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Ralph Bernard Everett

Lawyer and political advisor Ralph Bernard Everett was born on June 23, 1951 in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He graduated from Morehouse College in 1973 with honors from the Phi Beta Kappa Society and went on to attend Duke Law School, where he received his J.D. degree in 1976 and was an Earl Warren Legal Scholar.

Everett then went to work as a lawyer for the North Carolina Department of Labor in Raleigh, North Carolina. He was appointed as the Democratic staff director and minority chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation in 1982, becoming the first African American to lead a Senate committee; he later became Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the full Committee. Everett achieved another “first” when he became the first African American to be named partner at the law firm of Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker in 1989.

Everett has advised several U.S. presidential campaigns, including Democratic candidates Ernest Hollings and Michael Dukakis. His political involvement continued when Everett served as the Senate Liaison to the Clinton-Gore Presidential Campaign in 1992 when Clinton defeated incumbent President George H.W. Bush. A devotee of the Democratic Party, Everett served as parliamentarian for the 1992 Democratic National Convention. With experience in telecommunications and policymaking, Everett served as the U.S. Ambassador for the 1998 International Telecommunication Union’s Plenipotentiary Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 2007, Everett succeeded Togo D. West, Jr. as President and CEO of the Washington, D.C. based Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

Everett has served on the boards of numerous community organizations, including the National Urban League, the Center for National Policy, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Cumulus Media, Inc., Shenandoah Life Insurance Company, and his church, Alfred Street Baptist Church, which is the oldest African American congregation in the City of Alexandra, Virginia.

Everett resides in Alexandria with his wife, Dr. Gwendolyn Harris Everett, and they have one adult son, Jason Gordon Everett.

Everett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 1, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/1/2008

Last Name

Everett

Middle Name

B.

Schools

Duke University School of Law

Morehouse College

Elloree Training School

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

EVE01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Whatever You Do, Strive To Do It So Well That No Man Living And No Man Dead And No Man Yet To Be Born Could Do It Better.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/23/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Fish, Chicken

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive, administrative lawyer, and presidential advisor Ralph Bernard Everett (1951 - ) was the President and CEO of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C. He served as lead counsel to the U.S. Senate commerce committee, and as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention in New York City.

Employment

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph Bernard Everett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Elloree Training School in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the sharecropping community in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his father's leadership in the community

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his neighborhood in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his parents' discipline

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers segregation in South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the response to the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls school integration in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his activities at Wilkinson High School in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his schools' unequal resources

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his start at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the students at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the chapel services at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the election of Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes Morehouse College Presidents Hugh Gloster and Benjamin E. Mays

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the required reading at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Atlanta University Center in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the notable alumni of Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his decision to study law

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the activism at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Watergate scandal

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the political climate at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his classmates at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work at the North Carolina Department of Labor

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls becoming a legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his arrival in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' political career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the African American staffers under U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about Thurgood Marshall and Thurgood Marshall, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes U.S. Senator Al Gore

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' presidential campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as chief counsel of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Challenger disaster

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his farewell party at the U.S. Senate

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard recalls meeting with African American congressional staffers

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers joining Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his work on Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the mentorship of Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work for President Bill Clinton's administration

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the leadership of the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the agenda of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett shares his advice for young people

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his son's accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon the importance of family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon his life and career

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett narrates his photographs

James Dumpson

International social worker and educator James Russelle Dumpson was born on April 5, 1909 to James and Edythe Dumpson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Dumpson’s family moved to West Philadelphia where he attended West Philadelphia Boys’ High School. He then attended Chaney Normal School (now Chaney Teachers College) and received a teaching certificate in 1932. He went on to Temple University to receive his B.A. degree in education in 1934. Dumpson taught elementary school for two years before moving to New York City to work for the Children’s Aid Society as a case worker. He then received his M.A. degree in social work from Fordam University and his Ph.D. from the University of Dacca in Ghana.

From 1953 to 1954, Dumpson served as a United Nations Advisor/Chief of Training in Social Welfare to the Government of Pakistan. In 1971, he worked as a consultant in Pakistan, and in 1977, received a fellowship to Pakistan through the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to Pakistan.

Dumpson began his association with Fordham University in 1957 as a Visiting Associate Professor in the Graduate Institute for Mission Studies. Ten years later, he returned to Fordham University as the Dean of the Graduate School of Social Work, with the faculty rank of professor.

In 1959, Dumpson was named Commissioner of Welfare for the City of New York, becoming the only African American welfare commissioner in the country. His appointment also marked the first time that a social worker had held the position. He then returned to New York seven years later to become administrator of the Human Resources Department.

As an advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, Dumpson served on various advisory commissions, including the Presidents Commission on Narcotics and Drug Abuse. In 1990, Dumpson was appointed to serve as New York City’s Health Service Administrator and Chairman of the Health and Hospitals Corporation. Upon retirement, he continued to teach at Fordham University until 2006.

Dumpson passed away on November 5, 2012.

Accession Number

A2007.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/10/2007

Last Name

Dumpson

Maker Category
Schools

West Philadelphia Boys’ High School

West Philadelphia High School

Octavius V. Catto Secondary School

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Temple University

Fordham University

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

DUM01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape May, New Jersey

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/5/1909

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef (Corned), Cabbage

Death Date

11/5/2012

Short Description

City government appointee, presidential advisor, and social worker James Dumpson (1909 - 2012 ) was the first social worker to be named Commissioner of Welfare for the City of New York. He also held appointments as advisor to Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, and he served on various advisory commissions, including the President’s Commission on Narcotics and Drug Abuse.

Employment

Government of Pakistan

Children's Aid Society

City of New York

Fordham University

Health and Hospitals Corporation, NYC

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Dumpson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Dumpson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Dumpson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Dumpson describes his maternal grandparents' role in his family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Dumpson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls growing up in Philadelphia in the 1920s

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his experiences at Octavius V. Catto Secondary School

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Dumpson recalls his childhood community in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Dumpson remembers West Philadelphia High School for Boys

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Dumpson talks about the role of music in his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his activities at West Philadelphia High School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Dumpson recalls his experiences at Cheyney Training School for Teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Dumpson remembers working as a teacher in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Dumpson recalls becoming at caseworker at the Children's Aid Society

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Dumpson describes his tenure at New York City's Children's Aid Society

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls his work in child welfare for the City of New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Dumpson recalls being hired to consult for the United Nations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Dumpson remembers his work with the United Nations in Pakistan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his work for New York City's Bureau of Child Welfare

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes his career in academia in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Dumpson recalls the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Dumpson recalls attending the March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Dumpson recalls his chairmanship of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Dumpson recalls his chairmanship of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his career since retiring from New York City government

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Dumpson describes his work in social welfare with the United Nations

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Dumpson describes his work with Whitney Young's National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Dumpson describes the awards he received during his career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Dumpson recalls prominent African American politicians from New York

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Dumpson describes his family life

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Dumpson reflects upon his career in social welfare

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Dumpson reflects upon his values

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Dumpson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Dumpson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Dumpson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
James Dumpson recalls his experiences at Cheyney Training School for Teachers
James Dumpson remembers his work with the United Nations in Pakistan
Transcript
So, how did you decide what school, what college you wanted to go to?$$I wanted to be a teacher at those days, and there was a man by the name of Leslie Pinckney Hill, a great African American educator, who had been a companion with Frederick Douglass, not Frederick Douglass, it's another American, African American luminary. But Leslie Pinckney Hill was then the president of the Cheyney Training School for Teachers, now Cheyney University of Pennsylvania [Cheyney, Pennsylvania], and it was decided--I decided, my mother [Edyth Smith Dumpson] supported it, having been a teacher herself, that I was gonna go into the teaching profession. And I went to Cheyney and had the great fortune of becoming associated with Leslie Pinckney Hill, one of the great African American educators in this country. And Cheyney became almost a landmark as the beginning of my professional career. I went to Cheyney, and it was at Cheyney that I heard about and learned about Negro spirituals, for example. It was at Cheyney that I learned about leaders in the African American history books. It was at Cheyney that--it was at Cheyney that I became an African American in the true sense of that term. And the roots for that, from my identification as an African American, my knowledge now of African American contribution to American culture and to world culture, began in my relationship with Leslie Pinckney Hill at Cheyney.$$Okay, what else stands out about your college years?$$Well in addition to what I just said about Cheyney and professional preparation as a teacher, there was a woman named Laura Wheeler Waring, who was our music teacher at Cheyney, and through her I became interested in, committed to music written by African Americans. I began to know the spirituals, I began to know people like Nathaniel Dett [R. Nathaniel Dett], then later Marian Anderson who was practically a neighbor of mine in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]. And (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So this was in college?$$This was in Cheyney Training--$$Cheyney, okay--$$--School, Cheyney normal school, now Cheyney Teachers College.$$All right, so, what happens as you begin to get ready for graduation from college?$$Well, to begin to get ready for graduation from college two things happened. One, I realized that I was at a, what was then a normal school that was just becoming a teachers college, that was Cheyney, and that was part of the Pennsylvania higher education system. I then realized that my degree from Cheyney was not gonna be enough to get me where I thought I wanted to go, where I belonged, and therefore I began to take courses at Temple University [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and got my first graduate degree from Temple University. Then, of course, I was in the midst of the whole educational system and knew that that was not enough, and I had to go on and finally ended up, of course, with a Ph.D. and all the rest of it--$Now, you accepted this position to go to Pakistan. So tell me about life in Pakistan.$$Oh, it was great.$$(Laughter) Okay.$$Make my reservation for tomorrow.$$Okay.$$I went there as advisor to the government in child welfare and my experience there with the government and with the community for the academic community and the community at large led to my, of course, teaching at what they then had as in social welfare, and child welfare which was very meager in terms of what they needed. And I suppose, as I look back on it, my real contribution was helping them set up a school of social work with an emphasis on family and child welfare in Lahore [Pakistan] and in Dhaka [Dhaka, Pakistan; Dhaka, Bangladesh] and then in Karachi [Pakistan], the three major cities of that country. It was my first international experience. I'd never been out of the country to work and I must tell you it was probably the richest professional experience I ever had in my life, or ever can have.$$What made that so?$$First of all, the commitment of the United Nations [UN] to developing countries and by commitment. I mean not only verbal commitment, but material commitment, money and staffing. Secondly the eagerness and acceptance of the Pakistani people themselves, recognition of their need to get on board with their social develop- educational development and social welfare. And number three was the commitment of the people whom we trained, who are now the social work leadership in that country. Without those three parts we could have done nothing, and Pakistan would not be where it is in the league of nations of social welfare and social development. That was probably the richest experience that I've ever--will ever have in my life, of working in a new culture, African American among Asians, fear of the United States in that country, not spoken of course, but fear, some of it envy. Misunderstanding of who we are as Americans, suspicion about race relations in this country, and here's a black man coming to our country, a Christian in a Muslim country. All of those conflicting contributions in the picture, and the United Nations, and then America, and then the Muslim world, coming together or being in surroundings, in which you then are going out to help them set up a social welfare education program. It was quite a, as I look back on it, probably one of the richest challenges that anybody could possibly have.$$Okay.$$But I did it with the help of the government in Pakistan, with the support of the United Nations social development department [Commission for Social Development], but most importantly with the people, the family--leadership, the families of--who were all Pakistani in Karachi and Dhaka, and Lahore.$$Okay, so you were there for, for about a year, is that right?$$I was there two years.$$Two years?$$And then I've gone back periodically.$$Okay, all right, so we're really now in 1953, you were there from 1953 to 1954?$$That was the official of the United Nations; I'm still there (laughter).$$Yeah, but I'm just saying this is when you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, officially, yes--$$--first went--$$When I first went was '53 [1953] to '54 [1954]--$$--fifty-four [1954]--$$That's correct--$$Okay, all right.

The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Lawyer, businessperson, and civic leader Valerie Bowman Jarrett was born Valerie Bowman, November 14, 1956, in Shiraz, Iran to education expert Barbara Bowman and Dr. James Bowman, a pathologist and pioneering geneticist. Her maternal grandfather was Chicago housing legend, Robert Taylor. Moving from Iran to London, Jarrett attended Tetherdown Elementary School. Returning to the United States, she attended Shaesmith University of Chicago Lab School and graduated from Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts in 1974. Jarrett received her B.A. degree in psychology from Stanford University in 1978 and obtained her J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1981.

Beginning her career as a corporate banking associate at Chicago’s Pope, Ballard, Shepherd, and Fowle, Jarrett then joined the real estate department of Sonnenschein, Carlin Nath and Rosenthal. In 1987, she was tapped to serve as deputy corporation counsel for finance and development for the City of Chicago under Mayor Harold Washington and continued service under Mayor Eugene Sawyer and Mayor Richard M. Daley. From 1988 to 1989, Jarrett also served as director of Leadership Greater Chicago. In 1991, she served as Mayor Daley’s deputy chief of staff. Jarrett was appointed Chicago’s commissioner of planning and development where she consolidated three departments and was awarded the Women’s Business Development Center’s Government Support Award. In 1995, Mayor Daley appointed her as chairman of the Chicago Transit Authority where she served for eight years and was responsible for a budget of over $800 million. That same year, Jarrett was appointed Vice President of the Habitat Company. In 2003, Jarrett was elected to a three-year term as chairman of the Chicago Stock Exchange. In 2007, Jarrett was named president of the Habitat Company.

A longtime advisor of President Barack Obama, Jarrett served as co-chairperson of the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition Team. She is Senior Advisor and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Liaison.

Accession Number

A2006.165

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2006

Last Name

Jarrett

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Stanford University

University of Michigan

Northfield Mount Hermon School

Beulah Shoesmith Elementary School

First Name

Valerie

Birth City, State, Country

Shiraz

HM ID

JAR04

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

And That Is That.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/14/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Iran

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Real estate lawyer, city government appointee, and presidential advisor The Honorable Valerie Jarrett (1956 - ) served as president of the Habitat Company, and was a former chairman of both the Chicago Transit Authority and the Chicago Stock Exchange. She was also the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama, and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Liaison.

Employment

Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP

City of Chicago

Chicago Transit Authority

The Habitat Company

Chicago Stock Exchange

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:952,22:4012,84:6256,115:8636,324:11220,383:11560,389:12104,400:12512,407:12988,415:13328,421:16116,484:16592,494:24922,558:25738,570:26350,577:26860,586:27370,592:27982,599:35578,694:36898,725:38152,747:38548,755:38944,762:39670,778:40066,785:40594,794:41320,806:43432,855:48219,915:48551,920:49049,928:51124,982:51788,992:55530,1013:56230,1022:56630,1027:61300,1088:61783,1097:62680,1116:63163,1123:64474,1163:64957,1172:65440,1182:67924,1242:69856,1292:71098,1324:71512,1331:72133,1343:72478,1349:73030,1361:73582,1372:74341,1384:75031,1397:77032,1440:77308,1445:78757,1481:79447,1492:80827,1522:81310,1531:81655,1538:82483,1551:90005,1610:90855,1625:94800,1671:95325,1679:95850,1688:97575,1729:98250,1740:98850,1750:100350,1789:101025,1800:104025,1871:104400,1877:116440,2027:116860,2036:117280,2044:117700,2053:118120,2062:121330,2096$0,0:312,9:8140,268:12244,379:14828,438:15588,453:15892,458:17564,489:34060,661:34655,669:42900,808:43580,818:44940,842:50402,910:52178,942:52844,954:53954,970:59060,1077:59430,1083:60762,1108:61280,1117:69054,1191:69318,1196:71364,1245:74070,1306:76908,1362:77304,1376:77832,1386:78426,1396:79284,1416:79614,1422:79878,1427:84580,1468:85490,1512:86400,1539:87030,1549:90180,1618:90460,1623:90740,1628:96410,1771:97250,1787:101781,1818:103433,1864:103964,1874:104318,1881:104613,1888:104849,1893:105203,1905:107673,1928:109590,1992:109945,1999:110442,2011:111010,2020:112075,2039:112643,2048:113779,2062:118181,2198:118678,2213:119885,2237:128340,2403:130720,2460:132395,2476:132850,2484:133370,2494:133695,2500:137725,2592:138830,2619:139415,2634:140910,2684:141625,2697:142210,2715:143510,2745:144485,2778:146565,2824:146825,2829:149490,2926:150075,2938:150530,2946:156261,2970:159411,3042:159852,3051:160671,3075:161553,3093:162057,3104:162624,3114:163191,3124:166908,3221:167475,3231:168987,3278:169491,3300:174804,3346:175236,3353:175812,3362:176100,3367:176532,3374:177036,3382:178116,3398:178404,3403:178908,3412:179268,3418:179700,3429:180276,3440:181572,3464:183732,3516:186684,3589:187476,3605:187908,3612:195170,3660
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her upbringing shaped her worldview

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls how she was perceived in Iran and England

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her childhood experiences abroad

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls appearing on 'Bozo's Circus'

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her teacher at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her decision to attend Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her childhood exposure to politics

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her changing academic interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her psychology professors at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her social life at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her decision to attend law school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers the University of Michigan Law School in Ann Arbor

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls joining Harold Washington's administration in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her early roles in Chicago's city government

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers Chicago's Harold Washington administration

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls Harold Washington's sudden death

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the transition to Eugene Sawyer's administration

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls becoming Richard M. Daley's chief of staff

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls forming Chicago's Department of Planning and Development

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her work for The Habitat Company

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the redevelopment of Chicago public housing

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the opening of Chicago's Robert Taylor Homes

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon the role of civil service

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes the impact of Section 8 housing vouchers

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her appointment to the Chicago Transit Authority board

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls reforming the Chicago Transit Authority

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the Illinois Fund for Infrastructure, Roads, Schools and Transit

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about Mayor Richard M. Daley

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes The Habitat Company's recent projects

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about her career plans

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her corporate board leadership

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett narrates her photographs

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sponsors of 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Introduction to 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michele Norris introduces The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michele Norris greets The Honorable Valerie Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's family background

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about how her parents met

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes her education

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's civil service career in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her transition to the City of Chicago government

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls the impact of Harold Washington's death

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers her redevelopment efforts in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers meeting Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 15 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the importance of balancing work and family life

Tape: 6 Story: 16 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls her early support for Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 17 - Film reel of The Honorable Valerie Jarrett's foray into national politics

Tape: 6 Story: 18 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 19 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers Barack Obama's presidential campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 20 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett recalls a moment from President Barack Obama's campaign trail

Tape: 6 Story: 21 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the political climate in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 22 - The Honorable Valerie Jarrett remembers the death of Trayvon Martin

Tape: 6 Story: 23 - Conclusion of 'An Evening with Valerie Jarrett'

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

10$7

DATitle
The Honorable Valerie Jarrett describes how her upbringing shaped her worldview
The Honorable Valerie Jarrett talks about the redevelopment of Chicago public housing
Transcript
How did you deal with questions of identity as a small child--and well, you were so young in Iran, I don't know if that was a question or not, but (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, part of the reason my parents [HistoryMaker Barbara Bowman and HistoryMaker Dr. James Bowman] moved back here--it didn't really affect me whatsoever, but they felt it was hard to raise this little black child in a Muslim country where people had servants and it was kind of con- they thought I was getting a confused upbringing. I don't, I don't know, I--maybe kids are, they adjust pretty well. I think having grown up in the Middle East and then England and then Hyde Park [Chicago, Illinois], gave me a perspective on the world and a perspective on people that is pretty unique. And my father traveled extensively with us throughout Africa and Mexico and the Far East, and I guess I--and I wish I had the opportunity to do that with my daughter [Laura Jarrett] to the degree my parents did because I think it gives you a sense of self that, you know, the people in the United States would rather think of themselves and the United States as rather self-important. And I think it helps you understand, you know, where you fall in the total scheme of things. But I also think it gives you a sense of people and that they really are pretty similar the world over, and I think I am comfortable sitting down talking to, you know, the residents that I work with who live in public housing and connecting with them. And I'm perfectly happy to have a conversation with the leader of the free world, president of the United States. And I think, you know, I've been to villages in the poorest parts of Africa and played with the kids while my father was doing his work. And, you know, I've played with people who were, you know, related to royalty so--and everyone in between. And I think that world-rounded experience certainly shapes you. And it's probably better for other people to say how it shapes you, but it certainly gives you a level of comfort with all kinds of people which I think is important.$I guess, back to the redevelopment, I remember in the mid-'90s [1990s], Chicago housing coalition, a lot of groups, there was a lot of demonstrations outside of Cabrini [Cabrini-Green Homes, Chicago, Illinois] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yep, yes.$$--people, the community was in a flux as to what should be done--$$Yes.$$--with those high rise units.$$Huge fights. We had demonstrations, we had lawsuits, we had everything you can think of. And last week, we were at Cabrini for a groundbreaking for the new redevelopment of the onsite at Cabrini that's being done by a developer here in town. And I was asked to give a speech, and I said, you know, I started working on Cabrini in 1991, and so the moral of the story is if you live long enough and you are tenacious and you have a dream, you know, magic can actually happen. And I think, you know, we had lots of problems along the way, but the one thing we continued to do was to talk to one another and the residents who, you know, I remember meeting with in there in the mid-'90s [1990s] in the dead of winter in their office haggling over all kinds of issues were the same ones who were there, you know, all standing together last week. And, you know, I feel like we've grown up together, and if you think about over a fifteen-year period, eventually, if you're patient, you get to a really good place. And I think the residents forced us to really think hard about what was important to them, and we forced them to say, you know, you're not in isolation anymore. You're part of a community, and it can't just be what's in your--what you think is in your best interest. We've got to look at it as a community as a whole. And so, in the end, it was a love fest, and it was a--it's a better development having had that friction. Do I wish it hadn't taken as long? Of course, I do. But I think sometimes things take a long time. If I look at, you know, the neighborhood around North Kenwood-Oakland [Chicago, Illinois]. When I started the planning commissioner, as a planning commissioner, this is, you know, the neighborhood like 47th [Street] to 39th [Street], the lake [Lake Michigan] to Cottage [Cottage Grove Avenue], 70 percent of the land was vacant in that community. And 50 percent of what was vacant was owned by the city. And everyone said, well, it's a terrible neighborhood. Well, I'd grown up at 49th [Street] and Greenwood [Avenue], and I can remember driving down 47th Street and only looking south and never looking north. And I can remember thinking, well, why is there this invisible line on 47th Street, you know. And how could it be so close to South Kenwood [Chicago, Illinois] and be perceived so poorly. And so I looked at that vacant land as potential. I said, well, if the city controls all that land, you know, we can help rebuild the community. And if you drive through the neighborhood today, it doesn't look a thing like it did fifteen years ago. And, but it required, you know, community hearings and community input and a lot of back and forth, and in the end I think, again, you make a far healthier community having heard all the voices as opposed to just one. And that's what I really enjoy. That's the community process that I enjoy, and I think what ties it back to my [maternal] grandfather [Robert Rochon Taylor] is that he really believed that public housing should be woven back into the urban fabric and that there should be--it should be temporary. It should be a place for you to go when times are tough and you need to get back on your feet. But while you're there, he was a strong believer in requiring a sense of responsibility.

Zina Pierre

As a high-ranking member of President Bill Clinton's administration, Zina C. Pierre worked on issues and programs affecting the lives of women, African Americans and small business owners. Born in 1964 in Annapolis, Maryland, and educated at Catholic University of America, Pierre is the founding president and CEO of the Washington Linkage Group, a political lobbying and consulting firm.

Early in her career, Pierre worked in television journalism as a writer, field reporter and producer. She then moved into the government following Clinton's inauguration in 1993 as a speechwriter. She worked in the Labor Department as communications director for the Women's Bureau. In that capacity, she developed public relations strategies and campaigns for informing women of their rights in the workplace. This included a ten-city tour for the "Don't Work in the Dark" initiative.

Pierre was appointed to director of the Small Business Administration. She was responsible for the department's "Welfare to Work" initiative, for which she developed partnerships with public and private entities to hire approximately 200,000 former welfare recipients. In 2000, Pierre worked as one of the highest-ranking African American women in the White House, serving as special assistant to the president on intergovernmental affairs. In that role, she served as a presidential liaison to city and county governments across the country, promoting the presidential agenda on a local level. Pierre also worked to bridge the "digital divide" by making technology accessible to people from low-income backgrounds.

After leaving the White House, Pierre started the Washington Linkage Group. She also served as director of the National Council of Black Mayors Corporate Advisory Council, and as vice chairperson of the Future PAC, a national African American women's political action committee. Pierre is frequently sought out for her views on women's issues and politics, and is the recipient of many awards and commendations. She is an associate pastor at her childhood church in Annapolis and is working on a master's degree in divinity.

Accession Number

A2003.133

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/14/2003

Last Name

Pierre

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Zina

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

PIE01

Favorite Season

March, May

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sun City, South Africa

Favorite Quote

At The End Of The Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/29/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab ( Maryl Blue)

Short Description

Government relations chief executive, presidential appointee, and presidential advisor Zina Pierre (1964 - ) was Special Assistant to the President on Intergovernmental Affairs under President Bill Clinton, and founded the Washington Linkage Group, one of the few minority owned political lobbying and consulting firms in Washington D.C.

Employment

United States Women's Bureau

United States Small Business Administration

White House

Washington Linkage Group

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:42820,335:57409,588:75452,841:76844,862:77192,867:86410,966:87190,983:87736,991:112567,1310:124445,1466:130445,1581:147610,1788:155030,1852:163082,1960:164408,2027:182440,2245$0,0:20386,228:51595,657:52015,662:65000,768:65468,773:81024,950:91793,1128:92416,1136:111645,1399:132844,1672:133168,1677:139452,1724:146404,1851:147431,1869:154778,1992:155331,2000:155647,2005:166690,2080:180210,2303
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Zina Pierre's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes her household as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre describes her aunt and cousin

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre shares her school memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre describes her school activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Zina Pierre recalls her interest in religion as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre talks about moving away from home at age fifteen

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre describes attending Anne Arundel Community College in Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes attending The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre recalls working briefly for the National Rifle Association (NRA)

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes working at the Gannett Company and becoming a production assistant on the USA Today television show

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre describes her various jobs in television production

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre remembers working at News Channel 8 in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre describes how she was hired as a communications aide in the Clinton administration

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre outlines her career trajectory during the Clinton administration

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Zina Pierre describes working as the Director of the Welfare to Work Initiative at the U.S. Small Business Administration

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre describes the Welfare to Work initiative

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre recalls the challenges of people on welfare

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre talks about the challenges of ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes becoming a Baptist minister and attending Howard University School of Divinity

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre describes becoming the Special Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre recalls her first meeting with Bill Clinton as Special Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre talks about the impeachment of President Bill Clinton

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Zina Pierre talks about her mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Zina Pierre describes the 2000 Presidential Election

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre remembers the final days of the Clinton administration

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Zina Pierre remembers saying goodbye to President Bill Clinton

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Zina Pierre describes becoming CEO of Washington Linkage Group

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Zina Pierre describes her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Zina Pierre talks about how she does not have regrets

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Zina Pierre reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Zina Pierre narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Zina Pierre narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Zina Pierre describes how she was hired as a communications aide in the Clinton administration
Zina Pierre describes the Welfare to Work initiative
Transcript
I had an opportunity to cover the inaugural ball of President [Bill] Clinton. And I was just so enthralled and excited about all of the things that were happening, in terms of this new person who came out of nowhere and became President of the United States, even amidst all of the issues that he was facing then with the allegations that were taking place then.$$This is '92 [1992], right?$$This is '92 [1992]. But I was impressed with him, because he had a message for the people, and it was for all people. And I'll never forget going to, we covered the...There were a number of us that they had... they sent off, News Channel 8 sent off, they sent, provided us with gowns, sent us to a hair salon. And we all split up and went to various balls. And the minute I saw him, I knew I wanted to work for him. It was something about his message that made me feel like I was someone, and that I counted. And so, I'll never forget when someone came to me, it was just by chance. Someone from the administration came to our studio, and I was assigned to escort them back to the studio to be interviewed by one of the anchors. And I just boldly said to the woman, "Do you have a communications or a press office?" And she goes, "Yeah, by chance, yeah, we do." And I said, "I'd love to find out more about that." And so she said, "Well, get me your resume." And I went over to my computer and printed off my resume. And I gave her my resume there, and then I officially sent her a letter and another resume and told them that I was very much interested in being afforded an opportunity for an interview. And that was granted. And so they called me in, I guess, about two months after begging (Laughter) and I had two interviews with two people at the same time. And really, the rest is history. You know, most people's stories are that they worked on the campaign trail, etc., etc. I did a lot of local political stuff in terms of volunteerism and campaign stuff, but never anything on the national level. And so, never in a million years would I have thought that I would have--this little girl from Annapolis, Maryland--would have been working for the President of the United States. And it was a very humbling experience for me.$I was in the story of the Welfare to Work Initiative--$$That's right.$$--and how rewarding it was. I remember we were putting together a videotape to show to businesses... to use as a piece to show businesses the importance of getting involved in the Welfare to Work Initiative, and the benefits of doing so. And we were interviewing several women had surpassed the odds. And one woman was Sarian Bouma. And Sarian became our poster child, because she was a self-made millionaire.$$Can you spell her name for us?$$B-O-U-M-A is the last name. First name is S-A-R-I-A-N.$$She was, she came from Africa?$$Yes, she was African. She came from, I think she came from East Africa. And she came over with a very abusive husband... pregnant... and didn't know a soul in this country, but knew that she had some rights when she got here. And she packed up her bags one day after she had the baby, took the baby along with her to a shelter, went to the House of Ruth, and the rest is sort of history for her. She's... now she owns a thriving multi-million dollar business. It's a cleaning service. A number of her contracts are defense contracts. And she, the great thing that I love about her is that she never forgot where she came from, and she began to hire people off the welfare rolls. In fact, her vice-president would... When I remember her vice-president working for her company she was cleaning bathrooms. And Sarian mentored her all the way up to vice-president of her company. And I remember us interviewing Sarian, and I remember interviewing this one girl, Tamika, who said "People think that we're lazy and we're shiftless. But don't they understand that there is no raise on welfare. And so, if they think that we're living high off the hog every year, that's not true." And it really gave, for me, a different perspective of what I saw, too. Because it... there were points and times where I felt like, "Well, my tax dollars are going to people who can be out here working just like I am." And when I got to understand and know some of the people that actually are on the welfare rolls, many of these women don't want to be on it, and they want the dignity of a paycheck just like anybody else. But there were just circumstances that prevented them from being able to do so.

Truman K. Gibson, Jr.

Lawyer, boxing promoter and entrepreneur Truman K. Gibson, Jr. was born on January 22, 1912 in Atlanta, Georgia. In an effort to flee the race-related violence of the South, the Gibson family relocated to Columbus, Ohio in the early 1920s. Truman Gibson, Jr. attended Columbus' predominantly white East High School. He went on to study political science at the University of Chicago where he roomed with Benjamin O. Davis, the first Black general in the Air Force. After graduating in 1932, Gibson remained at the University of Chicago to pursue a law degree, which he received in 1935.

From 1935 to 1940, Gibson practiced law in Chicago. In 1940, he became the assistant to William H. Hastie, aide to U.S. Secretary of War Henry Stimson. In 1943, Gibson became aide to Henry Stimson. Gibson was then appointed to President Harry S. Truman's Advisory Committee on Universal Military Training in 1946. The committee's findings greatly influenced President Truman's landmark decision to desegregate the military. In 1947, Gibson became the first African American to be honored with the Medal of Merit Award for Civilians.

After helping Joe Louis with tax problems in 1949, Gibson took on the role of director and secretary of Joe Louis Enterprises and entered the word of professional boxing as a manager and promoter. He was the first black boxing promoter and Secretary of the International Boxing Club. In 1959, Gibson became one of the three original directors of the Chicago-based National Boxing Enterprises, the company that brought the legendary Friday night fights to television.

By the early 1960's Gibson abandoned boxing and went into private practice. Since then, he has faced numerous legal battles of his own. These entanglements have not prevented Gibson from remaining an active and respected member of the Chicago legal and business communities. Over the years, he has worked with the School for Automotive Trades in Chicago, and acted as Secretary of the Chicago Land Clearance Commission. He served on the boards of directors of the Chicago Community Fund and Roosevelt University and has been a member of the Cook County Bar Association. His friends and associates have included Thurgood Marshall, Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes and Richard Wright. Gibson continues to reside in Chicago and practice law. He is the sole survivor of President Truman's "Black Cabinet."

Accession Number

A2002.079

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/20/2002 |and| 6/17/2003

Last Name

Gibson

Middle Name

K.

Organizations
Schools

East High School

University of Chicago

University of Chicago Law School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Truman

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

GIB02

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Greece, West Indies

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/22/1912

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese Food

Death Date

12/23/2005

Short Description

Lawyer, presidential advisor, and boxing promoter Truman K. Gibson, Jr. (1912 - 2005 ) was a member of Truman's Black Cabinet.

Employment

United States Department of War

President's Advisory Commission on Universal Training

Joe Louis Enterprises

International Boxing Club

National Boxing Enterprises

Private Practice

U.S. Department of War

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:300,22:4500,86:11900,174:25300,360:54457,590:87960,857:129017,1249:140360,1365:145730,1478:151680,1567:152220,1627:162710,1725$0,0:6730,37:11698,146:16126,207:36240,386:107042,908:173579,1413:188280,1509:206750,1653:207795,1667:231120,1878:231384,1883:233510,1891:234392,1901:235666,1922:246884,2068:247388,2076:273880,2371
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Truman K. Gibson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his parents and siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes his father's educational background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes his father's experiences attending Harvard University, and his grandmother's educational aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson describes his connection to the family of Dr. Edward Willingham Beasley

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson describes his family's move from Atlanta, Georgia to Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson describes what influenced him to attend the University of Chicago

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Truman K. Gibson describes living in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Truman K. Gibson describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Truman K. Gibson talks about moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Truman K. Gibson talks about General Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., and his son, General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson talks about General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his African American classmates at the University of Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson describes his experiences working for Harold Foote Gosnell

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes the dynamics between students and professors at the University of Chicago Law School during the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson talks about prominent black lawyers in Chicago in the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes being appointed as the Executive Director of the 1940 American Negro Exhibition

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Abraham Lincoln Marovitz

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes the 1940 Hansberry v. Lee case

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the 1940 American Negro Exhibition

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson describes Paul Robeson's sense of humor

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson describes the political culture of the early 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Truman K. Gibson describes his role in the 1940 Hansberry v. Lee case

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes housing issues on the South Side of Chicago during the 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson describes the 1940 Hansberry v. Lee case and segregation in Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson talks about African American lawyers in 1930s and 1940s Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the consequences of the 1940 Hansberry v. Lee case

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson talks about desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces and Judge William H. Hastie

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes the close-knit community of African American attorneys in the 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson describes institutionalized segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes confronting segregation in the U.S. Armed Forces as assistant to William H. Hastie

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Otto Nelson, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis' U.S. Army service during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson comments on the "Double V" campaign

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Truman K. Gibson describes the discrimination Jackie Robinson faced while serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes a poignant conversation he had with President Harry S. Truman

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson compares how Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower perceived Jim Crow, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson compares how Presidents Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower perceived Jim Crow, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he became involved with the International Boxing Club

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson describes how the International Boxing Club operated, and its dissolution

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes how much money the International Boxing Club made and spent from 1949 to 1959

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis' substance abuse issues

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson describes the issues he faced with corrupt labor union leaders and the mob as president of the International Boxing Club

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes how his involvement with the International Boxing Club and its corrupt affiliates compromised his relationship with Attorney General Robert "Bobby" Kennedy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson talks about being an African American boxing promoter

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson talks about being arrested in 1959 for conspiracy and extortion

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he changed the boxing business

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson describes how boxing promotion and television production intertwine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis' divorce from Marva Trotter, and his marriage to HistoryMaker Rose Morgan

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson describes how the policy numbers game operated in Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the greatest boxers of all time

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the boxing training gyms and farm clubs he and his business partners managed

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson reflects upon the heyday of the International Boxing Club

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson describes how the International Boxing Club became involved in promoting fights for television

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Truman K. Gibson describes how endorsements from rich sportsmen and large companies like Gillette aided the International Boxing Club

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes practicing law in the 1960s, including representing Colvin Roberts, brother of HistoryMaker Herman Roberts

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson describes a deal he and his business partners tried to strike with the Bahamian government

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he balanced his interests in business, business law, and his duty for civil rights cases

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes what he is most proud of

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson describes how the black community has changed

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson comments on the relevance of his accomplishments, and the relevance of African American history

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson notes how individuals can be catalysts for larger change

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his relationship with U.S. Congressman William L. Dawson

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his father

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Slating of Truman K. Gibson's interview

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson describes his father's educational background and career

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson describes why his family moved away from Atlanta, Georgia in the early 1920s

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes his father's ambition

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his father's social circle

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he perceived segregation as a youth

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he perceived color as a youth

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes his relationship with his parents during his youth and adult life

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his mother

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson describes his teenage years in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson describes his interactions with his white peers as a teenager in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 8 Story: 12 - Truman K. Gibson describes segregation in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 8 Story: 13 - Truman K. Gibson describes how his upbringing shaped his approach to life

Tape: 8 Story: 14 - Truman K. Gibson describes what motivated him to enroll at the University of Chicago

Tape: 8 Story: 15 - Truman K. Gibson talks about working for political scientist Howard Foote Gosnell as a student at the University of Chicago

Tape: 8 Story: 16 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his African American classmates at the University of Chicago

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he obtained his first job

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson describes his early experiences working as a young lawyer in Chicago

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson describes the policy numbers game in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he became associated with Chicago's powerful network of African American attorneys and businessmen in the 1930s

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson describes how he developed relationships with Julian Black and Joe Louis

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson describes how Joe Louis aided the integration of U.S. Army posts

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson describes Joe Louis' financial troubles

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson describes how Joe Louis mixed golf and gambling

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis' issues with infidelity

Tape: 9 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Joe Louis' decline

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson describes the first east to west boxing fight he and Arthur Wirtz televised

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson describes refusing a bribe from the mob syndicate, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson describes refusing a bribe from the mob syndicate, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Truman K. Gibson describes how sportsman James D. Norris fixed horse races

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the mob's influence on the boxing industry

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the Jones Brothers, Ted Roe, and other kingpins of the policy numbers game, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Truman K. Gibson talks about the Jones Brothers, Ted Roe, and other kingpins of the policy numbers game, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Truman K. Gibson talks about Sylvester "Two Gun Pete" Washington

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Truman K. Gibson describes U.S. Congressman William L. Dawson's involvement in Chicago's "shadow economy"

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Truman K. Gibson notes how integration changed black business culture in Chicago

Tape: 10 Story: 11 - Truman K. Gibson reflects upon being a member of Chicago's black bourgeoisie

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Truman K. Gibson talks about leading a healthy life

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his greatest regrets

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Truman K. Gibson talks about his family and reflects upon his life

DASession

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DATape

3$5

DAStory

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DATitle
Truman K. Gibson talks about desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces and Judge William H. Hastie
Truman K. Gibson describes how the policy numbers game operated in Chicago
Transcript
JULIEANNA RICHARDSON: Were there--did the fight then turn to, to government? And was that sort of hard because the politicians, were they, did they take up the, the flag at that point?$$Well, it--but you see, the--at that point the war intervened, and then we had... With Bob Weaver, Bill Hastie [Judge William H. Hastie], the "Black Cabinet" that you have a picture of, great--was--put great pressure on Roosevelt, so he initiated not by law, but by executive order, the Commission on Fair Employment Practice. Then that switched, went over until Truman [President Harry S. Truman] said that this race thing is out. So he issued a directive, on which I worked, eliminating discrimination in the armed services; took two presidential commissions to enforce it. And that's when, when my letter to General [Colin] Powell [HM], and his reply, when he said that Truman had been actuated by politics. I, I showed him several--two letters and one personal situation.$$Okay, that's--lets'--I wanna backtrack to your, I guess the beginning of your involvement with, I guess in the Roosevelt Administration, I mean with national issues.$$Bill Hastie.$$Okay, through--so you, you worked with Bill, William Hastie.$$He called me--$$Yeah.$$--to, to be his assistant, yeah.$$Can, can you tell people who Bill Hastie is (unclear)?$$Bill Hastie was one of the most brilliant legal minds, Amherst [College, Amherst, Massachusetts] graduate, Harvard Law [School, Cambridge, Massachusetts], Harvard S.J.D. [doctor of juridical science], Harvard Law Review, dean of the Howard law school [Howard University School of Law, Washington, D.C.], Governor of the [U.S.] Virgin Islands, judge in the Virgin Islands, and you know, that being that.$Now, you know you've had--I, I don't know if Larry [Crowe] had, if--did you talk about the whole role that you played with the, you know, numbers runners, and, and what--$$Well, I, I, I didn't play any role with numbers.$$No, no, I'm--$$You see--$$--(simultaneous)--were representing the policy.$$No, well, you see, the people, they had thirteen policy guys. The Dawson kept the white forces out of policy. When Ed Jones went to Indiana, Sam Giancana was his cellmate. He boasted, Ed, to Giancana about the money, and that exploded. Then that was--the, the guys, when I met them, I mean I, I worked for Henry Young. They had--Henry had three drugstores. We had several businesses. We had Peaceful Valley Country Club, where we had Momence, Illinois. They, they were businessmen. They didn't have anything. They, they--the, the guys that represented them in policy were guys that went to 47th, 48th Street and--but they, they had a license, you know.$$Well, can you talk about how it worked here in Chicago, how the whole business worked?$$What do you mean?$$The business of, you know, of, of the policy, how it worked.$$Well, they had drawings; they had a.m. and p.m.; and they had other--the--what, what the hell is--they had a gambling casino at 51st and Michigan. But they all, always--we had a, oil deals to Centralia, Illinois, where we go, go down and some get some, and others get nothing. But they, they got--they, they were businessmen. And, and Ed Jones had the department store, about eight mo--hotels, motels, brilliant guy, but with a mouth with no shutter when, when he call--talked to Sam Giancana.$$So this, this, this, the numbers, they were a very vibrant part of the, the black community really--$$Oh, absolutely.$$--in terms of business.$$Sure. Well, they had, of course, we had insurance companies; we had Overton Hygienic. But it was--they, they were an important part of the business community.$$And how many were there that, that were there (simultaneous)--$$Well, there, there--the important ones, about fourteen.$$And then the numbers business, it lasted up until when?$$I don't know.$$It was five--up until--$$I, I don't know.$$Okay.$$When the lottery came, they, they, they--I, I suppose now they, they play the lottery, you know, the--they have the odds, lottery odds and the, they, they play--pay. But I didn't--I don't know.