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The Honorable Ronald Adrine

Judge Ronald B. Adrine was born on April 21, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio to Russell T. and Ethel Adrine. Adrine graduated from Shaker Heights High School in 1965 and then entered Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio before transferring to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he received his B.A. degree in history in 1969. He obtained his J.D. degree from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1973.

Adrine passed the Ohio State Bar in 1973 and went on to work as prosecuting attorney for the Cuyahoga County in the criminal division in 1974. He entered into private practice with his father, the late Russell T. Adrine, in 1976. Adrine was appointed to serve as senior staff counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Select Committee on Assassinations, in Washington, D.C. in 1978. In 1980, he returned to Cleveland and merged four African American legal organizations into the Norman S. Minor Bar Association in Cleveland. He first ran for a seat on the Cleveland Municipal Court bench in 1981, and was re-elected five times to full six-year terms from 1981 to 2017. He chaired the Ohio Commission on Racial Fairness in 1994. Adrine served as administrative and presiding judge of the Cleveland Municipal Court from 2008 to 2017. Here, he led the effort to create a Family Justice Center in 2014. Adrine received national attention for his ruling in a Cleveland Municipal Court case that involved the actions of two Cleveland police officers that resulted in the death of twelve year old Tamir Rice. Adrine retired from the court after thirty six years of service in 2017. He joined Cleveland State University’s Cleveland-Marshall College of Law as a Leader-in-Residence, serving as its first jurist-in-residence in 2018.

Adrine served as chair of the Ohio Supreme Court’s Interpreter Services Advisory Committee and of the National Board of Directors of Futures Without Violence, and was co-chair of the advisory board of the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence. He was also a member of the Supreme Court’s Criminal Sentencing Commission’s Ad Hoc Committee on Bail and Pretrial Services.

He was awarded the Ohio State Bar Association Ohio Bar Medal in 2000. The Cleveland-Marshall Law Alumni Association also recognized Adrine in 2002, and he received the second Elizabeth Hines Domestic Violence Award in 2013. In 2017, he was the recipient of the Association of Municipal/County Court Judges of Ohio President’s Award for Excellent Judicial Service, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Cleveland Branch of the NAACP, and was an inaugural member inductee of the Cleveland-Marshall Law Hall of Fame. Adrine also received the first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award of the Northeast Ohio Chapter of the American Constitution Society in 2018.

Ronald Adrine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 28, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/28/2018

Last Name

Adrine

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

ADR01

Favorite Season

Late Summer, Early Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saint Croix in the Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

The Name Of The Game Is To Win Friends And Influence People.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

4/21/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Judge Ronald B. Adrine (1947- ) served thirty-six years on the bench of the Cleveland Municipal Court and, in 1980, founded the Norman S. Minor Bar Association.

Favorite Color

Purple

Brian E. Hall

Entrepreneur Brian Hall was born on May 5, 1958 in Cleveland, Ohio to Virginia and William Hall. He attended John F. Kennedy High School, graduating from there in 1976. Hall went on to obtain his B.B.A. degree from the University of Cincinnati in 1980. He then earned his M.B.A. degree from Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio in 1987, and later attended the executive management program at the Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business.

Hall began working part-time for his family’s company, Industrial Transport, Inc. in 1977, where he eventually became president and CEO in 1984. In 1987, Hall founded the Tremont Elementary School Advisory group. He then purchased Industrial Transport Inc. in 1999. In 2001, Hall led a joint venture between Industrial Transport Inc. and Applied Industrial Technologies Inc. to form iSource Performance Materials. Four years later, Industrial Transport, Inc. restructured under the name Innogistics, LLC. The same year, Hall created JIT Services, LLC. Hall also served as the interim executive director of the Commission on Economic Inclusion in 2012, where he served multiple subsequent terms as co-chair. In 2014, Hall joined the senior leadership team at the Greater Cleveland Partnership as the senior vice president. The same year, he opened an All About People recruiting franchise. Hall went on to form 2NorthStar Capital, LLC in 2016.

Hall has served on various boards throughout his career, including with University Hospitals Health System Inc., the Cleveland Cuyahoga Port Authority, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District, the University of Cincinnati Foundation, the Cleveland Water Alliance, the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum Board. In 2011, Hall was named to the Cuyahoga County Economic Development Commission, and served as secretary of the Cleveland Rock and Roll Inc. board in 2013. He later also founded the President’s Council, LLC.

In 1990, Hall was featured on Crain’s Forty under 40 list. He was first named as a part of the Power Pack list in 2003 and was featured intermittently through 2012. In 2007, Hall was awarded the Bridge Builder Award by the American Jewish Committee and the Pacesetter Award by the Christian Business League. He also received the Volunteer of the Year by Leadership Cleveland and the Supplier of the Year Award for Community Service by Ford Motor Company.

Brian Hall has three children and resides in Cleveland, Ohio.

Brian Hall was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 26, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.192

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/26/2018

Last Name

Hall

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Organizations
First Name

Brian

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

HAL17

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Zihuatanejo, Mexico

Favorite Quote

Work Hard And Play Harder.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

5/5/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Favorite Food

Spaghetti, Pizza

Short Description

Entrepreneur Brian Hall (1958 - ) was president and CEO of Innogistics, LLC/ JIT Services, LLC before becoming senior vice president of the Greater Cleveland Partnership in 2014.

Favorite Color

Gray

The Honorable Marcia L. Fudge

Political leader Marcia L. Fudge was born on October 29, 1952 in Cleveland, Ohio to Marian Saffold. She graduated from Shaker Heights High School in 1971, and went on to obtain her B.S. degree in business administration from The Ohio State University in Columbus in 1975. Fudge later received her J.D. degree from Cleveland State University’s Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1980.

After completing her J.D. degree, Fudge worked as a law clerk and then as director of the personal property tax department in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Later, she served as the deputy county auditor for the county’s estate tax department and the director of the Cuyahoga County Budget Commission. In 1988, Fudge worked as the director of budget and finance for the Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office. Then, in 1999, she entered politics as the chief of staff for U.S. Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, where she worked for a year before running and winning the race for mayor of Warrensville Heights, Ohio. Following the untimely death of Jones in 2008, Fudge became the U.S. Representative for the 11th District of Ohio. She won re-election for her seat in the subsequent elections of 2010 and 2012. In 2013, Fudge became chair of the Congressional Black Caucus for the 113th Congress and founded the Rock and Roll Caucus. In 2016, she was selected to fill the position as chair of the Democratic National Convention after the resignation of Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Fudge served on the board of Cleveland Public Library for over twenty years and was elected vice president in 1986. In 1988, she was elected as the national treasurer of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Four years later, Fudge became the first vice president of the sorority and completed her tenure as national president in 1996. She subsequently joined the boards of Alcoa Aluminum and Judge Lloyd O. Brown Scholarship Committee. In 2003, Fudge was named a hall of fame alumna at the eighteenth annual Shaker Heights Alumni Association hall of fame ceremony. Fudge was featured in Who’s Who in Black Cleveland in 2004 and 2005. The same year, she received the Trailblazer of the Year Award from the Norman S. Minor Bar Association. In 2007, Fudge received the Patricia Roberts Harris Medallion Award for excellence in government service and was named Municipal Leader of the Year by the Northeast Ohio Municipal Leader magazine.

Marcia L. Fudge was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.189

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/24/2018

Last Name

Fudge

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

FUD01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cancún, Mexico

Favorite Quote

Give the best you have everyday, even if it's not the best you have it is the best you have for that day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

10/29/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Favorite Food

Pork Chops

Short Description

Political leader Marcia L. Fudge (1952 - ) became U.S. Representative for the 11th District of Ohio in 2008, winning reelection in 2010 and 2012, before being named chair of the Democratic National Convention in 2016.

Favorite Color

Black

The Honorable Ben Holbert

Journalist and political leader Ben Holbert was born on March 6, 1959 in Cleveland, Ohio to Benjamin, Jr. and Mollie Holbert. He graduated from Benedictine High School in Cleveland, Ohio in 1977, received his B.A. degree in communications from Kent State University in 1984, and his M.B.A. degree from University of Phoenix in 2012.

Holbert began his professional career in broadcast journalism and served as a reporter and anchor at several media outlets in the Cleveland television market, including WJKW-TV, WKYC TV-NBC, WVIZ-PBS, WUAB-TV-43/WOIO-CBS, and WJMO-1490-AM, from 1985 to 2005. He also worked as vice president and general manager of the Cleveland Television Network from 2001 to 2002, and served as general assignment reporter at WKYC-TV, NBC from 2002 to 2005. He was director of communications at Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, in Decatur, Georgia from 2006 to 2007, and served as interim chief communications officer at the Cleveland Metropolitan School District from 2007 to 2008. He was also a senior partnership specialist at the U.S. Census Bureau from 2009 to 2010. Holbert was an aide and executive assistant to the commission president of Cuyahoga County from 2010 to 2011. He established and served as president at Holbert Enterprises in 2010; and, in 2011, was elected city councilman, later becoming city council president for the Village of Woodmere, Ohio, remaining until 2017. Holbert subsequently worked as the Cleveland chapter parliamentarian for National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) in 2014, and was a business specialist at the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District from 2014 to 2016. He also served as adjunct professor at Cleveland State University in 2016. The following year, he launched a local restaurant called Sides 2 Go BBQ. In 2017, Holbert was the second African American elected mayor of the Village of Woodmere, Ohio.

Holbert has received numerous honors and awards including Kent State University- Outstanding Alumni Award and Community Service Award, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity-Omega Man of the Year, Village of Woodmere-Council Member Award, and Knights of Peter Claver-Image Award. He was inducted into the Benedictine High School Hall of Distinction. He was also the recipient of four Emmy Awards for journalistic reporting and the Akron (Ohio) Broadcasters Hall of Fame “Personality of the Year”.

Ben Holbert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.188

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/24/2018

Last Name

Holbert

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Ben

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

HOL23

Favorite Season

Late Summer And Early Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean, Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Friendship Is Essential To The Soul.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

3/6/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Journalist and political leader Ben Holbert (1959 - ) served as a reporter and anchor in the Greater Cleveland area for twenty-five years before being the second African American elected mayor of the Village of Woodmere, Ohio in 2017.

Favorite Color

Purple

Donald K. Anthony, Jr.

Fencer and entrepreneur Donald K. Anthony, Jr. was born on May 22, 1957 in Cleveland, Ohio. He graduated from Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1975. Anthony then went on to attend Princeton University and fenced for the school’s varsity team. He graduated with his B.S.E. degree in systems and civil engineering in 1979 and later earned his M.B.A. degree from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1988.

After graduating from Princeton University, Anthony accepted a position at IBM as a systems engineer and marketing executive. In 1989, after ten years with IBM, he left to pursue a career as an entrepreneur. In 1996, Anthony founded the management consulting firm, Warrior Group, Inc. and became the company’s president and chief executive officer. He then became the national secretary of the United States Fencing Association in 2000. The same year, Anthony founded SwordSport LLC and served as the company’s president and chief executive officer. From 2008 to 2010, Anthony was executive director of After-School All-Stars Columbus. He was also the executive producer of the documentary film BlackBlades, which premiered in 2011 and focused on the history of African American Olympic fencers. The following year, Anthony was elected as president and chairman of the United States Fencing Association.

Anthony was a member of the National Black MBA Association’s Advisory Board since 1990, and was a trustee of the Ohio Society of CPAs Foundation. He also served as chairman of First Tee of Columbus from 2003 to 2012. He was co-chair of the Arnold Fencing Classic and a member of the executive committee of the International Fencing Federation from 2012 to 2016.

Anthony continued his fencing career after completing college and has won several accolades for his abilities. He competed in multiple World Championships and North American Cups, and earned multiple medals. Anthony also was at the U.S. Olympic Festival and the U.S.A. Fencing National Championship. In 1979, Anthony was awarded the Johnston Award for fencing at Princeton University.

Anthony and his wife, Karen, have one daughter.

Donald K. Anthony, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.199

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/17/2017

Last Name

Anthony

Maker Category
Middle Name

K.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Walnut Hills High School

Princeton University

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Donald

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

ANT03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. John and Maui

Favorite Quote

I really don't have time for dumb things.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

7/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbus

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Thai and Mangoes

Short Description

Fencer and entrepreneur Donald K. Anthony, Jr. (1957 - ) was the founder, president, and CEO of the Warrior Group, Inc. and SwordSport LLC. He also served as the president of the United States Fencing Association.

Employment

Warrior Group, Inc.

IBM

SwordSport LLC

Favorite Color

Blue and Gray

Matrice Ellis-Kirk

Management executive Matrice Ellis-Kirk was born on March 9, 1961 in Cleveland, Ohio. She earned her B.A. degree in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1982.

Ellis-Kirk began her career as an officer in commercial banking at MBank in Dallas, Texas. In 1987, she became the director of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit’s Office of Management and Budget, and remained in that position until 1993. Ellis-Kirk then joined Apex Securities as vice president and office manager until 1995, when she began serving as a consultant with Spencer Stuart. In 1999, Ellis-Kirk was hired by Heidick & Struggles International, Inc. and later became a managing partner at the firm. She joined RSR Partners in 2014 as the managing director.

Ellis-Kirk received the Spirit of the Centennial Award from the City of Fair Park, Texas in 2001. She was also the recipient of the Dallas Historical Society’s Jubilee History Makers Award in 2015. The following year, Ellis-Kirk was named to D Magazine’s “Dallas 500” list.

Ellis-Kirk served as a board member for many organizations, including for the Dallas Museum of Art, the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts Foundation, The Woman’s Museum, the Dallas Symphony Association, and North Texas Tollway Authority. She also served on the board of directors for ACE Cash Express, on the Executive Committee for the Texas Business Hall of Fame Foundation, on the executive board for Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business, and on the University of Pennsylvania’s Board of Visitors. She was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Council on Women’s Empowerment, a member of the advisory board for the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, a trustee for the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Foundation, a member of the Dallas chapter of the National Association of Corporate Directors, and chairwoman for the AT&T Performing Arts Center. In 2013, Ellis-Kirk was appointed to the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships by President Barack Obama.

Ellis-Kirk and her husband, Ron, have two children, Elizabeth and Catherine

Matrice Ellis-Kirk was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.071

Sex

Female

Interview Date

03/16/2017

Last Name

Kirk

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

John W. Raper Elementary School

Lulu Diehl Junior High School

East Technical High School

University of Pennsylvania

Mount Greylock Regional High School

First Name

Matrice

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

ELL07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Life Is Choices, You Have A Choice Every Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

3/9/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard greens

Short Description

Management executive Matrice Ellis-Kirk (1961 - ) served as an investment banker with Apex Securities for several years before becoming an executive search agent with RSR Partners. Ellis-Kirk also served as the first African American first lady of Dallas, Texas.

Employment

Mercantile National Bank

Dallas Area Rapid Transit

Apex Securities

Spencer Stuart

Heidrick and Struggles International Inc.

RSR Partners

Favorite Color

Black

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Matrice Ellis-Kirk's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her mother's family background pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls how her parents met and married

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her likeness to her paternal great grandmother and grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls briefly living with her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her father's early death

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her childhood interests

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers advocating for sensible dress codes in schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers the Friendly Town initiative in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls the popularization of the term L7

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her educational aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her early interest in investment banking

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her friends at Mount Greylock Regional High School in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about her mentors at Mount Greylock Regional High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her return to Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls her decision to attend the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers playing sports at Mount Greylock Regional High School in Williamstown, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls her activities at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about her early interest in the arts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers the MOVE bombing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about the challenges facing first time African American mayors

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls her decision to move to Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers working for Mercantile National Bank in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her early community involvement in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls joining Dallas Area Rapid Transit

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers marrying Ron Kirk

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about working at Apex Securities

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her husband's decision to run for mayor of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her husband's first mayoral campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls her husband's election as mayor of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes the mayor's reading program

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about Texas Governor Ann Richards

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes Texas' political structure, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes Texas' political structure, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls becoming an executive recruiter

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her duties as first lady of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her husband's senate run

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her board involvements

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about her role in Barack Obama's presidential campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk recalls serving on the President's Commission on White House Fellowships

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers working at RSR Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about the AT&T Performing Arts Center in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about the value of civic involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Matrice Ellis-Kirk describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

7$5

DATitle
Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her early interest in investment banking
Matrice Ellis-Kirk remembers her husband's decision to run for mayor of Dallas, Texas
Transcript
And my dream was, when I was eight years old I wanted to be an investment banker. So my [paternal] grandmother [Lillian Miller Bowden (ph.)] had talked about it. I first thought I wanted to be a nurse and then I saw blood and I passed--almost passed out so that, that went by the wayside before I was even eight years old.$$Now there aren't many youth that come up with the idea that they want to be an investment banker. So how did you--did you ha- did you know somebody who was an investment banker (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) So grandmother ran the dry cleaning business. So she got The Wall Street Journal and the newspaper, I later learned that she had it and was looking at the stock market because that's how they figured out what the numbers were. But she would help me look at the names of companies and we would look at the New York Stock Exchange [New York, New York] and I would learn what the tickers were of those companies. So then I started reading and started asking questions what's capital, what's equity and so she would have me pull up my World Book Encyclopedia and we would talk about it and I started reading it and just would read about an investment banker. I said, "That's what I want to be--that's what I want to be." So I was reading The Wall Street Journal and that's how I made that decision. Her belief was that, well if they're in The Wall Street Journal they are doing something right. Their names are on buildings. And so it was Morgan Stanley [Morgan Stanley Wealth Management] and places like that, Manufacturers Hanover [Manufacturers Hanover Corporation] you know, all of the names of the banks from way back when, National City Bank [First National City Bank; Citibank, N.A.]. So in the summer I would go and do summer internships through the city 'cause they had these little paid internships for inner city kids and you could work at the banks. So I would work at the bank and clip coupons, J and L Steel [Jones and Laughlin Steel Company] coupons. But I just knew that I wanted to be an investment banker. I wasn't really sure exactly what it was but then over time--by the time I was in the seventh grade I knew what an investment banker was so and that's really what I wanted to do.$$You knew they were around a lot of money and had money.$$I knew they made money yeah exactly. And you know, I didn't--I was good in school so when I was good in math and science and everything I read said that's what you could do with math and science so that was what was interesting. Then when I went off to high school [Mount Greylock Regional high School, Williamstown, Massachusetts], you know I had teacher who I would tell him I really wanted to go to a school that was good in math and science. He says, "Well you want to go to the University of Pennsylvania [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] that's where, that's where really--people that are good in math and science that's where they go."$So that--that was for two years. But what--did the company [Apex Securities, Dallas, Texas] do--(unclear) (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) The company was doing great.$$Okay.$$I was doing everything that I wanted to do and then my husband [HistoryMaker Ron Kirk] came home and told me he wanted to run for mayor. And, and so I just started crying (laughter) because first anybody in politics that we knew, they had a dysfunctional family. So I was like ugh, I've got two kids [Elizabeth Alexandra Kirk and Catherine Ellis Kirk], we were happy, it's a great family situation, I loved my husband, we have fun together. You know, but everything you've read in politics either the husband was cheating or it was dysfunctional; I was like oh my Lord look at what I've gotten myself into on one aspect of it. And on the other side of it was I'm finally doing everything that I want to do from a career standpoint. I've dreamed since I was eight years old and if you become mayor and you win this thing, I'm going to have to quit because the business did business with entities around or affiliated with the city. It's not just the city, but then the city had a piece of the ownership of DFW Airports [Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas], so you can't do work there. The city had pieces to do with water utilities and other markets, you can't do anything. So my company was going to basically have to say I love you but I'm going to miss you because otherwise they could not participate in all those types of revenue opportunities. And that just, that was not good business and it didn't make business sense. So he runs--$$And now, did you see this coming at all that he might--was he that kind of--was he popular like that then (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes, a little bit. So I kind of knew what I was getting. I kind of knew what I was getting. I can't fain complete ignorance as much as I would like to. When we were in our session with our minister when we were getting married in '86 [1986] he says, "One of the things one should do is talk about yourself aspirationally so that you can see if you can even grow together." Mine was I wanted to be a billionaire philanthropic donor to the arts and education. I wanted to be Alice Walton redux and he wanted to be mayor. So yes I kind of knew what I was getting.$$Okay. All right. So, so you quit your job--this is your favorite job and you quit it basically to help your husband run (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So that he could, so that he could--yeah absolutely. And it was the right thing to do because he was the right person. I mean, you know, one of the things my [paternal] grandmother [Lilian Miller Bowden (ph.)] always said when we were young was that if you have--that you have to give back and you have to find a way to do it in a way that's going to bring people along with you. So you can't, you you can't--my grandmother was completely against people who wanted to be the only ones. It was if you get something you have to bring people along with you. You cannot do this by yourself. And him being mayor--I too would have the highest impact by him being in that role. It would long term serve everyone well because you would be able to use that bully pulpit to further all of the things that you're talking about. And you know we had conversations in our house always about what can we do to bring along the next generation. What can you do to create wealth in these various communities so that they can have the resources to accomplish their goals and what can you do to impact education. The city, the city here--government does not impact the school district. There's two different elections but you have a bully pulpit by which you can talk about the importance of education, the importance of investing in ensuring kids not to drop out, the importance of nutrition and getting a meal, the importance of early childhood education, the importance of families being together at mealtime, the importance of kids having afterschool study and tutoring and the importance of their ability to serve others so that they understand what service looks like. So you have the pulpit to do all of those things that here you are as one person trying to impact in a community. So it was the right thing to do and I had to give up my job for it. I could always go back after he was done was the way I looked at it. But I was too young to have a mindset that I couldn't.$$Okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Plus the fact you, in my house you can't say you can't do anything. That's just, that's blasphemy if you say, "I can't," that, that--you get excommunicated (laughter).

Daryl Waters

Music composer and arranger Daryl Waters was born in Cleveland, Ohio. From the age of eight years old, Waters studied music at the Cleveland Music School Settlement. While attending Shaw High School in East Cleveland, he played piano and served as a conductor for Karamu Theater and The Singing Angels, as well as conducting at a summer music theatre program and performing with his own band. Upon graduation, Waters enrolled at Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina, where he obtained his B.A. degree in music with a specialization in piano performance in 1978.

Waters returned to Cleveland after graduation, playing various jobs around town, before moving to New York in 1981, where he began working as a nightclub pianist, arranger and conductor. In 1983, Waters became the music director for the European tour of Ain’t Misbehavin’, the acclaimed musical revue of the Harlem Renaissance and tribute to Fats Waller. In 1985, Waters landed his first job on Broadway as the associate conductor of the Broadway musical, Leader of the Pack, directed by Michael Peters who choreographed Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” and “Beat It” music videos. In 1992, Waters was the associate conductor for George C. Wolfe’s Jelly’s Last Jam, joining Wolfe again in 1996 as a co-composer of Bring in ‘Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk, which garnered him his first Tony and Grammy nominations. In 1997, Waters supervised and orchestrated Street Corner Symphony, a revue of 1960s and 1970s soul music.

Waters worked Off-Broadway as the music director for George C. Wolfe’s The Colored Museum (1986), the composer for In Real Life (2001), orchestrator for Kirsten Childs’ Miracle Brothers (2005), music director of The Seven (2006) (a hip-hop adaptation of Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes), composer for Blue Door (2006), supervisor/arranger for the highly-acclaimed musical celebration A Civil War Christmas (2008) by Pulitzer winner Paula Vogel, and orchestrator for Childs’ Bella (2017).

In 2010, Waters earned rave reviews for his orchestration of Memphis: A New Musical, receiving both Tony and Drama Desk Awards. In 2013, he was the conductor for After Midnight, under the music direction of Wynton Marsalis, with various stars including Fantasia, Toni Braxton and Kenneth Edmonds, and Patti LaBelle. He arranged, orchestrated and supervised music for Holler If Ya Hear Me (2014), Shuffle Along (2016) with director George C. Wolfe (for which he also wrote new material), and The Cher Show (2018).

In addition to his theatrical accomplishments, Waters became Eartha Kitt's music director in 1986, performing concerts with her on six continents over twenty-two years. He also conducted and arranged for many other stars, including Leslie Uggams, Sammy Davis Jr., Gregory Hines, Cab Calloway, Nell Carter, Patti Austin and Jennifer Holliday.

Waters is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America and the American Federation of Musicians.

Daryl Waters was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.143

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/12/2016

Last Name

Waters

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Maurice

Schools

Rozelle Elementary School

Mayfair Elementary School

Kirk Junior High School

Shaw High School

Livingstone College

First Name

Daryl

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

WAT15

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Favorite Quote

It Ain't Deep.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/12/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Music composer and arranger Daryl Waters (1956 – ) orchestrated such productions as Jelly’s Last Jam (1993), Bring in ‘Da Noise (1995), Memphis (2009), and Shuffle Along (2016).

Employment

DMW Enterprises, Inc

Eartha Kitt Productions

Self Employed

Favorite Color

Caribbean Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Daryl Waters' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters talks about the traits he inherited from his grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Daryl Waters remembers his early neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Daryl Waters talks about his elementary school

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Daryl Waters recalls his early musical interests

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Daryl Waters describes The Music Settlement in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Daryl Waters names his early musical influences

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Daryl Waters remembers his first musical theatre experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters remembers early encouragement from his piano teacher and his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters talks about his special qualities as a young musician

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters remembers acting as a music director at Karamu House while in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters talks about his musical influences in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters remembers balancing music and academics while in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters talks about his early exposure to religion

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters remembers his high school band, Life Is Real

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Daryl Waters recalls his experiences at Livingstone College in Salisbury, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Daryl Waters remembers his mentor, K. Wilhelmina Boyd

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Daryl Waters describes the challenge of adjusting to life in Salisbury, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Daryl Waters talks about the movie 'Uptight'

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Daryl Waters remembers directing a homecoming talent show at Livingstone College

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Daryl Waters reflects upon his reluctance to promote himself

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Daryl Waters remembers his decision to move to New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters remembers attending his first Broadway production

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters recalls his experience as a pianist at a New York City dessert club

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters remembers touring in Europe with the musical 'Ain't Misbehavin''

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters describes his duties in the production of 'Ain't Misbehavin''

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters remembers his first experience as a music director on Broadway

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters describes the responsibilities of a conductor in musical theatre

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters recalls how he began working with Earth Kitt

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Daryl Waters reflects upon Eartha Kitt's musical influences

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Daryl Waters describes his experience working with Eartha Kitt

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Daryl Waters talks about Eartha Kitt's personality

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters describes his experiences as the associate conductor of 'Jelly's Last Jam'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters describes the rehearsal schedule for a Broadway show

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters remembers becoming involved in 'Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters talks about the music production of 'Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk'

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters remembers his Tony Award nomination for 'Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters talks about the educational component of 'Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Daryl Waters describes HistoryMaker George C. Wolfe

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Daryl Waters talks about the business elements of a career in musical theatre

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Daryl Waters describes the benefits of joining the American Federation of Musicians

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Daryl Waters talks about the musical 'Street Corner Symphony'

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Daryl Waters remembers working on 'In Real Life'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters talks about creating the music for 'Drowning Crow'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters recalls the reception of the 2005 musical 'The Color Purple'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters describes the seating capacity of Broadway theatres

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters talks about the relationship between music and lighting cues

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters describes the musical 'Miracle Brothers'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters remembers the hip hop musical 'The Seven'

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters talks about the play 'Blue Door'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Daryl Waters remembers the musical 'Memphis'

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Daryl Waters talks about how winning awards impacted his career

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Daryl Waters remembers working with Wynton Marsalis on 'After Midnight'

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Daryl Waters reflects upon the reception of 'Holler If Ya Hear Me'

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Daryl Waters describes the challenges of scoring 'Shuffle Along, or, the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed'

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Daryl Waters talks about his projects at the time of the interview

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Daryl Waters remembers his favorite musical collaborators

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Daryl Waters reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters talks about his early work on Broadway

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Daryl Waters reflects upon black representation on Broadway

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Daryl Waters talks about the challenges to success on Broadway

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Daryl Waters describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Daryl Waters reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Daryl Waters talks about his close acquaintances

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Daryl Waters describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Daryl Waters narrates his photographs

Anthony Chisholm

Actor Anthony Chisholm was born on April 9, 1943 in Cleveland, Ohio to Edith Amilia and Victor Chisholm. Drafted by the U.S. Army, Chisholm served as platoon leader for the 4th Armored Calvary, 1st Infantry Division in the Vietnam War.

Upon returning from the Vietnam War, Chisholm performed in The Boys from Syracuse and The Threepenny Opera at Karamu House in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1968, he made his film debut in Uptight, directed by Jules Dassin. That same year, Chisholm began studying with Lloyd Richards in the Negro Ensemble Company’s master class. Chisholm appeared in a number of films in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including Putney Swope in 1969 and Cotton Comes to Harlem in 1970. In 1985, he portrayed Habu and Drill Sergeant Williams in Tracers at the Joseph Papp Public Theater in New York City. In 1987, Chisholm’s Vietnam War experiences served as the inspiration for the HBO television series Vietnam War Story. He also joined the Vietnam Veterans Ensemble Theater Company, where he acted in several productions including Back in the World in 1988 and The Strike in 1990. Chisholm met August Wilson in 1990 while auditioning for Two Trains Running, and was cast in the role of Wolf. After appearing in the first run at Yale Repertory Theatre, he went on tour with the production to Boston’s Huntington Theatre, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Los Angeles’ Doolittle Theatre, the Kennedy Center, and San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre. Chisholm reprised the role in the Broadway production of Two Trains Running at the Walter Kerr Theatre in New York City in 1992. In 1996, he became part of the core cast for August Wilson’s Jitney, which appeared off-Broadway at New York City’s Second Stage Theatre in 2000. Between 2001 and 2003, Chisholm portrayed prisoner Burr Redding in the HBO crime drama series, Oz. He then acted in August Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean in 2004, alongside Phylicia Rashad, Ruben Santiago-Hudson and John Earl Jelks. Beginning in 2007, Chisholm portrayed Elder Joseph Barlow in the final installment of August Wilson’s “Pittsburgh Cycle,” Radio Golf. He received a Tony Award nomination for his portrayal of Elder Joseph Barlow in the Broadway production of Radio Golf, directed by Kenny Leon at the Cort Theatre in New York City.

In addition to his stage roles, Chisholm appeared in numerous television shows and films, including Reign Over Me (2007), Premium Rush (2012) and Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq (2015). He was the recipient of the Drama Desk, Obie, Ovation, NAACP Theatre, and AUDELCO awards.

Anthony Chisholm was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 10, 2016 and April 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2016.110

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/10/2016 |and| 04/14/2017

Last Name

Chisholm

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Victor

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

New York University

Case Western Reserve University

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

CHI05

Favorite Season

Early Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Tokyo Ropongi

Favorite Quote

Everybody loves the sunshine

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/9/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood - Crab

Short Description

Actor Anthony Chisholm (1943 - ) was a core cast member for off-Broadway and Broadway productions of August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle, including Two Trains Running, Jitney, Gem of the Ocean and Radio Golf. He appeared on the HBO series Oz, and in films like Premium Rush (2012) and Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq (2015).

Employment

NBC

PBS

ABC

HBO

CBS

A &E

Fox Broadcasting Company

CBS (MOW)

New Line Cinema

Amazon Studios

Independent Film

Columbia Pictures

Sony Pictures Entertainment, Inc.

True Life Films

Lonette Productions

Image Entertainment

Artisan Entertainment

Buena Vista Entertainment

Xanon Entertainment Group

Cort Theatre

Walter Kerr Theatre

Second Stage Theatre

Two River Theatre Company

Long Wharf Theatre

Second Stage & Union Square Theatre

Joseph Papp Public Theatre

Delacorte Theatre

Joseph Papp Public Theater

Manhattan Theatre Club

Mark Taper Forum

Favorite Color

Orange, Burnt sienna

Lloyd G. Trotter

Corporate executive Lloyd G. Trotter was born on April 9, 1945 in Cleveland, Ohio to Lillian Trotter and Reverend Lee Trotter, Sr. He graduated from John Adams High School in 1963, and entered an apprenticeship program with Cleveland Twist Drill. He studied at Cleveland State University while working at Cleveland Twist Drill, graduating in 1972 with his B.A. degree in business administration.

Trotter was promoted to a full-time product design and application engineer at Cleveland Twist Drill in 1967. He began working for General Electric (GE) as a field service engineer in 1970, where he was named vice president and general manager of manufacturing for the Electric, Distribution and Control division (ED&C) in 1990. That same year, he helped found the GE African American Forum, a mentor group for African American GE employees. While working in management at GE, he invented the Trotter Matrix, a tool for evaluating standards across various plants which was quickly adopted throughout the company. In 1991, Trotter became the president and CEO of the Electric, Distribution and Control division, and then to president and CEO of GE Industrial Solutions in 1998. In 2003, Trotter became senior vice president of GE Industrial, followed by executive vice president of operations at in 2005. In 2008, after almost forty years, Trotter left GE to become a managing partner at the private equity firm GenNx360 Capital Partners, which he founded with Ronald Blaylock, Arthur Harper and James Shepard.

Starting in 2008, Trotter served on the board of directors of PepsiCo as well as Textron, Inc., Meritor, Inc. and Daimler AG. Trotter also served on the boards of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, and National Electrical Manufacturers Association. He received the 2001 Lifetime Achievement Award from GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt, and the GE Chairman’s Award for three consecutive years from 2003 to 2005. Trotter received an honorary doctorate degree from his alma mater, Cleveland State University, North Carolina A&T School of Business and Saint Augustine University. The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) honored Trotter with a schoarlship established in his name, and the Harlem YMCA presented him the Black Achievers in Industry Award.

Trotter and his wife, Teri, have three children.

Lloyd G. Trotter was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 25, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.036

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/24/2016

Last Name

Trotter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

George

Schools

Cleveland State University

Bolton Elementary School

Andrew J. Rickoff Elementary School

John Adams High School

First Name

Lloyd

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

TRO02

Favorite Season

Fall in US

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard - Sandy Lane

Favorite Quote

God Grant Me Patience, And I Want It Right Now.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/9/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Southern cuisine

Short Description

Corporate executive Lloyd G. Trotter (1945- ) worked for GE for nearly forty years, where he served as a president and vice chairman of GE Industrial. In 2008, he became the full-time managing partner of the private equity firm, GenNx360 Capital Partners.

Employment

GenNx360 Capital Partners

General Electric

General Electric Industrial

Cleveland Twist Drill Company

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lloyd G. Trotter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lloyd G. Trotter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his parents' move to Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls experiencing racial discrimination as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his immediate family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls the racial demographics of the neighborhoods in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers the election of Cleveland Mayor Carl Stokes

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about race relations at John Adams High School

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls accepting an apprenticeship at Cleveland Twist Drill Company

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his apprenticeship at Cleveland Twist Drill Company

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls his promotion at Cleveland Twist Drill Company

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers being hired at General Electric

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his roles as field service engineer and project lead

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls working in Brazil

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes the scope of his work at General Electric

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls interviewing at Honeywell International, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his brief career at Honeywell International, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls his first executive job at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about African American managers at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers Jack Welch's leadership style

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls working as a general manager at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his experiences as General Electric's first African American executive

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes the Trotter Matrix

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers his relationship with Jack Welch

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls pushing for greater diversity at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about the founding of the African American Forum

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his relationship with NBC executives

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes the African American Forum

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about the changes at General Electric during the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lloyd G. Trotter explains General Electric's business strategy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his sources of support at General Electric

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers his challenges at General Electric

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his interactions with government officials

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his involvement on non-profit boards

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about the leadership of Jack Welch and Jeffrey R. Immelt

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lloyd G. Trotter remembers the founding members of GenNX 360 Capital Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lloyd G. Trotter recalls working as director of Genpact Limited at General Electric

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his roles at GenNX360 Capital Partners and General Electric

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about the success of GenNX360 Capital Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes the effect of government on GenNX360 Capital Partners

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his relationship with General Electric after retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his involvement in the National Association of Guardsmen, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his philosophy on mentorships

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Lloyd G. Trotter reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Lloyd G. Trotter shares his advice to young professionals

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Lloyd G. Trotter reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Lloyd G. Trotter talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Lloyd G. Trotter describes his plans for the future

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Lloyd G. Trotter remembers being hired at General Electric
Lloyd G. Trotter describes his sources of support at General Electric
Transcript
You start selling these tools that you have previously made and then designed and come across GE [General Electric]. Tell us about that (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Right. Well, what happened there was and I say selling but we were the technical support behind the distributors who had sales guys and one of our distributors had sold some tools to GE that made specialty equipment for making light bulbs. We call them lamps because you can get more money in margin by changing the name of it. But they sold light bulbs and they built this piece of equipment that was going to cut aluminum and it wasn't working and they were blaming it all on the tool. I got a call from our distributor; I need some technical help here. I went out and looked at it and I said, "Yeah the tools are not right for your application and I'll fix that for you but this is got to be your first chip cutting application that you've ever done." They guy on the other end of the conversation was a GE employee and he said, "How would you know that?" And I said, "Well the tools aren't right that's for sure but your speeds and feeds the way you're holding the part, the coolant that you're using to cool down the part they are all wrong too," (laughter) you know, kind of thing. And he looked at me and he says, "You sound like you know what you're doing," and I said, "Well let me tell you about my background," and he said, "Well would you be willing to help us?" I said, "I live down the street why don't every Monday we do a debrief and I'd tell you what I would do if in fact I was doing this application." They probably accepted 90 percent of my ideas.$$And you volunteered to do this?$$Well it's part of the job, you know. I want to sell more tools, I want my distributor to sell more tools and that was a part of the technical support for what you do. So they then had a run off date, we had the new tools there and so on and it went really, really well and what I noticed is it was over a six month period at a time, you know. So I noticed that there were a lot of more white suits and ties around for this run off than there was for the first one that failed. The guy that I worked with for that six month period at a time, he says, "I want you to meet my bosses' boss," and I said, "I'm glad to meet you and I hope we didn't let you down, we really want more of your business. The distributor here who ultimately is supporting you, he says they have a really great relationship so help us." He says, "Well let me talk to you one on one." He said, "Would you feel offended if I offered you a job?" I said, "Yeah I would, I have a job. If you're talking about a career I'd be willing to listen but I'm not out looking at all." He said, "I meant a career," and I said, "Well, let me make sure you understand. I don't have a resume I can put something together and I don't have a college degree at this point and I'm not starting over." He said, "Are you committed to getting a college degree?" I said, "I am not for you or not for anybody else because that's what I know I need to do." He said, "Well we want to talk to you about a career," and it was like I don't know three months later I got an offer and I was a GE employee as a field service engineer for their lighting division at Nela Park in Cleveland [Ohio] and that started my career.$As you are growing in your position [at General Electric], because you--it's at a pretty fast clip.$$Yeah.$$I mean you are being promoted almost every year it looks like. Who are your mentors?$$Well a lot; once you become a senior executive ban really Fairfield [Connecticut] takes over on placement and what you're going to do next. So a lot of the mentors that would maybe make a difference are in Fairfield the Jack Welch's of the world, the Ben Heinemans [Benjamin W. Heineman] of the world, you know people like that. But then on the sideline there are individuals who are your peers that you're also taking coaching from and having to get advice. But more importantly by then--by the time I got to leading a bigger business there were other officers of the company--twelve of them in fact that were in similar positions where we could mentor each other. Just because I was maybe a step ahead or whatever doesn't mean that they can't give you great advice and you can capitalize on what they're seeing and mold it into what you ought to be thinking about. So it comes from people below you, from people who are peers and people above you. Some of the best help I ever got in my manufacturing career was from hourly employees who gave me advice about you better watch your back (laughter). Now I remember early on in my career where I was an industrial engineer at a manufacturing plant and literally I had this brilliant idea that now in retrospect it wasn't that brilliant, it was really pretty bad and the plant they were threatening a strike, they were doing this and all of a sudden magically it started working and I'm standing there at a machine where I had done this it was like reduce the workforce by a third. They didn't get laid off, they went to other areas of the plant but we were going to do three times as much work with a third of the people and I thought it was great. I thought I had really thought it through and this young lady, Sadie [ph.] I remember her. She was a twenty-five year employee, African American female and I'm standing there watching it work, smiling and she said, "You're pretty proud of yourself aren't you?" I said, "Yeah it's finally beginning to gel and it's working." And she said, "You are really proud of yourself aren't you?" I said, "Yeah, I am." She says, "Well the reason it's working has nothing to do about you." I said, "Yeah? Tell me about it." She said, "Look they were getting ready to go out on strike, I've been here for twenty-five years and we had a meeting in the ladies' room." 60, 70 percent of the employees in the lighting plant are female. I said, "What went on in the ladies' room?" She said, "I told them we have dumb ideas for white folks, we're going to do dumb ideas for this black kid so get out there, we ain't going on strike, go to work." And she was the turning point. She was the turning point. I said, "Why would you do that for me?" She said, "I have a grandson about your age and he's out there doing dumb ideas too and I hope somebody saves his butt" (laughter). But all my life I've had secretaries and people like that who I had gotten to know who from different ways helped me, saved me, if you will, in some cases. If you are so arrogant you're not listening, you won't see that you know, kind of thing. But I've had people again below that were huge supporters and they did it in their own way. People who were peers who have been huge, huge supporters and they did it in their own way and then people from the top pulling me up. So it was that triangulation that really was the difference I think.

Leonard Burnett, Jr.

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and executive Leonard Burnett was born on April 18, 1964 in Shaker Heights, Ohio. His family was involved in franchising, which sparked his interest in entrepreneurship. After attending the University of Michigan for two years, Burnett went on to Florida A&M University, where he received his B.B.A. degree in business, management and marketing in 1986.

Burnett went into business with his classmate, Keith Clinkscales, to launch his first magazine, Urban Profile, in 1987, to fill a void in the media market. In 1992, Burnett and Clinkscales sold Urban Profile to Career Communications and got involved in the creation of Vibe magazine. From 1993 to 1999, Burnett served as a publisher and advertising director for the magazine. In 1999, he co-founded Vanguarde Media Group with Clinkscales. Burnett served as vice president and group publisher with Vanguarde and helped launch three successful urban magazines: Savoy, Honey, and Heart & Soul. In 2004, Burnett co-founded Uptown Media Group, or Uptown Ventures, publisher of Uptown magazine, where he served as the chief executive. The following year he helped Vibe magazine launch Vibe: Vixen. After Vibe reopened under new ownership in 2009, he served as the group publisher for the magazine until 2012.

In 2010, Burnett co-authored Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans. In 2013, he founded U Brands after re-purchasing Uptown magazine from InterMedia Partners and acquired Worldwide Electronic Publishing, the publisher of Hype Hair magazine. Burnett has successfully expanded the Uptown brand and reached underserved communities. He also has spoken at the ADCOLOR Awards and is considered an expert of African American buying power, brand-building, and marketing to both urban and affluent African American communities.

Burnett lives in New York City and has two children, Lenny Burnett III and Rani Burnett.

Leonard Burnett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 10, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.148

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/10/2014

Last Name

Burnett

Maker Category
Middle Name

Everett

Schools

Moreland Elementary School

Sterrett Elementary School

The Campus School Of Carlow University

Sacred Heart Elementary School

Shrine Catholic High School

University of Michigan

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

BUR24

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha’s Vineyard and St. Martin

Favorite Quote

If You Have To Say Who You Are, You Ain’t.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/18/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese, Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and magazine publishing chief executive Leonard Burnett, Jr. (1964 - ) was the cofounder of Vanguarde Media and cofounder and co-CEO of Uptown Ventures, the publisher of Uptown magazine. He was also author of Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans.

Employment

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Urban Profile

Vibe Ventures

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Uptown Media

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leonard Burnett, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his father's family background and early football career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's entrepreneurial career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his early interest in sports

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early career aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his family's frequent moves

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his early experiences of religion

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his decision to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers transferring to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his first impressions of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his growth at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the community at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls pledging the the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett reflects upon his formative development in college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early sales experiences at the Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers cofounding Urban Profile magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls operating Urban Profile magazine full time

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls joining the Career Communications Group, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls selling advertisements for Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the early staff of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the initial challenges at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls the ownership transition period at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett recalls leaving Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his attempts to buy XXL and Honey magazines

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his acquisition of Honey magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring magazines from BET

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the downfall of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the aftermath of Vanguarde Media's bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his inspiration to return to work

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his return to Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the changes in the magazine industry in the early 2000s

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the business plan for Uptown magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about Keith Clinkscales' career after the end of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the acquisition of Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls divesting from Vibe to focus on Uptown magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the U Brands company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about U Brands' projects

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his legacy and career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's opinion of his career path

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. shares his advice to future generations

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Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine
Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture
Transcript
And so doing that and then Keith [HistoryMaker Keith Clinkscales] got a call from Time Inc. They had--well back up. So Time Inc. had launched or did a test issue of this magazine called Vibe. And Vibe in their first little test issue had more ads than we had ever had in any, in all our combined issues. And so, but that sort of empowered us more. You know it was like you know, you know whoever is doing Vibe you know uncle time, you know they, they go had fund (unclear) and you know do this and we're just out here doing our own thing and we will make it happen, you know. We will just keep pushing, we're black owned, we're that. And so Keith got a call from, from Time Inc. from a friend, Lynne McDaniel who is now a friend of ours. And said hey, he said to him, "Hey if you notice Urban Profile--if you guys, what are you guys doing, you know? Are you happy?" Said, "Yeah, yeah," and you know, "Have you seen Vibe?" "Yeah, yeah, we've, we've seen it. It's cute you know." "Well we want to launch it and we were thinking about you and Len [HistoryMaker Leonard Burnett, Jr.] maybe coming up and help launching the magazine." And Keith's response was you know, "We all sort of both felt like okay that's, that's nice you know, but we're entrepreneurs, we're doing our own thing. We have our own autonomy you know, this is what I'm doing." "Okay well we're paying this much money." It was like, "Oh we'll be there tomorrow," (laughter). And so we, Keith went up in let's see, Keith went up in late '92 [1992] and I came down in February of '93 [1993] and just part of the team that launched the--$$And what was your role?$$I was the sales guy, I was account exec. So Keith was the president and CEO. I was account exec. A gentleman by the name of John Rollins you know technically hired, he hired me and I sold music advertising and had all the black agencies 'cause you know I was you know I was the black guy so I got all the black agencies. And, and so we were part of the team that launched Vibe. And you know great environment, met all sorts of people you know that, but, but the big thing was I'm back in New York City [New York, New York]. I cannot believe I'm back in New York. This was not what my life's plan was to be. Keith and I got a little studio apartment in Hell's Kitchen [New York, New York] you know while we were trying to figure out where we were gonna live you know but we were never there, we'd be in the office all the time. And we were you know all working hard trying to make this Vibe thing you know become a real business and a reality. And so that's how we got back.$So I wanna talk about what was going on culturally in America during the time that Vibe began and really had an incredible assent.$$Um-hm.$$What, you know, hip hop was just beginning. What--can you describe what was happening?$$Yeah. So you know hip hop you know it was beginning to become, be put on the map.$$Correct.$$You know 'cause it had, it had been there right, of course. And then the, but, but there was a sense of empowerment that was coming about from not the, the music. The music sort of drove everything, you know, culturally, politically, entrepreneur wise, fashion. Technically, it did, it drove all that and so what was quickly becoming known is, and Vibe really helped propel this, is our influence on American culture. We knew that, that the day was coming you know so we would talk. We would sell the idea hey when you grow up you'll listen to first music we listened to was pop music, you know. There are kids that were birthed around this time. The first music they're gonna listen to and the first radio station was gonna be a hip hop station. Their first athletes they're gonna fall in love with were black athletes basketball player. The, the, you know, the, the you know Serena [Serena Williams], the best black; the best tennis players were, were black. Golf champion [Tiger Woods] was black. And all this stuff was sort of happening. And was sort of turning America sort of upside down. This is it. And so what we knew at that time early on before we knew somehow was happening is that's where it was all going. No matter how much you didn't agree with it or what you didn't want to happen. What was going--what was happening was the browning of America not only from skin, but in terms of its aesthetic. And--$$Uh-huh.$$--and so you need--so the conversation was you can either jump in this conversation now and go for the ride or I'll see you later on down the road and it's gonna be a lot more expensive too, you know. And, and don't, and hope that no one else comes in along the way and jumps over you because they, they embraced it rather than fought it. And so, and so you know, and so everything was going on you know it's in the news. So there, there was a vibrance in a, and again empowerment. There were businesses being started in fashion or record labels being launched. And there were movies and movie companies coming out that were you know producing you know, black producers of movies. So obviously there was Spike Lee, but then you know the Hudlin brothers [HistoryMaker Reginald Hudlin and Warrington Hudlin], and you know, the, the whether it was just movies you know there, there were a plethora of movies were coming out that were about us and our culture and it start off very hip hop but then it grew into more of just our lifestyle, you know. So it wasn't all about gang banging and rap and it was about love. It was about family and all of our stories. And so there was a movement and I think there was a, again because of the music there was a sense of again going back to the idea of entre- being an entrepreneur, people didn't feel that they had to go work for Corporate America. There were other alternatives. There were other things that were going on whether it was going to work for a fashion company that was targeting our audience or whether it was starting your own business. I mean there was just a--there was a sense that you could do anything. And that was an exciting time, you know. And it, you know less to do about I think Vibe sort of told the stories but it's really the hip hop music and the culture that was making it happen.