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Monica Cost

Real estate broker Monica Diane Cost was born on January 18, 1971 in Atmore, Alabama to Veronica Mason Hairston and Chalmers Hairston, III. Growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Cost attended Samson Freedman Pre-School, Anna Blankston (A.B.) Day School, Abington Friends School and Baldie Middle School. Studying and working at Seafood America, Cost graduated fifth in her class from Lankenau College Preparatory School in 1988. At Hampton University, where she attended college for three years, Cost studied accounting and held internships at Mellon Bank and Prudential Insurance. Cost graduated in 1994, from Temple University with her B.S. degree in accounting and finance.

Hired by Prudential Insurance first as a healthcare benefits analyst then as an auditor, Cost traveled the country studying and correcting Prudential’s systems and controls. In 1996, Cost moved to Boston, Massachusetts, and joined TJX Companies as an auditor. Cost, while serving as TJX’s associate human relations officer, started diversity groups for women and people of color in 1998. In 1999, Cost was appointed finance analyst and in 2000, accounting supervisor. Accepting a job with Reebok in 2000, Cost was mentored by Jimmy Jones in human relations, and served as financial analyst, senior financial analyst and compensation analyst; she also participated in The Partnership, a leadership program to support aspiring people of color in the corporate world. In 2004, Cost joined Cushman and Wakefield and became the first African American and one of the youngest individuals to hold the operations manager position within that organization. Cost also became the first African American broker in the New England area for Cushman & Wakefield and the first African American female broker in a major real estate firm in Massachusetts.

Cost served on the boards of The Partnership and the Crittendon Women’s Union; she also was a participant on the advisory board of the Epiphany School and the planning committee for the Paul and Phyllis Fireman One Family Campaign, mentoring one of their scholars. Cost served as president of The Partnership Alumni organization and chaired the Girl Scouts’ Leading Women Awards. In 2006, Cost was a Leading Woman herself; in 2000 she was a YMCA Black Achiever; and in 2004 the Chamber of Commerce Future Leader. "The Boston Herald" named Cost one of The Hub’s Future Leaders. Cost counsels young professionals on how to succeed in business through her consulting firm, Evidently Assured (www.evidentlyassured.com). She has also been featured as a motivational speaker at Northeastern University, Boston University and the University of Suffolk.

Cost is the author of the blog "Out of Living in the Land of Make Believe."

A longtime resident of the Boston area, Cost is married to Donald M. Cost with two sons, Christopher and Cameron.

Monica Diane Cost was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 10, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.130

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/10/2007

Last Name

Cost

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Temple University

Hampton University

Lankenau High School

Abington Friends School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Monica

Birth City, State, Country

Atmore

HM ID

COS01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, college students, young professionals, minorities, women

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: $500-$2,000
Preferred Audience: Adults, college students, young professionals, minorities, women

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Aruba

Favorite Quote

Failure is Not an Indication of Your Ability but Just a Need to Adjust Your Strategy.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/18/1971

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon, Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Real estate broker Monica Cost (1971 - ) was the first African American female real estate broker for a major real estate firm in Massachusetts.

Employment

Cushman & Wakefield of Massachusetts

Reebok International Ltd.

TJX Companies

Favorite Color

Burgundy

Timing Pairs
0,0:111810,1912$0,0:166240,2522
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Monica Cost's interview, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Monica Cost's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Monica Cost lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Monica Cost describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Monica Cost describes her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Monica Cost recounts her father's disappearance

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Monica Cost describes her parents and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Monica Cost describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Monica Cost describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's Mount Airy neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Monica Cost describes the roles of music and church in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Monica Cost describes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Monica Cost recalls the schools she attended in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Monica Cost describes her extracurricular activities at Lankenau High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Monica Cost recalls her early aspirations of becoming a businesswoman

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recounts how she became a real estate broker

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Monica Cost recalls influential teachers and mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia and Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Monica Cost recalls her African American studies professor at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Monica Cost recounts her time at the Prudential Insurance Company

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Monica Cost recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts in 1995 and race relations there

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Monica Cost describes working at TJX Companies in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Monica Cost describes working in finance and human resources for Reebok

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Monica Cost talks about HistoryMaker Benaree P. Wiley, The Partnership, Inc. and joining Cushman & Wakefield

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recounts how she became the first black female real estate broker at a major firm

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Monica Cost describes how she negotiated the predominantly white male field of real estate brokering

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Monica Cost describes her work as a real estate broker

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Monica Cost describes her biggest agency deal and how she connects with clients

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Monica Cost talks about her image consulting company, Evidently Assured

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Monica Cost talks about her desire to write a book and to help individuals and firms network with one another

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Monica Cost provides her advice for aspiring brokers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Monica Cost describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Monica Cost recalls obstacles she has overcome in her life

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Monica Cost reflects upon her life and what she would do differently

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Monica Cost reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Monica Cost describes her family

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Monica Cost describes her late friend Daynese Jimerson-Forsey

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Monica Cost describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Monica Cost narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Monica Cost narrates her photographs, pt.2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Monica Cost recalls her early aspirations of becoming a businesswoman
Monica Cost describes her work as a real estate broker
Transcript
Now when you were--when you were in high school [Lankenau High School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], did you think about business at all as a--as a occupation or did you read books about business or any of those, those, like Og Mandino's books or any of the, the self-improvement kinda, you know, the, those kinds of things--(simultaneous)--$$I didn't read them and I don't think I knew to read them, but I knew that I wanted to be a deal maker, if that makes sense. When my sister [Tiffany Hairston Lindsey] and I--I think maybe when I was twelve, you know how they used to have the carbon copies at the bank? You fill out your deposit form, you keep one and give one to the teller. We would take a stack of those, you know, home, and we'd use our [Coleco] Quiz Wiz as our computer and we'd use those as our paperwork, and our closet in our bedroom was the elevator, and we were business women. And we--you know, we'd type up on the Quiz Wiz and make it beep and do all this stuff, and we'd fill out the paperwork and we'd hand it to each other and say, can you take this to accounting? Can you take this here? Can you take this there? It was--it was the funniest thing. And I always had a--I always had a vision of wearing a suit. I don't know what I was doing. And then there was also on the way to my grand aunt's house, there was a public accounting firm on the East River Parkway [East River Drive, now Kelly Drive, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], and I don't remember the name of it, but it's a very neat, stuccoed building, and it said something, something, CPA, something else. And every time I rode by that building, because once I saw women and men coming out of that building in suits, and I said, that's what I wanna do. So I thought I wanted to be an accountant because it felt like it was--felt like the business and the paperwork that I--and the suit-wearing that I dreamed of, of having.$Walk us through how, how a deal is made and is (laughter)--okay.$$The amazing thing is that I didn't believe when I heard, a deal can come from anywhere at any time. It could fall out of the sky, meaning, you could go to Starbucks and overhear someone talking about outgrowing space, or you can sit on a board at a nonprofit and--I don't know, just every person you touch has the ability to create a deal. But basically, it could come from a lot of different ways. We represent landlords and we represent tenants, so on the landlord side, for instance, myself and two other team members represent the John Hancock Tower, which is the tallest building in Boston [Massachusetts], and for our landlords, we leased a building. So we go out and we find tenants to lease the building and we negotiate on the best terms for the landlord, helping them to make their underwriting, and to maximize their value on the building so that when they actually sell the building, they can get the most money for it; so that's on the landlord side. On the tenant side, we take every day nonprofits, financial institutions, anybody you can name. Let's say a financial institution, we--if someone came to me--if you were the head of a financial institution and you said, hey listen, I'm starting in--I'm based in Chicago [Illinois], I'm starting a new branch in Boston, we're gonna have about twenty people, I need ten offices, five cubes, dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, ten thousand square feet. You basically take them out on a tour, so--our, our value is really in our knowledge of the market, so being able to help them be strategic about their real estate decisions. What do you need? Do you need public transportation? Do you need amenities? Who do you need to be close to? Where do you wanna be? So you go through this process of understanding who they are and what makes sense for them, take 'em out on a tour. They find a couple buildings they love, you submit a request for proposal. They come back, you evaluate your best option, negotiate the best terms, sign the lease, off they go.$$Okay. But--$$To put it simply.$$Yeah. Now does this match the--your vision of deal-making when you were a kid?$$On every level. My sister [Tiffany Hairston Lindsey] and I laugh about it. From the fundraising events that I go to, to sitting on boards, to talking the market with people in private equity firms, like--it, it absolutely hits on every cylinder. I think I've arrived (laughter) for this phase of my life anyway.$$Okay.$$Yeah.

Eugene Henry Webb

Eugene Henry Webb was born in Red Level, Alabama on November 24, 1918. After graduating from Parker High School in Birmingham, Alabama, Webb later attended Columbia University in New York City, where he studied real estate appraisal. He also attended Pohs Institute and Miles College.

After high school, Webb worked as a dining car waiter on the Seabound Rail Road and the New York Coastal Railroad. In 1941, he joined the U.S. Navy, serving for two years during World War II. After his honorable discharge, Webb moved to Harlem, and began attending school. After attending Columbia University, he went to work in the real estate industry, and in 1968, opened his own brokerage, Webb & Brooker, Inc. Today, after almost forty years, Webb & Brooker is one of the most successful real estate management brokerage firms in Harlem.

Webb has been active in the Harlem community for decades, having been a part of the group that helped to found both Carver Federal Savings and Loan Bank and Freedom National Bank. He later served as chairman of the executive board of Freedom National Bank. He has been a member of the Real Estate Board of New York for twenty years, and a member of the Columbia Society of Real Estate Appraisers for almost four decades. He is also a former member of the board of trustees of Cambridge College and Stillman College, and has received honorary doctorates from Miles College and the New York Podiatric College of Medicine.

Webb has two children, and in 1999, married attorney Danna Wood Webb.

Accession Number

A2004.244

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/2/2004

Last Name

Webb

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Henry

Occupation
Schools

A.H. Parker High School

Councill Elementary School

Miles College

Columbia University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Eugene

Birth City, State, Country

Red Level

HM ID

WEB04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/24/1918

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

Real estate broker Eugene Henry Webb (1918 - ) is the owner of Webb & Brooker, one of the most successful real estate management brokerage firms in Harlem. He also helped to found Carver Federal Savings and Loan Bank and Freedom National Bank.

Employment

U.S. Navy

St. Louis-San Francisco Railway

Webb & Brooker, Inc.

Seabound Railroad

NY Central Railroad

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:448,35:2594,61:7774,158:8070,163:11326,301:20150,373:20934,384:26948,486:27572,501:30926,563:34592,638:38960,711:51340,857:51900,866:53660,898:54460,909:54780,914:63980,1097:85958,1364:89312,1430:97540,1528:106119,1673:112185,1764:113545,1803:118242,1837:127170,1988:128430,2083:133890,2154:137740,2221:154760,2505:155056,2510:163640,2664:175800,2855$0,0:2684,163:15581,392:20927,506:32834,765:33158,770:44081,885:44720,898:45288,914:57260,1134:59776,1185:61404,1230:61774,1236:63180,1285:64216,1306:71320,1464:89706,1782:93109,1833:94022,1847:96595,1901:97010,1908:104995,2090:108802,2169:126440,2437
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eugene Henry Webb's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about his father, Eddie Webb

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers growing up in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers the First Baptist Church of Ensley in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls getting into trouble with the police

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes Council Elementary School in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his mother's parenting

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his life as a young boy

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about segregation in Ensley, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working odd jobs as a boy

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working and attending Birmingham's A. H. Parker High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes the jobs he worked as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers looking for work in California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers working as a waiter on the railroad

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his time in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers joining the real estate business

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his trajectory in the real estate business

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers his mentors in business

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers founding Webb & Brooker Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers connections he made in the real estate business

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb predicts increasing gentrification of Harlem, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon changes in race relations

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb explains the economics of poor African American communities

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb explains why he kept Webb & Brooker, Inc. located in Harlem, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon challenges for black owned businesses

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his hopes and concerns for American politics

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb talks about prioritizing his employees

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon the importance of preserving history

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his concerns for young people in Harlem

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his commitment to communities in Harlem and Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls giving free rent to the embassy of Chad

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers encouraging Fannie Mae to advertise in black publications

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers helping a young man pay for college

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eugene Henry Webb reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eugene Henry Webb recalls his greatest moment

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his family

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eugene Henry Webb describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eugene Henry Webb offers advice to aspiring businessmen

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers saving the TV show 'Like It Is' from cancellation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Eugene Henry Webb remembers HUD Secretary Robert C. Weaver

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Eugene Henry Webb describes notable African Americans acquaintances

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Eugene Henry Webb describes his office decor

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Eugene Henry Webb narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

11$1

DATitle
Eugene Henry Webb talks about segregation in Ensley, Alabama
Eugene Henry Webb remembers his mentors in business
Transcript
Well we know this is the South, we know what time it is, but this is a history that you're giving us, so I'm, I'm asking you, what--what's your impression of race relations in that--in that place (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now?$$Yeah. No, no, then.$$Then?$$Then and what, what did you--$$Well, then, you--as I said, when you--when you are born in, in a, a period of time where segregation was accepted and we didn't--there was no such a thing as a Civil Rights Movement. During that period of time, black people didn't rise up and say I'm not going to be segregated in schools, I'm not--housing, like that. Black people accepted that. And where I came from, we had no--we had no black leaders talking about white people was treating us bad or treating us good or--we were in--we didn't have this or we were denied this. We did not have that. So when you grow up in that environment and everything else around is, is that way, it really doesn't affect you. We wasn't able to travel to other places to, like, Chicago [Illinois] or maybe some of the northern cities where there might be different type of style of living. Were we grew up, there--we lived over in the, what they call a Bottom, the Sandy Bottom [Ensley, Alabama], for example, and those blacks who had better incomes, like a postman or a doctor or something, they lived in another little section. We didn't live over there. We lived in sand--what they call Sandy Bottom. That's where all the very few--very poor people lived. We didn't live in the section that the blacks that was mobile or financially were able. We couldn't afford to live up there. We didn't have no house. We lived in a shotgun house; we rented. We didn't own any land. We didn't own anything.$$Who owned the house that you were in and was it a--$$Some Italian fella. He owned the house. And then I think he used to have the grocery store in the corner, and he owned those houses we lived in. In the South back in those days, the companies used to have the company housing. You worked in the steel mill, you could live in a company house or if you're a coal miner, you can live in their house. They would be houses for their employees and the blacks could live there and then have a commissary where they could go buy. I--we didn't live in one of those houses. We lived in a house where we--this I--Italian grocery man owned. He had a bunched of 'em and we lived in one of his houses, and that's who we paid the rent to.$$Okay.$$If we hadn't been able to, I've--if I had an adult that worked in the steel mill or coal mine, we would've maybe had a, a house, 'cause the company built those. If, if my mother [Docia Foster Webb] had a better school teacher, perhaps we could've been able to move over to the better section of black community and we'd had a house. We didn't have those things.$Okay, now I was just talking--we, we just--you just described kind of quickly how you got involved (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$--and how you rose and stuff, but, but what were--were there any obstacles to, to being a successful real estate person--$$Well, you know--$$--in Chicago [Illinois]?$$--when you start out--$$In, in New York [New York]?$$--you're, you're poor. There's always obstacles because you're poor and you start out. You don't start out with a wealthy background or wealthy family in the real estate business, so you start out from scratch; you're very poor, and, and, and--far as real estate is concerned, and you don't have the luxury of having a family that's in there and that you have a foundation you build on. When you start from scratch, you, you build a foundation, so I didn't--that wasn't successful. I was helped along the way by a lot of people. For example, I just said, Danny Burrows [Daniel L. Burrows], who was the father-in-law of Dave Dinkins [HistoryMaker David N. Dinkins], the former mayor, I, I was helping with him because he, he would give me business during that period of time, and other elder real estate brokers that had been in business a long time. There's a guy named Lloyd Jenkins [ph.] who used to give me a lot of business, you know. Because at that--at that stage in their life, the business that they--that they didn't want was like a piece of cake to me, but it was--you know, they didn't need it, they say give it to Webb [HistoryMaker Eugene Henry Webb], and that's what a lot of the old timers used to say, give it to Webb, you know. It's like a crumb if you wanna look at it--back at it, but it was a piece of cake at the period of time. So that's where you get the idea on, what do I do next with my life or what do I do to make my--to, to be able to make a better business than I got? Well, I came to the conclusion, like I said, my friends was all over the--United Mutual [United Mutual Life Insurance Company; Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, New York] was a company that was controlled by blacks, so I asked, like I said, Danny Burrows, I appreciate if you could, you know, if an opening come on the board, I'd like to be able to sit on that board and he said, all right, I'll keep it in mind. Well, a couple years later, he mentioned it and says "I'm on--you wanna sit"--I said, "Yeah." So I asked people like that who has helped me.

Jerline Lambert

Jerline Lambert was born in West Helena, Arkansas, on July 16, 1938, and was adopted when she was ten months old. While her early education was in Arkansas, Lambert finished her education in Chicago, earning an A.A. from Central YMCA and a B.A. from Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago in 1989. Lambert has also received a variety of other certifications, including a certified real estate appraiser license from Howard University and a certified real estate manager license from the University of Chicago.

Lambert first began in real estate in 1965, when she went to work as a sales representative for Well's Realty in Chicago. In 1968, she became a real estate broker and opened up Lambert's Realty, serving as president and CEO. Lambert took classes and became the first African American woman certified real estate manager. Since then, her business has grown to include real estate appraisals and property management, incorporating a staff of fifteen, including four of Lambert's children.

In recent years, Lambert was appointed by the National Association of Realtors to work as district coordinator for Illinois Congressman Danny Davis, bringing to his attention various housing related issues throughout his district. She has also been involved in a number of community organizations and has been the recipient of numerous awards. She was appointed by former Illinois Governor Jim Edgar to serve as a member of the Governor's Commission of Mortgage Practices; is president emeritus of the Chicago Chapter of Africare; and the first vice president of the Midwest Community Council. Lambert has also served on the national board of Operation PUSH. Lambert has appeared in Who's Who In American Women, has been the recipient of the Rainbow/PUSH Women in Business Achievement Award and has received the Midwest Community Council Lifetime Award for Distinguished Community Service.

Accession Number

A2003.086

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/21/2003

Last Name

Lambert

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Central YMCA College

Northeastern Illinois University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Jerline

Birth City, State, Country

West Helena

HM ID

LAM01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Summer

Speaker Bureau Notes

Would like to be notified about future speaking events that she could attend as an audience member.

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Keep On Pushing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/16/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish, Vegetables

Short Description

Real estate broker Jerline Lambert (1938 - ) is the first African American woman certified as a real estate manager, and later became a certified real estate appraiser.

Employment

Well's Realty

Lambert's Realty

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:522,3:4785,88:16008,272:24938,347:34090,529:38138,599:58305,889:62730,987:63930,1015:64380,1100:90714,1292:92730,1401:94074,1459:107778,1534:110742,1595:115500,1688:115812,1693:118932,1771:120492,1891:131441,1987:170380,2512:172920,2518$0,0:2458,206:10090,321:11890,346:25772,518:59844,954:67290,1152:67582,1157:79334,1361:89890,1501
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Jerline Lambert narrates her photographs

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Jerline Lambert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jerline Lambert lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jerline Lambert describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jerline Lambert describes being raised by her adoptive parents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jerline Lambert describes her adoptive father's cotton farm in Round Pond, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jerline Lambert describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jerline Lambert describes her experiences attending Rosenwald School in Round Pond, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jerline Lambert talks about being bussed to Lincoln High School in Forrest City, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jerline Lambert describes being a young bride

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jerline Lambert describes the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood in Round Pond, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jerline Lambert describes her childhood home in Round Pond, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jerline Lambert talks about her desire to finish her education after she got married

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jerline Lambert describes her move to Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jerline Lambert describes her experiences living in Chicago in the late 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jerline Lambert describes how her work experiences in Chicago motivated her to go back to school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jerline Lambert describes completing her high school education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jerline Lambert describes purchasing her first home, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jerline Lambert describes purchasing her first home, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jerline Lambert describes why she enrolled in real estate school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jerline Lambert describes being released from the contract for the first home she purchased

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jerline Lambert talks about buying a home on contract

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jerline Lambert describes being involved with Operation Breadbasket and Operation PUSH

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jerline Lambert describes what motivated her to begin managing properties

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jerline Lambert describes why she and her husband divorced

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jerline Lambert describes being trained as a real estate agent by Mrs. Geraldine Wells

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jerline Lambert describes the real estate success of Geraldine Wells on Chicago's West Side

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jerline Lambert describes what she learned from real estate agents Geraldine Wells and Michael Willis

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jerline Lambert describes the term "blockbusting"

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jerline Lambert describes opening her own real estate office, Lambert's Realty

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jerline Lambert describes how the Fair Housing Act of 1968 affected the first year of Lambert's Realty

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jerline Lambert describes being a property manager

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Jerline Lambert describes how she decreased her overhead costs during her early years managing properties

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Jerline Lambert describes the challenges of owning Lambert's Realty, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jerline Lambert describes the challenges of owning Lambert's Realty, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jerline Lambert describes why she became a real estate appraiser

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jerline Lambert talks about realtors and realtists, and the mentorship she received as a real estate broker

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jerline Lambert describes her political involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jerline Lambert describes serving committees for Illinois State Governors Jim Edgar and Dan Walker

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jerline Lambert talks about maintaining her business interests on Chicago's South and West Sides

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jerline Lambert talks about Chicago African Americans who were involved in real estate and professional organizations she was involved in

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jerline Lambert talks about the circumstances in the real estate market that shaped the 1940 Hansberry v. Lee case

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jerline Lambert describes how she has helped youth and her clients

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jerline Lambert describes her work ethic

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jerline Lambert talks about her children's involvement in her real estate business

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jerline Lambert talks about attending college

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jerline Lambert describes the real estate profession

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jerline Lambert reflects upon having a successful family business

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jerline Lambert shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jerline Lambert describes the challenges of transitioning from public and rented housing to private housing

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jerline Lambert describes what it means to be a good property manager

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jerline Lambert talks about the legal aspects of property management

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jerline Lambert describes how Chicago neighborhoods have changed over time

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jerline Lambert describes what she would have done differently in the real estate business

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jerline Lambert talks about her adoptive parents

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Jerline Lambert describes being involved with Operation Breadbasket and Operation PUSH
Jerline Lambert describes the term "blockbusting"
Transcript
At that time, when I was working for Mrs. [Geraldine] Wells, I really was not that much into any politics or anything like that. I was busy trying to work, trying to raise five children, and I just really was not that aware. I know that Mayor [Richard J.] Daley was the mayor. And I remember when Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] came, you know, came to Chicago around that time and he stayed on the West Side and all of that. I remember driving by to look at the building where he was staying over, I think it was around 16th Street over there, 16th and Ridgeway somewhere... Hamlin. I remember that. And I remember going to... Dr. King would give some speeches, you know kind of like... Once I know... I remember he was doing a speech and had a, I guess, a platform built. And he was standing on this platform, and a lot of people were all around just... you know. And I went to that, just in the audience, you know, in the group--the crowd, you know, standing back, you know, just to hear him speak. At that time that's about it, you know. Now, I did join Operation Breadbasket and I've always, I've been involved with Breadbasket. Because it was a little earlier than that. I joined Breadbasket in 1967. That's when--and I did get a chance to meet Dr. King before he passed, just the one time, and that was it. And I was active in, pretty active in Breadbasket during the whole time that it was Breadbasket. And then I've always, I've been active ever since. Now, during--oh, right after I opened my office it was really a hard struggle, and doing the things... I was not as attentive as I would have liked to have been. Because Saturdays were the days that I had to show properties. So I could not really attend. So, I would attend--the Saturdays that I could, I would attend. But most Saturdays, truthfully, I was working and I could not attend a lot of... was not that active. And I always--as I was coming up in real estate and doing all of this, I'd say, I always used to say, "I want to go home." And they'd say, "Where is that?" And I'd say, "Operation PUSH." (Laughter). "I want to go back to PUSH." So, I actually... and after coming up doing all these things in the seventies [1970s]... And then in the eighties [1980s], well, 1980 I guess, I, I was elected president of the Dearborn Real Estate Board, and I served two years. And in 1982 when my tenure as president ended, then I went back--I really got very, very active with Operation PUSH, and I've been active ever since.$And tell me, when you said, you know, "I engaged, we were engaging in blockbusting." Can you just talk about that?$$Well, you know, we solicited. Now, later on they said it was blockbusting, because they said, you know, we were running the whites out. But we were not. You know, we just... if they, you know, because they used to... I mean, they... I remember, getting back to the Basses, once we went out and we were soliciting and, you know, the whites came out. They were a little bit hostile. And you know, this white man harked and spit on him, you know. You know, but he just wiped the spit off and just kept on. But, you know, we were just asking if you're interested in selling your house. And if they said, "No, we're not interested," we said okay and we moved on, you know. So, we used to do just do that. So, later on they called it blockbusting. You know, so we couldn't solicit anymore, you know. And we couldn't... it came to where we couldn't solicit even through the mail anymore. Because we used to send out the letters, you know, "Are you interested..." And I even get them today, you know. But, you know, I guess in some areas it's okay, you know. But, you know, we used to say, "Are you interested? You know, just let us know, you know, give us a call." And we used to get a lot of calls, and that was one way we got our business. But later on they called it blockbusting, then they instituted laws that we, you know, we definitely couldn't go out and solicit.