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Juan Williams

Television personality and news journalist Juan Williams was born to Rogelio and Alma Geraldine Williams on April 10, 1954 in Colon, Panama. At the age of four, Williams and his family moved to Brooklyn, New York. In 1969, Williams won a scholarship to attend the Oakwood Friends School in Poughkeepsie, New York, a Quaker school. Williams then attended Haverford College, where he graduated with a B.A. degree in philosophy in 1976.

After interning at the Washington Post, Williams was hired by the newspaper in 1979. He worked as an editorial writer, op-ed columnist and White House reporter in 23 years at the Washington, D.C. newspaper. Williams published his first book, Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years (1954-1965) in 1987, the best-selling companion to the award winning documentary of the same name. Williams was then hired by Fox News Channel in 1997 as a contributor. A year later, his second book, Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary, about the pioneering Supreme Court justice, was published. It was designated a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. After serving as co-host of the television news program America’s Black Forum, Williams was hired as host of the National Public Radio call-in program Talk of the Nation in 2000. He wrote his third book, This Far by Faith: Stories from the African American Religious Experience, a companion to the critically acclaimed Public Broadcasting System documentary. Williams then wrote My Soul Looks Back in Wonder: Voices of the Civil Rights Experience and Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It; the former was co-written with Pulitzer-prize winning author David Halberstam and published in 2005, and the latter was published two years later. Williams has authored six books in total.

He is also the recipient of several awards for his writing and investigative journalism, he won an Emmy Award for television documentary writing and received widespread critical acclaim for numerous projects, including a series of documentaries like Politics: The New Black Power and A. Phillip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom. Williams has also written numerous articles for national magazines including TIME, Fortune, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Republic, Ebony and GQ.

Juan Williams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.061

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/15/2012

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Schools

Haverford College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Juan

Birth City, State, Country

Colón

HM ID

WIL58

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Outer Banks, North Carolina

Favorite Quote

Check It Out.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/10/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Panama

Favorite Food

Wife's Cooking

Short Description

Newspaper columnist, radio personality, and television commentator Juan Williams (1954 - ) is one of the most prominent African-American journalists on television, having appeared on Fox News Channel and award-winning Public Broadcasting System (PBS) documentaries.

Employment

Washington Post

National Public Radio

Fox News

Favorite Color

Blue, Orange, Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Juan Williams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Juan Williams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his father's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses his father's occupations in Panama and New York

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Juan Williams shares the story of how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about his likeness to his parents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his likeness to his parents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's move to Bedford-Stuyvesant, New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Juan Williams describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Juan Williams describes the sights, sounds, and smell of growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Juan Williams describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about the apartments where he lived in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his favorite subject in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about his favorite teachers in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about playing sports in Brooklyn, New York, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about playing sports in Brooklyn, New York, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his childhood interests

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about earning a scholarship to attend Oakwood Friends School in Poughkeepsie, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Juan Williams talks about the racial makeup and his extracurricular activities at Oakwood Friends School

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Juan Williams remembers the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Juan Williams talks about his father's move to New York and how it affected him

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about Malcolm X's impact on his family, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Juan Williams talks about Malcolm X's impact on his family, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his family's discussions about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about going to black bookstores and movies in downtown Brooklyn

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his grades in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his brother's and sister's roles in his early development

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses his mentors and role models at Haverford College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about his early writing

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about how he started writing

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his African American influences from the news media

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about the racial makeup of Haverford College

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Juan Williams discusses his studies at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about his influences at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses how he majored in philosophy at Haverford College and the usefulness of critical analysis

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his philosophy professor at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his internships and jobs during and after Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about the black reporters at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about being hired at the Washington Post after working as an intern

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about the stories that he worked on and his career at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about covering Marion Barry at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Juan Williams discusses Marion Barry's strengths and weaknesses as mayor of Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Juan Williams discusses Marion Barry's strengths and weaknesses as mayor of Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Juan Williams discusses some of the scandals surrounding Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Juan Williams discusses political philosophy in relation to Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses public sector jobs and public services during Mayor Marion Barry's administration

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses his coverage of public schools in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Juan Williams discusses his first impressions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Juan Williams shares his opinions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Juan Williams shares his opinions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Juan Williams discusses U.S. Supreme Court Justices Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses U.S. Supreme Court Justices Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Juan Williams discusses the appointment of African Americans to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about what led to his work on PBS's "Eyes on the Prize"

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about meeting documentary producer, Henry Hampton

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses writing the book 'Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years: 1954-1965'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses what he remembers most about writing 'Eyes on the Prize'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about interviewing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about interviewing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about writing his biography on Thurgood Marshall, entitled, 'Thurgood Marshall: An American Revolutionary'

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about 'America's Black Forum', pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about 'America's Black Forum', pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about how his book, 'Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary' was received

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about his book on Thurgood Marshall and the media attention it received

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Juan Williams talks about the conflict between Carl Rowan and Thurgood Marshall

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about working at CNN and at Fox News

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his interview with Bill O'Reilly that led to his departure from NPR

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about the reaction to his Bill O'Reilly interview

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his experiences at Fox News

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Juan Williams describes his professional philosophy as a journalist

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Juan Williams responds to criticisms of his book, Enough

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Juan Williams discusses the organizational efforts that are required to make progress on civil rights

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his future projects

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Juan Williams reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses the political culture of Fox News

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Juan Williams reflects upon his legacy and what he would do differently

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Juan Williams describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Juan Williams talks about covering Marion Barry at the Washington Post
Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1
Transcript
Okay, now, when you were hired as a report--now, you covered Marion Barry, didn't you as mayor--$$Um-hum.$$--of the City of Washington [Washington, D.C.]. And what was that like?$$Oh, gosh, it was a mess. You know, I was covering--when I was young--when I had, first was working on the City Staff, I was covering the School Board, and then went from the School Board to covering some of City Hall, the district building is what we call it here in the District of Columbia. And Barry was a character in both settings for me. And Barry's history with the paper, remember "The Washington Post" is the big white newspaper in town, had always been problematic. They had fallen in love with his image as kind of the Dashiki-clad, civil rights activist, and the reality on the ground is that Barry was oftentimes involved in all kinds of political shenanigans and questionable activities from way back in his days with "PRIDE" and all that. But he had the kind of dashing, charismatic energy, absent from the people who were the pioneers of what we call in the District of Columbia, "Home Rule," and these were older, more bureaucratic, administrative-type black men. I'm thinking here of Walter Washington. I'm thinking here of Sterling Tucker. These are suit and tie type guys, but they were at the cutting edge of making deals that led to Home Rule for the District of Columbia, that allowed control of budgetary authority for the District of Columbia to come to local hands, established the whole notion of the right to vote and proper representation for the people of the District of Columbia as opposed to having Congress control it. Barry comes from a different tradition, if you will. Whereas you had Walter Washington, Sterling Tucker, Walter Fauntroy, as kind of establishment, political and church leadership in the black community, Barry comes in as someone who'd been in SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee], someone who then comes to town with the Civil Rights Movement, comes from Mississippi, comes to D.C., and gets involved with these job training organizations that are taking advantage of federal grants. And he is much more kind of the voice of young, impatient and challenging to whites, black America. And, you know, the paper fell in love with Barry, especially, the editorial board and all that. And so when I start writing about Barry, writing editorials about Barry and the like and being critical of him, the newspaper is like whoa, you know, why are you writing critically about Marion Barry? But Barry was always up to tricks, and I was always critical of some of Barry's activities and willing to write in that way. And then Barry, of course, has his own issues, once he gets into elected office on the City Council and as the Mayor. And writing about him, and writing about his deals and his missteps, and the like, I think it was very difficult for lots of people to see those stories in "The Washington Post," and I remember being castigated and criticized, you know, why are you writing, why are you writing critically about a black leader in a white newspaper and those kind of things.$In 1992, you left "The Washington Post"?$$Yes.$$Okay, so what happened?$$I didn't leave "The Washington Post" in '92 [1992], but--$$Okay, well--$$I think in '92 [1992] is when I start working on the Thurgood Marshall book which comes out in '98 [1998]. But in the course of the Clarence Thomas hearings--remember Thomas was charged with--Anita Hill said, oh, he's, he's sexual harassment and all that stuff had emerged. And in the course of those hearings, then at the paper, people said, well, Juan Williams tells dirty jokes, and Juan Williams flirts with women. And all of a sudden they would say oh, well, should we be investigating Juan Williams, you know? And, you know, they--I remember the editors at the "Post" [the Washington Post], I think fearing for lawsuits against the "Post" said, well, you should be going on TV. You shouldn't be talking about this. And I had been writing about Clarence Thomas for, as we've discussed for some time. But it was so painful to me that this institution which I regarded as my home, would suddenly turn on me. In other words, they hadn't turned on me, although they had been very skeptical about my critical writings about Marion Barry. And that was highly politically charged in this black majority town. They hadn't turned on me in that situation, but in this situation where I was involved in a controversy about Clarence Thomas because I said I thought what was going on there was really unfair to him, the human being, the woman in the newsroom clearly said, "You're either with us or against us on this issue," and anybody who's writing anything favorable about Clarence Thomas is out of bounds. And so I became part of the story. And it was again, to me, just the wildest thing, I mean just--you know, they came. They had me sit through interviews with people. Did you say this? Did you do this? And it ultimately came down to write an apology and let's get over with this thing. But it was very painful to me, and I don't think, I don't think my relationship with the Post was ever the same after that. It was searing for me, and it was very public. It was all over. So-

Roland Martin

Journalist, Columnist, and Commentator Roland Sebastian Martin was born November 11, 1968 in Houston, Texas’ Third Ward, the center of Houston's African American community. Roland’s mother and father where his role-models growing up and his father was an avid newspaper reader and fan of television news. When Roland was 14, he found his passion for communications as he was part of the magnet program in communications at Jack Yates High School. In 1987, Roland attended Texas A&M University on academic scholarship, were he studied journalism and worked for the Bryan-College Station Eagle and for KBTX (Channel 3). As a junior in college Martin pledged Pi Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., and attended the National Association of Black Journalist convention.

In 1991 Roland graduated Texas A&M with a B.A. in Journalism and began working at the Austin American-Statesman. Roland eventually left Austin American-Statesman and became a city hall reporter for Forth Worth Star-Telegram. In 1995 he became a morning driver reporter with KRLD radio as sports reporter. During his time at KRLD he won top sports reporting award from the National Association of Black Journalists; and honors from the Houston Press Club. Roland became news editor and morning anchor of KKDA 730 AM radio, as well as editor at Dallas Weekly. In 2000, Roland was working as a freelance producer covering the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles and suffered a ruptured appendix; his medical bills led him to file bankruptcy.

In 2001, Roland became the first editor of blackamericaweb.com founded by Tom Joyner and married Rev. Jacquie Hood Martin. He returned to radio as a news correspondent for the American Urban Radio Network and as a sports commentator on Washington, D.C., radio station WOL's "Fifth Quarter Program.” He also launched the ROMAR Media Group in Dallas, and became news editor for the new Savoy magazine. In 2007 Roland made his first appearance on CNN (later joins as contributor) and Fox television’s conservative-oriented O’Reilly Factor and wrote a column that was picked up by the nationally distributed Creators Syndicate and ran in the Detroit News, Denver Post, and Indianapolis Star. In 2004 Roland was hired as a consultant by the Chicago Defender and served as a radio talk show host for WVON-AM in Chicago. Roland has published three books and is named top 50 pundits by the Daily Telegraph in the United Kingdom. In 2008 he earned his masters degree in Christian Communications from Louisiana Baptist University. He is two time winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Interview for “In Conversation: The Michelle Obama Interview,” and for “In Conversation: The Senator Barack Obama Interview”. Ebony Magazine has selected Roland as one of the 150 Most Influential African Americans in the United States three times in a row. Currently he works as host and managing editor of “Washington watch with Roland Martin”, and recently launched “Roland a Fresh Perspective for the 21st Century” on rolandmartin.com.

Roland Martin currently resided in Washington, D.C. with wife Rev. Jacquie Hood Martin.

Roland Martin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May s, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.063

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/2/2012

Last Name

Martin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

S.

Schools

Jack Yates High School

Texas A&M University - Commerce

Louisiana Baptist University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Roland

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

MAR15

Favorite Season

Sunset On a Golf Course

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Negril, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

If you do good, I will talk about you. If you do bad I will talk about you. At the end of the day, I am a journalist and I will talk about you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/11/1968

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Television commentator Roland Martin (1968 - ) served as an analyst on CNN and hosts the shows “Washington Watch with Roland Martin” and “Roland Martin: A Fresh Perspective for the 21st Century.”

Employment

Austin American-Statesman

Forth Worth Star-Telegram

KRLD radio

Dallas Weekly

Houston Defender

Democratic National Committee

BlackAmericaWeb.com

American Urban Radio Network

WOL Radio

Savoy magazine

Chicago Defender

WVON Radio

CNN

Delete

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Roland Martin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Roland Martin lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Roland Martin describes his mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about the Great Creole Migration from Louisiana to California

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about the neighborhood of Clinton Park, where his maternal grandparents and their family lived in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Roland Martin talks about his parents attending Jack Yates High School in Houston, Texas, getting married, and starting a family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Roland Martin describes his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about his grandfathers' employment in Houston, Texas, his father's high school education, and his family responsibilities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Roland Martin talks about how his parents met and married

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Roland Martin describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Roland Martin describes his father's interest in the news and his mother's Macintosh computer

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Roland Martin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Roland Martin talks about his siblings, and his physical likeness to his mother as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Roland Martin describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about the reason his father grew up without knowing his biological mother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about the focus on skin color in the Creole population of his grandparents' generation

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Roland Martin describes his close-knit family

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Roland Martin talks about his parents' activism in his neighborhood of Clinton Park, in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about his parents' leadership at the community-level in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Roland Martin describes his experience in school in Houston, Texas, and his father's involvement in his academics

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Roland Martin talks about the schools that he and his siblings attended in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Roland Martin talks about his teachers in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Roland Martin talks about challenging his teacher in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Roland Martin talks about being a voracious reader as a child, going to the public library, and attending summer camps

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about the wealth of knowledge that he gained from his reading habit

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about his interest in the sports teams in Houston, and playing baseball

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Roland Martin describes his decision to attend Yates School of Communications to study television, and his experience there

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Roland Martin describes his experience in the television studio at Yates School of Communications

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Roland Martin talks about playing baseball in high school, and securing custom jackets for students in the television program

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Roland Martin talks about black role models in the media and television

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Roland Martin talks about being involved in his grandmother's catering business from a young age

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about being involved in the leadership of the Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver organization in Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about being involved in the leadership of the Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver organization in Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Roland Martin talks about the continuation of his maternal grandmother's catering business

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Roland Martin describes his decision to attend Texas A and M University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about the communications program at Texas A and M University, and his decision to not pursue sports journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Roland Martin talks about working at a local television station in College Station, Texas, and his experience with racial discrimination there

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Roland Martin talks about his experience in the video department at Texas A&M University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Roland Martin describes his experience as a student at Texas A and M University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about attending the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) convention in New York in 1989

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Roland Martin discusses serving as the student representative on the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Board of Directors

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Roland Martin talks about meeting HistoryMaker Vernon Jarett and being active in the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ)

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Roland Martin talks about being offered his first job at the 'Austin American Statesman'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about his move from the 'Austin American Statesman' to the 'Fort Worth Star Telegram'

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Roland Martin talks about getting married, his experience working at the 'Fort Worth Star Telegram' and his reasons for leaving in 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Roland Martin talks about his experience at KKDA Radio in Dallas, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Roland Martin talks about his experience at KKDA Radio in Dallas, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Roland Martin talks about moving from KKDA Radio to KRLD Radio in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about his coverage of the "Million Man March" in 1995

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about his move from KKDA Radio to KRLD Radio, and becoming the managing editor of the 'Dallas Weekly'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Roland Martin talks about moving to Houston, Texas in 1999 to save his marriage, his divorce, and working at the 'Houston Defender'

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Roland Martin talks about moving back to Dallas in 2000, meeting his wife, Jacquie Hood Martin, and freelancing for eighteen months before finding a job

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about being diagnosed with appendicitis during the Democratic National Convention in 2000, and his financial hardships that year

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Roland Martin talks about becoming the news editor of BlackAmericaWeb.com and publishing his book, 'Speak Brother! A Black Man's View of America'

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Roland Martin talks about his faith and spirituality, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Roland Martin talks about his faith and spirituality, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Roland Martin talks about becoming the executive editor of the 'Chicago Defender'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Roland Martin describes his experience at the 'Chicago Defender', pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Roland Martin describes his experience at the 'Chicago Defender', pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Roland Martin talks about leaving the 'Chicago Defender' in 2006, and signing on as a CNN contributor in 2007

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Roland Martin talks about his radio show on WVON in Chicago, Illinois, and his decision to join the Tom Joyner Morning Show

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about becoming visible on CNN, and President Barack Obama's rapid ascent from state senator to president in four years

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Roland Martin talks about meeting Senator Barack Obama for the first time

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Roland Martin talks about his syndicated column

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Roland Martin talks about his growing career since 2008, his busy schedule, and his marriage

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Roland Martin talks about his perspective on the media and the news profession

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Roland Martin discusses various news platforms and their merits

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Roland Martin analyzes the critique of President Barack Obama

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Roland Martin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Roland Martin talks about his goals and being content in his career

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Roland Martin reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

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DATitle
Roland Martin talks about his parents' activism in his neighborhood of Clinton Park, in Houston, Texas
Roland Martin discusses serving as the student representative on the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Board of Directors
Transcript
Now, how was the neighborhood, Clinton Park [Houston, Texas] in terms of--$$Clinton Park was a, it was a perfect example of a working-class neighborhood. You had, growing up, a number of the people in Clinton Park were homeowners. And folks took care of the homes, and they took care of their yards and things along those lines. And then you could, and then, I mean you had, you had folks, you had drugs. It wasn't like it was prevalent, but then all of a sudden, you can--I can remember the transformation as it went from homeowners to folks passing away to their kids taking over the homes or then renting it out. What was in, I remember watching as the neighborhood began to slowly crumble. But what was interesting about my street really, the, that portion of Pennsylvania, all of that mess was sort of kept out. Our home, the home next to us, the home across the street, the other home across the street, I mean all these other homes, they took care of their yards, took care of their homes and would not allow any sort of foolishness. But then you saw it begin to change. It was a picturesque neighborhood in terms of trees and yards--what was interesting is about, as the neighborhood began to go down, that's when my parents [Emelda Joyce Lemond Martin and Reginald Lynn Martin, Sr.] hooked up with several other people and they said they wanted to start a civic club. A lot of people said, man, you guys are crazy. I mean that's just nuts. And so they began to meet, and the Saturday they launched the Civic Club, I mean it was like eight o'clock in the morning, and I remember it when we had--and again, my parents had five kids, so they had day laborers. So I remember having to make the signs and the leaflets and stuff, and we had to go door-to-door, passing the stuff out.$$You were in high school then?$$Un-un.$$Grade school?$$I was in elementary school. I remember it was, I had to have been, let's say sixth, fifth, sixth, seventh grade, something like that. But it was, but I remember being a kid, and it was so funny because KTRK, the ABC affiliate did a story on launching the Civic Club. And the reporter was Arthur Wood. And how things happened, of course, I later go into journalism, and later, I'm a member of the National Association of Black Journalists [NABJ], and I meet Arthur Wood again. And Arthur--and I follow Arthur's career. He followed mine. It was always interesting that we came, our paths crossed that early. But they really, they said, we want to change our neighborhood, and they began to work on it. And, again, people say it can't be done. And I use this in my speeches all the time, when I talk about how do you change a community? And they began to meet in homes and they began to, you know, how do we do it, and talk to the police and talk to the fire department. Who do we pick--who picks up trash or whatever? And they began to make those calls, and the next thing you know, they had small, you know, let's have a trash pickup day. And then let's have a--we had one success. And the next thing is what else can we get? You know what? We need our park refurbished. And we need a senior citizen's center. Then it was, we need new street lights, and we need paved streets and a new sewer system. And literally watching my parents--and again, my parents were not people who were in the newspaper, didn't have mega homes, didn't go down to the City Council. They weren't in the paper or on television, but they were just your real-life community activists who cared about their neighborhood and all of the things that they fought for, they got. And so I watched as a child, I literally watched parents who understood the value of change, the value of activism, the value of commitment and never forgot it.$And just going there [National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) convention in New York], and, in fact, that's, the convention, I'd already decided I was running for the student rep on the board of directors, threw my name in the hat, same thing. And, in fact, going back to Parliamentary procedures with Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver, the guy who was a regional director forgot to submit my information for the ballot. And I was initially off the ballot, and I remember going to his hotel room, this John Hansen, and I said, you're going to fix this or I will do everything in my power to destroy you at every turn. So I was always--and people were like, man, I can't believe you threatened him like that. I said, he screwed up. I said, he screwed up, and it was so badly run, the student election was so--they blew us off so bad that they really even forgot I was in the election. Thirteen students were there, thirteen students, no, sixteen students were there, sixteen students. I won thirteen to three. And the rest is history. Students, everything that most of the students have today, I led and created. It was, and the board had never, and, again, I go back to KPC, I go back to catering, I go back to all of that leadership development. The board had never, ever come across--I was the second student rep. The first one, she never even showed up. To this day, I never even met her. And so they were like, you know, who is this kid? They had never, ever come across a high school student, a college student like me 'cause when I went to board meetings, I went to board meetings. I read the constitution, the bylaws, procedures, and I got more, I got more initiatives passed than any other board member while I was on the board. And it was, it was an interesting experience, and, in fact, I was on the board with Jonathan Rodgers, who later became, later was the one who hired me at TV One. Neal Foote who made it happen for me to get hired at 'Black America Web', Neal was on the board. And so, so many different folks, but that experience also was critical in terms of my development because that's where I got to meet some of the top people in media, head hunters, organizational folks, all the different media companies. And so that, the NABJ has played a crucial role, the most significant role, I would say, in my professional career.$$Okay.