once told my mother [Evangeline Rondon Paterson] I had a bad attitude. Well, you know, when you're eleven, twelve years old, how can you have a bad attitude? I mean, there was a tension, but there was no confrontation with the cops. Nobody would dare do that, but I can remember being chased by cops. For what? For putting a--building a fire in the street, you know. Three of us would--I always remember this, we were chased around a corner. It was dark--it didn't have to be that late, it was winter--and the cop threw his nightstick at us. I always remember that, the nightstick clanging along as we're running on, and I said--you know, I thought about it years later, the eldest person with us couldn't have been more than thirteen years old, twelve maybe, and a cop throws a nightstick at us. As I got older, it got more difficult. There's been tension with people in Harlem with the police since I can remember. It's always been there. The strangest thing is we used to say that the very cops who--by the way, corruption was rife, you saw it, you saw the numbers men, who were the only ones who knew the cops, knew their first names. Numbers, if anybody doesn't understand that, it was a policy racket, you bet three numbers, if you came out, you got 550 to one, what happened to the other 450? You figure it out. Some people got rich, and some cops got rich. All this came out with the Knapp Commission [Commission to Investigate Alleged Police Corruption] investigation many years ago, it all got--it was laid right out. But everybody that lived in Harlem knew about it long before that. You knew that when you saw a police car stop in front of the local deli on a Sunday morning, they're stopping to get their pay-off because the deli was probably selling beer before two o'clock or whatever time it was, we had blue laws in New York and churches required that they not sell beer before a certain time. You saw it. It was--obviously, and the cops break up crap games and somebody says, "Stop and give them the money," and the crap game resumed, yeah, you saw this. It's not like that anymore. I mean, there may be graft, there may be corruption, but it's not systemic. I mean, even when Judge Mollen, Milton Mollen Commission [Commission To Investigate Allegations of Police Corruption and the Anti-Corruption Procedures of the Police Department] investigated the Dirty Thirty precinct, his report was you had certain precincts where you might have a gang of four or five cops who in many ways intimidated the other members and did things that were bad, but it's not like it once was. I mean, it's systematized, but the precinct got a certain amount of money every month from the numbers men, the cop on the beat got, the traffic cop got, you name them, they all got paid a certain amount, it was known. What was funny, I look back now, I remember all these big scandals and they're shaking up the police department [New York City Police Department], they're transferring people from one borough to the other, but when I got to law school [St. John's College School of Law; St. John's University School of Law, New York, New York], I found out what that was about. The black book stayed in the precinct, so whoever came to the precinct knew who it was who paid X number of dollars into the precinct each week or each month. That began--it was an interesting point in law, because that black book was entered into evidence--I think it was Tom (unclear) [ph.] and his special prosecutors way back on the grounds that these were entries made in the ordinary course of business, which is a fundamental law of evidence. Entries made into any document in the ordinary course of business are admissible into evidence, so that black book was admissible into evidence, and that's how they got a lot of people. But that black book was always there, they could shift cops around, but it didn't matter. The system remained and existed until--probably the biggest impact on it was when they legalized the lottery. When they had a legal lottery--when they legalized it (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now, when did they legalize the lottery--$$Oh, that had to be--I was going to say I was in the State Senate [New York State Senate] when it happened, so it had to be around '68 [1968], 1968, '69 [1969], but there's still numbers men operating, the state and the government can't give credit, but private entrepreneurs can give credit. But it's not like it once was, and the graft is not there, but the tension still remained. You asked about the tension, the tension's still there, but they used to say the very same cops who were on the take would risk their lives to save you, there was a belief there, the very cops that might be abusing somebody (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Did you agree with it?$$Did I agree with it? Yeah, I think it was true. I think it was just a system that existed. They--some cops say, well, it was combat pay. Combat pay for what? For operating in a minority community, a black or Latino community? I literally have seen a cop cry, and asked--I was eating in a restaurant, what's (unclear)--I said, "What's that about," and another cop said to me, "He's being transferred." I said, "Where to?" He said, "Staten Island [New York]." I said, "Where does he live?" He said Staten Island, I said, he ought to be happy. He said, "He can't afford it." He was in a precinct where he could make money, he couldn't afford to be sent to a precinct where he couldn't make money, but that's--hopefully it's gone.$Rangel [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel] and Sutton [Percy Sutton], after I won, it was a one year term because they were doing reapportionment, they said, we're gonna reapportion you out, we've got, we got too--with our heavy hitters, and you're finished. Well, what happened--I was finished. I understood what they--they reapportioned me out of where I was strong, put me into mostly in Adam Powell's [Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.] district, so one of their people, unbeknownst to them, invited me to meet with Powell. He liked me, he said, "I like ya," he says, "Come meet with Powell." And Powell said to me--one day I went down to see Powell--here's a story, but it's true--went down to see Powell, took my wife [Portia Hairston Paterson] and one of my sons, my other--I have two sons, the other son--and Powell, only thing he wanted to know was, he said, "Are you Sutton's guy?" I said, "No, we used to be friends but he opposed me." He said, "Are you Sutton's guy?" And I said, "I don't think so, I think I'm my own guy." He said, "Well, okay." He said, "The four closest people to me all sing your praises." I said, "Who are they?" "Livingston Wingate [Livingston Leroy Wingate] says you're his protege." Wingate was his counsel, and I was Wingate's protege.$$What was that name again?$$Livingston Wingate.$$Livingston.$$He was his counsel, he later became a judge. Wingate had always kind of looked out for me. And then a guy named Chuck Sutton. Remember, he was the editor of a local newspaper one time, and then he was his press guy. Not Chuck Sutton--got the wrong name. Chuck Sutton's his nephew--Sutton's nephew--oh, his name'll come to me, but you know--you probably know the name, he was well-known in the black newspaper guild and all that--who I knew. And then a guy named Wellington Beal, who did a lot of economic stuff for him, and sometimes would ask me to sit down and work with him.$$Wellington--what was--$$Wellington Beal, B-E-A-L. And the last one was a fella named Lloyd Mitchell [ph.], who was his bodyguard, and Mitchell sang my praises to him, he said, he and his friends have always helped me. Well, we were street guys, so of course we were his help, he was a nice guy. So Powell said, "I'm interested, let me think about it." I was asking would he help me. He says, "Is that your wife and your son outside?" I said, "Yeah." He said, "Bring them in, I'd like to meet them," so I bring them in, introduced my wife and my son. About that time Daniel [Daniel Paterson] was--let me think. If this was '66 [1966]. He was born in '57 [1957], so he was nine years old. He hadn't yet turned nine, he was eight. So he said to him, "How old are you, Daniel?" He said, "I'm eight years old." "When's your birthday?" He said, "November 29th." And Powell stopped, he said, "Either you're the luckiest guy going or one of the slickest people I've ever met." He said, "Isn't this a school day?" He was smart. I said, "Uh-huh." "And you took your son out of school and brought him down here?" I said, "Uh-huh." It's his birthday. It's just one of those weird coincidences. Powell's birthday. So he said, I think I'm gonna support you (laughter). And you know what he did, he sent his secretary to bring all kinds of things that had his name on it, he used to send birthday cards to my--to my son, and by that night word was out I was Powell's candidate, and I was now Jones' [J. Raymond Jones] candidate. He called Jones. Powell said, "I want this guy," and Jones said, "Okay."

James Dumpson

International social worker and educator James Russelle Dumpson was born on April 5, 1909 to James and Edythe Dumpson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dumpson’s family moved to West Philadelphia where he attended West Philadelphia Boys’ High School. He then attended Chaney Normal School (now Chaney Teachers College) and received a teaching certificate in 1932. He went on to Temple University to receive his B.A. degree in education in 1934. Dumpson taught elementary school for two years before moving to New York City to work for the Children’s Aid Society as a case worker. He then received his M.A. degree in social work from Fordam University and his Ph.D. from the University of Dacca in Ghana.

From 1953 to 1954, Dumpson served as a United Nations Advisor/Chief of Training in Social Welfare to the Government of Pakistan. In 1971, he worked as a consultant in Pakistan, and in 1977, received a fellowship to Pakistan through the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to Pakistan.

Dumpson began his association with Fordham University in 1957 as a Visiting Associate Professor in the Graduate Institute for Mission Studies. Ten years later, he returned to Fordham University as the Dean of the Graduate School of Social Work, with the faculty rank of professor.

In 1959, Dumpson was named Commissioner of Welfare for the City of New York, becoming the only African American welfare commissioner in the country. His appointment also marked the first time that a social worker had held the position. He then returned to New York seven years later to become administrator of the Human Resources Department.

As an advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, Dumpson served on various advisory commissions, including the Presidents Commission on Narcotics and Drug Abuse. In 1990, Dumpson was appointed to serve as New York City’s Health Service Administrator and Chairman of the Health and Hospitals Corporation. Upon retirement, he continued to teach at Fordham University until 2006.

Dumpson passed away on November 5, 2012.

Accession Number

A2007.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/10/2007

Last Name

Dumpson

Maker Category
Schools

West Philadelphia Boys’ High School

West Philadelphia High School

Octavius V. Catto Secondary School

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Temple University

Fordham University

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

DUM01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape May, New Jersey

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/5/1909

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef (Corned), Cabbage

Death Date

11/5/2012

Short Description

City government appointee, presidential advisor, and social worker James Dumpson (1909 - 2012 ) was the first social worker to be named Commissioner of Welfare for the City of New York. He also held appointments as advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, and he served on various advisory commissions, including the President’s Commission on Narcotics and Drug Abuse.

Employment

Government of Pakistan

Children's Aid Society

City of New York

Fordham University

Health and Hospitals Corporation, NYC

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:10962,146:11586,153:14081,170:14516,176:15125,184:15821,193:28165,290:33034,366:34414,391:34966,400:35587,411:40070,433:43916,507:46508,562:47399,576:47966,584:49748,622:50396,631:58746,720:60072,753:60582,759:61398,767:63336,789:63744,794:70421,864:71273,877:75218,940:75598,950:76130,958:80994,1050:81526,1058:82134,1067:82666,1075:89770,1142:90370,1150:96701,1224:98303,1245:99015,1253:103910,1316:104622,1325:105512,1340:106847,1355:110128,1367:110824,1380:115709,1425:116041,1430:117867,1465:119859,1493:120274,1500:120938,1510:131674,1625:132139,1631:136231,1691:141492,1729:144484,1784:144756,1789:150740,1976:152576,2018:155432,2092:155976,2101:166740,2126:167028,2131:169692,2217:170268,2227:170988,2238:171276,2243:178796,2289:181369,2329:182365,2350:188953,2435:189559,2442:190468,2452:192690,2468:193570,2477:195340,2485:195808,2492:197368,2522:198460,2539:202750,2619:206962,2710:207586,2722:214382,2765:216084,2796:216750,2817:223120,2927$0,0:1577,18:1909,23:4814,77:11122,198:23876,301:26112,341:33160,406:33616,413:34376,426:34756,432:35288,440:35820,450:36124,455:36732,465:37264,474:38708,499:39924,518:41140,538:42280,555:42812,563:43572,577:44180,587:44636,594:48310,599:56480,719:57560,751:57860,757:60674,798:61139,804:62348,818:69464,900:71808,921:72600,934:73326,971:78000,1007:79170,1025:80250,1043:80880,1050:82050,1077:85470,1122:86010,1129:89972,1145:91064,1166:94262,1214:96758,1242:97226,1249:98474,1261:100502,1297:106673,1358:107291,1365:109306,1379:109798,1386:110700,1400:111930,1418:115990,1458:116470,1465:116790,1470:118700,1484:119036,1489:123908,1544:128508,1566:129288,1579:131124,1598:131796,1608:132552,1619:133056,1626:133896,1638:134400,1645:139510,1681:140161,1689:144460,1746:145344,1763:147906,1772:148402,1780:151943,1795:154370,1803:154986,1815:155602,1822:156394,1832:156746,1837:159480,1860:160155,1872:160680,1878:163860,1896:166560,1930:167910,1941:168720,1951:169170,1957:169530,1962:170520,1975:170880,1980:172050,2002:172770,2012:173760,2026:177377,2037:178325,2052:178799,2059:184875,2115:186266,2132:187015,2139:191608,2170:193666,2186:195770,2193:196274,2200:197702,2221:200894,2257:201384,2270:201580,2275:203249,2289:203603,2296:207138,2331:208370,2350:209338,2362:212242,2406:212858,2414:215322,2456:215938,2465:222240,2525:222905,2532:225945,2611:228035,2637:248212,2794:249588,2835:250878,2862:251222,2867:261760,2963:273980,3260
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Dumpson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Dumpson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Dumpson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Dumpson describes his maternal grandparents' role in his family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Dumpson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls growing up in Philadelphia in the 1920s

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his experiences at Octavius V. Catto Secondary School

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Dumpson recalls his childhood community in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Dumpson remembers West Philadelphia High School for Boys

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Dumpson talks about the role of music in his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his activities at West Philadelphia High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Dumpson recalls his experiences at Cheyney Training School for Teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Dumpson remembers working as a teacher in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Dumpson recalls becoming at caseworker at the Children's Aid Society

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Dumpson describes his tenure at New York City's Children's Aid Society

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls his work in child welfare for the City of New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Dumpson recalls being hired to consult for the United Nations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Dumpson remembers his work with the United Nations in Pakistan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his work for New York City's Bureau of Child Welfare

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes his career in academia in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Dumpson recalls the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Dumpson recalls attending the March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Dumpson recalls his chairmanship of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls his chairmanship of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his career since retiring from New York City government

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Dumpson describes his work in social welfare with the United Nations

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his work with Whitney Young's National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes the awards he received during his career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Dumpson recalls prominent African American politicians from New York

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Dumpson describes his family life

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Dumpson reflects upon his career in social welfare

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Dumpson reflects upon his values

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Dumpson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Dumpson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
James Dumpson recalls his experiences at Cheyney Training School for Teachers
James Dumpson remembers his work with the United Nations in Pakistan
Transcript
So, how did you decide what school, what college you wanted to go to?$$I wanted to be a teacher at those days, and there was a man by the name of Leslie Pinckney Hill, a great African American educator, who had been a companion with Frederick Douglass, not Frederick Douglass, it's another American, African American luminary. But Leslie Pinckney Hill was then the president of the Cheyney Training School for Teachers, now Cheyney University of Pennsylvania [Cheyney, Pennsylvania], and it was decided--I decided, my mother [Edyth Smith Dumpson] supported it, having been a teacher herself, that I was gonna go into the teaching profession. And I went to Cheyney and had the great fortune of becoming associated with Leslie Pinckney Hill, one of the great African American educators in this country. And Cheyney became almost a landmark as the beginning of my professional career. I went to Cheyney, and it was at Cheyney that I heard about and learned about Negro spirituals, for example. It was at Cheyney that I learned about leaders in the African American history books. It was at Cheyney that--it was at Cheyney that I became an African American in the true sense of that term. And the roots for that, from my identification as an African American, my knowledge now of African American contribution to American culture and to world culture, began in my relationship with Leslie Pinckney Hill at Cheyney.$$Okay, what else stands out about your college years?$$Well in addition to what I just said about Cheyney and professional preparation as a teacher, there was a woman named Laura Wheeler Waring, who was our music teacher at Cheyney, and through her I became interested in, committed to music written by African Americans. I began to know the spirituals, I began to know people like Nathaniel Dett [R. Nathaniel Dett], then later Marian Anderson who was practically a neighbor of mine in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]. And (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So this was in college?$$This was in Cheyney Training--$$Cheyney, okay--$$--School, Cheyney normal school, now Cheyney Teachers College.$$All right, so, what happens as you begin to get ready for graduation from college?$$Well, to begin to get ready for graduation from college two things happened. One, I realized that I was at a, what was then a normal school that was just becoming a teachers college, that was Cheyney, and that was part of the Pennsylvania higher education system. I then realized that my degree from Cheyney was not gonna be enough to get me where I thought I wanted to go, where I belonged, and therefore I began to take courses at Temple University [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and got my first graduate degree from Temple University. Then, of course, I was in the midst of the whole educational system and knew that that was not enough, and I had to go on and finally ended up, of course, with a Ph.D. and all the rest of it--$Now, you accepted this position to go to Pakistan. So tell me about life in Pakistan.$$Oh, it was great.$$(Laughter) Okay.$$Make my reservation for tomorrow.$$Okay.$$I went there as advisor to the government in child welfare and my experience there with the government and with the community for the academic community and the community at large led to my, of course, teaching at what they then had as in social welfare, and child welfare which was very meager in terms of what they needed. And I suppose, as I look back on it, my real contribution was helping them set up a school of social work with an emphasis on family and child welfare in Lahore [Pakistan] and in Dhaka [Dhaka, Pakistan; Dhaka, Bangladesh] and then in Karachi [Pakistan], the three major cities of that country. It was my first international experience. I'd never been out of the country to work and I must tell you it was probably the richest professional experience I ever had in my life, or ever can have.$$What made that so?$$First of all, the commitment of the United Nations [UN] to developing countries and by commitment. I mean not only verbal commitment, but material commitment, money and staffing. Secondly the eagerness and acceptance of the Pakistani people themselves, recognition of their need to get on board with their social develop- educational development and social welfare. And number three was the commitment of the people whom we trained, who are now the social work leadership in that country. Without those three parts we could have done nothing, and Pakistan would not be where it is in the league of nations of social welfare and social development. That was probably the richest experience that I've ever--will ever have in my life, of working in a new culture, African American among Asians, fear of the United States in that country, not spoken of course, but fear, some of it envy. Misunderstanding of who we are as Americans, suspicion about race relations in this country, and here's a black man coming to our country, a Christian in a Muslim country. All of those conflicting contributions in the picture, and the United Nations, and then America, and then the Muslim world, coming together or being in surroundings, in which you then are going out to help them set up a social welfare education program. It was quite a, as I look back on it, probably one of the richest challenges that anybody could possibly have.$$Okay.$$But I did it with the help of the government in Pakistan, with the support of the United Nations social development department [Commission for Social Development], but most importantly with the people, the family--leadership, the families of--who were all Pakistani in Karachi and Dhaka, and Lahore.$$Okay, so you were there for, for about a year, is that right?$$I was there two years.$$Two years?$$And then I've gone back periodically.$$Okay, all right, so we're really now in 1953, you were there from 1953 to 1954?$$That was the official of the United Nations; I'm still there (laughter).$$Yeah, but I'm just saying this is when you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, officially, yes--$$--first went--$$When I first went was '53 [1953] to '54 [1954]--$$--fifty-four [1954]--$$That's correct--$$Okay, all right.

The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Lawyer, businessperson, and civic leader Valerie Bowman Jarrett was born Valerie Bowman, November 14, 1956, in Shiraz, Iran to education expert Barbara Bowman and Dr. James Bowman, a pathologist and pioneering geneticist. Her maternal grandfather was Chicago housing legend, Robert Taylor. Moving from Iran to London, Jarrett attended Tetherdown Elementary School. Returning to the United States, she attended Shaesmith University of Chicago Lab School and graduated from Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts in 1974. Jarrett received her B.A. degree in psychology from Stanford University in 1978 and obtained her J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1981.

Beginning her career as a corporate banking associate at Chicago’s Pope, Ballard, Shepherd, and Fowle, Jarrett then joined the real estate department of Sonnenschein, Carlin Nath and Rosenthal. In 1987, she was tapped to serve as deputy corporation counsel for finance and development for the City of Chicago under Mayor Harold Washington and continued service under Mayor Eugene Sawyer and Mayor Richard M. Daley. From 1988 to 1989, Jarrett also served as director of Leadership Greater Chicago. In 1991, she served as Mayor Daley’s deputy chief of staff. Jarrett was appointed Chicago’s commissioner of planning and development where she consolidated three departments and was awarded the Women’s Business Development Center’s Government Support Award. In 1995, Mayor Daley appointed her as chairman of the Chicago Transit Authority where she served for eight years and was responsible for a budget of over $800 million. That same year, Jarrett was appointed Vice President of the Habitat Company. In 2003, Jarrett was elected to a three-year term as chairman of the Chicago Stock Exchange. In 2007, Jarrett was named president of the Habitat Company.

A longtime advisor of President Barack Obama, Jarrett served as co-chairperson of the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition Team. She is Senior Advisor and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Liaison.

Accession Number

A2006.165

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2006

Last Name

Jarrett

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Stanford University

University of Michigan

Northfield Mount Hermon School

Beulah Shoesmith Elementary School

First Name

Valerie

Birth City, State, Country

Shiraz

HM ID

JAR04

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

And That Is That.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/14/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Iran

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Real estate lawyer, city government appointee, and presidential advisor The Honorable Valerie Jarrett (1956 - ) served as president of the Habitat Company, and was a former chairman of both the Chicago Transit Authority and the Chicago Stock Exchange. She was also the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama, and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Liaison.

Employment

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP

City of Chicago

Chicago Transit Authority

The Habitat Company

Chicago Stock Exchange

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:952,22:4012,84:6256,115:8636,324:11220,383:11560,389:12104,400:12512,407:12988,415:13328,421:16116,484:16592,494:24922,558:25738,570:26350,577:26860,586:27370,592:27982,599:35578,694:36898,725:38152,747:38548,755:38944,762:39670,778:40066,785:40594,794:41320,806:43432,855:48219,915:48551,920:49049,928:51124,982:51788,992:55530,1013:56230,1022:56630,1027:61300,1088:61783,1097:62680,1116:63163,1123:64474,1163:64957,1172:65440,1182:67924,1242:69856,1292:71098,1324:71512,1331:72133,1343:72478,1349:73030,1361:73582,1372:74341,1384:75031,1397:77032,1440:77308,1445:78757,1481:79447,1492:80827,1522:81310,1531:81655,1538:82483,1551:90005,1610:90855,1625:94800,1671:95325,1679:95850,1688:97575,1729:98250,1740:98850,1750:100350,1789:101025,1800:104025,1871:104400,1877:116440,2027:116860,2036:117280,2044:117700,2053:118120,2062:121330,2096$0,0:312,9:8140,268:12244,379:14828,438:15588,453:15892,458:17564,489:34060,661:34655,669:42900,808:43580,818:44940,842:50402,910:52178,942:52844,954:53954,970:59060,1077:59430,1083:60762,1108:61280,1117:69054,1191:69318,1196:71364,1245:74070,1306:76908,1362:77304,1376:77832,1386:78426,1396:79284,1416:79614,1422:79878,1427:84580,1468:85490,1512:86400,1539:87030,1549:90180,1618:90460,1623:90740,1628:96410,1771:97250,1787:101781,1818:103433,1864:103964,1874:104318,1881:104613,1888:104849,1893:105203,1905:107673,1928:109590,1992:109945,1999:110442,2011:111010,2020:112075,2039:112643,2048:113779,2062:118181,2198:118678,2213:119885,2237:128340,2403:130720,2460:132395,2476:132850,2484:133370,2494:133695,2500:137725,2592:138830,2619:139415,2634:140910,2684:141625,2697:142210,2715:143510,2745:144485,2778:146565,2824:146825,2829:149490,2926:150075,2938:150530,2946:156261,2970:159411,3042:159852,3051:160671,3075:161553,3093:162057,3104:162624,3114:163191,3124:166908,3221:167475,3231:168987,3278:169491,3300:174804,3346:175236,3353:175812,3362:176100,3367:176532,3374:177036,3382:178116,3398:178404,3403:178908,3412:179268,3418:179700,3429:180276,3440:181572,3464:183732,3516:186684,3589:187476,3605:187908,3612:195170,3660
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her upbringing shaped her worldview

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls how she was perceived in Iran and England

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her childhood experiences abroad

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls appearing on 'Bozo's Circus'

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her teacher at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her decision to attend Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her childhood exposure to politics

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her changing academic interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her psychology professors at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her social life at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her decision to attend law school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers the University of Michigan Law School in Ann Arbor

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls joining Harold Washington's administration in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her early roles in Chicago's city government

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers Chicago's Harold Washington administration

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls Harold Washington's sudden death

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the transition to Eugene Sawyer's administration

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls becoming Richard M. Daley's chief of staff

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls forming Chicago's Department of Planning and Development

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her work for The Habitat Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the redevelopment of Chicago public housing

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the opening of Chicago's Robert Taylor Homes

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon the role of civil service

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes the impact of Section 8 housing vouchers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her appointment to the Chicago Transit Authority board

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls reforming the Chicago Transit Authority

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the Illinois Fund for Infrastructure, Roads, Schools and Transit

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about Mayor Richard M. Daley

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes The Habitat Company's recent projects

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about her career plans

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her corporate board leadership

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett narrates her photographs

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sponsors of 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Introduction to 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michele Norris introduces The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michele Norris greets The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's family background

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about how her parents met

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her education

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's civil service career in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her transition to the City of Chicago government

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the impact of Harold Washington's death

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her redevelopment efforts in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers meeting Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 15 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the importance of balancing work and family life

Tape: 6 Story: 16 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her early support for Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 17 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's foray into national politics

Tape: 6 Story: 18 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 19 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers Barack Obama's presidential campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 20 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls a moment from President Barack Obama's campaign trail

Tape: 6 Story: 21 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the political climate in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 22 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers the death of Trayvon Martin

Tape: 6 Story: 23 - Conclusion of 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

10$7

DATitle
The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her upbringing shaped her worldview
The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the redevelopment of Chicago public housing
Transcript
How did you deal with questions of identity as a small child--and well, you were so young in Iran, I don't know if that was a question or not, but (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, part of the reason my parents [HistoryMaker Barbara Bowman and HistoryMaker Dr. James Bowman] moved back here--it didn't really affect me whatsoever, but they felt it was hard to raise this little black child in a Muslim country where people had servants and it was kind of con- they thought I was getting a confused upbringing. I don't, I don't know, I--maybe kids are, they adjust pretty well. I think having grown up in the Middle East and then England and then Hyde Park [Chicago, Illinois], gave me a perspective on the world and a perspective on people that is pretty unique. And my father traveled extensively with us throughout Africa and Mexico and the Far East, and I guess I--and I wish I had the opportunity to do that with my daughter [Laura Jarrett] to the degree my parents did because I think it gives you a sense of self that, you know, the people in the United States would rather think of themselves and the United States as rather self-important. And I think it helps you understand, you know, where you fall in the total scheme of things. But I also think it gives you a sense of people and that they really are pretty similar the world over, and I think I am comfortable sitting down talking to, you know, the residents that I work with who live in public housing and connecting with them. And I'm perfectly happy to have a conversation with the leader of the free world, president of the United States. And I think, you know, I've been to villages in the poorest parts of Africa and played with the kids while my father was doing his work. And, you know, I've played with people who were, you know, related to royalty so--and everyone in between. And I think that world-rounded experience certainly shapes you. And it's probably better for other people to say how it shapes you, but it certainly gives you a level of comfort with all kinds of people which I think is important.$I guess, back to the redevelopment, I remember in the mid-'90s [1990s], Chicago housing coalition, a lot of groups, there was a lot of demonstrations outside of Cabrini [Cabrini-Green Homes, Chicago, Illinois] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yep, yes.$$--people, the community was in a flux as to what should be done--$$Yes.$$--with those high rise units.$$Huge fights. We had demonstrations, we had lawsuits, we had everything you can think of. And last week, we were at Cabrini for a groundbreaking for the new redevelopment of the onsite at Cabrini that's being done by a developer here in town. And I was asked to give a speech, and I said, you know, I started working on Cabrini in 1991, and so the moral of the story is if you live long enough and you are tenacious and you have a dream, you know, magic can actually happen. And I think, you know, we had lots of problems along the way, but the one thing we continued to do was to talk to one another and the residents who, you know, I remember meeting with in there in the mid-'90s [1990s] in the dead of winter in their office haggling over all kinds of issues were the same ones who were there, you know, all standing together last week. And, you know, I feel like we've grown up together, and if you think about over a fifteen-year period, eventually, if you're patient, you get to a really good place. And I think the residents forced us to really think hard about what was important to them, and we forced them to say, you know, you're not in isolation anymore. You're part of a community, and it can't just be what's in your--what you think is in your best interest. We've got to look at it as a community as a whole. And so, in the end, it was a love fest, and it was a--it's a better development having had that friction. Do I wish it hadn't taken as long? Of course, I do. But I think sometimes things take a long time. If I look at, you know, the neighborhood around North Kenwood-Oakland [Chicago, Illinois]. When I started the planning commissioner, as a planning commissioner, this is, you know, the neighborhood like 47th [Street] to 39th [Street], the lake [Lake Michigan] to Cottage [Cottage Grove Avenue], 70 percent of the land was vacant in that community. And 50 percent of what was vacant was owned by the city. And everyone said, well, it's a terrible neighborhood. Well, I'd grown up at 49th [Street] and Greenwood [Avenue], and I can remember driving down 47th Street and only looking south and never looking north. And I can remember thinking, well, why is there this invisible line on 47th Street, you know. And how could it be so close to South Kenwood [Chicago, Illinois] and be perceived so poorly. And so I looked at that vacant land as potential. I said, well, if the city controls all that land, you know, we can help rebuild the community. And if you drive through the neighborhood today, it doesn't look a thing like it did fifteen years ago. And, but it required, you know, community hearings and community input and a lot of back and forth, and in the end I think, again, you make a far healthier community having heard all the voices as opposed to just one. And that's what I really enjoy. That's the community process that I enjoy, and I think what ties it back to my [maternal] grandfather [Robert Rochon Taylor] is that he really believed that public housing should be woven back into the urban fabric and that there should be--it should be temporary. It should be a place for you to go when times are tough and you need to get back on your feet. But while you're there, he was a strong believer in requiring a sense of responsibility.

Sharon Gist Gilliam

Sharon Gist Gilliam was born on August 24, 1943 in Chicago, Illinois. The youngest of three siblings, Gilliam, was raised in the Chicago neighborhoods of West Chesterfield and Lawndale. Gilliam’s parents, Mr. Arthur C. Gist and Vivian M. Gist, were small business owners. She attended Burnside Elementary School, and graduated from St. Mary High School in 1961. In 1965, she received her B.A. degree in history at Mundelein College. Gilliam also completed coursework in the graduate department of Public Management at DePaul University. Gilliam then became a history teacher from 1965 to 1968 in the Chicago Public School System.

Gilliam worked with the City of Chicago’s Committee on Urban Opportunity in 1968 as a social planner for the poverty program. Between the years of 1973 and 1979, Gilliam became Assistant Budget Director Commissioner of Consumer Services for the City of Chicago. She then moved to Washington, D.C. and became assistant budget director for the local city government. In 1983, Gilliam relocated back to Chicago and worked as the Budget Director/Chief Operating Officer (COO) for the City of Chicago under then Mayor Harold Washington. As COO, Gilliam was responsible for policy implementation and an operating budget of $4 billion. In 1989, Gilliam received the Marks of Excellence Award from the National Forum for Black Public Administrators.

In 1989, Gilliam also became the executive vice president of the management consulting firm of Unison-Maximus. In 1999, Mayor Richard Daley appointed Gilliam to serve as the commissioner and chairperson of the Chicago Housing Authority until July 2009.

Today, Gilliam is principal at UCG Associates, a management consulting firm. She is Chairman of the Board of the Chicago Housing Authority and serves as a board member for several organizations including Mundelein College; Illinois State Board of Education; Chicago Board of Education; and Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Accession Number

A2006.034

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/8/2006

Last Name

Gilliam

Maker Category
Middle Name

Gist

Schools

St. Mary High School

Burnside Elementary Scholastic Academy

William Cullen Bryant School

Mundelein College

First Name

Sharon

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

GIL04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

And This Too Shall Pass.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/24/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream, Potatoes (Mashed)

Short Description

Management executive and city government appointee Sharon Gist Gilliam (1943 - ) is the former budget director for the City of Chicago and Chairman of the Chicago Housing Authority.

Employment

Farragut High School

Chicago Committee on Urban Opportunities

Model Cities Chicago

City of Chicago

City of Washington, D.C.

Unison-Maximus

Favorite Color

Pink, Rose

Timing Pairs
0,0:9152,124:9568,129:15394,154:15868,162:16895,174:17290,180:18238,198:21330,246:21798,255:22812,272:24216,309:24528,314:24918,320:31080,464:32952,527:35760,571:37086,585:37398,590:38022,600:44482,622:46406,657:46850,664:47590,676:48182,693:48478,698:54488,738:69308,972:69740,980:73248,1005:73815,1016:74130,1022:76083,1070:80765,1148:84248,1208:85058,1221:87245,1264:88541,1288:88865,1293:89675,1304:96915,1370:100592,1435:102840,1459:103330,1467:103890,1478:104380,1486:106252,1509:106888,1517:108372,1533:115377,1696:133352,1826:135138,1845:135796,1854:136548,1863:138280,1870$0,0:780,5:7699,67:11615,130:12327,139:13039,144:13484,150:16421,192:20938,224:21532,231:22225,240:23611,261:30305,358:30825,368:31670,383:32320,395:42618,501:49242,586:49606,591:50061,597:56345,718:57105,727:57580,733:57960,738:59385,759:60240,776:64879,812:65211,817:68780,879:69278,886:69610,891:71270,916:72266,929:73096,941:83336,1066:84016,1078:84424,1085:86532,1143:87076,1153:87348,1158:88028,1171:89864,1209:95340,1275:98560,1340:100170,1366:100590,1373:101080,1381:105280,1461:106050,1474:107030,1490:114142,1537:114688,1546:117730,1567:118258,1574:119182,1589:119578,1596:123627,1634:128199,1676:129225,1696:129681,1706:129909,1711:130422,1723:130707,1729:131106,1738:131391,1744:132360,1765:132759,1773:133215,1783:133443,1788:139280,1824:139655,1830:147888,1932:152120,1956:152416,1961:155006,2033:155598,2042:156930,2063:159510,2072:160026,2077:160542,2082:164753,2142:165148,2149:165622,2156:166254,2165:167992,2195:168466,2207:169019,2215:174672,2293:175342,2305:176749,2326:177620,2341:182158,2381:185692,2431:192667,2530:193132,2536:194062,2549:198480,2557:198812,2562:200555,2585:200887,2590:205535,2664:206199,2673:211214,2705:214716,2743:216158,2758:220865,2796:224581,2832:225117,2841:226390,2874:231620,2968
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam narrates her photographs

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Sharon Gist Gilliam's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her maternal grandmother's family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her maternal grandfather's family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her father and uncle's tax strategy

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her parents' college experience

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her parents and her likeness to her father

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers West Chesterfield in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her parents' move to West Chesterfield in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the history of her neighborhood in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers moving into her father's store

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her father's decision to purchase a tavern

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls working in her father's store

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her childhood experiences with white people

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls schools she attended

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls transferring to St. Mary High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes St. Mary High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her decision to attend Chicago's Mundelein College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes Mundelein College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers taking on a second job during college

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls becoming a certified teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the demographics of Farragut High School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers becoming an urban life advisor

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her work for the Committee on Urban Opportunity

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the Chicago Committee on Urban Opportunity

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers the 1968 Chicago riots

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls teaching night school

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the Model Cities program

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam explains how Erwin France used the Hatch Act to avoid Chicago politics

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls joining the Chicago city budget office

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remember Mayor Richard J. Daley's death

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls becoming acting commissioner of consumer sales, weights and measures, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls becoming acting commissioner of consumer sales, weights, and measures, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam explains what she learned as assistant budget director

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her role as assistant budget director

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers working for Marian Barry in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her complaints about working in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls what she learned in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sharon Gist Gilliam compares the governments of Washington, D.C. and Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her return to the Chicago city government

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls the Chicago council wars

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her coworkers in Chicago's mayoral office

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls overhauling the Chicago budget with David F. Schultz

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers becoming Chicago's budget director

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers working for Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers pushing for a mandatory retirement age

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls why she enjoyed serving as budget director

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers the challenges she faced as budget director

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers the death of Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her job as Chicago's chief operating officer

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls the fallout from Steve Cokely's anti-Semitic remarks

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the changes she made to Chicago's budget

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam remembers Mayor Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls leaving the public sector

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her consulting firm, Unison-Maximus, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls milestones at Unison-Maximus, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the strengths of Unison-Maximus, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam lists her appointments to civic boards

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls serving on the Chicago School Reform Board of Trustees

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls serving on the Illinois State Board of Education

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the Chicago Housing Authority's history, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the Chicago Housing Authority's history, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Sharon Gist Gilliam talks about the Chicago Housing Authority's agreement to improve public housing

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her goals for the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes the state of Chicago's public housing

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Sharon Gist Gilliam lists her activities in the public and private sectors

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Sharon Gist Gilliam lists the board memberships she enjoys most

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Sharon Gist Gilliam describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Sharon Gist Gilliam reflects upon her personality

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Sharon Gist Gilliam reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Sharon Gist Gilliam reflects upon her family's expectations

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$4

DATitle
Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls working in her father's store
Sharon Gist Gilliam recalls her work for the Committee on Urban Opportunity
Transcript
You know and I grew up working in a grocery store you know, as a little kid you stocked the lower shelves. Back in the day when there, when soda pop was sold in bottles all those bottles had to be sorted when they came, when people brought them back for their deposits. Well as a little kid that was one of your first jobs, was sorting pop bottles into the correct shelves. You know the Coke [Coca-Cola] bottles gotta go on the Coke shelves so they can go back with the Coke man and the Pepsi [Pepsi-Cola; Pepsi] and all of that so you know as kids that's what we did until you got tall enough to reach the counter and then you could add stuff up on the adding machine and learn to use the cash register and you know, so there was any number of little activities to keep us, and we didn't know, me and my sisters [Myra Gist and Vivian Gist Spencer], we didn't know from hanging out. You know there was work to be done (laughter) in the businesses and all of us at one time or another worked in one or another of those businesses. Now once they went into the tavern business you couldn't work there 'cause you were too young you know under the liquor licensing laws so but most of the time growing up he always had a grocery and package liquor where you could work and--I mean it was good experience because I mean because you were family. Yeah you may have been a teenager but if he or my mother [Vivian Montgomery Gist] weren't there you may have been fifteen years old, sixteen years old, you were in charge, responsible and accountable for that store. You supervised whatever employee who was there, you may have been fifteen and they were forty-five but I mean it was up to you to see that they were there, they were doing what they were supposed to be doing. You were the one who took in any deliveries, reviewed those invoices and paid the delivery person.$Good Lord but what we did as an urban life advisor, what I did was interviewed folks who were having trouble--whatever their life troubles were which typically at the time--there were--at one point I thought that surely the entire State of Mississippi had been depopulated, because all of those people were on the West Side [Chicago, Illinois], half of them living in their cars and looking for work (laughter), but you could come to an urban progress center and you could apply--they were co-located there, CCDPA, the old Cook County Department of Public Aid, which--whose job has now been taken over by the Illinois Department of Public Aid [Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services]. You had--the job training folks were there, they were all here in this one building. So you could come in and make application for all of these services, you know it's--current people talk about oh, let's do these multiservice centers and there are no new ideas, you know. Been there, done that so people came in and they saw us urban life advisors when they had various and sundry problems. They couldn't get their kids in a school, they needed to know where to get this, that or other kind of help, you know we had our handy Blue Book [Social Service Directory] there, which was put out by the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago which listed every single social service known to man, because remember there is no Internet yet (laughter), so you, you actually had directories and things, and you dealt with CCDPA, the--because that was back in the day when people actually had a social worker, a case worker who figured out their grant amount based on you know what their rent was, the number of kids they had, a whole bunch of other things. So you were forever having to deal with CCDPA to advocate on behalf of these people and try and straighten out stuff that case workers had either had not done or screwed up, help people get food stamps, deal with the CHA [Chicago Housing Authority] you know I mean there-- it was actually possible then to get housing, deal with that and what we were is--even though we didn't necessarily have a social services background, what you had were people with college degrees, who could go through all these directories and figure out how to get through the bureaucracy. I mean that's what we could do and that's what we did and you know. I happened to share an office with a girl, Karen Ivy [ph.] who had worked for CCDPA and she, she taught me you know (laughter) really how you dealt with and got through that bureaucracy to try and help people get you know what at the time you believed they were entitled to. Remember this is the '60s [1960s], we're children of the '60s [1960s] with the mentality that folks here, the government, folks are entitled to all of this service and somebody ought to beat on the head of the government and make them provide it, you know (laughter), give these people their food stamps.

The Honorable Judith C. Rice

Former City Treasurer for the City of Chicago, Judith Carol Rice was born on July 30, 1957, in Chicago, Illinois. The granddaughter of sharecroppers and daughter of Thelma Dean Martin and Fred Rice, Chicago’s first African American Police Superintendent, Rice attended Avalon Park Elementary School and Mercy High School. While attending high school, Rice was a member of the drama club and performed in the lead role for her high school’s production of Hello Dolly. Rice graduated from high school in 1975, and attended Northern Illinois University from 1975 to 1976. In 1977, Rice began attending Loyola University and graduated cum laude with her B.A. degree in communications in 1981.

In 1982, Rice was hired to work in the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office. Rice rose from a Victim/Witness Assistant to Assistant to the Illinois State’s Attorney. While working in the Illinois State’s Attorney’s Office, in 1984, Rice decided to further her education by attending John Marshall Law School. In 1988, Rice earned her J.D. degree and was admitted to the Illinois Bar. In 1989, Rice began her career with the City of Chicago serving as Assistant Corporation Counsel. Rice went on to become the city’s managing Deputy Director and then Director of the Department of Revenue from 1993 to 1995. It was in these positions that Rice was instrumental in the complete overhaul of Chicago’s parking ticket collection system. Also in1995, Rice worked as a staff member for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Between 1996 and 2000, Rice became the first woman commissioner of two of the biggest infrastructure agencies in City of Chicago government; from 1996 to 1999, she served as Commissioner of the Chicago Department of Water, and from 1999 to 2000, she served as head of the Chicago Department of Transportation. In November of 2000, Rice was appointed by Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley as City Treasurer. As City Treasurer, Rice was responsible for all cash and investments for the City of Chicago.

Accession Number

A2005.165

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/18/2005

Last Name

Rice

Maker Category
Middle Name

C.

Organizations
Schools

Mercy High School

Avalon Park Elementary School

Loyola University Chicago

John Marshall Law School

First Name

Judith

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

RIC10

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Barbara Burrell

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/30/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

City treasurer, city government appointee, and city commissioner The Honorable Judith C. Rice (1957 - ) was the first woman to serve as commissioner of the Chicago Department of Water and head of the Chicago Department of Transportation. Rice also served as City Treasurer for the City of Chicago under the administration of Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Employment

City of Chicago Office of the Treasurer

Cook County State's Attorney's Office

City of Chicago Department of Transportation

City of Chicago Department of Revenue

City of Chicago Department of Water Management

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of the Honorable Judith C. Rice's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice shares her father's perspective on education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her father's career in the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice reflects upon her father's career in the Chicago Police Department

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes Chicago's Avalon Park community

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her family's relationship to church

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her early home life

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice remembers her educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her time at Mercy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice explains how she entered Chicago's Loyola University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes majoring in corporate communications

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her work for the Cook County State's Attorney's Office

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her time at Chicago's John Marshall Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her time at Chicago's John Marshall Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice remembers passing the Illinois State Bar

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her work for the Cook County State's Attorney's Office in 1988

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice talks about the U.S. criminal justice system

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice reflects upon the Cook County State's Attorney's Office in the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her career trajectory in the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her work as Chicago's revenue director

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice talks about Chicago's parking regulations

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her work as Chicago's water commissioner

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes the benefits of law school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice recalls becoming Chicago's treasurer

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her role as Chicago's treasurer

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes Our Money Matters financial literacy programs

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice reflects upon her work as Chicago's treasurer

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice talks about running for political office and her investment philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her parents' support

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her father's career in the Chicago Police Department
The Honorable Judith C. Rice describes her work as Chicago's water commissioner
Transcript
Your father [HistoryMaker Fred Rice, Jr.] became the first black superintendent of police for the City of Chicago [Illinois], right? Can you tell us about and how it affected, I guess the rest of the family, you know?$$Sure. I think the road that he took to achieve that position really affected us most of all because, when I was a small child, my father did a lot of different jobs. He was a taxi driver. He worked for the post office for a while. And he didn't seem to really have his foot in anything. And he applied to the [Chicago] Police Department and to the [Chicago] Fire Department. And he always says that, that in his mind whoever called him first was where he was going. And he felt that he could push into either of those departments. The police department called him up first and he went through that process. But at the time he was hired on the police department, blacks were not just part of the whole department, city-wide. He had to go into the park district police [Chicago Park District Police Department]. And so he went into the park district police and worked there in the park system and then somewhere, I think in the early '60s [1960s], the police department expanded and allowed African Americans to come a part of the general force. And he was a patrolman for a while. All through my childhood he was a patrolman and then my mother [Thelma Martin Rice] said, "You know you've been a patrolman for a long time, and you're not going anywhere in this department, and you need to start taking the tests to get some rank." And he kind of you know poo-poo her, I don't need to do that, that's one thing. So it was my mother that really got on him to take the tests. And he took the sergeant's exam and scored very high and became a sergeant and then he went on to take the lieutenant's and captain's. And I think his first kind of break in the department was being named district commander. And he was named district commander, I think of both the Fillmore [Police] District and Englewood Police District. And Englewood, that's when he really started to get into things and become part of the higher echelon of the department. So the night that he was named. And I think the other opportunity--opportune thing was Harold Washington becoming mayor. Because Harold had the same background as my father. As a matter of fact, they knew of each other all their lives. Harold was a bit older than my father. But they came from the same place and knew the same people. And so I think it came down to three final contenders, and he hung out there a few days, not knowing what the result would be. But I remember being at home watching television and the night that he was named and he knew but he would not tell any of us (laughter) until it was official. And just the excitement of all of us that were there. And I think a couple of his sisters and brothers where over. And it just--just felt such a since of pride in him and his accomplishments and kind of the road that he had taken to get to that position.$$Okay. So this was in 1984, '83 [1983] (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah it would have been '83 [1983]--I think '83, '84, somewhere in there. Because he retired in '87 [1987].$Now you were commissioner of water from '96 [1996] 'til 2000, now what does a commissioner of water do in the City of Chicago [Illinois]?$$Well, the city has the function of providing fresh drinking water to the city, so all the water's taken out of Lake Michigan and purified, so the commissioner's got to make sure that all the com- staff is in place to do that. All the infrastructure is happening, all of the projects that surround providing fresh drinking water are done. So, we're more--I think I (unclear) as more of a planning phase and project manager and implementation in that department [Chicago Department of Water Management]. One of the things we did was we privatized the whole engineering division because they were coming out with only a couple of projects a year, and so we got a private company in to help us to really spit out different projects that we had to get done to get the whole water system modernized. And we moved up to replacing like fifty miles of water mains in the City of Chicago. Tried to keep the infrastructure tight, keep it current. And it was--it was an awesome job. I mean I attended a lot of water management programs all over the country. And got us involved with different water management groups that tried to bring new technology to the city. And there are still plans sitting there that probably will be implemented in the future, that we participated in bringing to the table.$$Okay, so really what you have developed, I guess, is a reputation for being--manage well--$$Yes, I think if anything that is the way I look at it. And even being treasurer I look at, what things need to happen in this department to make sure that we are a protecting the revenue in terms of getting it into the right banks and being--maximizing the city's revenue. How are we going to get the biggest return for the monies that we have. And how are we going to have the systems in place that are going to be able to help us do that?

Iola McGowan

Iola McGowan, former vice chairman of the Illinois State Democratic Party and Chicago Park District Commissioner, was born Iola Stewart on September 8, 1936, in Chicago, Illinois. Proud of her West Side roots, McGowan graduated from Farragut High School in 1954. In the years following graduation, McGowan started a family and began to spearhead neighborhood efforts in her area. Inspired by another black woman, the late head of Midwest Community Council, Nancy Jefferson, McGowan became more involved in public life. Although a conscientious wife and mother, a determined McGowan did not let family life stop her from pursuing her education. She earned her B.A. degree in inner city studies from Northeastern Illinois University in 1980.

McGowan started at the precinct level of local government ascending up the ranks of the Democratic Party to become the director of Consumer Services for the City of Chicago under Mayor Jane Byrne. McGowan served in that capacity for a six-year term, managing a budget of $900,000. As director of Consumer Services, she headed the Model Cities Community Services program and successfully funded proposals totaling approximately $1 million. In addition, she developed an innovative classroom coloring-book aimed at teaching children how to buy food. The Federal Food Program adopted McGowan's book. McGowan served as commissioner and vice president of the Chicago Park District and vice chairman of the Illinois State Democratic Party.

She is a member of the National Organization of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs, the Chicago Council on Fine Arts City Arts Panel and Community Development Program for the Austin Area and the Chicago Chapter of the Coalition of Labor Union Women. McGowan is still a valued consultant and activist in the Austin community.

Iola McGowan passed away on May 25, 2012.

Accession Number

A2002.105

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/11/2002

Last Name

McGowan

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Thomas Jefferson Elementary School

Chicago State University

Northeastern Illinois University

First Name

Iola

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

MCG01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Do what you can and do it well.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/8/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Death Date

5/25/2012

Short Description

City government appointee and political party executive Iola McGowan (1936 - 2012 ) was a former board member of the Chicago Park District and was the former vice president of the Illinois Democratic Party. McGowan started at the precinct level of local government ascending up the ranks of the Democratic Party to become the director of Consumer Services for the City of Chicago under Mayor Jane Byrne.

Employment

City of Chicago

Chicago Park District

Illinois State Democratic Party

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Iola McGowan interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Iola McGowan's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Iola McGowan discusses her family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Iola McGowan discusses changes in her family life

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Iola McGowan describes her childhood environs on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Iola McGowan remembers family members

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Iola McGowan recalls her school years

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Iola McGowan describes the social life at her schools

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Iola McGowan describes her early career goals

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Iola McGowan shares episodes from her school life and career

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Iola McGowan recalls her early involvement in civic organizing, part I

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Iola McGowan recalls her early involvement in civic organizing, part II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Iola McGowan discusses her experiences at Northeastern Illinois University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Iola McGowan describes how she became involved in politics

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Iola McGowan recalls her activities after the death of Mayor Richard J. Daley

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Iola McGowan recounts her experiences with the Chicago Park District, part I

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Iola McGowan recounts her experiences with the Chicago Park District, part II

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Iola McGowan shares thoughts on Chicago, Illinois's 1983 mayoral election

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Iola McGowan shares observations of tension in the black community in 1983

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Iola McGowan discusses her 1983 campaign for Alderwoman and her relationship with Danny Davis

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Iola McGowan discusses issues on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Iola McGowan describes her position on the State Central Committee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Iola McGowan considers future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Iola McGowan talks about her concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Iola McGowan considers her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Iola McGowan discusses her parents' feelings on her political career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Iola McGowan discusses how she'd like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Iola McGowan discusses her heart transplant

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Photo - Iola McGowan Gay Teens photo, 1950-1954

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Photo - Iola McGowan with her sisters and mother, Chicago, Illinois, ca. 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Photo - Iola McGowan with her sixth grade Thomas Jefferson Elementary School class, Chicago, Illinois, ca. 1948

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Photo - Iola McGowan and U.S. Congresswoman Cardiss Collins, ca. 1987-1988

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Photo - Iola McGowan with Chicago Park District Superintendent Ed Kelly, ca. 1980

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Photo - Iola McGowan's mother Ernestine Martin at beauty school graduation, ca. late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Photo - Iola McGowan with attendees at a consumer sales event, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Photo - Iola McGowan with Bill Lee, Ed Kelly, Richard Elrod and Sydney Marovitz, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Photo - Iola McGowan with Judge Eugene Pincham and two unidentified men, n.d

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Photo - Iola McGowan and Lenore Cartwright, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Photo - Iola McGowan and Niles Sherman, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Photo - Iola Mcgowan with Marge and Neil Hartigan, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Photo - Iola McGowan in her home, not dated

Tape: 4 Story: 19 - Photo - Iola McGowan featured in the '29th Ward News', ca. 1980-1984

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Photo - Iola McGowan with Fred Kitch, Walter Simmons and Clarence Thomas, not dated

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Photo - Iola McGowan with her husband and daughters, Hawaii, not dated

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Iola McGowan with U.S. Presidential candidate William Clinton, 1992

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Iola McGowan with her husband, daughters and son, ca. late 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Iola McGowan with her father, St. Louis, Missouri, ca. late 1970s

DASession

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DATitle
Iola McGowan recounts her experiences with the Chicago Park District, part II
Iola McGowan describes her position on the State Central Committee
Transcript
You were talking about your activities in the Chicago [Illinois] Park District.$$Right. So after, after, you know, after a while we began to have a meeting of the minds. And I still, whenever I had concerns about things that went on at the District, I raised them. I did a lot of things at the District that had not been done before. For an example, I brought women on as carpenters. I brought women on as truck drivers. I brought minority on as--African Americans, on as carpenters into craftsmen trade, I should, not just carpenters, but the craftsmen trade. In fact, when I go out today, I see people, "Oh, Ms. McGowan, you got me this job. Don't you remember me?" And I can't remember them--"oh, can't, don't you remember", and you know, and things like that. So there was a lot of inroads made. There was a decree that was put on, a Federal decree that was put on the Park District when I was there because they had--there was a charge that they were not doing, for minority parks as they should have. That was done prior to me coming there, but the decree was assessed while I was there. But I mean that, the fact that they weren't doing, that was done before my time. Anyway, a lot of (unclear), this park, right up here where they have the water park now in Austin, the new--there was a, I had a new pavement put through there, had--just a lot of things in different parks throughout the city, you know, a lot of changes I had made that weren't done before. And the other Commissioners did things too. But I'm not just saying I did--everything I did. But I did do a lot of thing, you know. And I'm very proud of the legacy that I have at that Park District. I, I just feel that it was a time in my life that I was very happy that I was able to give back to the citizens, you know, for growing up here and being able to be a part of the citizenry of Chicago and be able to give something too. And as I was looking yesterday on television, they were talking about the roses they were giving away from the park, that people could come--and I thought about that beautiful rose garden, nothing--there is a reason why they're doing it. I'm not saying anything about that, but it brought it back memories of how I used to go down and see that beautiful rose garden at the park, you know, at Grant Park. And just different things that went on throughout the parks that a lot of people didn't take advantage of. At one time, we used to use the parks a lot, but, you know, I think the change of the neighborhoods had a lot to do with people not using the parks the way they used to. And a lot of it had to do with social status in our neighborhoods, you know. For an example, you know, we had the gang element and things like that. And then people began to work, and their children would go to daycare whereas when I grew up, we would go to the park and stay till our Mom came home from work or something. But they were afraid for them to walk the streets to get to the park, just a number of reasons why it changed. But now, it seems like it's sort of coming back. It's just like the pendulum. It goes this way, then it comes back that way. You know, and so I just happened to be there at a time that there was a lull in using the parks. In the Hispanic areas, their area had just changed, and they really use their parks, they really do because half--Douglas Park, one half of it, the African American community uses, and the other half, the soccer and the Hispanic community use for their, in their leisure time and their recreational activities. So it's, it's, it's something, you know, and the next ten years, people are--they've got the water parks, the next ten years, they will be out. And it'll be something different, something new, you know. Ice skating used to be a big thing in the parks. It's not as much as it used to be, you know. Am I putting you to sleep?$$No.$$(Laughs) Okay. So that's, that's primarily it, you know, with the parks. I really enjoyed it. I loved--when I see the fire works when they have it, like they had at the 4th of July night, and I've spent a many a fourth of July night on the lakefront with the fireworks. So, you know, things like that you know. And you'd say, "hey, I've been there," you know, I, I know the enjoyment that the people are getting.$Tell us how you became the Democratic Committee--$$State Central?$$Yeah, State Central Committeeperson.$$In 1984, I think it was--no '87 [1987], Jane Byrne was out of office when I got that, they had just--[Illinois state senator] Phil Rock who as the head of the Senate at that time, they passed a bill where if there's a Committee, State Central Committeeman, there has to be a State Central Committeewoman. That's to give the women equal, you know, equal representation within the Democratic Party. And so it had never been done before. The law was brought into effect, and they had to appoint a State Central Committeewoman from every district. All the Committeemen met out here in this district at Phil Rock's office, from the Congressional district, each--it's done by Congressional districts. And this was the Seventh District. So they all met at Phil Rock's office, and they appointed me as the State Central Committeewoman. I was appointed the first two years. After that I had to run, be elected the next four years throughout fourteen wards, throughout this district. And I campaigned, and I won. I ran for that, and I won. And I served there eighteen years in, in that position. And being State Central Committeeman, Committeewoman, I also--and a Democratic National Committeeperson, I go, you know, to all the National meetings and the conventions that are held. I have something to do with that, and being the Vice Chair of them, and also I was appointed Vice Chair of the Party, which means that next to Mike Madigan, I'm next to him. When it was the other, Gary Lapelle, I was next to Gary Lapelle. I served under four or five Committee, Presidents, you know, Chairmen's of the Party. And I've always stayed. As a result of being Vice Chair and Democratic National Committeeman, we have an organization nationally that's called the Association for State Democratic Chairs. They just gave me that award. And I served on there for seventeen years as an Executive Secretary, and I just stepped down two months ago. And that was quite a prestigious position. I got a opportunity--I've been all over the world, and just--it was just tremendous, you know, the things that I was involved with and making policy for the Democratic Party.$$What are some of the highlights of that position?$$Of the--which one?$$Well, the State--$$The State Chairs?$$Yeah, and the National, well, all (unclear) (simultaneously)--$$Oh, all of it? Well, the highlight is that being--first you got to get elected for State Central. Once you get elected, then you have the opportunity of being appointed. And I was appointed. The highlight of being Vice Chair was that I served--I had a role with the parties here in the State of Illinois, the State of Illinois party. I would sit in, you know, the Executive level, making sure that the votes were tallied. And when we had the platform to present to the full body of Democrats, I would be part of making sure the platform was presented. In addition to that, I also helped in getting the Convention together. You know, if they had in Illinois, I had a bigger role. Because it was in Chicago, we had a real big, real big role, but if it's in other states, it's just getting people, and making sure the other Democratic National Committee people are on board, and that things are--and we plan the weekend for them when they get out there. It's--I'm involved with the President. I, I've--President Clinton. I was very much involved with-- David Wilhelm (ph.), who was the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and I are very close. I, you know, they'd call me. In fact, they call me all the, right now, all the time, do this meeting here; go here, do that. We're doing this. And then, and it's involvement, you know. I have a picture with Clinton, so. I had one with Gore. I don't know who took it. But anyway, I'm saying all this on tape (laughs), I forgot. But anyway, basically, it, it's a, it's an unpaid position. There's no salary involved with it whatsoever, but it's a rewarding position, you know. And you can become State Central Committeeman, but the, the real best part of it is when you're the Vice Chair, you know. If you don't have that, it's just, you know, you just go to the meetings twice a year and, but when you're Vice Chair, you're involved at every level, you know.$$That's the exciting part of the--$$Yes, it is. Okay, now, tell us how you became the Democratic Committee--$$State Central?$$Yeah, State Central Committee President.$$In 1984, I think it was--no '87 [1987], Jane Byrne was out of office when I got that, they had just--Phil Rock who as the head of the Senate at that time, they passed a bill where if there's a Committee, State Central Committeeman, there has to be a State Central Committeewoman. That's to give the women equal, you know, equal representation within the Democratic Party. And so it had never been done before. The law was brought into effect, and they had to appoint a State Central Committeewoman from every district. All the Committeemen met out here in this district at Phil Rock's office, from the Congressional district, each--it's done by Congressional districts. And this was the Seventh District. So they all met at Phil Rock's office, and they appointed me as the State Central Committeewoman. I was appointed the first two years. After that I had to run, be elected the next four years throughout fourteen wards, throughout this district. And I campaigned, and I won. I ran for that, and I won. And I served there eighteen years in, in that position. And being State Central Committeeman, Committeewoman, I also- and a Democratic National Committeeperson, I go, you know, to all the National meetings and the conventions that are held. I have something to do with that, and being the Vice Chair of them, and also I was appointed Vice Chair of the Party, which means that next to Mike Madigan, I'm next to him. When it was the other, Gary Lapelle, I was next to Gary Lapelle. I served under four or five Committee, Presidents, you know, Chairmen's of the Party. And I've always stayed. As a result of being Vice Chair and Democratic National Committeeman, we have an organization nationally that's called the Association for State Democratic Chairs. They just gave me that award. And I served on there for seventeen years as an Executive Secretary, and I just stepped down two months ago. And that was quite a prestigious position. I got a opportunity--I've been all over the world, and just--it was just tremendous, you know, the things that I was involved with and making policy for the Democratic Party.$$What are some of the highlights of that position?$$Of the--which one?$$Well, the State--$$The State Chairs?$$Yeah, and the National, well, all (unclear) (simultaneously)--$$Oh, all of it? Well, the highlight is that being--first you got to get elected for State Central. Once you get elected, then you have the opportunity of being appointed. And I was appointed. The highlight of being Vice Chair was that I served--I had a role with the parties here in the State of Illinois, the State of Illinois party. I would sit in, you know, the Executive level, making sure that the votes were tallied. And when we had the platform to present to the full body of Democrats, I would be part of making sure the platform was presented. In addition to that, I also helped in getting the Convention together. You know, if they had in Illinois, I had a bigger role. Because it was in Chicago, we had a real big, real big role, but if it's in other states, it's just getting people, and making sure the other Democratic National Committee people are on board, and that things are--and we plan the weekend for them when they get out there. It's--I'm involved with the President. I, I've--President Clinton. I was very much involved with-- David Wilhelm (ph.), who was the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and I are very close. I, you know, they'd call me. In fact, they call me all the, right now, all the time, do this meeting here; go here, do that. We're doing this. And then, and it's involvement, you know. I have a picture with Clinton, so. I had one with Gore. I don't know who took it. But anyway, I'm saying all this on tape (laughs), I forgot. But anyway, basically, it, it's a, it's an unpaid position. There's no salary involved with it whatsoever, but it's a rewarding position, you know. And you can become State Central Committeeman, but the, the real best part of it is when you're the Vice Chair, you know. If you don't have that, it's just, you know, you just go to the meetings twice a year and, but when you're Vice Chair, you're involved at every level, you know.$$That's the exciting part of the--$$Yes, it is.