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Esther Jackson

Magazine editor Esther Jackson was born on August 21, 1917 in Arlington, Virginia to Esther Irving Cooper and George Cooper. She graduated from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C. in 1934, and enrolled at Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio, where she earned her B.A. degree in social work. Jackson went on to earn her M.A. degree in sociology at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1940. Her thesis, The Negro Woman Domestic Worker in Relation to Trade Unionism, examined the issues faced by African American domestic workers, and the benefits of labor unions.

Jackson joined the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC) in 1940 and became a member of the voting project in Birmingham, Alabama. From 1942 to 1946, she worked as the organization’s executive secretary. In 1947, Jackson and her family moved to Detroit, Michigan, where she became active with the local branches of the Progressive Party and the Civil Rights Congress. During the 1950s, Jackson worked for the National Committee to Defend Negro Leadership and the Families of Smith Act Victims. In 1961, Jackson became the managing editor of Freedomways, a globally distributed journal that featured the work of Derek Walcott, C. L. R. James, Julius K. Nyerere, Alice Walker and Nikki Giovanni. Jackson also co-edited the books Black Titan: W. E. B. DuBois, published in 1970, and Paul Robeson: The Great Forerunner, published in 1978. Jackson remained the managing editor of Freedomways until it ceased production in 1985. In 2015, Sara Rzezutek Haviland published, James and Esther Cooper Jackson: Love and Courage in the Black Freedom Movement, a biography detailing Jackson and her husband’s activism.

Jackson was the recipient of several awards including the 1987 Community Contribution Award from the Harlem School of Arts, the 1989 Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York Association of Black Journalists, and the 1990 Mary Church Terrell Award from Clara Barton High School. In 2003, Jackson was awarded an honorary doctorate degree of Humane Letters from the Brooklyn campus of Long Island University.

Jackson and her late husband, James Jackson, had two daughters.

Esther Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.213

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Esther

Birth City, State, Country

Arlington

HM ID

JAC48

Favorite Season

Spring and Summer

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/21/1917

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Magazine editor Esther Jackson (1917 - ) worked for social reform organizations like Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC), Progressive Party and the Civil Rights Congress before working as the managing editor for Freedomways journal for over twenty years.

Favorite Color

N/A

Carolyne S. Blount

Magazine editor Carolyne S. Blount was born on March 21, 1943 in Richmond, Virginia to Callie Brown Scott and Earl Scott, Sr. Blount graduated from Ruthville High School in Ruthville, Virginia, and received her B.S. degree in education, library science, and history from Virginia State University in 1963. She then earned her M.A. degree in library science from Drexel University in 1964.

From 1964 to 1967, Blount worked as an assistant librarian at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1967, she accepted the position of technical reports specialist in the federal systems division at IBM in Owego, New York. From 1969 to 1971, Blount worked as a reference librarian in IBM’s systems development division in Endicott, New York. Once Blount and her husband, James M. Blount, assumed ownership of About…Time Magazine, Inc. in 1972, she became the executive editor. Under her leadership, About…Time researched and published a six-part history series called “Rochester Roots/Routes” in 1984.

Since then About...Time Magazine has edited, designed, and printed other books: The City of Frederick Douglass: Rochester's African-American People and Places by Eugene E. Du Bois; Mount Olivet Baptist Church: 100th Anniversary History, 1910-2010; The State of Black Rochester 2013: Education Employment = Equity, edited by Dana K. Miller; Decades of Timeless Service and Divine Sisterhood: Delta Nu Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated; 150 Ancestors Commemoration, which highlights pioneering African Americans in Rochester; and Beyond These Gates: Mountains of Hope in Rochester’s African-American History, a walking tour book of black history in Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, NY.

About…Time published other notable articles such as “Last Mile of a 400-Year Journey,” which examined the spirituality of African burial grounds, and “Katrina Echoes: Storm Season Aftermath is Hard to Erase.” In addition to her publishing, Blount was involved with the Southern Black Heritage Collection’s research on black elementary and high school histories in Charles City County, Virginia.

Blount serves on the board of directors of the national Gateways Music Festival, celebrating classical musicians of African descent, and is a member of the Rochester Association of Black Journalists and Delta Nu Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Blount received a number of awards over her career including the Howard Coles Communications Award in 1983 and 1985, the Media Achievement Award from Virginia State University National Alumni Association, Women’s History Month Award from the Rochester Board of Education, as well as a Global Ministries Humanitarian Award for international reporting, presented at the United Nations by the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's International Division.

Blount and her husband, James M. Blount, have three children: James Ural, Christina, and Cheryl.

Carolyne S. Blount was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.069

Sex

Female

Interview Date

04/20/2018

Last Name

Blount

Maker Category
Middle Name

S.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Carolyne

Birth City, State, Country

Richmond

HM ID

BLO04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Virginia

Favorite Quote

I Am Only One, But Still I Am One. I Cannot Do Everything, But Still I Can Do Something, So I Will Not Refuse To Do What I Can Do.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/21/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Rochester

Favorite Food

Banana Pudding

Short Description

Magazine editor Carolyne S. Blount (1943-) was the co-owner, editor, and executive director of About…Time Magazine in Rochester, New York since 1972.

Favorite Color

Purple

Michaela Angela Davis

Magazine editor, activist, and writer Michaela Angela Davis was born in 1964 in Germany. When she was young, Davis and her family moved to Washington, D.C., where she attended the Duke Ellington School for the Arts. Upon graduation, Davis enrolled in New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts before being accepted to the Stella Adler Acting Conservatory in 1983. She gained fashion experience by apprenticing with her aunt, a former stylist for Harper’s Bazaar, and photographer Richard Avedon.

In 1991, Davis was hired as an associate fashion editor for Essence magazine. She then became the founding fashion director for Vibe magazine in 1993. In 2002, Davis worked as a stylist for the film Paid in Full, before becoming editor-in-chief of Honey magazine in 2003. Davis also published an essay titled “The Beautiful Ones” for the anthology Everything but the Burden: What White People are Taking from Black Culture in 2003.

In 2004, Davis returned to Essence as the executive Fashion and Beauty editor while simultaneously directing the Culture section. She launched the “Take Back the Music” campaign along with Essence in 2005 and appeared on VH1 News Presents: Hip Hop Videos – Sexploitation on the Set. That same year, Davis authored a gift book entitled Beloved Baby: A Baby’s Scrapbook and Journal. In 2008, she was featured in the documentary The Souls of Black Girls, as well as the BET special, Hip Hop vs. America II: Where Did the Love Go? Davis went on to become the chief creative consultant and editorial brand manager for the rebranding of BET. She appeared in Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness in 2011 with an essay titled “Resistance.” Also that year, she launched a community conversation project called MAD Free: Liberating Conversations About Our Image, Beauty and Power as well as “BuryTheRatchet: The Revolutionary Pro Sisterhood Campaign” the following year.

The New York Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People recognized Davis as a “Phenomenal Woman” in 2011, and the President of the Borough of Manhattan presented her with a “Trailblazer Award.” In 2013, she was honored with two separate “Empowerment” awards from BLACK STREET and the Feminist Press.

Davis lives in Brooklyn and has one daughter, Elenni Davis-Knight.

Michaela Angela Davis was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on August 15, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.219

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/15/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Angela

Schools

Takoma Education Campus

Duke Ellington School Of The Arts

New York University

The New School for Social Research

Stella Adler Studio of Acting

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michaela

Birth City, State, Country

Landstuhl

HM ID

DAV35

Favorite Season

Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Africa

Favorite Quote

This Is The Day The Lord Had Made, Let Us Rejoice And Be Glad In It.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/31/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Germany

Favorite Food

Okra

Short Description

Magazine editor, activist, and writer Michaela Angela Davis (1964 - ) was the founding fashion director of Vibe magazine and a former editor of Honey and Essence magazines.

Employment

BET/Centric

Freelance

Essence Magazine

Honey Magazine

Vibe Magazine

CNN/Time Warner

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michaela Angela Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her father's acceptance into the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her upbringing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis recalls her experiences of racial discrimination in Woodbury, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her early awareness of skin color, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her early awareness of skin color, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her neighborhood friends in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her childhood best friend

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the music of her youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the death of her brother, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the death of her brother, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her acting experiences at the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her experiences at the Stella Adler Conservatory in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role as an assistant stylist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the start of her career in fashion

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers the New York City club scene of the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her fashion career in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to work for Essence magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to work for Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the influence of hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the early covers of Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the evolution of hip hop culture

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her reasons for leaving Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers meeting Polly Allen Mellen

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis recalls the founding of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the founders of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she came to be editor in chief of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role as editor in chief of Honey magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her return to Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about Essence's Take Back the Music campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers her early speaking engagements

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she became a commentator on CNN

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis remembers how she became a commentator for 'Anderson Cooper 360'

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about the next generation of black fashion activists

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis describes the MAD Free project

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role in the rebranding of BET, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Michaela Angela Davis describes her role in the rebranding of BET, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Michaela Angela Davis talks about her current projects

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Michaela Angela Davis reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Michaela Angela Davis describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Michaela Angela Davis reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Michaela Angela Davis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Michaela Angela Davis talks about the evolution of hip hop culture
Michaela Angela Davis remembers how she became a commentator for 'Anderson Cooper 360'
Transcript
How long did you work at Vibe?$$Just a year. So I worked the first year cycle and this is when my activism began. I challenged--something very scary started happening in hip hop, 'cause again, we're so excited by this culture, by being a part of hip hop, being a part of defining, this defining culture was very powerful. But by the time we got to '92 [1992], '93 [1993], you started to see this very disturbing wave of--$$That's okay.$$They were talking upstairs. Wave of, the plethora of voices because we had all kinds of hip hop. Whether it was you know Biggie [Biggie Smalls; The Notorious B.I.G.] who was this like so talented but kind of nasty and talking about, you know, shooting people and all kinds of crazy sex, but his lyricism was amazing. To you know Wu-Tang [Wu-Tang Clan] to Pharcyde [The Pharcyde] to sort of what people consider conscious rap. And all these, you know Monie Love and Queen Latifah and MC Lyte, you had all these different voices. And then what you started to see happen was the voices were beginning--very narrow very, very quick, very, very quickly. And you saw women's voices just dropping off and the, the men's voices--and this is in mainstream and the records that they were selling and promoting were getting hyper violent. And what, I don't--what some people called gangsta rap, we never, we never called it that in, internally, inside. But it was, it was a very disturbing, disturbing quick trend of hyper violent images with hypersexual images of women. And then all these women's voices going, falling away and the only ones left standing were Lil' Kim and Foxy Brown, Lauryn [Lauryn Hill] came later. And they were really playing on the hypersexuality, which we didn't mind before when they were all these other voices too. Like that's, that's a voice, that's real, but we saw that what was happening to the music, or the music that we were being asked to cover and sell and promote, was so narrow and it was--it's like that's that kind of the opposite of what we came here to do, right? So, I got into very clear philosophical--I resigned because I remember one of the older white executives from Time Warner [Time Warner, Inc.] coming in and, at the photo editing, was like going, "Yeah, like show the picture of him peeing on the wall." And like, "Yeah that's like, you wanna see the dirty shit, let's see the dirty shit," and I was just like, who are you that--you old man in a suit like. I was like this is it--we came here to tell our story, right, like if this is--and, and it was something very significant. I saw--our editor in chief was a very smart, white gay man, right? I remember this same executive was at Martha Stewart [Martha Stewart Living] and I heard Martha Stewart in the hallway like letting him have it. She was like--'cause what had happened is both these magazines were hot, right? No one was paying attention to us 'til we got hot. Then it's like. "Ooh, I'm gonna come down and play with the hot magazines from my little office." I heard Martha Stewart saying, "The day that you know how to cook and," and blah, blah, blah. She's like, "This is my culture, either you give me this magazine or you get out." Like she defended her--she's like, "You don't live in Connecticut, you don't know about--," like she was like (makes sound), she defended her, her brand. But he's, I don't know what he was telling her to do, but she was literally out in the hallway. And I was like nobody's defending us, nobody's going, "Why are you--what's happening to this magazine [Vibe] that was supposed to be about this big bright culture, or breadth of the culture?" Not to say that those rappers didn't exist, but to silence the others was problematic.$Wait before you get there, I just wanna point out that you started being honored for your activism.$$Yes.$$Like people started noticing you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$--and--$$Yes.$$--just, just to make a point, you know the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] acknowledged your work in 2011 with the phenomenal woman award. And then you, you were featured in a number of anthologies--$$Right (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) so Rebecca Walker's ['Black Cool: One Thousand Streams of Blackness,' ed. Rebecca Walker] was another--$$And this is all after--so this point is critical 'cause all that came after, and there's very interesting (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Really? Came after what?$$The--what I'm about to tell you why, how I got to 'Anderson Cooper' ['Anderson Cooper 360'].$$Okay.$$How I got to 'Anderson Cooper' was I challenged Essence, that--$$I didn't realize it came after, okay.$$And I was, I was being recognized, I wasn't being honored, but I was being, I was becoming a voice particularly on these campuses, right? I was talking about image, image activism and, and being empowered and challenging images and, and being, having media literacy, particularly as it came to women and how they perceive themselves and how the world perceives them. Because they were being treated based on these music videos, and that's what we were finding when talking to girls that traveled, people thought--would solicit them for sex when they're in Italy as a scholar, because they think that their video--so we understood something was happening in the culture, and I was helping to facilitate those conversations and giving us tools to deal with them. When--and this--at this critical moment too, I discovered the power of Facebook. So Essence magazine had a new editor in chief for a while, who had hired a white fashion director. And I had had that, this job and I knew what a fashion director was. A fashion director was someone that didn't just pick out dresses, for Essence particularly because it was the only magazine for black women, the fashion director was in the community. The fashion director spoke on behalf of the community; the fashion director would be you know if H&M [H and M Hennes and Mauritz A.B.] opened in Harlem [New York, New York], or a MAC store [MAC Cosmetics] opened in downtown Detroit [Michigan], the fashion director of Essence was supposed to be there. The fashion director at Essence sits at the front row at the fashion shows with all the other fashion directors. So when a white woman was chosen for that one spot, I, I was appalled, but I didn't act until a group of young women--I had started, I started to have mentees by this point, right? Young women that I was nurturing and were talking to me and I was talking to them, I started to host salons in my home with young women, mentoring them. And a group of young women called me and they were crying, they, they said to me, "What does this mean to us?" And they were, they were all fashion professionals, one just finished fashion history at NYU [New York University, New York, New York], blah, blah, blah. And they're like, "So if Essence doesn't think that we can do this, where do we go, what does this mean to us?" And they were crying and I was talking to--and that's--I didn't act until I felt the hurt and I wrote on my Facebook page, "Essence magazine has hired a white fashion director. I feel like I lost my best girlfriend," right, something to that effect. Hundreds of comments later, in an hour or two Clutch magazine had written a blog.$$Which is an online (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) An online magazine, a popular mag- online website for this audience. So be clear that the first people that covered this story were the young women who were being most affected. So Clutch did it first, then, then New York Magazine picked it up from Clutch. Then from New York Magazine it went viral. Twenty-four hours later, I was on 'Anderson Cooper,' right? I had no idea Facebook was like that, I was really naive, I was really new, I was having like these conversations that I thought were very contained with like couple thousand friends and, I was talking to young women, most I would ask ques- and what I realized that my Facebook page was, was the open for some news stories I was like OMG. So I learned a lot by then, but so what hap- so it's very challenging and very interesting and very full circle to be in this moment where you are challenging home, 'cause Essence was home to me. But I, I had gotten the blessings from my mentor like this--'cause I called, I guess it's okay to say now--$$Um-hm.$$--in public. I called Susan [HistoryMaker Susan Taylor] before I accepted that interview, and I said, "Look, I'm getting calls from the media, and what do you think?" Because I knew I was gonna--this was basically going to war with Essence. I didn't know how big it was gonna be, I didn't know it was gonna be this thing. And I got, I got, she told me, she said, "Michaela [HistoryMaker Michaela Angela Davis] you're my hero," and that's, I said that's all. So if my mentor says that it was something--and I had all these young women, and, and they were like nobody stands up for us. And I didn't have anything to lose; I wasn't trying to get that job--like, so I felt like they couldn't do it, because they might want that job one day. They're new in their career, I understood that, so I felt like I could speak for them, and I wasn't afraid.

Audrey Edwards

Magazine editor and author Audrey M. Edwards was born on April 21, 1947 in Tacoma, Washington. Edwards received her B.A. degree from the University of Washington in 1969, and her M.A. degree from Columbia University in 1974.

In 1970, Edwards began her career at Redbook magazine as an associate editor in the fiction department. She served for one year as editor of Community New Service, a black and Puerto Rican news service in 1974. Then, in 1975, Edwards went to Fairchild Publications where she was hired as a news reporter for the trade paper, Supermarket News, and was then promoted to the promotions news editor position. In 1977, Edwards joined Black Enterprise magazine as an associate editor, but left in 1978 to become a senior editor at Family Circle magazine. Edwards was named executive editor of Essence magazine in 1981, and was promoted to the position of editor two years later. She left Essence in 1986 to open a real estate brokerage firm, Plaza Properties, but continued to write for the magazine as a contributing editor/writer. In 1990, she returned to Black Enterprise magazine as executive editor and vice president of editorial operations, while continuing to run her real estate business. In 1998, Edwards became a senior editor at More magazine.

In 2008, after successfully running her real estate company for twenty-two years, Edwards joined the real estate firm of Brown Harris Stevens as an associate broker. In addition, Edwards has served as an adjunct professor of magazine writing and magazine editing at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University and New York University, respectively.

Edwards has consistently freelanced as a journalist, and her work has appeared in numerous publications including Vibe, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, the Columbia Journalism Review, Essence, More, Redbook, Ladies Home Journal, Glamour and Black Enterprise. Edwards has also authored several books including, Children of the Dream: The Psychology of Black Success, published by Doubleday in 1992, and co-written with Dr. Craig Polite. Her latest work is a collaboration with Edward Lewis, co-founder, CEO and publisher of Essence magazine, on his business memoir, The Man From Essence: Creating a Magazine for Black Women, to be published by Atria Books (Simon & Schuster) in 2014.

Edwards’ professional affiliations include membership in the New York Association of Black Journalists (NYABJ), The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). She served as a regional director of NABJ from 1981 to 1983, and was the program co-chair for the NABJ Annual Convention held in New York in 1989. In 1992, Edwards received an NYABJ Excellence Award for Magazine Feature Writing.

Audrey Edwards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.320

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/12/2013

Last Name

Edwards

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

University of Washington

Columbia University

Rogers Elementary School

Gault Middle School

Lincoln High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Audrey

Birth City, State, Country

Tacoma

HM ID

EDW05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/21/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Rice

Short Description

Magazine editor and author Audrey Edwards (1947 - ) was the executive editor and editor of Essence magazine, and also served as executive editor and vice president of editorial operations at Black Enterprise magazine.

Employment

Redbook

Community News Service

Fairchild Publications/Supermarket News

Black Enterprise

Family Circle

Essence

Plaza Properties

More Magazine

Brown Harris Stevens

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

New York University Graduate School of Journalism

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:660,6:2200,14:3430,31:4332,43:4660,48:13700,145:14400,154:15100,162:16300,179:17300,192:18600,207:21800,254:22300,260:25063,298:25753,311:26374,321:30820,417:31740,427:34684,453:35215,464:36749,495:37162,503:37811,514:38283,525:38814,535:44308,627:45180,639:46379,668:47142,677:48341,709:60740,882:64360,976:64880,985:65400,995:65790,1002:68000,1052:70888,1090:71808,1106:76920,1188:77808,1212:78770,1227:79288,1238:94340,1382:94790,1388:95420,1397:96410,1440:97040,1449:98390,1492:98840,1498:106050,1590$0,0:1491,80:3692,127:4189,136:4757,145:5254,153:5964,169:9120,181:9687,189:10254,198:12036,231:19300,363:19768,370:20314,378:21094,392:25815,446:26480,454:35022,642:36426,763:37128,773:38532,800:39156,809:41028,836:41574,845:53611,937:54023,942:57628,1003:58452,1013:64400,1101:65872,1131:70802,1163:76028,1252:76821,1282:77553,1297:77858,1303:78285,1311:82796,1329:83237,1338:83804,1349:84590,1357
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Audrey Edwards' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about her maternal grandparents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards remembers segregation in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about her mother's U.S. Army service

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards talks about her West Indian identity

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards talks about her relationship with her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards remembers attending Catholic school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards remembers living in Japan, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards remembers living in Japan, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards recalls attending an all-black school in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about living in Jefferson City, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards remembers her family's first home in Tacoma, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards talks about her father's first marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards recalls her transition to Gault Junior High School in Tacoma, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards remembers narrowly avoiding a fight with a classmate

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards describes her activities at Lincoln High School in Tacoma, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards recalls her parents' views on the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about her father's Caribbean heritage

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her parents' community involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards talks about her early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards recalls her childhood aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards recalls attending the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards remembers attending Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards recalls her academic experiences at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards describes her return to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards recalls briefly attending Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards remembers meeting her half-sisters

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Audrey Edwards recalls moving to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards lists publications where she has worked

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards recalls learning about her Caribbean heritage in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards remembers working for Redbook

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards describes her decision to leave Redbook

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards remembers working at Columbia University's Urban Center in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about joining Black Enterprise

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards recalls working for the Community News Service and Supermarket News

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards remembers her experiences writing for Supermarket News

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards describes her position at Black Enterprise

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards remembers working for Family Circle

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards remembers working with Susan Taylor

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes memorable stories from Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards remembers the staff dynamics at Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes the challenges of starting a magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards recalls Essence's first men's issue

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about Susan Taylor's 'In the Spirit' column

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's coverage of Vanessa Williams

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about covering historically significant events

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes the prominent figures at Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards talks about her freelance editing career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about the Essence Achievement Awards and Essence television show

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards recalls being chosen to co-author a book with Edward Lewis

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes the founding of Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards remembers Essence's first three editors-in-chief

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes the Essence television show

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards talks about the editorial process at Essence

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards talks about hiring African Americans at Essence

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards recalls her attempt to hire African Americans for Essence's television show

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards describes her role on the Essence television show

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards talks about the editors at Essence Magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's political coverage

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about Essence's appeal to men

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence magazine's varying subject matter

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards reflects upon her career

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to leave Essence magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards talks about her marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Audrey Edwards describes her successors at Essence magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls working as the editor-at-large of Black Enterprise

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her book, 'Children of The Dream'

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards recalls writing 'Children of The Dream' with Craig K. Polite

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards describes the reactions to 'Children of The Dream'

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards recalls writing an Essence coffee table book

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards talks about her move to Paris, France

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards describes her real estate business

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards recalls working at More magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards talks about her freelance writing career

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards remembers writing 'Bring Me Home A Black Girl,' pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards remembers writing 'Bring Me Home A Black Girl,' pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Audrey Edwards talks about the importance of a black press

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Audrey Edwards describes the role of Black Enterprise

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Audrey Edwards talks about Time Warner, Inc.'s acquisition of Essence

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Audrey Edwards describes Essence founder Edward Lewis

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Audrey Edwards remembers Susan Taylor's retirement

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Audrey Edwards talks about the importance of training successors

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Audrey Edwards describes her concerns for the black press

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Audrey Edwards describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Audrey Edwards reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Audrey Edwards narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$7

DAStory

11$6

DATitle
Audrey Edwards recalls her decision to join Essence, pt. 1
Audrey Edwards talks about Essence's appeal to men
Transcript
Oddly enough, when the Essence opportunity came along, I initially turned it down because--now I'm thinking as a history maker--Family Circle is about to make me articles editor, which is now almost part of management, which would have been a coup for a black woman to make articles editor. And I wanted to do something historic, and that was become articles editor. And I--and Ed Lewis [HistoryMaker Edward Lewis] called me when [HistoryMaker] Susan Taylor was made editor-in-chief. She was putting together a staff. He called me first, took me to lunch, and I told him no, wasn't interested. And you know what turned it around? My friend [Emile Milne] who had taken my place at Black Enterprise. The person they made a senior editor, he told me, "If you don't want that job at Essence, I do." And I'm like they're not gonna give this--it was--it was the executive editor; that was the title, executive editor. I'm like they're not giving this to you. And then the managing editor at Family Circle, who was a white man, said to me, "Are you crazy? You have an opportunity to go work for a real magazine." And I'm like, "But Family Circle is number one." He did not view--he just said, "You have an opportunity to work for a magazine that is fairly new, reflects who you are; it's geared to black women." So it took two men to turn me around (laughter). And I called Susan over the weekend, and I said, "Look," and I had met with her also, and I said, "I'd like the weekend to think about the offer." And I called her on Monday and said I'd take it, but I initially said no.$The other thing the magazine did under, under Susan [HistoryMaker Susan Taylor] that I think was absolutely groundbreaking was create a dialogue between black women and black men. Because what was going on--the big thing going on culturally in the '80s [1980s] was this schism all of a sudden. Well, I don't know if it was all of a sudden, but there was a real schism between black men and black women. You know, there was--there was a lot of fallout from Alice Walker's book, 'The Color Purple,' Gloria Naylor's book, 'Women of Brewster Place,' ['The Women of Brewster Place'] and Ntozake [HistoryMaker Ntozake Shange] play, 'For Colored Girls' ['For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow is Enuf']. You know, that had men up in arms, sometimes women up in arms. And the magazine became a forum for men and women to talk to each other. And at its height, 25 percent of Essence's readers were men, which was very significant for a women's magazine because it meant that men wanted to know what women were thinking. And men wrote for the magazine, so women could find out what they were thinking--very important. And, again, not what typical women's magazines were doing. And then a lot of magazines started copying. You know, all of a sudden women's magazines were doing special issue on men, and that was started by Essence.

Corynne Corbett

Magazine editor Corynne L. Corbett attended the Pratt Institute and graduated with her B.F.A. degree in fashion merchandising.

Corbett began her magazine publishing career at Elle magazine in 1985, and was promoted from editorial assistant to senior beauty, health and fitness editor. From 1993 to 1997, Corbett was the owner of Corynne Corbett Creative Connections where she worked on projects that ranged from freelance writing to advertising and special events. She was then hired at Mode magazine as executive editor and senior editor before being promoted to editor-in-chief. After a brief stint as editor-in-chief at Heart & Soul magazine from 2001 to 2003, Corbett joined Real Simple magazine. While there, she served as beauty and wellness director before being promoted to executive editor. In 2010, Corbett was named beauty editor at Essence magazine where she served for three years.

Corbett also founded Chic Jones Media, LLC in 2008, which later launched several websites and media outlets, including “That Black Girl Site,” “My Black Girl Site,” “My Black Girl Blogging,” “The Grown Diaries,” and “My Black Girl Radio.” She has also written for such publications as Self magazine, Town & Country magazine, Ladies Home Journal, and Ebony magazine.

Corbett has appeared as a beauty and style expert on several shows, including Tia & Tamera, Better TV, Good Day New York, the Dr. Steve Show, The View, Good Morning America, Today in New York, Positively Black, and E!, among others. In addition, she has served as a brand strategist and image consultant for companies such as Clinique, Maybelline New York, IMAN Cosmetics, L’Oreal, Bumble & Bumble, Black Opal, Christian Dior, Phyto, and Coty.

Throughout her career, Corbett has mentored many young women interested in succeeding in the beauty industry through her non-organization, Beauty Biz Camp. Corbett professional memberships include the American Society of Magazine Editors and the National Association of Black Journalists.

Here is a sampling of some of the publications Corbett has overseen:

Accession Number

A2013.302

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/13/2013

Last Name

Corbett

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

LaVerne

Occupation
Schools

Pratt Institute

August Martin High School

I.S. 59 Q Springfield Gardens

P.S. 15 Jackie Robinson School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Corynne

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

COR05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

It Is Not Over.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/26/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Japanese Food

Short Description

Magazine editor Corynne Corbett (1961 - ) founder of Chic Jones Media, LLC and owner of Corynne Corbett Creative Connections, has held key editorial positions at major publications, including Elle, Real Simple, Essence, MODE, and Heart & Soul.

Employment

Times, Inc./Essence Communications

Time, Inc.

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Mode/Girl

Aveda, Mary Hatchette Custom Publishing

Hatchette/Elle Magazine

Women's Wear Daily

Favorite Color

Fuschia

Timing Pairs
0,0:18115,237:19985,264:22960,354:31366,414:32315,429:36038,505:43922,727:54768,890:59871,983:100723,1565:116166,1820:119008,1862:145110,2196:146334,2211:154263,2357:155495,2388:185650,2779:196542,2972:197118,2994:200455,3020:200785,3029:204066,3059:204506,3065:205914,3098:208994,3156:221410,3347:229466,3489:229730,3494:238730,3610$0,0:8370,116:8742,121:30878,433:31206,438:50094,643:82892,1205:83360,1212:84452,1243:86636,1300:87494,1312:101940,1509:102360,1516:112925,1661:113327,1669:114399,1689:115203,1710:117280,1753:117950,1772:131388,1877:133359,1957:160564,2369:161203,2380:161984,2398:162907,2413:178088,2643:183470,2720:183860,2726:193368,2823:195800,2846:198156,2895:199068,2912:216227,3049:225786,3227:233900,3292:234380,3299:235020,3308:236030,3318
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Corynne Corbett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett describes her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett describes her father's civil rights and union activities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes her mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett talks about her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett talks about her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett describes her mother's and grandmother's personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Corynne Corbett talks about her siblings and her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Corynne Corbett describes the block where she grew up in St. Albans, Queens, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Corynne Corbett describes her family life during childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Corynne Corbett describes her family's participation at church and church camps

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood, pt. 3

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett describes how her family celebrated the holidays

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett talks about her family activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes her schools and her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes her early interest in art and fashion

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett describes her sisters' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett describes her decision to attend Pratt Institute in New York City, New York to study fashion

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience at the Pratt Institute in New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett talks about black social life at the Pratt Institute in New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett describes her childhood family vacations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett describes her fashion aesthetic at the Pratt Institute in New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett describes being hired at Women's Wear Daily journal

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett describes being hired at Elle magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett talks about one of her mentors, Eleanor Barron

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience at Women's Wear Daily journal

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes being hired as an editorial assistant at Elle magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience at Elle magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett talks about the popular models and photographers when she worked at Elle magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Corynne Corbett reflects on the culture at Elle magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett describes beginning to write articles for Elle magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett describes the position of African American women in the fashion magazine industry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett describes the changes in ownership and management during her tenure at Elle magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett talks about the changing numbers of African American models and editors at fashion magazines

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett shares her enjoyment of the fashion publishing industry

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes the editorial structure of Elle magazine and its publishing competition

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett talks about the beauty directors who worked at competing publications

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes leaving her position as Senior Beauty Editor at Elle magazine in 1993

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett talks about the proliferation of new magazines in the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett talks about Andre Leon Talley, the Black Girls Coalition, and casting representative models

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience with Hachette Custom Publishing

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett talks about how magazines invite customer feedback

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett describes her difficult experience with Hachette Custom Publishing

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience with Corynne Corbett Creative Connections

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett describes becoming editor-in-chief of Mode magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes how Mode magazine celebrated plus size women

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience shooting Queen Latifah for the cover of Mode magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes her experience as editor-in-chief of Mode magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett talks about the skills she learned as editor-in-chief of Mode magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett reflects on what she enjoyed about working at Mode magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett describes why Mode magazine ceased operation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett describes quitting Mode magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett talks about joining Vanguarde Media

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett remembers the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett describes the magazines produced by Vanguarde Media

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett talks about the male dominated black media industry

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes HistoryMakers Keith Clinkscales and Roy Johnson

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes the party culture of Vanguarde Media, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett describes the party culture of Vanguarde Media, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett talks about HistoryMaker Leonard Burnett, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett talks about a magazine cover featuring Iman

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett shares stories of working at Vanguarde Media

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett recalls meeting with Time, Inc. editorial director Isolde Motley amid Vanguarde's financial struggles

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett shares her view on black media publications

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes the ending of Vanguarde Media in 2003

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett describes working as the beauty and wellness director at Real Simple magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett talks about becoming executive editor of Real Simple magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett talks about the leadership at Time, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett describes working on television shows for The Learning Channel and PBS-TV

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Corynne Corbett describes the content of Real Simple magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Corynne Corbett describes being laid off during the 2008 staff cuts at Time, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Corynne Corbett talks about blogging for Real Simple and starting That Black Girl Blogging

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett talks about the readership of Real Simple magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett describes changes in the media landscape post-9/11

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett talks about shifting from print to digital media

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett describes her blog post on Michelle Obama's hair

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett talks about audience engagement on social media

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett talks about being the beauty director at Essence magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett talks about her challenges as the beauty director of Essence magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett talks about her accomplishments as beauty director of Essence magazine

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett talks about being laid off from Essence magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett talks about creating Beauty Biz Camp

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett comments on the media landscape for black women

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Corynne Corbett talks about the growth of citizen journalism and bloggers

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Corynne Corbett comments on the need for traditional publications to adopt online platforms

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Corynne Corbett talks about the change in fashion and beauty media over the past thirty years

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Corynne Corbett describes the need for more black leadership in the beauty industry

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Corynne Corbett shares her views on multicultural and black beauty standards

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Corynne Corbett describes her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Corynne Corbett describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Corynne Corbett reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Corynne Corbett narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Corynne Corbett narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$8

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Corynne Corbett describes being hired at Women's Wear Daily journal
Corynne Corbett talks about being the beauty director at Essence magazine
Transcript
What were you wanting to be?$$I, I thought I wanted to be a buyer till I found out what buyers did. And then I wanted to do something in fashion, probably styling cause I heard what stylists did and I was really interested in that. So that was what I really was interested in, like putting things together. And there was--and I was interested in some production too. So I worked on some, some, some production aspects of the fashion end, like producing--there was a, a designer called Bill Tice that, that the merchandising students produced a show for him. And I was in the first--it was a two semester course [at Pratt Institute in New York City, New York]. I was in the first part of it. And the second semester they actually got to do the show and stuff like that. And I did some other--I did the video part of it, with the video production team. And I really loved that.$$And that was as a student project.$$Yeah, a student project.$$Okay. So it's--you're graduating; what do you do? Where do you go?$$I didn't have a clue. There was no such thing as internships. There were, there were--and so I thought I wanted to work at a magazine and the best way to get a job at a magazine was to pass the typing test at Conde Nast. So one of the things--in addition to my mom [LaVerne Henderson Corbett] being--my mom was a Spanish teacher. And she taught honor students and she also taught Spanish sten, stenography and typing. And I asked her to bring home a typing book for me, an English typing book for me. And I sat in there till I got my typing back up to fifty words a minute. But you couldn't have any errors. So make an appointment and go take the typing test at Conde Nast, and go take the typing test until I could pass it. And then see if I could get an interview. I was trying to get into publishing anyway I could. I didn't know anything about--I knew I wanted to be in styling. There were two ways you could be a stylist. You work at a magazine, or you work at a, a catalogue house and be an assistant. So I applied for those. But I didn't even know where to look for this kinds of job. And so I, I, I did a little of that and I, I started temping. And my first temp--at first I temped at a brokerage house as just a receptionist. And then I temped at--while all along applying for jobs. Then I temped at a, at, at Crown Publishing [Group], book publishing. So I got exposure, I was there for maybe six months and I got exposure to that. So I knew that I didn't want book publishing; that wasn't for me. And I got an interview at Women's Wear Daily. And I knew what Women's Wear Daily was the bible of the fashion industry. So I said well this is a way in (unclear). The job was for a secretary, and it was one of those interviews where it's like five minutes long. I walk in and the woman who's a supervisor for all the secretaries wanted to--she interviewed me for a few minutes and she wanted to introduce me to the two women that I would be working with. And one of them was yelling at her. So I met the first person and the second person was yelling at her for some reason. And so she went into her boss whose name was name was Jean Fahey and said I have this woman here, I think she'd be good for the job, but this lady's yelling. She's like "hire her." So I got the job. And I started working there. And the first, first time I go out to lunch with all--a bunch of the other secretaries, they tell me you know there have been nine people in your job in the past year because of the lady who yells.$$Who was, who was--$$Her name was Eleanor Barron.$But I want to ask--so I want, I want to go to Essence next, which is more recent.$$Right.$$So how did Essence come, come about?$$I got a call from Angela Burt-Murray. Angela and I worked together at Vanguarde [Media]. And she asked me if I would consider doing beauty again.$$Now what was her role at Vanguarde?$$At Vanguarde she was executive director when Amy [DuBois] Barnett was editor-in-chief of Honey. And when Amy went to Teen People, Angela went with her and took on a similar role--she took a--I think she went in as a senior editor, but eventually became executive editor there. So she--and then while I was at Real Simple, she became editor-in-chief of Essence in 2005. So she called me and asked me if I considered doing beauty. And I said "Hadn't thought about it, but let me give it some thought." She said "Okay, I'm gonna give you a call back in a week or so." She called me back and said--she said "Would you want to go back in the market," would you--cause this all--it's a different mindset. I said yeah, I think I could come up with a story--I was more concerned do I know enough about what's happening in terms of trends and stuff. Could I come up with story ideas. And I looked into it and I said "Oh yeah, I think I could do this again." She said "Okay, I have an opportunity here. I'd like you to come and freelance. Would you be interested in doing that?" And I said "Yeah." So in March of 2010, I went to Essence and one of--Pamela Edwards [Christiani] was going to People magazine as the--she was the senior beauty editor and she was going to be the fashion and beauty editor at People magazine. And I was there for about a week, or not even a week and then it was announced that Mikki was retiring from her position as beauty director at Essence, Mikki Taylor. And then everybody said "that's why you're here" cause they--I guess that's what we couldn't-somebody said "That's what we couldn't tell you when we called." I was like okay. So I freelanced in Mikki's job after she left for a couple of months and I interviewed for the job and I got the job and I started officially in May of 2010. And one of the things that, that changed while I was there was that you know fashion and beauty had been all in one section and, and, and what Angela had--no, beauty and hair had been all in one section. And what Angela had noticed is that there was an opportunity to create two separate sections and that she wanted to create a strong hair presence, strong black hair presence. And she thought that was a very strong both argument for readers and for advertisers to do that. So she wanted me to create that and to just reinvigorate and change the, the way that beauty was being looked at. And so I, I re-envisioned the section and also the other thing that was happening is that they were doing a special hair issue, a freestanding issue, like a thirteenth issue which she wanted me to oversee. So I did that and that's when the next round of late nights came. But it was a really great experience because we really got to get in-depth about black hair. Not just natural hair, but all about, about care, about weaves, about wigs, about relaxers, about all the things that we talk about. And we got great reaction, a really, really, really strong reaction from that.

Yanick Rice-Lamb

Editor, publisher and professor Yanick Rice Lamb was born on September 27, 1957 in Akron, Ohio to William R. Rice and Carmelie Jordan. Lamb graduated from Buchtel High School in Akron in 1976. She went on to receive her B.A. degree in journalism from Ohio State University in 1980.

Upon graduation, Lamb was hired as a copy editor at the Toledo Blade, where she was promoted to reporter in 1982. Lamb then worked for the Journal-Constitution in Atlanta, Georgia, as a copy editor until 1984, when she was hired as a layout editor for the New York Times. While employed at the New York Times, Lamb worked in various capacities, including deputy home and living editor, assistant editor of the Connecticut Weekly, and metropolitan copy editor. Then, in 1992, she became a senior editor for Child Magazine, serving two years. She was then hired as an editor-at-large at Essence Magazine in 1994. From 1995 until 2000, Lamb served as editor-in-chief, editorial director, and vice president at Black Entertainment Television. At BET, she was responsible for editorial management of BET Weekend, for which she was founding editor, as well as BET Publishing Group’s Heart & Soul. Lamb worked at Vanguarde Media, Incorporated, as editor-in-chief from 2000 to 2001. She was then hired as a journalism lecturer at Howard University in 2001, and was later promoted to associate professor. After receiving her M.B.A. degree from Howard University in 2005, she became the associate publisher and editorial director of Heart & Soul, where she served until 2011. In 2010, Lamb co-founded Fully-Connected.com, a website that connects people from Atlanta to Accra through interactive journalism and social networking. She also co-founded FierceforBlackWomen.com in 2013. Lamb continued to teach at Howard University, serving as chair of the Department of Media, Journalism and Film since 2013.

Lamb has co-authored three books: 1996’s The Spirit of African Design, 2004’s Born to Win: The Authorized Biography of Althea Gibson, and 2005’s Rise and Fly: Tall Tales and Mostly True Rules of Bid Whist. She has also received numerous awards, including the Folio: Editorial Excellence Award and the McDonald's Black History Maker of Today Award in Journalism. Lamb was also honored at the NABJ Salute to Excellence Awards; and she has served twice as president of the New York Association of Black Journalists. In addition, the Association of Health Care Journalists selected Lamb as a Health Performance Fellow in 2010; and, in 2013, she became the John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow.

Yanick Rice Lamb was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 23, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.275

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/23/2013

Last Name

Rice-Lamb

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Buchtel High School

The Ohio State University

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Yanick

Birth City, State, Country

Akron

HM ID

RIC18

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Lamu, Kenya

Favorite Quote

Dream big

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/27/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Magazine editor Yanick Rice-Lamb (1957 - ) , founding editor of BET Weekend, is the co-author of three books: The Spirit of African Design, Born to Win: The Authorized Biography of Althea Gibson, and Rise and Fly: Tall Tales and Mostly True Rules of Bid Whist.

Employment

Toledo Blade

Journal-Constitution

New York Times

Child Magazine

Essence Magazine

BET

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Howard University

Heart and Soul Magazine

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb narrates her photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Yanick Rice-Lamb's interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mother's family background and life in Haiti pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mother's family background and life in Haiti pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her father's educational background and teaching career

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about growing up in a Haitian household in a diverse neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family's religious background

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Yanick Rice-Lamb briefly talks about going to Catholic schools

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family's living near the Akron Zoo in Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her childhood interests, favorite subjects and teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about how her interest in writing was influenced by the comic strip Brenda Starr and others

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about some black journalists that served as role models in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her high school achievements and experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her experiences at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her mentors at Ohio State University and newspapers she worked for as a student

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her first internship and expectations for black students at Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb recounts her experiences as an intern at the 'Reader's Digest' and 'The Times Union'

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences as a general assignment reporter at 'The Toledo Blade'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb recounts her first day as a reporter for 'The Toledo Blade'

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about 'The Toledo Blade' staff and her mentors in Toledo, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about being hired at 'The Atlanta Journal Constitution'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences in Atlanta, Georgia during her time at 'The Atlanta Journal Constitution' in the early 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her experiences at 'The New York Times' and her professional mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about transitioning from newspaper journalism to magazine journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes her most memorable project at 'The New York Times'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about the mentors she had while working at 'The New York Times,' as well as difficult situations she faced at the paper

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb discusses her work with 'Child' magazine and the differences between publishing a newspaper and a magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes memorable stories she worked on at 'Child' magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her transition from 'Child' magazine to 'Essence,' and on to 'BET Weekend' in the mid-1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about developing the 'BET Weekend' magazine and her philosophy for magazine production

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about criticism Black Entertainment Television has faced over its programming content

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Yanick Rice-Lamb describes innovative television and print content BET has tried to produce

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her transition from 'BET Weekend' to teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her work with 'Heart and Soul' magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about memorable stories from 'BET Weekend' and 'Heart and Soul' magazines

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb mentions milestones of her career from 1998 to 2011, including writing her first book

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about writing Born to Win, a biography of Althea Gibson, with Fran Gray

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks Althea Gibson's life and career

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about writing and promoting her book Rise and Fly

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her Aunt Rose, a relative who influenced her and whom Rice-Lamb wrote about

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about working on her coffee table book, The Spirit of African Design

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about articles she has written on teaching media and the history of newspaper supplements

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her coverage of the 2012 Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her professional association memberships

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her personal philosophy on teaching and journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Yanick Rice-Lamb reflects upon her career and legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about her family and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

9$9

DATitle
Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about developing the 'BET Weekend' magazine and her philosophy for magazine production
Yanick Rice-Lamb talks about articles she has written on teaching media and the history of newspaper supplements
Transcript
Well, tell us about BET's [Black Entertainment Television] magazine. (Unclear)--$$That was fun. That was probably one of my most enjoyable jobs. I, I like starting things, and I had always wanted to start a magazine since I was in college, so it gave me the opportunity to start a magazine with someone else's money (laughter). But I figured whoever did the prototype, if they liked it, that, that person would get the job, so I wasn't gonna let go of the prototype, you know, developed it--you know, the different ideas I had-- Bob Johnson in, in particular, and I've worked with Debra Lee. They were particularly interested in my Style background at the 'New York Times' and some of the things I did there, and just kind of the diversity of doing news and Style and Entertainment and bringing that together. So I kind of help develop the concept for the magazine, and it was--it took off; it was a hit. Readers really loved it. The papers liked carrying it. We traveled around the different newspapers to negotiate them picking up the newspaper and inserting it in their magazine. We had to pay--I mean their newspaper--we had to pay for that of course, but just like building something from the ground up, coming up with a concept, hiring a staff, finding the writers, setting up, you know, photo shoots, and thinking about paper and--you know, just all the different things that go into it. And it was kind of a way of pulling in everything I had done, you know, from the copy editing, reporting, from the design and layout, and all of that in, in one place, and then reacting to news or thinking long term about how we were gonna do things too so. And we--our circulation grew in three years from eight--800,000 to 1.3 million, so we were the second largest publication behind 'Ebony.'$$What, what's your philosophy in, in terms of layout of a magazine, you know, in terms of what, what, what should the--should be the--what, what the cover should be like and what the--$$One, one of the things--because we were working with the newspaper initially, they were kind of content with doing something on news print. But we felt that--you know, thinking about how African Americans do things, we like top shelf this and that. We wanted to have magazine quality publication, so we wanted to make sure that we went after some of the people who were popular or pioneering at the time, whether it was Toni Morrison or Dr. Ben Carson, or whether it was Denzel Washington or you know, an Olympian at the time. So we wanted to be topical, we wanted to try to be as fresh as--you know, first if possible with the information. We wanted to use some of the best photographers, the best writers, have a really nice design for the time--you know, make it interesting, telling people something they didn't already know. And that was my criteria when people pitched stories to me. It's like I read a lot of things. I keep up with things. Tell me something I don't already know. You know, tell me a new angle on this, a new twist on this. So we wanted to--we wanted to give the audience something they hadn't been getting so. And I think that's why people were receptive to it, because they were seeing stories that they weren't seeing in other places, that they weren't seeing in their newspapers so. Some people said it was a breath of fresh air when they picked up their newspaper and they pulled out 'BET Weekend.'$Okay, now the, the book 'Teaching Converged Media through News Coverage of the 2--2--2008 Presidential Election.' Now this is--I think it's the first election that was won where--$$Obama [President Barack Obama].$$--where the media was used in the campaign, social media.$$Yes.$$Yeah.$$This--so this was a--this was a journal article that we did. We had one of the largest news teams covering the election, with students. 'Cause we had almost the entire department. We--there were students who were excused from their classes for the 2008 election, and, and then again for the inauguration. And we had them at precincts all over the region also--all over Washington, D.C., all over northern Virginia, all over Maryland, the out--the surrounding counties of, of Maryland, and so they were there. We had 'em in shifts all day long, from the--from when the polls opened til the time that they closed. So they were doing that, and they were, you know, monitoring like the traffic and how often people are voting, any problems, special stories, taking pictures, shooting video, all of that. So they, they did a really wonderful job with that, so we kind of documented some of that in that article--$$Now (unclear)--$$--then we did it again for the inauguration.$$Was this like a priority for the School of Communications at Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.] to make sure that we document the history of this first inauguration of (unclear)--$$It was--$$--(Simultaneous)--$$--it was a priority. I mean, it was--the, the university was very engaged, I mean political science obviously. It was a--it was a major story, and one of the things that we--we encourage our students to get off campus. And being here right here in Washington, it was--you know, we couldn't pass up the opportunity to have them, you know, cover history, and they were excited about doing it. And then we had a lot of professionals, and some of our adjuncts had come in too, so we commandeered all of the computer labs on this floor, and we had, you know, just a big operation all day long. And, and so the student who wrote the lead story declaring him the winner, she was actually--she had it online actually ahead of some major news organizations too. But they, they were everywhere. They were at, like I said, all over the precincts, at the White House, on U Street. And, and also, the ones who went home to vote, they were sending back stories and pictures from there. So we had one, when he gave his victory speech--his acceptance speech, we had a student there who sent a picture of--through her cell phone, and we put it online immediately. And she was sending information from there. We had students who were where Biden [Vice President Joe Biden] went to vote in, in Delaware, so they were all over the country and as `well as a big team here. So it was a lot of work, but it was a lot of fun, and the students got a lot out of it. Then we did it again for when he ran for re-election.$$--(Simultaneous)--$$And we've done it for a lot of--a lot of different elections, not just those, for local elections as well.$$Okay, okay, students have credentials and stuff when they go out?$$Yeah, they had credentials and, and they've, they've covered things. They've gone out of the country. They've gone to Haiti. They've gone to--they've done, you know, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. So wherever it's a story--anniversary of the sit-in movements in Greensboro, North Carolina. Some of them go abroad and do different things, so wherever there's a--you know, and the hurricanes that were on the East Coast, they were doing--some of them went up to New York and New Jersey to do stories there.$$Okay, this is an art--article too I guess, 'Supplementing the news, an Industry Based De--Description of Magazine Supplements.'$$Yes, that's a journal article. I was always--when I started doing 'BET [Black Entertainment Television] Weekend,' people kept telling me about 'Tuesday,' which was basically doing what we were doing except much earlier. And so I was always fascinated by that history, so I was looking--and then as a result of 'BET Weekend,' a number of other supplements started. People started local ones as well as national ones, so I was looking--I was interested in looking at the history of that. So that's what that article was.$$And what, what are the other memorable ones other than 'Tuesday.'$$There was one called 'Suburban Styles' that was--I think Annette was doing as a partnership. And there was--I'm trying to remember the names of all of them. Oh, the 'Atlanta Daily World' started one of the first ones that they were doing--they were circulating. They owned a number of--they owned a number of other smaller papers, and they were in partnership with a num--they had a distribution arrangement with a number of papers in the South where they were printing their papers for them and distributing them. So they had kind of a sepia tone insert that they were putting in some of the newspapers there. So that was kind of the first one that I discovered, and--so that's, that's one that stood out too.

Alfred Edmond, Jr.

Journalist and commentator Alfred Adam Edmond Jr. was born on March 8, 1960 in Long Branch, New Jersey to Alfred and Virginia Edmond. He graduated from Rutgers University in 1983 with a B.A. degree in studio art and a minor in economics. Having served as editor of a campus newspaper, Edmond worked during the next three years at black-owned newspapers in New York – first, in 1983, as managing editor of Big Red News, in Brooklyn, and then as associate editor at the New York Daily Challenge, in 1985. In 1986, he moved to magazines as senior editor at Modern Black Men (MBM) . A year later, he joined publisher Earl Graves at Black Enterprise magazine.

Edmond, an associate editor, obtained an exclusive interview with financier Reginald F. Lewis, who was about to execute his company’s $985 million acquisition of Beatrice International Food Company. Edmond was then sought as a quotable expert on financial matters outside of his own publication. By 1995, Edmond rose to the post of executive editor at Black Enterprise. Beginning in 1997, Edmond gave much of his attention to Black Enterprise.com, the magazine’s Web site, working to expand the publication’s digital reach.

Appointed editor-in-chief at Black Enterprise in 2000, he led the magazine’s Black Wealth Initiative, an effort to focus African Americans on the task of wealth building. In 2006, Edmond launched his “Off My Chest” blog column, taking on any subject that caught his attention, from culture to politics to personal finance. He continued his great interest in Black Enterprise.com becoming its editor-in-chief in 2008 and assuming the role of multimedia editor-at-large in 2010. He has also expanded his work as a motivational speaker, and in 2012 entered into a deal with Windsor Neckwear to launch a line of bow ties.

Edmond was interviewed by TheHistoryMakers on July 14, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.206

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/14/2013

Last Name

Edmond

Maker Category
Middle Name

Adam

Occupation
Schools

Gregory School

Long Branch Middle School

Rutgers University

Stanford University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Alfred

Birth City, State, Country

Long Branch

HM ID

EDM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

The road to Heaven is paved through Hell.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

3/8/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

West Orange

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chocolate

Short Description

Magazine editor Alfred Edmond, Jr. (1960 - ) is known for his work as an editor at Black Enterprise magazine, leading the magazine’s digital efforts and offering expert analysis on a wide range of financial topics.

Employment

Black Enterprise Magazine

Modern Black Man

Big Red News

Daily Challenge

WVON Radio

American Urban Radio Network

Alfred Edmond Jr. Bowtie Collection for Windsor Neckwear

A2Z Personal Growth Enterprise

Favorite Color

No Favorite Color

Marcia Ann Gillespie

Magazine editor Marcia Ann Gillespie was born on July 10, 1944 in Rockville Centre, New York. Her father, Charles M. Gillespie, was a church sexton and ran a floor waxing business; her mother, Ethel Young Gillespie, a domestic worker who operated a catering business on the side. Gillespie and her sister, Charlene Gillespie, grew up- in Long Island, New York. She graduated from a mostly white and Jewish high school and then enrolled in Lake Forest College where she graduated with honors with her B.A. degree in American studies in 1966.

Upon graduation, Gillespie worked as a researcher at Time-Life Books, Inc. in New York City. She was hired as a managing editor at the newly-founded African American publication Essence Magazine in 1970 and was promoted to editor-in-chief in 1971. While there, she transformed Essence Magazine into one of the fastest growing women’s publications in the United States. Gillespie joined Ms. Magazine in 1980 and served in several capacities, including as a contributing writer, contributing editor, and executive editor. In 1992, she was named editor-in-chief of Ms. Magazine, making her the first African American woman to achieve that position at a mainstream publication in the United States. She went on to serve as president of Liberty Media for Women in 1996 after the company purchased Ms. Magazine from the McDonald Communications Corporation. Gillespie also served as a guest lecturer and advisor to the vice chancellor of the University of the West Indies.

Gillespie served on the board of directors of the Rod Rodgers Dance Company, the Arthur Ashe Institute of Urban Health, the Black & Jewish Women of New York, the Violence Policy Center in Washington, D.C. She also was appointed to the advisory board of the Aspen Institute, the New Federal Theater in New York City, and the Studio Museum of Harlem. Gillespie is a member of the National Council of Negro Women and the American Association of Magazine Editors.

In 1973 received the Lake Forest College Outstanding Alumni Award; and, in 1978, she received the New York Women in Communications Matrix Award in 1978. The New York Association of Black Journalists honored Gillespie with its Life Achievement Award for Print Journalism. In 1982, Gillespie was named as one of the “Top Ten Outstanding Women in Magazine Publishing” by the March of Dimes.

Marcia Ann Gillespie was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.205

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2013

Last Name

Gillespie

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ann

Occupation
Schools

Lake Forest College

South Side High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Rockville Centre

HM ID

GIL07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica, Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Shit Happens

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/10/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood, Oysters

Short Description

Magazine editor Marcia Ann Gillespie (1944 - ) the first African American woman to achieve that position at a mainstream publication in the United States, served as editor-in-chief at Essence and Ms. Magazines.

Employment

Essence Magazine

Ms. magazine/Sarah Lazin books

New York times

Self Employed

State University of New York at Old Westbury

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie narrates her photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Ann Gillespie

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her maternal family history, talking about her great-grandmother's life

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her maternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her mother's life in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her paternal family history

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her father's move to Long Island, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcia Ann Gillespie desceribes how her parents met and their early marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marcia Ann Gillespie shares her early memories of her parents

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the segregation at Rockville Centre elementary schools in New York in the 1940's.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her earliest memories of Rockville Centre, New York and her parents

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her parent's involvement in community affairs in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes the town and her parent's civic involvement in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her impressions of her church as a girl in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her ambivalence about her church growing up in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - MARCIA ANN GILLESPIE shares her experiences in elementary school in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her interests and friends in elementary and junior high school in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes what books and periodicals she read as a child

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie recalls the Montgomery bus boycott in 1954 and a visit to her house from activist Bayard Rustin

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie recalls the 1963 March on Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her youth activism, including watching the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the FBI investigating her parents in 1960

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her attendance at Southside Senior High School in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes the counseling she received at Southside High School in Rockville Centre, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes how she funded her college education at Lake Forest College, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the professors who influenced her while attending Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes tutoring at the Robert Taylor Homes Housing Projects while attending Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the people she met while attending Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about American Studies at Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the culture at Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her interest in black history and issues of culture at Lake Forest College

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marcia Ann Gillespie reflects on the Civil Rights Movement during her attendance at Lake Forest College, pt 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marcia Ann Gillespie reflects on the Civil Rights Movement during her attendance at Lake Forest College, pt 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her graduation from Lake Forest College in 1966

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her early career at Time, Incorporate in 1966

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about book publishing at Time, Incorporated

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about working on a series for Time, Life about new leaders for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie remembers leaving Time, Incorporated and moving to Essence Magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie reflects on her skills at editing at Essence Magazine in 1970

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes the process of becoming editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine in 1971

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about her vision for Essence Magazine when she became its editor in 1971

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her audience for Essence Magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes the departments in Essence Magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marcia Ann Gillespie describes her vision to show a range of black beauty

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marcia Ann Gillespie shares some of her favorite issues and covers Essence ran

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the biggest challenges of being editor-in-chief at Essence Magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about the challenges of balancing readership and the target audience of Essence magazine

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Marcia Ann Gillespie describes the town and her parent's civic involvement in Rockville Centre, New York
Marcia Ann Gillespie talks about working on a series for Time, Life about new leaders for the black community
Transcript
You know, but there was--you know, I mean, they were always engaged in like village affairs, and going to the town meetings. My father and my mother served--my father was the president of the civic association. My mom was the secretary. And I mean one of my father's, you know, big pushes was, you know, really to improve services in the black community, because the services were not good. A lot of homes--I know there was some old apartment buildings that were not well-cared for. There were issues with the police, who were horrific--not surprising, you know. There was a lot of violence in the community, partly because, you know, Rockville Centre [New York] also had one of the great--I want to call it, great juke joints. You know, there was the bar, the bar and lounge. The barber shop was owned by one of my good friends, Dorothy. Dorothy McCludell's daddy was the numbers king for Nassau County [New York], baby. And they lived in Rockville Centre [New York]. And on, you know, Thursdays and Fridays and Saturday nights--Rockville Centre--the main drag in Rockville Centre was jumping. Because, again, it would be the time when a lot of the--they were called girls back then, although they were women--who slept in, you know, who were off. So, it attracted a lot of guys. I mean, it was wild. And there would be fights. There would be, there were "cut um, shoot-ums." And I mean, one of the things--you know, I always laugh, because when people ask you where you're from, and you say you grew up, you know, in a suburban town, they have kind of an Ozzie and Harriet kind of, you know, view of it. But in some ways, I guess it was. But it was also--you know, I can tell, you know... Violence... I was very aware of it, saw a lot of it, and was unperturbed. You know, so I can tell you about the time, you know, coming out on a Sunday morning. We had a big front yard. And a man apparently had been stabbed and had attempted, I think, to get out. But anyway, he crawled and he died, and died in our front yard. I remember I was the first one up. I open the door, I come out. And, you know, kids, we are blood thirsty. I am looking over at his body. I remember finally I go in and I say, "Mama, there's a dead man..." (laughter). I'm sorry, it's not funny. But, you know, what I'm trying to say is like it wasn't that kind of sheltered, though my mother was horrified. And then my father, I don't know what he thought that was going to do. He ended up building a wall across the front of our yard that summer. And I guess he thought that would help to... (laughter).$$He was trying to protect his family.$$Yeah, you know. But I never felt unsafe, because everybody knew everybody. Do you know what I mean? And my grandmother was like the matriarch of the community. And so, I mean, it always intrigued me. In the summertime my grandmother would be sitting. She had a house with a high front porch, you know. It was on the corner. She would be sitting on the front porch. And even--you know, the local drunks would be staggering, and they would straighten up and stop cussing when they came in front of my grandmother's house, so they could say "Good morning or good afternoon, Mrs. Young." She didn't play. (laughter).$Uh huh, I interviewed him. There was this man who I didn't quite understand why he was included. I'm trying to remember. There were a couple of others. But those were the highlights, you know, those were the ones that I interviewed. And so, I spent several weeks, you know, flying around to interview my brothers. And I remember going out to Chicago and, you know, to interview Jesse Jackson--never imagining that Jesse was going to remember me, which he did which was so sweet. And I remember him taking me home with him and, you know, meeting the family or whatever, you know, interviewing him. And interviewing Julian [Bond] on the plane. I forgot--and he was going someplace... and going up to, at the Cud (ph), to interview, you know, Harry [Edwards], Marsha and the guys. It was fascinating. We got all the interviews done. You know, the editor of the project, you know, was pleased with the interviews. And in coming up with the list of who were these people going to be--included in the list was Eldridge Cleaver. Think about the times, right.$$This was about the time that "Soul on Ice" [1968] was coming out?$$Uh huh. And there was a--the conference room where, you know, they would display--glass, you know. This special section was, you know, completed per se, and this photo essay that I, you know, had been working on, you know. And Ralph [Earl] Graves came in to look, to review it. And he's walking down, walking along the wall. And the editor is explaining--and then they come to the photograph of Eldridge Cleaver. Graves went ballistic. "We're not having a convicted rapist in Life Magazine. You know, "How dare you?" Blah, blah, you know. "He's nobody's leader, he's no new spokesperson." Blah, blah. "He's a convicted rapist", or whatever, you know. And the next thing I know, everybody is looking at me. The editor's looking at me. It's like it was if I was the only one who thought that, you know, Cleaver should be part of it. And I finally said, "Look, I don't like that he's a convicted rapist. So, that does not necessarily mean that therefore he is not a spokesperson or a leader." You know, I said, "We have had leaders of nations who have done worse", you know. "And it is not up to you to tell black people who they should follow. That's not who you, that's not your place either, Mr. Graves", you know. "And there are a lot of black people in this country who consider him to be a legitimate voice for their concerns. I thought he was going to have an apoplectic fit. And then he, you know, he yelled some more. And I said, "Look, Dr. Franklin, John Hope Franklin, was supposed to be the advisor on this, this thing that they were doing." I said, I said, "So, why don't you ask, speak to Dr. Franklin? You know, who am I? I'm a nobody. Ask Dr. Franklin, you know, what his opinion is." And I remember Graves stormed out of the room or whatever. The editor I remember said to me, "Well, dear, you know, if you had thought that maybe there was going to be a job for you at Life Magazine, I think you can forget it." It was true. You know, I thought that I was really was going to get to be a reporter there. But after that incident, I knew I was mud. The upshot was Graves talked to Dr. Franklin, and Dr. Franklin told him almost essentially what I'd said. And so, the compromise was that he insisted that we put--I think it was like Whitney Young--into the mix, which was insulting to Whitney Young. But you know what I mean, because-$$He was (simultaneous)$$(simultaneous) Thank you. But anyway, and so I went back to the books division a bit chastised. And what I ended up--then working on a black history book that they were doing.

Angela Dodson

Newspaper, magazine and books editor Angela P. Dodson was born on May 24, 1951 in Beckley, West Virginia to parents William Alfred, Sr., and Kira Evelyn. Dodson received her B.A. degree in journalism in 1973 from Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia and her M.A. degree in journalism and public affairs in 1979 from American University in Washington, D.C.

Having served as an intern at the Charleston Gazette, she accepted a full time position as a reporter for the Huntington Advertiser and later as a news correspondent with its parent company Gannett Co. Inc. at Gannett News Service in the Washington, D.C. bureau, and later for the Rochester Times Union. She also worked for the Washington Star, and the Courier Journal of Louisville, Kentucky. In 1983, Dodson moved to the New York Times as a National Desk copy editor and was soon promoted to editor for the “Living” section and head of the Style Department. In 1992, Dodson became the first African American woman promoted to be a senior editor at The New York Times.

After leaving the New York Times in 1995, Dodson contributed articles and served as an editor for various publications, including Essence and Black Issues Book Review, before being named executive editor of the book review in 2003. In 2007, she became a freelance editor, writer and publishing consultant, contributing frequently to DIVERSE: Issues In Higher Education. Dodson has edited and ghost-written many books for major publishers and numerous self-published authors. In 2012, she founded Editorsoncall LLC.

Dodson has been a consultant for the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education and Hampton University and is the host of an award-winning radio program, Black Catholics, Yes!, for the Diocese of Trenton, New Jersey. She has taught workshops on writing and editing for many organizations including the National Black Writers Conference, the National Association of Black Journalists, the American Press Institute, the American Society of Newspaper Editors, and the Maynard Institute’s Editing Program. She has served as an adjunct faculty member at Mercer County Community College.

Dodson was honored at Marshall University as the Black Alumna of the Year in 1998 and as a Distinguished Alumna in the School of Journalism in 1989. Dodson received a Black Achiever in Industry Award from the Harlem Y.M.C.A. in 1990 and the Feature Writing Award from the New York Association of Black Journalists in 2000.

Dodson lives in Trenton, New Jersey with her husband, Michael I. Days, editor of the Daily News of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They have four adopted sons.

Angela Dodson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 7, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.060

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2013

Last Name

Dodson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

West Side Elementary School

Meyersdale Area Middle School

Woodrow Wilson High School

Marmet Junior High School

East Bank High School

Marshall University

American University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Angela

Birth City, State, Country

Beckley

HM ID

DOD05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

West Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bethany Beach, Delaware

Favorite Quote

If You Can Keep Your Head When All About You Are Losing Theirs And Blaming It On You, If You Can Trust Yourself When All Men Doubt You, But Make Allowance For Their Doubting Too.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

5/24/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Trenton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Calamari

Short Description

Newspaper editor and magazine editor Angela Dodson (1951 - ) was the first African American woman appointed as style editor of The New York Times, where she later became a senior editor. She also served as executive editor of the Black Issues Book Reviews.

Employment

Charleston Gazette

Gannett News Service

Rochester Times-Union

Washington Star

Louisville Courier-Journal

New York Times

Essence Magazine

Black Issues Book Review

Mercy County Community College

Huntington Advertiser

Editorsoncall, LLC

Black Catholics YES

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Angela Dodson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson talks about her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson describes her family's move to West Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Angela Dodson describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Angela Dodson talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Angela Dodson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson talks about her father's college education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson remembers the Second Baptist Church in New Castle, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson remembers Westside Elementary School in New Castle, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson talks about Meyersdale Area High School in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson talks about her early exposure to books and media

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson remembers the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson talks about her high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson recalls her social environment in East Bank, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson talks about her influential high school teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson remembers her time at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson remembers covering the crash of Southern Airways Flight 932

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson remembers the aftermath of the Southern Airways Flight 932 crash

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Angela Dodson talks about the personal impact of the Southern Airways Flight 932 crash

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson talks about the media representation of the Southern Airways Flight 932 crash

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson recalls being hired as a reporter for The Huntington Advertiser

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson remembers covering the black community in Huntington, West Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson recalls lesson from her time at The Huntington Advertiser

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson remembers meeting Robert C. Maynard

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson talks about the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson recalls becoming the assistant news feature editor at the Gannett Company, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Angela Dodson describes the structure of the Gannett Company, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Angela Dodson remembers President James Earl "Jimmy" Carter's administration

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson talks about her master's degree program

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson describes her time at the Rochester Times-Union

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson recalls her time at the Washington Star

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson talks about her decision to move to Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson remembers the Janet Cooke scandal, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson remembers the Janet Cooke scandal, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson talks about the portrayal of African Americans in the media

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Angela Dodson recalls the aftermath of the Janet Cooke scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Angela Dodson talks about the founding of USA Today

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Angela Dodson recalls joining the staff of The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson describes her experience on the national desk of The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson recalls working the living section of The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson talks about her time as style editor of the New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson talks about her reasons for the New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson recalls her lawsuit against The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson recalls her time at Essence magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson talks about her company, Editorsoncall, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson describes the impact of technology on the publishing industry

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson shares her advice to aspiring journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Angela Dodson reflects upon her contributions to journalism

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Angela Dodson talks about her book reviews

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Angela Dodson reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Angela Dodson talks about her adopted children

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Angela Dodson talks about her children

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Angela Dodson shares her advice to parents considering adoption

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Angela Dodson lists her siblings

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Angela Dodson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Angela Dodson narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Angela Dodson narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Angela Dodson describes her father's education
Angela Dodson recalls becoming the assistant news feature editor at the Gannett Company, Inc.
Transcript
Now what stories did your father [William Dodson, Sr.] tell about growing up? I mean what was his, what was he doing and how did he, you know, what kind of occupation did he want to pursue?$$My father had a very interesting history. He often told stories about working in the mines and going to high school [Byrd Prillerman High School, Amigo, West Virginia] at the same time. He would go to school a couple of days and to the mines the other days and of course, you know, being from such a large family they were poor. He said he never owned a schoolbook, they--he had to borrow schoolbooks and he was a very, very good student. My mother [Kira Walthall Dodson] always said that she was too embarrassed to borrow schoolbooks so she wasn't as good a student. But he--my father apparently had been a pretty good athlete also in high school in a number of sports and he was a boxer, amateur boxer. I, we met somebody just in the last few years that said oh she knew my family, she asked her mother about the family and she said, "Oh yeah one of them was a boxer," and I said, "That would be my father." And then he went to the [U.S.] Navy and or first he went to the shipyards in Newport News, Virginia and then into the Navy and studied electronics at some point while he was there. I believe on the campus of Hampton University [Hampton Institute; Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia]. He talks about--or used to talk about that. And, he studied electronics in the Navy but when he--when the war [World War II, WWII] was over he came home and worked in the mines again and met, or actually re-met my mother who was home supposedly temporarily from Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] to see her brother graduate or something. And he continued to work in the mines maybe for about two or three more years but at that point the mines became unstable work. It was the coal seam or something that they were working on that was not as productive and they were laying off men, you know, left and right. So my fam- a lot of family started looking for other places to move to and my family ended up moving to western Pennsylvania to a town called New Castle mainly because some of the Bashams had settled in that area.$In '77 [1977] you were promoted to assistant news feature editor at Gannett [Gannett Company, Inc.], right?$$Um-hm.$$And you served there from '77 [1977] to '79 [1979]. I mean what--tell us about that promotion and--$$I, well I asked for it--someone who had been the in office editing, getting things on the wire and all that announced that she was leaving for I think the Knight Ridder papers or something. And I, and I knew that they had hired a new woman to come to the bureau who had been an editor and I figured that they might have her in mind for that job. But I went to the bureau chief, John Curley, and asked him if he had thought about how he was going to fill the job. And he grumbled, "No I just found out about that (unclear)," but I convinced him that I needed to do this job 'cause I wanted to be an editor and at that time the technology was changing. We had just--in the bureau we had just gone to computers. Huntington [The Huntington Advertiser] had already switched to computers but a lot of places were not using computers yet. And I--$$Yeah.$$--I was fascinated by the technology; I am my father's [William Dodson, Sr.] child. And (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) By, by computer you mean the?$$Ter- you know, the terminals.$$Copy graphic terminals they use to have--$$Yeah.$$--to do typesetting and all that, and?$$So, you know, to be able to, you know, learn about the new computers and how that was going to affect the copy, and you know, and to learn about the technology and to work with the wires and all that just fascinated me.$$Now, let's go back a little bit.$$Um-hm.$$Just, like before how was it, reporters just used typewriters, and?$$Yeah.$$Almanac and a typewriter (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) We were trained, you know, we were trained to use the typewriter, I learned--at Marshall [Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia] we had to learn to type if you are a journalism major so I, you know, I did. In the newsroom you would have your typewriter, you had paper what we called--most papers had what you called carbon sets. It was two or three stacks of paper with carbon paper between them so that you made copies. You had a copy for yourself, the desk had a copy and then one copy went up to the printer after it was edited. So at some point Gannett had used Huntington as an experiment, partly because it was a small paper, to bring in the computer terminals and see how it worked in a real life newsroom. But it wasn't long before I left, it might have been in the last six months I was there or something like that. When I got to the bureau, the bureau was still on paper and we would fax our stories up to Rochester [New York] and they would typeset them and put them on the wire or whatever they did with them. So because the bureau was fairly small it was also easy to com- to computerize it, long before some newspapers had switched over. And to be on the cutting edge of that and, you know, to learn how to do it and how to format the stories and that sort of thing, I think really interested me more, more than reporting did, so.$$Okay. All right, so--$$Although report- you know, reporting was fun there, so.

Jack White

Magazine editor Jack E. White, Jr. was born in 1946 in Washington, North Carolina. His father, Jack White, Sr., was a physician. White was awarded a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University in 1976 and studied African Affairs and American ethnic politics for one year. Prior to joining the staff at Time magazine, White was a staff writer at the Washington Post from 1966 to 1968, and then at the Race Relations Reporter in Nashville, Tennessee from 1969 to 1972. He also contributed articles to the Columbia Journalism Review, the Progressive, Ebony magazine, and Black Enterprise magazine.

White joined the staff at Time magazine in 1972 as a full-time staff writer where he contributed to the “Modern Living,” “Economy & Business” and “Energy” sections. In his twenty-nine year career with Time magazine, White served as correspondent in Atlanta, Georgia and Boston, Massachusetts; as a senior correspondent and editor of the “Nation” section in New York City; and, as a bureau chief in Nairobi, Kenya. In 1985, White became the Midwest bureau chief for Time magazine based in Chicago, Illinois. He was named deputy chief of correspondents Time magazine in 1987 where he managed fifty-one correspondents in ten domestic bureaus across the United States. White was the first African American staff-writer, bureau chief, and editor at Time magazine. In 1992, White left his TIME magazine and became a senior producer for domestic news on “ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings.”

In May of 1995, White was assigned by Time, Inc.’s Editor-in- chief Normal Pearlstine to recruit minority journalists for all magazines owned by the company, which include TIME, People, Sports Illustrated, Life, Fortune, Money, Sports Illustrated for Kids, In Style and Martha Stewart’s Living. He retired from Time magazine in 2001 and became a frequent contributor to The Root. White has also served as a writer-in-residence at the Howard University School of Journalism and as an adjust professor of journalism at Virginia Commonwealth University. He was the co-author, with Bari-Ellen Roberts, of Roberts vs. Texaco: A True Story of Race and Corporate America (1998). In 2005, White left his position as the Scripps Howard Endowed Chair at the Hampton University School of Communications.

White has won many journalism awards, including the Before Columbus Foundation’s American Book Award, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the New York Association of Black Journalists, and the Unity Award from Lincoln University (Missouri). In 1995, Time, Inc.’s in-house newsletter recognized White as the best writer at any of the country’s magazines. In 1999, the National Association of Black Journalists selected hum as one of the 100 Most Influential Black Journalists of the Twentieth Century.

Jack E. White, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 28, 2013

Accession Number

A2013.067

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/28/2013

Last Name

White

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Schools

McKinley Technology High School

Swarthmore College

Lucretia Mott Elementary School

John Burroughs Elementary School

Taft Junior High School

Nieman Foundation for Journalism

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jack

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WHI18

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York, New York

Favorite Quote

The Moral Arc Of The Universe Is Long, But It Bends Towards Justice.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

6/30/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Richmond

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chili

Short Description

Magazine editor Jack White (1946 - ) was the first African American staff writer and bureau chief at Time magazine.

Employment

Washington Post

Race Relations Information Center

Time, Inc.

ABC News

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jack White's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jack White lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jack White describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jack White talks about his maternal grandfather's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jack White describes his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jack White describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jack White talks about his father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jack White describes his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jack White recalls his father's relationship with Charles R. Drew, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jack White describes his father's career at the Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jack White describes his father's relationship with Charles R. Drew, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jack White remembers his father's colleagues at the Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jack White describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jack White lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jack White describes his father's medical career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jack White recalls his father's cancer diagnosis

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jack White remembers his father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers his early childhood years in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jack White recalls his family's move to Northeast Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jack White recalls the integration of the District of Columbia Public Schools

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jack White describes his community in Northeast Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jack White describes his memories of Wonder Bread, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jack White describes his memories of Wonder Bread, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jack White recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers his violin lessons

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jack White describes his elementary school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jack White remembers his influential teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jack White recalls his introduction to African American authors

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers his family's trips to the segregated South

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jack White remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jack White remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jack White describes his teenage personality

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers his high school trigonometry class

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jack White describes his classmates at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jack White remembers his civil rights activism in Chester, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jack White remembers being hired as a copy boy at The Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jack White recalls the mentorship of Robert C. Maynard

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jack White remembers covering H. Rap Brown's speech in Cambridge, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jack White recalls his promotion to reporter at The Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jack White remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jack White recalls the start of the riots of 1968 in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jack White describes the impact of the riots of 1968 in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jack White talks about the rhetoric of the riots of 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jack White remembers his work for TransCentury Limited

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jack White remembers reporting on the moon landing for the Richmond Afro-American

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers joining the Race Relations Information Center in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jack White remembers joining the staff of Time magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jack White recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Media Workers, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jack White recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Media Workers, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jack White describes his friendship with Earl Caldwell

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jack White remembers his introduction to the Time magazine newsroom

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jack White describes his early writing for Time magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jack White recalls becoming a Time Life News Service correspondent in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jack White recalls his early experience as a Time magazine correspondent

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jack White talks about the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jack White recalls becoming the head of Time magazine's Africa bureau

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jack White recalls his experiences as Time magazine's Africa bureau chief, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jack White describes his coverage of the 1980 Liberian coup d'etat

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers his travels to Nigeria

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jack White describes his experiences in Nigeria, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jack White describes his experiences in Nigeria, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jack White talks about his perspective as a journalist in Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers meeting African journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jack White recalls his experiences as Time magazine's Africa bureau chief, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Jack White remembers the Gambian coup d'etat of 1994

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jack White remembers his decision to leave Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jack White recalls the start of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential campaign

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers his off record conversations with Reverend Jesse L. Jackson

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jack White remembers Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's intercession in Syria

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jack White recalls the exposure of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's anti-Semitic comments, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jack White recalls the exposure of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's anti-Semitic comments, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers learning about Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's extramarital affair, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Jack White remembers learning about Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's extramarital affair, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Jack White recalls the National Enquirer's story about Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's affair

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Jack White talks about the impact of Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's presidential campaign

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Jack White remembers becoming the head of Time magazine's bureau in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers the bombing of MOVE in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Jack White talks about his interview with William Julius Wilson

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Jack White describes his reporting on violence in the black community, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Jack White describes his reporting on violence in the black community, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Jack White describes his work as the deputy chief of correspondents at Time magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Jack White talks about his cover stories in Time magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Jack White remembers being recruited to the staff of ABC News

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Jack White describes his perspective on television journalism

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Jack White remembers his coverage of the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Jack White remembers his coverage of the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Jack White talks about his reporting on police brutality

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Jack White talks about his writing on Ward Connerly

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Jack White describes the Home for Retired Racial Stereotypes

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Jack White remembers the merger of Time Warner, Inc. and America Online, Inc.

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Jack White describes his career after leaving Time magazine

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Jack White talks about the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Jack White talks about the reelection of President Barack Obama

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Jack White reflects upon President Barack Obama's first term

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Jack White talks about the challenges faced by President Barack Obama

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Jack White talks about his views on journalism

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Jack White talks about the criticism against President Barack Obama

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Jack White reflects upon his legacy and career

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Jack White talks about his family

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Jack White describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Jack White narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

11$8

DATitle
Jack White describes his memories of Wonder Bread, pt. 1
Jack White remembers covering H. Rap Brown's speech in Cambridge, Maryland
Transcript
We always ask this question: what were some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up?$$The sights and sounds and smells in the neighborhood [Brookland, Washington, D.C.]?$$Um-hm.$$Hm, that's an interesting question.$$Well of growing up period. So if it--(unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Okay, well I'll tell you one--I'll tell you--I'll tell you one--I'll tell you one. Actually, this is in two incarnations of this. There was something called the Wonder Bread bakery back in those days, and there was one on Georgia Avenue, right above--a block--less than a block from Freedmen's Hospital [Howard University Hospital, Washington, D.C.]. And--well let me go back to something my father [Jack E. White] used to laugh about. He said that when he was growing up in, in Florida, it was so boring that one of the things they'd do was--used to do was stand by the railroad track and wait for the train carrying the citrus fruit to go by so they could smell those oranges, you know. I actually do the same thing. I used to go waiting for him. And I would go and stand near the, the bakery so I could smell that fresh baked bread. I can remember it to this day. And then when I was in high school at McKinley [McKinley Technical High School; McKinley Technology High School, Washington, D.C.], there happened to have been a Wonder Bread factory near the bus stop that I used to take to go home after school. And we used to stand over there. And then to leap even further ahead about this Wonder Bread thing, 'cause this is the Wonder Bread connection. After Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was killed in 1968, I was at The Washington Post at that time. And I was one of the reporters who was sent out with a photographer every night to go around and keep track of the, the riot. The guy who was with me, a really wonderful black photographer--again, Matthew Lewis was his name. He liked that Wonder Bread. So on the nights when we had to get in our car--it was equipped with a radio and a police scanner so we could know where to go--we would start out by going to the Wonder Bread place, and we would each get a loaf of fresh baked Wonder Bread and a tin of butter (laughter). As we drove around Washington [D.C.] keeping track of the riots, seeing all kinds of violent stuff, we'd be eating this butter and bread 'cause Matt just liked that Won- he just liked that Wonder Bread, and I liked it too.$I'm a long way now from my goal, right, of wanting to become a reporter. But I started being able to do little stories. Like the first--my first byline at The Washington Post was--it was--[HistoryMaker] Marion Barry at the time was heading--he had, had come to Washington [D.C.] to head the SNCC office there--Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Well by this time, he and a guy named Rufus "Catfish" Mayfield [Rufus Mayfield] were running a poverty--anti-poverty organization called operation Pride [Pride, Incorporated]. And a kid had been killed by the police under bad circumstances. And Rufus and, and Marion held a demonstration on the steps of the district building. And The Post let me go down there and cover this story. And I wrote a little like seven or eight paragraph story about the demonstration, it ran in the--ran in the paper; and they put my name on it: by Jack White, Jr. [HistoryMaker Jack White], Washington Post staff writer, even though I was a--just a copy boy. Man (laughter)--oh, boy, nothing like it. My dad [Jack E. White], you know, he's mad at me now 'cause I've dropped out of school [Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania] and god knows what, you know. But then my name starts appearing in the paper, you know. His attitude starts to change. I mean, you know, maybe this is not so bad. Anyway, I'm just rolling along like this until July, 1967 when the person then known as the most notorious black militant in the United States, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, H. Rap Brown [Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin], is going to go make a speech in Cambridge, Maryland, which had had a long history of racial turmoil. And I talked The Post into letting me go over there and cover Rap's speech. I got on--I--it, it--I was twenty-one years old. I had on one suit--I had a, I had one suit. I had this blue cord [corduroy] suit that I had just bought for my birthday, which was on June 30th, you know. You know, what those things are like. And a blue shirt and a blue bowtie, and it was this sort of monochromatic look, which I--which in my mind was hip at that point. I must have looked ridiculous. But anyway, I had this blue cord suit. And I'm thinking I'm just gonna go over there and cover this speech, and I'm gonna do what I always do: I'm gonna phone back in and they're gonna write a little story about it, and then I'm gonna come home. Well I get over there and Rap gives his speech. You know, violence is America's cherry pie; le- you know, fuck Lyndon Johnson [President Lyndon Baines Johnson]; I'm gonna shoot Lady Bird Johnson, blah, blah, blah. You know, he's up on a, a hood of a car giving this speech, and he's haranguing folk and it's, it's going off. And then after the speech, somehow or other he's walking up a street, and a nervous policeman fired off a shot at him. One of the pellets br- grazed his head. And then I--it's, it's not entirely cla- clear about the sequence of events. But somehow or another a riot broke out. A school--an elementary school there was burned to the ground. The National Guard was sent in by then-governor Spiro T. Agnew [Spiro Agnew]. Rap went on the lam. He subsequently became a fugitive and, and one, one of America's most wanted criminals hunted by the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation]. I ended up staying in Cambridge for three or four days, just wearing my same little blue cord suit.