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George Jones

Biologist and biology professor George H. Jones was born February 21, 1942 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. He received his B.A. degree in biochemical sciences from Harvard University in 1963. Jones continued his education at the University of California, Berkeley, where he attained his Ph.D. degree in biochemistry under the tutelage of Dr. C. E. Ballou. Jones then worked for two years as a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Health between 1968 and 1970. After this, he moved on to the University of Geneva in Switzerland, where he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 1971. Upon returning to the United States, Jones was hired by the zoology department at the University of Michigan, and in 1975, he moved to the department of biology and chaired the department of cellular and molecular biology within the Division of Biological Sciences between 1980 and 1982.

In 1984, Jones assumed yet another post as professor and Associate Chairman for Space and Facilities at the University of Michigan; he also taught in the Division of Biological Sciences and served as Associate Dean at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Between 1986 and 1989, Jones served as a professor in the department of biology at University of Michigan, and then in 1989, he moved to Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia to serve as its Dean in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies. In 1990, he served as the college’s acting dean. In 1996, Jones received the prestigious Goodrich C. White Professorship in Biology at Emory University.

Jones’ numerous awards include the University of Michigan Excellence in Teaching Award (1989) and the Emory University Scholar/Teacher Award (1998), as well as membership in several distinguished professional societies, including the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the American Society for Microbiology. His research concerns the mechanism and regulation of antibiotic synthesis in the bacteria Streptomyces. He received a three-year National Science Foundation Grant in 2003 to study RNA degradation and antibiotic synthesis in Streptomyces, and another in 2008 to study RNA degradation and the regulation of antibiotic production. He resides in Atlanta, Georgia.

George H. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 12, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.021

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/12/2011

Last Name

Jones

Middle Name

H.

Schools

Manual Training High School

Harvard University

University of California, Berkeley

Search Occupation Category
First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Muskogee

HM ID

JON24

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Vancouver, British Columbia

Favorite Quote

Never give up. Never slow down. Never grow old. Never ever die young.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/21/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cheeseburgers (Bacon)

Short Description

Biology professor and biologist George Jones (1942 - ) researched RNA metabolism and the production of antibodies in bacteria. He was named the Goodrich C. White Professor in Biology at Emory University in 1996.

Employment

National Institute of Health (NIH)

University of Geneva, Switzerland

University of Michigan

Emory University

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slates of George Jones's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George Jones shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George Jones talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George Jones shares his mother's aspirations and career path

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George Jones describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George Jones describes his childhood family life

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George Jones recalls his childhood neighborhood in Muskoegee, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George Jones recalls older extended family members

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George Jones describes his early interest in science

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George Jones describes the community influences of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George Jones discusses the history of African Americans in Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George Jones recalls the black newspapers of Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George Jones describes the cultural influences of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George Jones remembers his interest in science, exploration and traveling

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George Jones discusses living out West during the 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George Jones describes the classes at Manual Training High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George Jones shares memories of his high school mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George Jones describes his interest in applying to Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George Jones talks about his high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George Jones discusses the importance of music in his community in Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George Jones remembers his acceptance to Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George Jones describes racial relations in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George Jones describes his trip from Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George Jones remembers his transition to Harvard University as an undergraduate

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George Jones talks about his college roommates and the black presence at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George Jones discusses the tension of the Cold War and Civil Rights Movement during his time at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George Jones talks about his sense of responsibility as a black student at Harvard University from 1959 to 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George Jones recalls his classmates from Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George Jones discusses not having any mentors at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George Jones recalls the lack of racism at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George Jones talks about his career aspirations after his Harvard graduation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about the field of biochemistry in the 1950s and 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George Jones describes the social climate of the Bay Area, California, in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George Jones describes his graduate research on alpha-mannosidase

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George Jones talks about the work environment at University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George Jones describes his work with the National Institutes of Health

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George Jones talks about his fellowship at the University of Geneva

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George Jones recalls his decision to work with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George Jones recalls the riots in Washington, D.C. in April 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George Jones shares his regrets on becoming a dean at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George Jones talks about his research on the bacteria, Streptomyces

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George Jones talks about the antibiotic, actinomycin

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George Jones describes his decision to work at Emory University in 1989

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - George Jones discusses the research environment in the biology department of Emory University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - George Jones talks about RNA degradation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - George Jones discusses the use of DNA sequencing in his research

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - George Jones discusses the value of learning something new every day

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - George Jones discusses the dogmas of science and religion

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about the importance of studying the evolution of microorganisms

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - George Jones discusses the dangers of antibacterials

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - George Jones discusses his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - George Jones remarks on the importance of science in modern society

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - George Jones talks about Atlanta as a center for research

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - George Jones answers questions about members of his family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - George Jones shares his concerns for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - George Jones reflects on how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
George Jones discusses the importance of music in his community in Oklahoma
George Jones discusses the use of DNA sequencing in his research
Transcript
What was it like, seeing your mother [Bernice Imonette Weaver] operate in a professional capacity [as choir director at Manual Training High School, Muskogee, Oklahoma], you know, I guess...?$$Well, I guess I didn't think much about it, I knew she was good at what she did because I had seen--she used to put on these really extravagant programs, musical programs of various sorts that I would always attend. And I would see her doing those kind of things and frequently, she would have rehearsals at the house or she would need to take me to school in order to have a--for there to be a rehearsal because, again, there wasn't any other child care available. So, I knew that she was good at what she did, because I saw the products of her efforts. And, so, being in the choir, I knew that she was going to hold all of us to a high standard, and she did. And the thing that she used to do, and it was very clever of her, and I even knew that at the time--so I was in the baritone section and whenever anyone was misbehaving, she wouldn't try to identify them, she would always blame me. She would say, you know, "Somebody was talking back there." She would tell me to stop talking. So, what I had to do in order not to be blamed for that was I had to keep all of them in line, because I knew I was going to be blamed for it, no matter who was doing it. It was very clever, and it worked.$$Okay, that's interesting. There seems to be a strong musical tradition in Oklahoma, you know.$$Yeah.$$Dr. [Legand L.] Burge [Dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Physical Sciences], we interviewed at Tuskegee [Tuskegee Inst., Alabama, on April 11, 2011], grew up in Oklahoma City, he plays the piano. He was a pianist in church and toured all over Oklahoma.$$I think that was a part of, again, the kind of, there weren't many artistic outlets for us as we were growing up. It was very difficult, I think, for anybody in my community, no matter how talented they were, to become an artist, a sculptor. There weren't even those kinds of classes in the high school, or anywhere for that matter that I'm aware of. So, when you thought about the kind of artistic outlets that people might both want and need to have, one of the ones that was available, one of the few that was available was music.$$Okay.$$And so a lot of really terrific musicians came out of my community.$Okay. Are you happiest doing research?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Yeah, even at my advanced age [sixty nine years old], I still enjoy the research, and actually still enjoy doing experiments myself. I don't do as much as I used to, but I still work at the bench myself from time to time.$$So, is there an ultimate goal you want to, is there--that you want to accomplish before you...?$$Well, yeah there is, there really is. Not ultimate in the sense of answering the fundamental biological question, but really sort of serendipitously, we have used, or are beginning to use, a new approach to study the biology systems that we're interested in. It's called high throughput DNA sequencing. Just to give you an idea of sort of the way that that has an impact on the kind of stuff that we do in terms of understanding the structure of the genetic material and the genomes of organisms, the first living cell whose DNA was sequenced, probably took a year to get that sequence information. It might have taken longer than that, certainly six months to a year. Now you can do it in a week, maybe less. And that's because of the development of new techniques that allow you to do this kind of sequencing very rapidly. We've been able to use that technique in our system to understand some things about the relationship between RNA degradation and antibiotic production. To my knowledge, nobody yet in the entire world, has done that, and I'm hoping that before I actually step down as a practicing scientist, that we will be able to mime, to use that approach, to mime the system and get as much information out of it as possible that will help us to understand how these processes work.$$Okay.$$And that's one of the reasons why I'm still involved and excited about the science, because there are things that we can do now that we couldn't even do two or three years ago.$$In research, the nature of research, I've been told, is that you really have to stay on the new technology...$$That's right. You know, there's a real temptation to get something that works and just to keep doing it. And that's the quickest way to stagnate. You may become very good at it, but in the meantime, the likelihood is going to be that the science is passing you by.$$Yeah, we've interviewed others who have gone into administration and tried to get back to research, and find that the bus has left, the train has left the station.$$Exactly. That's one of the reasons why I was not willing to completely give up my science when I became a dean, because I knew from talking to other people, in part, that if you give it up completely, it's almost impossible to come back to it.

Xernona Clayton

Broadcast executive, foundation chief executive, nonprofit executive, television host, and television producer Xernona Clayton and her twin sister, Xenobia, were born August 30, 1930 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Clayton’s parents, Reverend James M. and Lillie Brewster, were actively engaged in the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Muskogee. In 1952, Clayton earned her B.A. degree from Tennessee State Agricultural and Industrial College, now Tennessee State University. She later earned a scholarship and pursued graduate studies at the University of Chicago. In 1957, Clayton married noted journalist and civil rights activist Edward Clayton, who died in 1966. She later married jurist Paul L. Brady, the first African American appointed as a Federal Administrative Law judge.

Clayton's civic involvement and participation in the Civil Rights Movement was informed by the Chicago Urban League, in which she worked to investigate discrimination in employment. As an activist, Clayton was instrumental in coordinating activities for the Doctor's Committee for Implementation project, which culminated with the desegregation of hospital facilities in Atlanta, Georgia. Clayton also worked closely with Dr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr., helping to organize fundraising initiatives for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). By the mid-1960s, Clayton was writing for the Atlanta Voice, and in 1968, she became the first black woman in the South to host a regularly scheduled prime-time talk show, Variations, which became The Xernona Clayton Show on WAGA-TV in Atlanta. Her guests included Harry Belafonte and Lena Horne. Later that year, Clayton successfully convinced the Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan to renounce the Klan. In 1982, Clayton began her long standing and impressive career with Turner Broadcasting System (TBS). At TBS, she assumed many roles throughout the years, including producing documentaries, hosting a public affairs program entitled Open Upand serving as director and vice-president of public affairs in the early 1980s. Ted Turner, founder of TBS, promoted Clayton to assistant corporate vice-president for urban affairs in 1988. In 1993, Clayton created the Trumpet Awards for Turner Broadcasting to honor African American achievements. The program is seen in over 185 countries.

As Governor of Georgia, former President Jimmy Carter appointed Clayton to the State Motion Picture and Television Commission. She is a member of the Academy for Television Arts and Sciences, the National Urban League, among other civic and professional organizations. Clayton is also a board member of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change and served as chairman of the Atlanta University Board of Trustees. The recipient of numerous accolades, Clayton received the Leadership and Dedication to Civil Rights Award and the Drum Major for Justice Award from SCLC in 2004. In her honor, the Atlanta Chapter of the Association of Black Journalists established the Xernona Clayton Scholarship. Clayton’s autobiography, I’ve Been Marching All the Time was published in 1991.

Xernona Clayton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 22, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.143

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/22/2005 |and| 2/21/2014

Last Name

Clayton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Dunbar Elementary School

University of Chicago

Manual Training High School

Tennessee State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Xernona

Birth City, State, Country

Muskogee

HM ID

CLA10

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada, Bahamas, Caribbean

Favorite Quote

If You Can't Change People Around You, Change The People Around You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

8/30/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Grapes

Short Description

Foundation chief executive, broadcast executive, and television host Xernona Clayton (1930 - ) was the founder of the Trumpet Awards, and the first black woman in the South to host a regularly scheduled prime-time talk show, Variations, which became The Xernona Clayton Show on WAGA-TV.

Employment

WAGA TV

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

Chicago Urban League

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:1428,20:4896,86:6460,124:7412,145:8772,198:9248,206:10404,240:11492,261:13532,295:20102,335:20772,347:25931,474:28611,524:29080,531:34373,662:34641,667:35311,684:37388,728:37656,733:38728,759:48161,859:52111,922:53770,956:54323,962:54718,968:57325,1016:62855,1137:72650,1279:72946,1284:78940,1445:79606,1457:84130,1471:88546,1561:89098,1574:108552,1934:109514,1953:110180,1964:113436,2019:114324,2033:116618,2077:116914,2082:121310,2106:121913,2120:132365,2350:133839,2380:135782,2417:137926,2491:140338,2520:149904,2596:150480,2603:151440,2615:153700,2631$0,0:810,26:1260,32:1980,42:3420,95:7248,145:8132,165:10924,193:14476,266:15734,290:16474,303:20026,368:21950,403:36902,541:37832,554:48126,694:48498,702:49490,720:49924,728:55776,809:57017,939:57309,944:58915,972:59426,982:63500,1020:65100,1047:70124,1128:75674,1304:76414,1316:85410,1475:87621,1542:88157,1555:96202,1666:104808,1765:105340,1773:105644,1778:105948,1783:107848,1819:108456,1828:116227,1938:127268,2065:132164,2129:135899,2207:143330,2325:143890,2337:147460,2416:148160,2433:148440,2438:150610,2509:151240,2519:151520,2524:155806,2554:156400,2564:156928,2576:157654,2591:157918,2596:162604,2731:163462,2752:163726,2757:167092,2849:167752,2862:176930,2963:181840,3002:185840,3092:186480,3101:190960,3188:200900,3290:201868,3303:206895,3482:207155,3487:207415,3492:208260,3507:209885,3543:210210,3549:213966,3600:215144,3638:215392,3643:216260,3667:216818,3678:217128,3690:217500,3699:221096,3787:224800,3817
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Xernona Clayton's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Xernona Clayton describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Xernona Clayton describes her childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Xernona Clayton talks about her mother's paternal background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Xernona Clayton relates lessons from her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Xernona Clayton describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Xernona Clayton recounts how her parents met in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Xernona Clayton recalls her father's leadership in the Baptist church

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Xernona Clayton remembers her father's work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton recalls her father's humbling response to public praise of Clayton and her twin sister

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton recalls growing up as an identical twin, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Xernona Clayton recalls growing up as an identical twin, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Xernona Clayton describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Xernona Clayton describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Xernona Clayton describes Dunbar Elementary School in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Xernona Clayton recalls her favorite teachers and classes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Slating of Xernona Clayton's interview, session 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton talks about her educational foundation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton remembers Manual Training High School in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Xernona Clayton talks about being a twin

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Xernona Clayton describes her father's role in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Xernona Clayton describes her adolescent career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Xernona Clayton recalls her decision to attend Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Xernona Clayton recalls being named the smartest girl in her class at Manual Training High School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Xernona Clayton recalls matriculating at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Xernona Clayton considers how her childhood influenced her activism, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Xernona Clayton considers how her childhood influenced her activism, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Xernona Clayton recalls her collegiate extracurricular activities, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton recalls her collegiate extracurricular activities, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton recalls being sheltered from discrimination during college

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Xernona Clayton recalls participating in a University of Wisconsin twin study

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Xernona Clayton recalls studying with her twin at Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Xernona Clayton describes her approach to learning

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Xernona Clayton explains her decision to attend the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Xernona Clayton reflects upon the impact of her father's lessons on humility

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Xernona Clayton recalls how she became involved with the Chicago Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Xernona Clayton describes her initial work with the Chicago Urban League in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton talks about the Chicago Urban League's position on labor integration

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton recalls chairing the most successful Chicago Urban League charity dinner

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Xernona Clayton remembers deciding to leave graduate school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Xernona Clayton talks about meeting her husband, Edward Clayton

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Xernona Clayton recalls her involvement in Chicago's South Side society

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Xernona Clayton recalls teaching a prominent Chicago businessman to read and write

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Xernona Clayton reflects upon her legacy as an elementary school teacher in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Xernona Clayton recalls meeting Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Xernona Clayton explains how she began working for Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$5

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Xernona Clayton recalls growing up as an identical twin, pt. 1
Xernona Clayton describes her initial work with the Chicago Urban League in Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
But as a twin, now, people say it's--did you feel special--I guess you'd have to feel special as a twin, and did you have a special relationship with your twin [Xenobia Brewster]?$$Yes, we did feel special because when we found out we were rare and people made such notice of it--$$When did you first kind of realize it that something unusual was going on?$$Well, since we heard it every day, we started saying, "Mm-mm, you know, we're pretty special." But then we were so close. I mean, my sister and I, it's so like you have a best friend all the time. Everybody else has to go and try to find one and chose one. But I had one, and she had one, and we had each other. And it's somebody you really trust. I mean, you can tell your innermost secrets to your twin sister, and she could tell me hers. As a matter of fact, when we started courting, she'd tell me, like, she's going to slip out tonight when we had the curfew on and we couldn't get out after eight o'clock, and she had this hot date that she was determined to keep. And she says, "I'm going to slip out of the window"--we shared a bedroom; we slept together all the years. She said, "I'm going to slip out because my boyfriend's going to rap on the window, then I'm going out of the window, and then when I come back, I'm going to rap on the window, you let me back in and Mother [Lillie Elliott Brewster] will never know." And, of course, I didn't want her to do it, but that was my sister and my closest friend. And so, she was determined to slip out, that I was going to help her and support her, rather. And I was the one who really was always Miss Goody Two-Shoes. You know, I'd say, "Oh, no you can't break the rules. No, no, no." But she'd say, "Oh, yes, yes, yes." And so, since she was determined, I was going to support her because I didn't want her to get a whipping. And so, like we had those little secrets that nobody knew but us. But one night it backfired because my mother, having her own leveled wisdom, kind of figured something was going on I guess by the behavior pattern or body language. And so, that night when my sister slipped out and I was to assist her to slip back in when she rapped on the window, my mother opened the window (laughter). And she said, "Help me in," and the voice said, "Okay," and she thought it was my voice; it was my mother's voice. And when she came up, you know, she wanted to run back then; of course, it was too late then. Then when my mother gave her that little spanking, then I cried, too, because I didn't want her to, you know, to get spanked. But we shared everything, just everything.$We were talking about the Urban League of Chicago [Chicago Urban League]. And--$$Yes.$$--they needed--$$Well, discrimination was a reality, but they couldn't get a handle on it. So what they decided to do was, let's see if we can, you know, catch come--let do our homework to see if it's really being practice like what we think. So the pattern then was to, or the process was to look in the want ad sections and see who's hiring, what jobs are open, and then apply; apply meaning--now, this was in '52 [1952], and requirements or skills were not all that involved. Like, if you were a clerk, you could apply for a clerk/typist job if you could type and you could spell. And so you didn't have to have, you know, a medical degree to get a job. Now, my sister [Xenobia Brewster] and I had graduated from college [Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State College; Tennessee State University, Nashville, Tennessee], so you assume we knew something. We could spell, read, and write, and we could type, and, and we learned how to type in, in college. And I don't know if you remember a man name Cortez Peters, who was the fastest man in, in America.$$Right, Cortez Typing School [sic. Cortez W. Peters Business School].$$Yeah, he was a typist. And we had a chance to meet him. And he came to our college one year, and I got a chance to meet, and boy, I was so fascinated by him. And I said one of these days I'm gonna type like Cortez Peters. And I learned to be a pretty good typist, you know, of course nowadays it doesn't matter much. But I learned how to be a good typist, and so was my sister. So we were both good typists. And so the Urban League said well, let's do this: you be our front men. And we'll always like, position five minutes, ten minutes away from where we'd call. So we called, say Marshall Field's [Marshall Field & Company]. There would be an ad in the paper for a clerk typist. And we'd call and said, "I see you have an ad in the paper." "Yes." "Is the job still open?" "Yes." "It's okay to apply?" "Yes." Then we'd make a beeline over there, like ten minutes away. And we'd get there and, "We're here to apply. I understand you got a clerk/typist at"--we don't tell we're the ones that called. You said, "I came to apply for your clerk/typist job." "Oh, so sorry, but we just filled that." You know, (laughter), well, then you got them right there. Well, that happened with so many companies, Spiegel [Spiegel Inc.]--well, I don't wanna name all of the companies that were kind of guilty but major companies that looked like they were good guys. You know, Marshall Field's, everybody went to Marshall Field's. It was a joy to go to Marshall Field's. They looked like good guys. Spiegel was a good mail order place and oh, a lot of places. And my sister and I went to many of those places that did the same pattern, apply--I mean broadcast the--advertise an opening, and then when you got there, you're black, it's not for you. And we broke down a lot of that. And it was kind of, you know, fun job; job meaning, you know, it was assigned tasks. They were really very--and I was waiting for school to start anyways, then the summer, so it was before we went to col- before I went to school.$$So, so would the Urban League then confront the business in, in a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And they would--$$--formal setting--$$Oh yeah, and then they, they would document it.$$(Unclear)--$$And so they put, I mean had very good documentation, which means--and then they called a press conference. And of course, then you embarrass the company. And then the, you know, the good guys say well, we gotta change our image. You know, we can't be out here looking this bad. So that's how the integration took place, is all I think just felt embarrassed.$$

Ollie B. Ellison, Sr.

Foreign service officer Ollie Benjamin Jefferson Ellison, Sr. was born on February 23, 1927 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. His mother was a schoolteacher; his father, the first African American attorney in the State of Oklahoma. Ellison’s father also served as chairman of the Negro Democratic Party. Ellison graduated from Douglas High School in 1944 and then attended Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, where he received his B.A. degree in biology in 1949. During his junior year in 1946, Ellison was drafted into the U.S. Army for the Korean War and served in the Military Police Unit in Inchon, Korea. He later entered Indiana University’s graduate program, where he studied clinical psychology and Soviet studies. In 1951, Ellison was sent by the U.S. Army to intelligence school in Berlin, Germany. Upon returning from military duty in Germany, he enrolled in a graduate program in political science at the University of Chicago.

In 1957, Ellison was among the U.S. State Department’s first African American foreign service officers and was assigned to a post in the Middle East. He served in Cairo, Egypt from 1959 to 1964; Bremen, Germany from 1967 to 1970; Kinshasa, Zaire from 1974 to 1978; and Bangkok, Thailand from 1978 to 1981. Between 1981 and 1982, Ellison served in Bangui, Central African Republic; and, from 1983 to 1989, was an officer in Geneva, Switzerland. There, he served as U.S. representative to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. As a foreign service officer, Ellison met with several leaders and artists including P.W. Botha, Oliver Tambo, Malcolm X and Maya Angelou. He retired from the U.S. State Department in 1989 and later worked for the National Archives declassification department.

In 1973, Ellison authored the “Employment Practices of U.S. Firms in South Africa”, which appeared in the Johannesburg Star and became known later as The Sullivan Principles. In February of 2013, his career was featured in the U.S. State Department’s State Magazine.

Ellison passed away on May 26, 2015 at the age of eighty-eight. He was married to Lydia A. Ellison and had four children: Ollie B. Ellison, Sylvia J. Ellison, Bonita J. Ellison, and Rebecca W. Ellison.

Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2004 and January 14, 2005.

Accession Number

A2004.239

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2004 |and| 1/14/2005

Last Name

Ellison

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B.

Organizations
Schools

Douglass High School

Dunbar Elementary School

Lincoln University

Indiana University

University of Chicago

First Name

Ollie

Birth City, State, Country

Muskogee

HM ID

ELL01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Germany

Favorite Quote

He Who Doesn't Have It In His Head Must Have It In His Feet.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/23/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Death Date

5/26/2015

Short Description

Foreign service officer Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. (1927 - 2015 ) was among the first African American U.S. Foreign Service officers.

Employment

Chicago Transit Authority

Cook County Welfare

U.S. Army

U.S. Department of State

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ollie B. Ellison, Sr.'s interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his maternal family history, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his maternal family history, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers the impact of his father's death

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about Native American landholding in Oklahoma during his father's lifetime

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his childhood community in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about attending Inman E. Page School and Dunbar School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about career expectations in his community

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers being a bookish child

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about growing up Episcopalian

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes working while attending Douglass High School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his college ambitions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his time at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about influences in his early life

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his U.S. military training at Fort McClellan in Anniston, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his U.S. army service in Korea

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes moving between The University Graduate School at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana and the U.S. army

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers being stationed in Berlin, Germany as an intelligence officer

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his reputation as an intelligence officer

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about joining the United States Foreign Service in the early 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about passing the officer test for the United States Foreign Service

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes the politics of the United States Foreign Service

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his marriage and gender discrimination in his 1957 United States Foreign Service class

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his first United States Foreign Service assignment in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about being stationed in Cairo, Egypt in the late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about the political climate of Cairo, Egypt in the late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes the status he had while dispensing visas to the United States in Egypt

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers the impact of African nationalism in Egypt in the 1950s and 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Slating of Ollie B. Ellison, Sr.'s tape, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers trying to get a United States visa for Oliver Tambo

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers observing the Civil Rights Movement from afar

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes advising the United States Department of State about the Arab-Israeli conflict in the 1960s, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes advising the United States Department of State about the Arab-Israeli conflict in the 1960s, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his post in Bremen, Germany

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about an encounter with a local leader of the Communist Party of Germany

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about being assigned to attend a Neo-Nazi convention in Germany

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about his similarities and differences with HistoryMaker Angela Davis

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his research on employment practices in southern African countries

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. recalls his observations of apartheid while in South Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes the repercussions of his economics paper for the United States Department of State and the Sullivan Principles

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about the economic impact of the 'Rumble in the Jungle' in Kinshasa, Republic of Zaire

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about the connection between African Americans and Africans, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about the connection between African Americans and Africans, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about meeting Chinese President Deng Xiaoping while working in Thailand

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his accomplishments as the United States Embassy finance and development officer in Thailand

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his assignment in the Central African Republic

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. remembers conflicts with the United States ambassador to the Central African Republic

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes building relationships with local Central African Republic officials

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his assignment of providing diplomatic protection in the Central African Republic

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his assignment of providing diplomatic protection in the Central African Republic

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. recalls an intense encounter with soldiers from the Central African Republic

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about being recalled from the Central African Republic

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes his work on the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development in Geneva, Switzerland

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

5$8

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. talks about being assigned to attend a Neo-Nazi convention in Germany
Ollie B. Ellison, Sr. recalls an intense encounter with soldiers from the Central African Republic
Transcript
What was your assignment after Germany?$$When, when--my assignment after Germany--when, when--of course, I would like to add to that, that, that my, my meetings--and, of course, I think I had a full spectrum of meetings there, believe it or not. For instance, the, the Neo-Nazi party for, for, for Germany, the NPD, the National Partei Demokratische [sic. Nationaldemokratische Partei Deutschlands; National Democratic Party of Germany], was having--had this national convention there in Bremen [West Germany; Bremen, Germany] while I was there. Of course, the consul general was there at the time. And, of course, whenever a national party holders convention where, where you're assigned, you're supposed to cover the meeting and report from it. And so--and so the consul general was supposed to do certainly the--all the political stuff and I did most of the economic stuff. But for some reasons of his own, he decided that, that, that as a Jew, he, he didn't want to attend, and so he sent me.$$So he'd send you, huh (laughter)?$$Uh-huh. And, and so the--so it, it was an open meeting. It was being held at the (unclear) or the--or the local convention center so anyone could come in. You know, they paid this nominal fee. And so, so I came there and paid my money, and then of course, I, I had the decision as to where to sit, and so my first inclination was to find some quiet corner, you know, to, to sit among all these Neo-Nazis sorta thing.$$(Laughter).$$And then, then I decided somewhat puckishly, you know, well, I might as well get, get hung for a sheep as a lamb, so I proceeded to the very center seat of the--of, of, of the convention hall and, and sat down. Of course, I was way ahead of most people coming in to see me--to--not to see me, to, to the--to the convention. And after a while, I, I became aware from, from the corner of my eyes that I was the subject of discussion, you know, by some people there, there in, in the--in the aisle sorta thing. And so--and then so eventually, this--a very diffident young man, you know--you know, came up and sat next to me, and, you know, asked me if, if I knew where I was, and so I said yeah, I'm at a--NPD, NPD meeting, sorta thing. And, and so I, I think he must've thought that I was there for a rock concert or something of the sort.$$(Laughter).$$And, and so, he squirmed a bit and, and then he said--and then he asked me, did I know anything about the NPD. I said, yes, I've--I know a lot about the NPD, you know, so I'm--I was joking, said it's one of my favorite organizations, you know (laughter). And so he squirmed a, a, a bit further sorta thing, and eventually left. And, and, and there, at that point, my, my, my nervousness left because obviously, they were more nervous about my being there than, than I was nervous about being there myself. But the funny part about it, of course, is that the place eventually filled up completely with, with the exception of two seats next to me, in front of me, and, and back of me. I was sort of a--of a donut hole--$$(Laughter).$$--in, in the middle of this whole convention sorta thing--$What happened, [HistoryMaker] Mr. [Ollie B.] Ellison [Sr.], after you were pulled over, what happened?$$When the, the soldier on the other side of the car after--when my wife [Lydia Armstrong Ellison] was trying to get out of the car to, to, to follow his instructions, he possibly mistook, you know, her move to reach for the latch as a move to the glove compartment. So he--so he, he put a round in his rifle and stuck it directly in my--in my wife's face. And, as I--as I said, this is a very ticklish moment with, with these, these young guys 'cause you, you never know whether they're gonna shoot or not sorta thing, so I had to handle this very warily, get, get, get over there and get in between them, you know, and, and show, you know, that, you know, that, that she met nothing wrong by, by, by trying to open the door, and so I finally got him calmed down. And so I usually avoid anger in, in my dealing with people, but the next morning, of course, I, I, I went both to the [U.S.] Embassy [Bangui, Central African Republic] the next morning and found out that in fact all people in my embassy had been harassed in the same way that, that--the previous night.$$And why do you think--why was this happening?$$When, when--as it turned out, there had, had been a rumor that, that people who were trying to, to pull off a cue- a, a coup were bringing arms into the country and, and, and that that was a, a, a foreign embassy who was doing this, and it was supposedly another African embassy that was doing this. Now, I don't know whether they could've assumed, you know, that since I was black I was from another African embassy or, or the fact that--I mean, you never know how these things get translated. They did see that I had diplomatic plates and, and so that was perhaps the, the reason enough. Now, of course, the other people on my staff were white and they were also being harassed and stopped that night. But any rate, so--$$What were some of the other racial incidents that took place when you were in Central African Republic?$$When, when, when--I was just getting this, I guess trying to, to, to bring it down. But any rate, I, I did raise a bit of hell the next morning and, and, and, in fact, apparently people in the--in the foreign minister--ministry realized, you know, that, that, that if, if one of the people had shot the wife of the--of an American diplomat, you know, that it would've been the, the wrong thing to do. And so the whole thing was, was put on ice, the troops were taken off of the, the street, and so, so I got the--that situation settled as well as the situation about [Albert] Lincoln settled sorta thing. And I ended up even getting a, a commendation from the department of--as to the way the thing was, was, was handled. And so--but any rate, when the [U.S.] ambassador [Arthur H. Woodruff] came back, I think he had--in my view, he had had perhaps thought, you know, I would fall on my face and this would be a reason to have me recalled and in fact I got a commendation out of it.

Wesley South

Radio personality Wesley South was born to Dr. Elijah and Mayme South on March 23, 1914, in Muskogee, Oklahoma. The family moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1924. South was educated in the Chicago public school system, graduating from Englewood High School.

During World War II, South served two years in the U.S. Army. After leaving the service, he enrolled at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. In 1951, he was hired by the Chicago Defender. In December of that year, he joined the editorial staff of Johnson Publishing Company, where he worked for nearly six years.

While working as a columnist doing public relations work for the NAACP in 1961, South was approached by a local radio executive who was afraid of being penalized by the Federation Communications Commission (FCC) for not having any African Americans on the air. The station executive asked South to host his own show. Then, in 1962, Leonard and Phil Chess of Chess Records bought the station and changed the call letters to WVON. Two years later, Wesley South's Hot Line began its sixteen-year run on WVON Radio. During that time, South interviewed such luminaries as Presidents John F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter; jazz great, Duke Ellington; baseball pioneer, Jackie Robinson; and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He became part owner of WVON Radio in 1979 and stayed in this capacity until the partnership dissolved.

South passed away on January 9, 2010 at the age of 95.

Accession Number

A2000.037

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/18/2000

Last Name

South

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Carter G. Woodson South Elementary School

Edmund Burke Elementary School

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Kennedy–King College

Northwestern University

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Wesley

Birth City, State, Country

Muskogee

HM ID

SOU01

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

McCormick Tribune Foundation

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

3/23/1914

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Death Date

1/9/2010

Short Description

Radio personality Wesley South (1914 - 2010 ) is the former host of the WVON radio talk show, On Target, in Chicago. On his show South interviewed such luminaries as Presidents John F. Kennedy and Jimmy Carter, jazz great Duke Ellington, baseball pioneer Jackie Robinson, and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Employment

Chicago Defender

Ebony Magazine

Johnson Publishing Company

Chicago American

WVON Radio

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

None

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wesley South interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wesley South's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wesley South talks about his family's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wesley South discusses his parent's separation

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wesley South remembers his grandparents, part I

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wesley South remembers his grandparents, part II

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wesley South talks about his aunt and uncle's accomplishments

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wesley South describes his father, part I

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wesley South describes his father, part II

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wesley South remembers his mother, part 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wesley South discusses illness in the early 20th century

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wesley South remembers his mother, part II

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wesley South recounts his first experiences coming to Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wesley South discusses his school life, part I

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wesley South describes episodes from his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wesley South discusses his school life, part II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wesley South recalls his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wesley South discusses his occupational choices, part I

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wesley South discusses his occupational choices, part II

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wesley South recounts his military experience

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wesley South recalls his travels abroad while in the Army

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wesley South remembers his grandfather's death

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wesley South recalls mistreatment at a military camp

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wesley South explains his decision to pursue journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wesley South recalls the beginning of his career as a journalist

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wesley South discusses John Johnson's Johnson Publishing Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wesley South recounts episodes from his early career

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wesley South remembers prominent Americans

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wesley South describes his history with John H. Johnson and 'Ebony' magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wesley South discusses his employment at the 'Chicago American'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wesley South discusses his beginnings in radio broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wesley South describes his business relationship with Fred Wall

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wesley South describes his dealings with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wesley South recalls collaborating with investors to gain ownership of WVON

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Wesley South talks about WVON's move to an all-talk format

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Wesley South discusses his involvement in an associate judge election

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Wesley South recalls how he and Manford Byrd convinced Harold Washington to run for mayor

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Wesley South remembers his relationship with Jesse Jackson

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Wesley South begins a story about the death of Medgar Evers

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Wesley South explains how the death of Medgar Evers exemplified talk radio's importance

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Wesley South discusses the influence and legacy of WVON

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Wesley South discusses economic disparity in the black community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Wesley South shares his opinions on social problems in the United States

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Wesley South discusses Clarence Thomas's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Wesley South considers his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Wesley South considers how his grandfather would have reacted to his career success

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Photo - Wesley South in a publicity photo

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Photo - Wesley South with others

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Photo - Wesley South in a publicity photo

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Photo - Wesley South in a publicity photo

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Photo - Wesley South and others outside a storefront

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Photo - Rev. Jesse Jackson, ca. 1960s

Tape: 7 Story: 14 - Photo - Funeral ceremonies for unknown person

Tape: 7 Story: 15 - Photo - Wesley South with prominent Chicago political figures

Tape: 7 Story: 16 - Photo - Wesley South with youths in the aftermath of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr's assassination, April 1968

Tape: 7 Story: 17 - Photo - Wesley South with Elijah Muhammad, 1968

Tape: 7 Story: 18 - Photo - Wesley South with children on a field trip to WVON, ca. 1986

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Photo - Wesley South's autographed portrait of Mayor Harold Washington of Chicago, Illinois, 1985

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Photo - Publicity photo of Wesley South, ca. 1988

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Photo - Wesley South with Senator Carol Moseley Braun at a community meeting, Chicago, Illinois, 1996

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Photo - Wesley South outside of WVON studios, Chicago, Illinois, ca. 1992

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Photo - A parade down Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Photo - Wesley South with WVON executive Bernadine Washington and Senator Charles Percy of Illinois, 1966

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Photo - Wesley South receives an award from an Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. representative, Chicago, Illinois, 1992

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Photo - Wesley South in a portrait taken at The Blue Note nightclub, Chicago, Illinois, ca. 1960

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Photo - Portrait of Wesley South taken in Broadview, Illinois, 1992

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Photo - Wesley South with other Chicago, Illinois figures during his campaign for U.S. Congress, Springfield, Illinois, 1968

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Photo - Wesley South and others at a celebration of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas celebration, 1954

Tape: 8 Story: 12 - Photo - Wesley South observes unrest after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Woodlawn area, Chicago, Illinois, 1968

Tape: 8 Story: 13 - Photo - Portrait of Wesley South, ca. 1963

Tape: 8 Story: 14 - Photo - Wesley South with Illinois governor and presidential candidate Adlai Stevenson, 1952

Tape: 8 Story: 15 - Photo - Wesley South with his daughter, his assistant and Mr. and Mrs. Neil Hartigan, Chicago, Illinois, 1992

Tape: 8 Story: 16 - Photo - Wesley and Mildred South with 'Cadillac' Al Johnson at an Operation PUSH/Breadbasket fundraiser, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 17 - Photo - Wesley South with assistant campaign manager, Jim Hutchinson, at a fundraiser during his bid for U.S. Congress, 1968

Tape: 8 Story: 18 - Photo - Wesley South with Muhammad Ali, Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 19 - Photo - Wesley South with American artists in a cultural exchange program at the Kremlin, Moscow, Russia, 1966

Tape: 8 Story: 20 - Photo - Wesley South with family members at Christmas, 1967

Tape: 8 Story: 21 - Photo - Wesley South and others celebrate the Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas decision, cover of 'Crisis,' magazine, 1979

Tape: 8 Story: 22 - Photo - 'The Atlanta Journal' article on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s funeral procession, Atlanta, Georgia, 1968

Tape: 8 Story: 23 - Photo - Wesley South with then-Chicago, Illinois 8th ward alderman, William Cousins, 1968