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Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr.

Surgeon, professor, medical director, and contributor to community service, Asa G. Yancey, Sr., M.D. was born to Daisy L. Sherard Yancey and Arthur H. Yancey on August 19, 1916 in Atlanta, Georgia. Daisy was a housewife, and Arthur worked as a U.S. Post Office mail carrier. Mr. Arthur H. Yancey wrote an autobiographical book in 1959 entitled Interpositionulification: What the Negro May Expect. In 1933, Asa G. Yancey graduated as valedictorian from Booker T. Washington High School in Atlanta. He earned his B.S. degree with honors four years later from Morehouse College. Yancey was one of four African American students in his class at the University of Michigan Medical School where his elder brother, Bernise, graduated from medical school in 1930.

Upon receiving his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1941, Yancey first completed a general rotating internship from 1941 to 1942 at what is now Metropolitan General Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. It was from this experience that he decided to pursue general surgery training. He served as First Lieutenant in The United States Army Medical Corp. before he returned to complete his residency in surgery at Freedmen’s Hospital, Howard University, where he trained under the guidance of Dr. Charles R. Drew. In 1945, he was a surgical fellow at the U.S. Marine Hospital in Boston and then became an instructor of surgery at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. Also about this time, Yancey started his involvement with the National Medical Association (NMA), the largest and oldest national organization for African American physicians.

Following his time in Boston and Nashville, he served as the Chief of Surgery at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama and then the Hughes Spalding Pavilion of Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory Univerisity where he established the first accredited general surgery training program for black surgeons. With his return to Atlanta in 1958, Yancey was invited to join the faculty at Emory University School of Medicine where he became an Instructor of Surgery in 1964. In 1972, Yancey was appointed medical director of Grady Memorial Hospital and associate dean at Emory University Medical School. He was appointed full Professor of Surgery at Emory University Medical School in 1975. He continued to work at the Emory University Clinic and Grady Memorial Hospital until his retirement in 1989.

Yancey has contributed numerous articles to the academic surgical community, and he has been recognized with many awards His article, “A Modification of the Swenson Operation for Congenital Megacolon," published in a 1952 issue of The Journal of the National Medical Association, describes a surgical procedure that preceded Soave’s publication by ten years. Yancey has also written articles exploring issues of medical care, health care, and poverty including "Medical Education in Atlanta and Health Care of Black Minority and Low Income People," and "The Challenge of Providing Health Care for the Poor: Public Hospital Perspective". His book Portrayal of a Lifespan describes life as it was for him in the 21st Century. Yancey received the Bennie Service Award, in 1990 and he receivedan Honorary Doctor of Science from Morehouse College and Howard University. . The Society of Black Academic Surgeons established a lectureship in the name of Asa G. Yancey, Sr., M.D. The Emory University Health System recognized his professional contributions over the years by naming a healthcare facility, The Asa G. Yancey Health Clinic, in northwest Atlanta.

Yancey was married to the late Carolyn “Marge” E. Dunbar and they have four children: Arthur H. Yancey II, M.D, Carolyn L. Yancey, M.D., Caren L Yancey-Covington (deceased), and Asa G. Yancey, Jr., M.D.

Dr. Asa G. Yancey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 19, 2012.

Dr. Asa Yancey passed away on March 9, 2013.

Accession Number

A2012.056

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/19/2012

Last Name

Yancey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Edmund Asa Ware School

Booker T. Washington High School

Morehouse College

Michigan Medicine

First Name

Asa

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

YAN04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sea Coasts of Alabama, the Gulf of Mexico

Favorite Quote

Let's Get On With It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

8/19/1916

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Death Date

3/9/2013

Short Description

Surgeon, medical professor, and medical director Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. (1916 - 2013 ) served as the medical director of Grady Memorial Hospital and dean at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. He also created the first accredited surgical training program for black doctors in Georgia.

Employment

Freedmen's Hospital, Howard University

United States Marine Hospital

Meharry Medical College

Tuskegee Veteran's Administration Hospital

Hughes Spalding Pavilion of Grady Memorial Hospital

Emory University

Grady Memorial Hospital

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers his father's personality and book

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about his early schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers his elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his personality as a young child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls his family's home

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his relationship with his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers his childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes the race relations in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls enrolling at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls his residency at Freedmen's Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about his salary as a medical intern

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his experiences in the U.S. Army, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his experiences in the U.S. Army, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls working as a surgeon in Mound Bayou, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes the community of Mound Bayou, Mississippi

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his role at the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remember the death of Charles R. Drew, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. remember the death of Charles R. Drew, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about the Tuskegee syphilis experiment

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes Dr. William Montague Cobb

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls the history of Grady Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls becoming the chief of surgery at the Hughes Spalding Pavilion in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about the conditions at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls serving on the Atlanta Board of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes the achievements of the Atlanta Board of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls joining the staff of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about the closure of black hospitals

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. shares his views on public healthcare

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

9$8

DATitle
Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. recalls enrolling at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Michigan
Dr. Asa Yancey, Sr. describes the community of Mound Bayou, Mississippi
Transcript
Now, what happened when you graduated from Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia]?$$Well (pause), I caught the train (laughter) I caught the train and went to Detroit [Michigan] and I had a cousin there, a Mr. A.W. Prince [ph.] and I was just, my father [Arthur H. Yancey] wrote Mr. Prince and asked if I could live with him and Mr. Prince said, "Yes, I'd be glad to have him." So I was a roomer in Mr. Prince's home and I walked around Detroit and walked the streets looking for a job and that was in the days of, the Great Depression was still going on and a job was mighty hard to find, but I finally found a little job in a furniture store and my job was to keep the stock room straight with the furniture and keep it ready to place in the showroom to see. And, of course, while I was doing that I decided to go out to Ann Arbor [Michigan] and look around a little bit. My brother [Bernise A. Yancey] had finished medical school out there at the University of Michigan and, so I took the train or bus or whatever was moving at the time, and went out there and decided I'd go by the dean's office and tell him I wanted to go to medical school (laughter). He said, "You what?" He said, "You haven't even applied." I'm sure I realized that but that didn't make any difference. I'm here now and I want to go to medical school. He said, "When?" I said, "This September." That was maybe in July or August. He said, "No way. Just forget it." He said, "We took this class and decided who was going to be a member of this class last March and here you come in here in July and talk about you want to go to medical school. Just forget it." (Laughter) So I said, "Thank you very much," and left. And I knew I had a pretty good transcript at Morehouse and probably better than a lot that he had (laughter) so I went on home and wrote Morehouse and asked them to send my transcript to the dean there at, A.C. Furstenberg, at the University of Michigan school of medicine [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan], which they did, of course, and when I figured my letter had time to get to Morehouse and Morehouse had time to send in a transcript, I went back out there to see the dean and he said, "Well, you're here again," and I said, "That's right, here I am." He said, "What do you want?" I said, "I want to go to medical school," (laughter). "When do you want to go?" "I want to go this July. I want to go this September," and here it is July. He said, "Forget it," (laughter). We took this class--I said, "Now wait a minute." I said, "I have my transcripts and you can see it." But when he got it, he realized it was better than a whole lot that he had and I knew it would be so he says, "Just wait a minute." He sat there a minute or two and I sat there a minute or two and he said, he reached into the drawer and pulled out a blank form, he said, "Fill this out and come on to school" (laughter).$Tell us about Mound Bayou [Mississippi].$$Mound Bayou--$$Yeah.$$--was an all colored town. The word colored was popular at the time. It was a small town and they had a, back in those days our people always joined a burial society and they'd pay twenty-five, fifty cents a week so that when they passed away, they would have enough money in that pool to get a decent looking casket and have a decent service. So, that was, and Mound Bayou was an all Negro town and that was a popular word at the time, and it had a Negro mail and it was just a, the people in the surrounding community and it was just houses here and there and farms and so forth, and the Mississippi Delta country, the land was just as flat as the top of that table, and the people put their nickels and dimes and quarters and fifty cent pieces together and built, and they had a burial organization. That was what it's for, it's a big house there, but after many years had passed, they found they had a lot of money, so they decided to build a hospital and they built the Taborian Hospital [Mound Bayou Community Hospital, Mound Bayou, Mississippi] and the idea was that the people who were members of the Knights and Daughters of Tabor [International Order of Twelve Knights and Daughters of Tabor] would continue to pay their yearly policy, but they could go to the hospital and get treatment free at the time of service, and they did that, but the chief surgeon that they hired to take care of people began to try to collect fees from the patients. Some of them would pay, some of them got mad and objected. So, they came to a parting of the ways and that's how they invited us from Meharry [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee] to come down and help out, because he wouldn't treat the ones who wouldn't pay him. So, we went down and became chief in the hospital, so I was running the hospital and he built a little tent across the street and took his friends over there. We just ignored him and paid no attention. We just kept running the hospital.$$Sir, what was this doctor's name? What was his name?$$Dr. Howard [T.R.M. Howard]. He finally moved to Memphis [Tennessee] and practiced there for a while until he retired, I guess, I don't know.$$Okay. Is he any relation to the Dr. Howard that was involved in civil rights down there? Is he related to the Dr. Howard from Mississippi that was involved in civil rights?$$I don't remember anything about that.$$Yeah, there was a Dr. Howard from Mississippi that moved to Chicago [Illinois] who was involved in the Civil Rights Movement down there. Famous Dr. Howard.$$He did go to Memphis and then to Chicago, and I can't tell you about the other--I don't know anything about that.

Herman "Skip" Mason

Reverend and historian Herman ‘Skip’ Mason was born on July 14, 1962 in Atlanta, Georgia to Herman ‘Pop’ Mason and Deloris Hughes. At the age of fourteen, Mason read Alex Haley’s Roots and was inspired to research and document the history of African American people. In 1980, Mason graduated from Therrell High School in Atlanta, Georgia and enrolled at Morris Brown College in Atlanta. In 1982, Mason realized his life-long goal by being initiated into the Iota Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated on the anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King. That same year, he became president of the chapter and during his tenure the fraternity was named Georgia College Chapter of the Year. After graduating college in 1984 with his B.A. degree in communications and history, Mason joined the Eta Lambda chapter and became the chapter’s historian in 1985. In 1989, Mason received his M.S. degree in library and information science with a concentration in African American history from Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta and was awarded his certification in archival studies from the Archives Institute of the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library. Mason later studied at the Phillips School of Theology in Atlanta.

Mason began his career by working at the Herndon Home Museum in Atlanta during his junior year of college as a historian where he interpreted the history of the Herndon Family and the Atlanta Life Insurance Company. In 1986, he worked for the U.S. Department of Interior interpreting the historical significance of the Martin Luther King family with the King Center Library and Archives. From 1987 to 1992, Mason worked for the Atlanta Fulton Public Library as the black studies librarian and archivist for the Special Collections Department. His work with the library involved developing strategies for identification and procurement of archival collections on African Americans in Atlanta, the state of Georgia and the Southeast region. During this period, Mason became the first national archivist for Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated and helped to facilitate the transfer of its archives to the Moorland Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. In 1992, Mason founded Digging It Up, a full scale African American research and consulting firm which he later renamed Skip Mason’s Archives in 1998. Mason also became the pastor of Greater Hopewell Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Atlanta and later, pastor of St. James C.M.E. Church in Washington, Georgia. In 2006, Mason curated House of Alpha, an exhibition which displayed the records of Alpha Phi Alpha, Incorporated, local chapters and the personal collection of fraternity members for the fraternity’s centenary in Washington, D.C. In 2008, Mason was named Alpha Phi Alpha, Incorporated’s thirty-third general president. Mason served as Morehouse College’s archivist and interim director of Student Affairs.

Mason has authored several books including, Going Against the Wind: A History of African Americans in Atlanta, Black Atlanta in the Roaring Twenties, African-American Life in Jacksonville, Florida, The History of Black Entertainment in Atlanta, and African-American Life in DeKalb County, 1823-1970 (Images of America: Georgia).

Herman ‘Skip’ Mason was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on 06/20/2011.

Accession Number

A2011.037

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/20/2011

Last Name

Mason

Maker Category
Middle Name

"Skip"

Occupation
Schools

Berean Christian Junior Academy

E. C. Clement Elementary School

G.A. Towns Elementary School

Ben Hill UMC Christian Academy

Daniel McLaughlin Therrell High School

Morris Brown College

Clark Atlanta University

First Name

Herman

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

MAS06

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/14/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Archivist Herman "Skip" Mason (1962 - ) served as the 33rd general president of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and the college archivist at Morris Brown College and Morehouse College.

Employment

Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Morris Brown College

Morehouse College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Herman "Skip" Mason's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason talks about the discovery of his ancestors' burial grounds

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls the discovery of his maternal great-grandfather's original name

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason talks about the origin of his name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Herman "Skip" Mason talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his maternal grandmother's employers

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls the birth of his son

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls joining his stepfather's household

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his love of collecting

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the sights of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his relationship with his stepfather

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his childhood pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his elementary education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his mother's role in school desegregation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers his first white teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls Therrell High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the impact of 'Roots'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls the start of his genealogical research

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls his decision to attend Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls joining the staff of the Herndon Home Museum in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers working at the Herndon Home Museum in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls his early genealogical research resources

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers his introduction to archival work

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls working for the Atlanta Fulton Public Library System

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers teaching history at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls developing the markers for the black historic districts of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls joining the staff of Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls the loss of Morris Brown College's accreditation

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls becoming the Morehouse College archivist

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the history of the Atlanta University Center Consortium

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his work as the Morehouse College archivist

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his early publications

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls his first historical exhibition

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers curating 'The House of Alpha' exhibition

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his collection of artifacts from Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason recalls campaigning for the national presidency of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers his election as the national president of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Herman "Skip" Mason talks about the power of social media

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his plans for the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes the importance of black historical archives

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Herman "Skip" Mason shares the results of his historical research

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Herman "Skip" Mason talks about the results of his genealogical research

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Herman "Skip" Mason remembers his experiences of unemployment

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Herman "Skip" Mason describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Herman "Skip" Mason reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

4$9

DATitle
Herman "Skip" Mason talks about the discovery of his ancestors' burial grounds
Herman "Skip" Mason recalls becoming the Morehouse College archivist
Transcript
A few years ago we did the African ancestry DNA and I, I swabbed and, of course, it was purported to trace the DNA of my maternal line, my mother's mother's mother's and so forth. That's Amy's [Emmie London] line, and the results came back that we had a match from the, the Bamileke tribe in Cameroon, and so we unveiled that at a family reunion about three or four years ago in Macon [Georgia]. We were actually on the side of the plantation [McArthur Plantation], we found the descendants of the family that owned my family, the McArthurs, and we went to that site and it was just, it was so spiritual, walking down that long winding driveway to the spot that we had chosen. There was an old Confederate flag in the yard from the owner who currently owns the property now, but he was just so embracing and inviting. He said, "Y'all come on and make yourselves at home," and I couldn't help but to look at that Confederate flag and he also had a little, a little black figurine, a little jockey out in the yard as well. Just the ironies of the time, but about one hundred and fifty members of the family gathered on that site and it was just spiritual. The graves of the slave owning family were somewhere behind us. And I proclaimed on that day, that somewhere on this land are the remains of some of our ancestors. We didn't it, didn't know where it was, but we just assumed because most plantations or communities had an area where they would allow slaves to be buried. Well, let's fast forward, we get a call from the Georgia Department of Transportation. They're expanding the roadway, which was near the old side of the plantation, and a man who owned property that's part of this mansion, said, "Well, you may want to check, I believe, I heard that there was an old cemetery somewhere over there," and so DOT went out. There was really no evidence of any, any graves, but they went out and they began to do some, some scanning of the soil and so forth, and they uncovered what appeared to have been shallows of what were possibly graves, and they began to remove the layers of soil, and pretty much confirmed that there're probably bodies buried here, and then they called me out and a few family members out the day they brought the cadaver dogs out. And the cadaver dogs were let loose and each time the cadaver dog smelled human remains, they would sit right on top. Well a hundred and ten graves were uncovered, and two years ago we took the family reunion back so they could actually see the excavation, so family members were walking on this old cemetery and they could look down and see the skeleton remains because they were very slowly doing an archaeological dig and study of it. It was just the most amazing thing I've ever seen in my entire life, you know, and to have the little kids to witness and to be a part of this, and so the decision was made that the remains would be removed. Now I didn't contest it or fight it, one, because the DOT and this company called New South Associates [New South Associates, Inc., Stone Mountain, Georgia] who specialized in archaeological studies and digs said they wanted to study, you know, the remains, and study that area and they found, they found, jewelry, coffin nails, and so we documented it. I took a camera crew down as well, but it was just amazing. Now we're going through the DNA process. So what they're doing, they're taking samples of DNA from many members of our family and some of the people who lived in the community to see if any of them matched with the, the remains that they uncovered. But I would have never thought in a thousand years that I would have located the possible cemetery that may contain some of the remains, of some of the unmarked remains of my relatives. According to their research, the last grave was about, placed there may be around 1910. So after that you have years of growth, dirt, growth, grass, under bush, that had totally covered, there were no markers, no headstones, but I just simply said that because I kind of called it out at that reunion and said, "Somewhere over there's a cemetery," but had no idea, so, and this means a great deal to me, you know, I think I learned very early on that I wanted to be a historian, and you know, I wanted to learn more about my family. I think I shared with you earlier, Alex Haley's 'Roots' ['Roots: The Saga of an American Family'] just was a life changing moment for me at the age of, age of fourteen. All of that has led to Amy, who was our oldest known documented ancestor, documented in the wills of the slave owner and with the amount five hundred dollars, that's how much she was valued at the time that she was being given to one of the sons of the slave owner.$In August of oct- August of 2003, I faxed my resume over to Walter Massey [HistoryMaker Walter E. Massey] because I read an article in the paper that they had the Maynard Jackson papers, and I just sent a note, I said, "Well, if you need any assistance with that collection, I'd be interested." The next day I got a call from the provost. He said, "Well we have a position that we been trying to fill for two years, the director of the Learning Resource Center [Frederick Douglass Learning Resource Center]. It required one to have a degree in library science." And I said, "Well I have a degree in library science." He said, "Well why don't you come over to the school?" We went over to the school, he walked me through and he said, "We'd love to have you, are you interested?" And I wanted to say, "Am I interested?" I say, "I been unemployed for five months, you know, yes, I'm interested," and so I was hired to come to Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] to direct the Learning Resource Center and then he also included in my contract that I would be appointed the college archivist. But Morehouse didn't have an archive. They didn't have an archive. Dean Carter [HistoryMaker Lawrence Carter] had a collection of material, but they did not have a formal archive because they shared with the Woodruff Library [Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta, Georgia] and he said, "We need our own archives here at Morehouse." And I was kind of shocked, I said a school like Morehouse, the Morehouse, Martin Luther King's [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] school, educating black men for a hundred thirty-five, forty years does not have its own archives, and they didn't. There were boxes of papers, Benjamin Mays papers scattered all over the campus in this orchestra pit, in the gymnasium, in the back rooms, hallways, everywhere, Morehouse papers were scattered all over, and so part of my job was to begin to collect, to bring in, to gather all of the historic material that had been displaced everywhere. Walter Massey, no, Hugh Gloster, who was the previous president. His robe was over in an empty building that had been a laundromat, his robe sitting over there. Walter Massey's first robe was over there. See what would happen, you know, they would, the campus operations folks would take boxes and they just put 'em anywhere, cause they didn't, they didn't know where these things were supposed to go, so fast forward, now today we have our own facility. We got a grant from the save the treasures [Save America's Treasures] and IMLS [Institute of Museum and Library Services] early to do an inventory and then to begin the processing of the Benjamin Mays papers, and so that--$$And when did you get that grant?$$The IMLS grant we received in 2004.$$Okay, so a year after you came.$$Yeah, a year after I came and we did our preliminary inventory of archival material there, with that grant and then to save the treasures grant we got two years ago, which has allowed me to hire two archivists, processing archivists, to begin to process the voluminous collection of papers of Dr. Benjamin Mays as president of Morehouse College.

The Honorable Alford Dempsey, Jr.

County Superior Court Judge Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. was born on March 19, 1947 in Atlanta, Georgia to his parents Alford J. Dempsey, Sr. and Maenelle Dempsey. His father served in the U.S. Army and was assigned to General Eisenhower's honor guard in Europe after World War II. While growing up, Dempsey wanted to join the military to emulate his father. His mother was an educator who worked for the State of Georgia’s Department of Education, developing schools in African American communities throughout Georgia. In 1965, Dempsey graduated from New Hampton School, a boarding school in New Hampshire where he played football, basketball, and baseball. Dempsey entered Columbia University that same year as a pre-med student. While at Columbia, Dempsey participated in the 1968 student protests. He later transferred to Morehouse College in Atlanta where he graduated with honors with his B.A. degree in economics in 1972 and in 1976, Dempsey earned his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School.

Dempsey began his legal career working on Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. He later became assistant city attorney for the City of Atlanta’s Department of Law. In 1992, Dempsey was named judge of the Magistrate Court of Fulton County/State Court in Atlanta. He was appointed by Fulton County State Court Chief Clarence Coopers. In 1995, Dempsey was then appointed to the Fulton County Superior Court by Governor Zell Miller where he presided over civil and felony criminal cases. Dempsey was also instrumental in the development and implementation of the Fulton County Family Court. Dempsey has presided over many high profile cases throughout his career including the case involving the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and allegations of misspending by its leadership.

Dempsey has served as a member of a number of professional legal organizations, including the American Judges Association, the American Judicature Society, the Atlanta Bar Association (Past Chair Judicial Section), the Bleckley Inn of Court, the Gate City Bar Association (Immediate Past Chair Judicial Section), and the National Bar Association.

Dempsey has also been active in numerous community organizations including serving as the District Chair of the South Atlanta District of the Boy Scouts of America, a Board member and past president of the Board of Carrie Steele-Pitts Home and a Board member of Sisters By Choice, Inc.

Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.019

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/20/2011

Last Name

Dempsey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

J.

Schools

Oglethorpe Elementary School

Washington High School

New Hampton Community School

Columbia University

Morehouse College

Harvard Law School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Alford

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

DEM01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If washing don't get you, the rinsing sure will.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/19/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Snapper (Twice-Baked)

Short Description

County superior court judge The Honorable Alford Dempsey, Jr. (1947 - ) has been the presiding judge of the Fulton County Superior Court in Atlanta, Georgia and was instrumental in the development and implementation of the Fulton County Family Court.

Employment

City of Atlanta Deparment of Law

Magistrate Court of Fulton County/State Court Presiding Judge

Superior Court of Fulton County

Favorite Color

Green

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Alford Dempsey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey relates stories from his father

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about his father's education and career in the U.S. Military

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey discusses his father's experience with segregation in the U.S. Army

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about his mother's career, educational background and mother's side of the family in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey describes his maternal family in Noonan, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his parents' marriage and his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his birthplace, his adopted sibling, and the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes the neighborhood where he spent his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Scott family, owners of the Atlanta Daily World, as well as his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his family's church, First Congregational Church in Atlanta, and his activities as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey talks about his participation in sports and his experience attending Washington High School and New Hampton Boarding School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the New Hampton Boarding School in New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about his student activities and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his experience at the New Hampton Boarding School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey discusses how he chose Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his difficulties as a student at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his academic performance and student activities

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes the 1968 Columbia University student protest

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes the differences between the two 1968 Columbia student protests

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his band, the Soul Syndicate, and the famous musicians he met in New York and Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey recalls his time working at the Bird Cage Restaurant and Lounge in Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey discusses meeting his wife, Colleen

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey talks about leaving Columbia University to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his time between graduating from Morehouse College, and attending Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about his twin daughters, Audrey and Angela, and his grandchildren

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey discusses attending Harvard University Law School and his job search

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Alford Dempsey describes his work for the Atlanta City Attorney's Office

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey discusses the Minority and Female Business Enterprise Program and Maynard Jackson's impact as Mayor of Atlanta

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Atlanta Child Murders in 1979 and his son Alford James Dempsey, III

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey describes his work for the City of Atlanta, teaching at Atlanta University and his private practice

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey discusses his appointment to the magistrate court of Fulton County, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey talks about leaving the City Attorney's Office and his relationship with Hamilton E. Holmes

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey describes his experience as a judge in the Fulton County Superior Court

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about the Olympic bombing in Atlanta and the events of September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey discusses his wife's battle with breast cancer

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Alford Dempsey describes his work with the organization, Sisters by Choice

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Alford Dempsey describes his life and projects after the death of his wife

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Alford Dempsey describes the Brian Nichols courthouse shooting incident in Atlanta

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Alford Dempsey continues his discussion of Atlanta's Brian Nichols

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Alford Dempsey talks about his board affiliations, public service and charitable organizations

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Alford Dempsey discusses his legacy, goals and objectives

Christine King Farris

Civil rights activist and education professor Christine King Farris was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on September 11, 1927, to Alberta Christine Williams King and Martin Luther King, Sr. She was the eldest of three children: her younger siblings were Martin Luther King, Jr., and Alfred Daniel (A.D.) Williams King. Farris and her family belonged to Ebenezer Baptist Church, where her father preached. Farris attended Yonge Street Elementary School, famous for its organization of the first black Parent-Teacher Association, before transferring to Oglethorpe Elementary. From 1940 to 1942, she attended Atlanta University’s Laboratory High School, and when it closed, she enrolled at Booker T. Washington High School, which her grandfather helped to found. In 1944, Farris graduated from Washington High School and entered Spelman College, where her grandmother, mother and great-aunt had all matriculated.

In 1948, Farris graduated from Spelman College with her B.A. degree in economics. One year later, she graduated from Columbia University with her M.A. degree in the social foundations of education. Over the next few summers, she earned a second M.A. degree from Columbia University in special education. In 1950, Farris took her first job as a teacher at W.H. Crogman Elementary, where she taught a seventh grade reading class. In 1958, Farris was hired as director of the freshman reading program at Spelman College, and eventually became director of the Learning Resources Center, a position she still holds. She is Spelman's longest-serving faculty member. In 1965, when her brother, Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., led the campaign to vote in Selma, Alabama, Farris sang at the opening rally on the day they departed for Montgomery. After his death, his wife, Coretta Scott King, founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, Georgia. Farris served as the treasurer and taught workshops on nonviolence. Farris also went on to found the Martin Luther King, Jr. Child Development Center.

The recipient of the Fannie Lou Hamer Award, Farris helped establish the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historical Site in 1980, at the suggestion of President Jimmy Carter. She is the author of the acclaimed children's book, My Brother Martin, and of an autobiography, Through It All: Reflections on My Life, My Family, and My Faith. Currently, Farris resides in Atlanta with her husband, Isaac Newton Farris. They have two children, Isaac Newton Farris, Jr., and Angela Christine Farris, and one granddaughter, Farris Christine Watkins.

Christine King Farris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 11, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.074

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/11/2010 |and| 11/19/2017

Last Name

Farris

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

King

Schools

Spelman College

Teachers College, Columbia University

Atlanta University Lab School

Booker T. Washington High School

First Name

Christine

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

KIN15

Favorite Season

None

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/11/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Civil rights activist and education professor Christine King Farris (1927 - ) was the eldest sibling of the late Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. She was the longest serving faculty member of Spelman College, and served as vice chair and treasurer of the King Center.

Employment

Spelman College

W. H. Crogman Elementary School

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Christine King Farris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris discusses her childhood home, her parents Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King, and her maternal grandparents, part 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris discusses her childhood home, her parents Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King, and her maternal grandparents, part 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris discusses the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood at 501 Auburn Avenue

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris describes her neighborhood and how she spent her leisure time as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris discusses her relationship with her brothers Martin Luther King, Jr. and Alfred King

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris talks about family traditions and her earliest memories growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Christine King Farris talks about being a part of Ebenezer Baptist Church

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Christine King Farris talks about her home environment growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris discusses family dinners and her father, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr., as an activist

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris discusses her father's activist influence

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris discusses the death of her maternal grandmother, Jennie Celeste Williams, and the impact on her family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris discusses choosing a college and her family's legacy at Morehouse College and Spelman College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris discusses her family's homes at 501 Auburn Avenue, 193 Boulevard and Dale Creek Drive in Atlanta, Georgia.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris describes her childhood neighborhood and its businesses

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris talks about her brothers' and father's names, traditions at Ebenezer Baptist Church and the Baptist denomination

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris talks about her brother's decision to join the ministry

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris talks about her brother's development as a young minister and his influences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris talks about attending graduate school at Columbia University and her brother's theological education at Crozer Theological Seminary

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris talks about her family's relationship with Dr. Benjamin Mays and conflicts within the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris discusses her brother's beginnings as a civil rights activist, the SCLC and SNCC

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris talks about her family's role in supporting Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris talks about the Baptist World Alliance, her brother Alfred's role in the Civil Rights Movement and danger in Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris discusses her father and brother's name change and provides anecdotes about Ebenezer Baptist Church

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris talks about homecoming at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris explains and describes baptism and tithing

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris describes the church during her childhood, church traditions and her Uncle Joel King

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris talks about the Sunday morning murder of her mother, Alberta Williams King by Marcus Chenault

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris talks about childhood pets and her brother's grief over the death of their maternal grandmother

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris discusses her brother, Martin, Jr.'s burial and his accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Christine King Farris's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris remembers the opening of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris remembers the opening of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta, Georgia pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris describes the idea for a living memorial for Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris remembers the 1969 celebration of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris talks about preserving Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birth home

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris recalls balancing teaching with the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Christine King Farris talks about recognition of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s work

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Christine King Farris describes Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life's work

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris remembers the assassination of her brother, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris recalls the aftermath of her brother's assassination

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris talks about her friendship with Coretta Scott King

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris talks about the early locations of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris remembers fundraising for the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris describes her efforts to teach nonviolence

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris talks about the role of faith through her family's struggles

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Christine King Farris recalls parenting with Coretta Scott King

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris recalls her decision to become an educator

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris remembers the birth of her granddaughter, Farris Christine Watkins

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris talks about her granddaughter's interest in education

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris remembers meeting her husband, Isaac Newton Farris, Sr.

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris describes campus life at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris remembers Spelman College President Florence M. Read

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris recalls singing with the Spelman College glee club

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Christine King Farris describes the campus rules at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris remembers slipping off of Spelman College's campus as a student

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris talks about her classmates at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris recalls returning to Spellman College as a professor

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris talks about the relationship between Spelman College and Morehouse College

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris remembers her classmates at Spelman College and Morehouse College

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris describes campus life at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris talks about her marriage to Isaac Newton Farris, Sr.

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Christine King Farris remembers her wedding

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Christine King Farris remembers her mother's support following her brother's assassination

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Christine King Farris remembers her relationship with Coretta Scott King

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris reflects upon the many losses in her family

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris reflects upon her life

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris remembers the death of Coretta Scott King

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Christine King Farris talks about the exposure that comes from her brother's prominence

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Christine King Farris talks about the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Christine King Farris describes various collections of her brother's papers

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Christine King Farris describes her hopes for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Christine King Farris talks about race in the United States

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Christine King Farris reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Christine King Farris talks about her children

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$6

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Christine King Farris discusses her relationship with her brothers Martin Luther King, Jr. and Alfred King
Christine King Farris discusses her brother, Martin, Jr.'s burial and his accomplishments
Transcript
Now, did you parents talk at all about your role as the youngest [oldest]? Were you required to sort of look after your younger brothers [Martin Luther King, Jr.] [Alfred Daniel]?$$Well, in a way, yes. I recall that someone had made a good cake and given it to our family. And it was so good, the boys were just eating it away and slipping and getting it. So Dad [Martin Luther King, Sr.] called us together, and so he told them, "You know, now, you're not supposed to--you know, you don't eat cake without permission. You need to check with your mother or something." And so as they were putting the cake up and my brother M.L., [Martin Luther King, Jr.] who you would refer to as Martin, but we called him "M.L", he said, and so Dad told him, now, Christine is the oldest. So she's in charge. So you'll have to check with her. And, so as we were putting up the cake and everything, and there were crumbs around, and so it was so interesting and pitiful and M.L. said, "Well, Christine, can I have some of these crumbs?" (laughter) And, of course, I said, yes.$$So, were you a good big sister?$$I was a good, big sister, yes.$$Were you a disciplinarian yourself?$$Not really, not really. That was supposed to be my role, but I wasn't really a disciplinarian cause a lot of times I would be with them.$$Tell me about what the relationship, you know, because siblings have relationships. So can you talk about each of your brothers and yourself as young people?$$Well, we were very close because the three of us, I mean oft times, you know, we would go with my parents to places. And so we were, were very close, and, of course, I'm being the only girl and the oldest, and Dad would stress that, "She is in charge". Of course, they, you know, leaned on me a lot. But we played together.$$So was M.L. or A.D. [Alfred Daniel], were they mischievous like boys are or--$$Typical boys, typical boys. And I would want people to understand that. I mean he was, he was normal, typical boy, played and things.$$So give an example because we all have memories. So give an example from your memory.$$Yeah, well, I mean M.L. played those games, baseball, basketball. We had a basketball thing out in the yard, and they would play that. One day, and, of course, they were always, as I said, a little on the mischievous side. We had a garage in the backyard, and it had a slight incline. Dad kept the car in the garage, and, of course, typical boys wanting to explore and see what it was, they got in the car. And apparently, Dad had left the keys in the car, and they turned on the ignition, and they went straight through the back of that garage. And, of course, you know, they were taken care of when Dad found out (laughter) what had happened, yeah. They were typical. They were always exploring, seeing what things were all about. And, of course, like all boys, they wanted to drive a car. They weren't old enough to drive, so they were experimenting with the car, carried them right through the back of the garage.$$So how old were they about that time?$$Hum, I guess about nine, ten.$$So your father was pretty upset I bet ya.$$Oh, definitely (laughter).$$So they got a little hand to the--$$Yeah, they got a little taken care of on that one.$I have two more questions, and one is, if, you know, the facility has been built there, you know, and we have the Center and we have the National Park Service. What are your feelings about what has been done here in honor of your brother [Martin Luther King, Jr.] and your family?$$Well, I feel very good because I was right on, in from the beginning. I worked with my sister-in-law [Coretta Scott King], we worked through the design and what it should be. So, it's a humbling experience, but I think one that, you know, that we're pleased with. And all the time we were building this and thinking about the entombment, I was the one, along with my sister-in-law, who my brother was moved to his final location. It was about three times. We first moved him from South View Cemetery [Atlanta, Georgia]. That's where he was entombed at the beginning. And we decided that we had to move him there because hate was still on the move. And one day we discovered that there were bullet marks in that mausoleum. Of course, you know, it couldn't get through, but just the idea of somebody--we didn't know what they were trying to do. So we said, we've got to get him away from where we can protect him more. And so that's when we first brought him over--there was a vacant lot right next to the church [Ebenezer Baptist Church]. And we put him in a mausoleum there temporarily. He stayed there for several months, and then we built, there was space further up. And while we were constructing the King Center, as it is now, that's where he rested in that space. And we put a picket fence around it, and, of course, people are coming visiting. And then finally, we moved him to where he is now entombed. And I was at the forefront of all of those moves, you know, along with my sister-in-law. And when we first moved him from South View Cemetery, we did it early in the morning, and right then, it was unusual for much traffic to be out like 1:00 and 2:00 o'clock in the morning. So we met, got a few deacons from Ebenezer. And I went along with Coretta, and I think that was all, along with those deacons. And Ralph Abernathy was with us at that point, and brought him from South View Cemetery to the funeral home, which was on Bell Street, Hanley Bell Street, and brought the casket there. And they sprayed it because it had a little bit of mildew or something on it, and, of course, Coretta and I did not look at him. I think Ralph looked at him, and I don't know, but Coretta and I sat in the back. We didn't look at him, yeah, my father. I mean my husband. And then after that, and then we brought him over here. And, of course, we had somebody guarding it, you know, overnight because it was not protected at all. But he's been moved from South View to this temporary location, and then a little bit further up. So about three times before he was entombed where he is now.$$Oh, the last question was gonna go (laughter). I was wondering also about, you know, what you think your father, your brother, you know, your family would think about the work that, you know, has been done even by the National Park Service? What do you think they would think?$$Yeah, it's a humbling experience, and I think that my brother Martin [Martin Luther King, Jr.], you know, he would be very humble and not thinking that he deserves this. I mean he was self effacing. He didn't look for praise and honor. He felt more like it was a call for him. He was not doing it for the limelight like I see a lot of people now who do things. But it's, you know, so that I can get on camera or whatever, but my brother was not like that. So he would be very humbled by this experienced. And as I, I reflect on it, and I look at it, and it's very humbling to me because I'm saying, "This is my brother, and here he is up here among, you know, presidents." It's really something just growing up, you know, a normal individual, and never would have thought that anything like this would have happened in our family.$$That's it. Okay, thank you. Thanks a lot. Thanks Mrs. Farris.$$Okay.$$So it wasn't so bad, was it?$$No.

The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner

Former Colorado state senator Gloria Travis Tanner was born on July 16, 1934, in Atlanta, Georgia, to Blanche Arnold Travis and Marcellus Travis. Tanner received her B.A. degree in political science and graduated magna cum laude from Metro State College in 1974. She received her M.A. degree in urban affairs from the University of Colorado in 1976. In addition, Tanner graduated from the American Management Association Program for Women in Top Managerial Positions and the Women in Leadership Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

Tanner worked as an administrative assistant for the Office of Hearings and Appeals at the United States Department of the Interior from 1967 to 1972. She worked as a reporter and feature writer for the Denver Weekly News, one of the leading African American newspapers in the Denver area, from 1972 through 1976. From 1976 to 1978, Tanner was the executive assistant to Colorado lieutenant governor George L. Brown, one of the first black lieutenant governors since Reconstruction. She then worked for Senator Regis Groff as the executive director of his communications office. Tanner was elected as a member of the Colorado State House of Representatives for District 7 in 1985 and served as the House Minority Caucus leader from 1987 through 1990. She was the second African American to be elected to a leadership position in the Colorado House of Representatives. In 1994, Tanner was appointed to the Colorado State Senate to replace Regis Groff who resigned to take a position elsewhere. She was the first African American woman to serve as a Colorado state senator, and held the seat until the year 2000. During her seventeen years in public service, she initiated and sponsored legislation on key issues such as marital discrimination in the workplace, parental responsibility, worker’s compensation cost savings, civil rights for women and minorities, and parental rights for adoptive parents.

Tanner is a widow and has three children: Terrance Ralph, Tanvis Renee, and Tracey Lynne.

Accession Number

A2008.131

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/6/2008

Last Name

Tanner

Maker Category
Middle Name

Travis

Occupation
Schools

David T. Howard High School

Gray Street School

Metropolitan State University of Denver

University of Colorado Denver

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

TAN02

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

This Too Shall Pass.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

7/16/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Soul Food

Short Description

State senator The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner (1934 - ) was the first African American woman to serve as a Colorado state senator. She was also elected as a member of the Colorado State House of Representatives for District 7 in 1985, and served as the House Minority Caucus leader from 1987 through 1990. She was the second African American to be elected to a leadership position in the Colorado House of Representatives.

Employment

General Rose Memorial Hospital

U.S. Air Force

Colorado House of Representatives

Town and Country Real Estate, Inc.

Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC

U.S. Department of the Interior

Colorado Governor

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her relationship with her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers the holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes the Gray Street School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers David T. Howard High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes the sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes the sounds of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner recalls her aspiration to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her activities at David T. Howard High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers her time in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner recalls her conversion to Catholicism

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers her time in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner recalls meeting her husband

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her early career in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner lists her children

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about her work experiences in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her political activities in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about her career in real estate

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about segregation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner recalls the assassinations of the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers her first political campaign

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her tenure in the Colorado House of Representatives, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her tenure in the Colorado House of Representatives, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about her tenure in the Colorado State Senate

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her organizational affiliations

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers her work with NOBEL Women

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about serving on the Colorado State Senate's Joint Budget Committee

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her hopes for women in politics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her mentorship of aspiring black female politicians

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers the 2008 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about her family

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner shares her advice for aspiring politicians

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her hopes for the public education system

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner shares a message to future generations

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner reflects upon her accomplishments

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner talks about obstacles to her success

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner describes her hopes for women in politics
The Honorable Gloria Travis Tanner remembers the Civil Rights Movement
Transcript
And so, that's what made you so successful in the different organizations, you know, for, for women, and making sure that they get appointed. What was, what are some of the things--you talked about a lot of different organizations. But in the, and, and a lot of them have to do with women and making sure that, you know, they get appointed to boards. And what are some of the things that, that you had to accomplish to get these things done?$$Well, the first thing you have to help women to believe in themselves, to believe that you can accomplish this, and that you can do it. We always put everybody else before we put ourselves. We got our children. We got our husband. We got the house to take care of. We got this. We always have an excuse that we don't have time, and a lot of times, we don't, unless we can get our schedules together and set up priorities and do things. But the first thing you have to make women think that you, you can do it. You've done this at home. You've, you've done these kind of things before. You just didn't know you were doing it, you know, and get them to think that you can, you can accomplish it. And you can do it, and you are needed, and this is why you're needed there, you know, because if you're not there, these things are never going to come up 'cause, you know, men, men usually don't bring up some of this stuff, especially when it comes to things like parenting. And any kind of legislation that they--in fact, they used to tell us all the time, "That's the problem with you women that you don't get on the budget committee, or you don't get a leadership position 'cause you're always talking about families." Well, shouldn't they be concerned about families, too (laughter)? Are we the only one? But they think they talk about the big things, and we talk about the small ones, you know. So, you have to instill in women that we are capable of doing the same thing, you know. I think the only difference is that we're more sensitive. They say, we are more emotional, but I think being more emotional is--women make us more sensitive to these things, so that--but I, I think is really, really important. I think the most important thing for me, when I walked through that senate door every morning, was to realize how many shoulders I came in on, and how many people are going to be looking at my shoulders to see, can I climb on them, you know? But you got to do something to make it right, a lot less troublesome for women than it has been before. And from the Northeast, too, you know, you have, you have to look at those things and see. And people always say, "Aren't you proud of being the being the first black woman elected to the senate [Colorado State Senate]." I say, "No, I'm not, I'm honored because they finally opened the door, and let one in." But of a hundred years, that'll be, have the senate or so it just shows how many have been denied. It doesn't--I'm not so carried away with just being the first black woman, but what am I going to do with that? I'm going to make sure that I'm not the last one, that's for sure, so that's, that's some of the things (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And so--$You wanted to--we kind of brushed over the civil rights era.$$The era, um-hm.$$And we, we tried to go back and then we, we got a little lost, but you wanted to share a story--$$Yeah.$$--about that time.$$I, when I got out of the [U.S.] Air Force, as I told you, I got accepted at Emory University, Grady School of Nursing [Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia] there. And when I was there, the civil rights, it just really started with the Rosa Parks and everything. And the black students and nurses, we had a different dormitory. And for the least little thing that would happen if you were late coming in, five minutes, anything that would happen and, and you would get suspended and kicked out of school and everything. It was not happening to the white student nurses. So, we decided to go on strike there, and we all sit in the auditorium. And finally, they sent the dean there and she said to us, "If you don't get back in your classes, and get back in that hospital, you're all going to be maids, like your mother--like your mothers." And, and she never tried to tell us, we're going to try to make it right or anything, and that was really when it got started. And they, they finally suspended some of the students, you know, that got--they said, they got it started, and so forth and so on. But that--by that time in '56 [1956], I, in May, I left Atlanta [Georgia], so I wasn't there any longer. When I got to Denver [Colorado], most people worked for the government, so they all made around the same salaries. They were teachers. They worked at the Federal Center [Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado]. So, didn't have much of a civil rights thing going on here 'cause they didn't feel like they needed it, which I didn't agree, but they didn't feel that they needed it here. So, it was not really--the only thing you could really do is send money. And then things start getting tough here with gang type stuff, you know. And that's when people got involved here a lot, but before that, it was not a whole lot. Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.], I can remember coming here a few times, but not a whole lot of things. But I had faced so much prejudice as a child, drinking out of the coloreds' fountains, and going up all those steps to the Fox Theatre [Atlanta, Georgia] there that Senator Martha Ezzard was a senator here like I was. And she and I were back there in Atlanta for the Democratic Convention [1988 Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, Georgia]. And they took us over to the Fox and took pictures. And she showed how she went in the front door and I had to go up all these stairs, you know, and stuff. So, it was so many things that I remember--sitting on the back of the bus, and not being able to sit at the counters to eat lunch at the downtown drugstores, at Kress's [S.H. Kress and Co.] and all that, that a lot of things that these people here probably had not faced, you know. I don't know, but I do know they did have problems in Denver, but nothing like we had probably. So, I, I--it's a lot of memories back there, a lot of things that happened as a child, you know.

Bernice Albertine King

Elder Bernice Albertine King was born on March 28, 1963, in Atlanta, Georgia, the youngest daughter to the late civil rights leaders Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Coretta Scott King. King was only five years old when her father was assassinated in Memphis in 1968. Raised in Atlanta, King graduated from Douglass High School in 1981 and went on to earn her B.A. degree in psychology from Spelman College in 1985. In 1990, King was the first official graduate of a joint degree receiving her Masters of Divinity and J.D. degrees from Emory Candler School of Theology and Emory University Law School. She has also received an honorary Doctorate of Divinity degree from Wesley College.

King received her calling to the ministry at the age of seventeen. Shortly thereafter, in her mother’s stead, she gave an address advocating against the South African apartheid to the United Nations General Assembly in New York. In 1985 and again in 1986, King was arrested with her siblings while protesting against apartheid outside the Southern Christian Leadership Conference offices in Atlanta, an organization that her father founded.

While in graduate school, King was a student intern who participated in project STEP in one of Atlanta’s notorious housing projects, Perry Homes. The program connected the residents to employment. During that time, she also headed demonstrations at Emory University.

In 1988, King gave her trial sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church where both her father and grandfather served as pastors. In 1990, she received her degrees from Emory University in the morning, and that evening she was ordained into the ministry. This day would also mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of her father’s assignation. King assisted the pulpit for a number of years before going to Greater Rising Star Baptist Church in 1992, where she developed the praise team, women’s and youth ministry and the ministers-in-training program. King became assistant pastor in 1995. It was this year that she attended the inauguration of Nelson Mandela in South Africa.

King was privileged to serve as a law clerk in the Fulton County Juvenile Court system, under Judge Glenda Hatchett, who was Georgia's first African American chief presiding justice of a state court and the department head of one of the largest juvenile court systems in the country. During her tenure, King served as a rehabilitation-outreach coordinator and counseled teens that came through the juvenile court system. She has also served as a mentor to a group of fifth grade girls at an inner-city Atlanta elementary school. King became a member of the State Bar of Georgia in 1992.

King is a minister at New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Lithonia, Georgia, under the dynamic leadership of Bishop Eddie Long. In addition to being a speaker, orator and preacher, King has planned and organized numerous conferences, seminars and workshops for all walks of life. She has successfully coordinated women and family conferences as well as nonviolent conflict resolution conferences for college and university students. She has also conducted a class on race relations at Mississippi College in Jackson, Mississippi, and taught a year-long leadership development class.

King is a co-founder of Active Ministers Engaged in Nurturing (AMEN) and the Chair of the national advisory committee on National King Week College and University Student Conference on Kingian Nonviolence. She is also the author of a book titled Hard Questions, Heart Answers: Sermons and Speeches

Accession Number

A2008.032

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/27/2008

Last Name

King

Maker Category
Middle Name

Albertine

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Frederick Douglass High School

The Galloway School

First Name

Bernice

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

KIN13

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Better To Have It And Not Need It Than To Need It And Not Have It

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/28/1963

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Civic leader and minister Bernice Albertine King (1963 - ) was the youngest daughter to the late civil rights leaders Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Coretta Scott King. King, a co-founder of Active Ministers Engaged in Nurturing (AMEN) and the Chair of the national advisory committee on National King Week College and University Student Conference on Kingian Nonviolence. She was also the author of a book titled 'Hard Questions, Heart Answers: Sermons and Speeches'.

Employment

Be A King Enterprises

Favorite Color

Royal Blue, Royal Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:285,8:760,14:16904,211:17228,216:43020,624:49140,804:49650,811:51010,840:51945,860:71368,1098:72026,1143:72872,1191:88285,1379:88771,1386:92350,1412:96940,1465:111558,1683:112850,1708:113534,1719:133080,2015$0,0:1335,9:1869,17:2314,23:3115,35:3916,46:5073,117:12313,206:12818,212:23560,381:33035,475:36310,490:38830,557:45970,697:51340,752:52012,764:57964,873:58540,881:65197,932:78704,1055:79586,1066:80468,1077:81154,1086:87555,1144:88305,1157:89280,1174:97866,1317:105870,1605:124700,1869:137965,2083:138410,2089:139745,2107:150680,2272:151128,2280:155165,2325:167408,2482:167975,2498:171760,2554
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernice Albertine King's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bernice Albertine King lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bernice Albertine King describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bernice Albertine King describes her maternal grandparents' farm

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bernice Albertine King describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bernice Albertine King describes her maternal great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bernice Albertine King describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bernice Albertine King describes her relationship with her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bernice Albertine King describes her mother's aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bernice Albertine King describes her father's childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bernice Albertine King describes her father's neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bernice Albertine King describes her father's experiences of discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bernice Albertine King describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bernice Albertine King remembers her paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bernice Albertine King recalls her paternal grandmother's murder

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bernice Albertine King recalls coping with her family members' deaths

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bernice Albertine King describes her paternal family's education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bernice Albertine King describes how her parents met, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bernice Albertine King describes how her parents met, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bernice Albertine King describes her paternal great-grandparents

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bernice Albertine King describes her parents' honeymoon

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bernice Albertine King describes her mother's activism

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bernice Albertine King lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bernice Albertine King describes her sister, Yolanda King

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bernice Albertine King describes her brother, Martin Luther King, III

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bernice Albertine King describes her brother, Dexter King

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bernice Albertine King describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bernice Albertine King describes her early memories of her father

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Bernice Albertine King remembers her father's assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bernice Albertine King remembers her father's funeral

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bernice Albertine King reflects upon her parents' relationship

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bernice Albertine King recalls her family's relationship with the press

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bernice Albertine King describes her early activities

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bernice Albertine King lists her childhood friends

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bernice Albertine King recalls her teachers at The Galloway School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bernice Albertine King recalls her decision to attend Frederick Douglass High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bernice Albertine King describes her family's household

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bernice Albertine King describes the Vine City neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bernice Albertine King describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Bernice Albertine King describes her early personality

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Bernice Albertine King describes her early memories of her father
Bernice Albertine King remembers her father's funeral
Transcript
And the thing that I probably remember and cherish the most is--and I don't know how far back I remember, but when my father [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] used to come home off of the road, he loved to play with us, the children. And my mother [Coretta Scott King] was a little frightened for us because the kind of stuff he would do was a little dare devilish. One of the things I would do is I would run up into his arms and he'd say, "Okay we're going to play the kissing game today." And each one of us had a spot. So he'd say, "Okay, where is Dexter's [Dexter King] spot?" So I would kiss him on Dexter's spot. And then he'd say, "Where is Martin [Martin Luther King III]--" Marty was his name at the time. We don't call him that today. He gets upset if you call him Marty. So I'm saying that on this camera. Do not call him Marty. He will let you know it's Martin today. But back then it was Marty. "Where's Marty's spot? And where is Yoki's [Yolanda King] spot?" And then he would do mine and mom's. And I'm trying to remember my spot. I remember, I heard somebody tell it a different way, but I'm telling you what I remember as an impression in my mind, is that my spot was on the forehead. Martin and Dexter's was on either cheek. Yolanda's was on the side over here of the mouth, and then my mother's obviously was the center of the mouth. That's what I remember. But I'm also told that my father--and this is true, it's not that I'm told like it's not true. But he used to put all of us up on the refrigerator and have us to jump down in his arms. And my mother was just--that's the one I said she was just so afraid for us. But we didn't have a care in the world because we felt that our father was going to catch us in his arms and that we were safe and secure. And Yolanda tells the story that she used to get so jealous because she got too big to do it. So when I came along (laughter), I took over everybody's spot (laughter). And I would jump down into his arms.$So when, when we first went to the airport to receive his [King's father, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.], his remains, I remember going up on the plane and when I got in the plane I heard this, this sound like a wind. And I asked, I told my mom [Coretta Scott King], I said, "He's breathing back there." And she said, "No, that's the plane." Now I don't know where I got that from, but in my mind it was him breathing. And then when we finally went to the funeral home, my silly brothers [Martin Luther King III and Dexter King]. We went in, my father was on one side and there was this other woman. And this other woman apparently, back then they used to put pennies in your eyes to close them. I don't know if you know about that. But this woman, some kind of way she blinked or something, something happened. And it frightened everybody and they ran and left me down there, and I was so terrified. But you know, again, I was keeping all this stuff in my head. And when we got to the funeral on Tuesday the 9th of April, '68, 1968, my mother had decided to allow my father to preach his own eulogy. Because the--two months prior to his assassination on February 4th, '68 [1968], he preached at Ebenezer [Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, Georgia] a sermon called The Drum Major Instinct. And in that sermon near the end, he talked about if any of you are around when I have to meet my day, tell them I don't want a long funeral. Tell them not to talk too long. And if you get somebody to do the eulogy, he went on and on, you know, tell them not to talk about all of the degrees I have and, you know, all of that kind of stuff. And I just want to be remembered as being a drum major for justice, freedom and all the other shallow things don't matter, and all that kind of stuff. So as soon as they started playing his voice, now I was asleep, basically off and on during the funeral. I was hot. I saw all these lights and, you know, cameras and you know, I'm looking around and all these people. So I go in and out of sleep, and then all of a sudden his voice comes through the speaker, and I'm sitting up there, you know, like and I look at the casket like he's going to come out of it, looking for him. 'Cause she told me he couldn't speak anymore when I saw him. Well I'm five years old. I know my father's voice by this time. And I'm thinking wait a minute, where is he? So I was very confused. And even to this day, it's an issue, this whole death thing and completion of it because that was embedded in my psyche.

Mary Shy Scott

The 23rd International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Sorority, Inc., Mary Shy Scott was born on July 19, 1930, in Atlanta, Georgia, to Robert Shy and Flora Spearman Shy. Under Scott’s leadership, the AKA Sorority initiated an international chapter in London, England; established a non-military memorial to World War II veterans; helped to encourage reading through a partnership with the Library of Congress; and completed the building of an addition to the national headquarters.

Raised in Atlanta where she attended public elementary and high schools, Scott went on to enroll at Spelman College, where she graduated with her B.A. degree. In 1953, Scott was initiated into the Kappa Omega Chapter of the AKA Sorority. She continued her education by earning her M.A. degree from New York University. Afterwards, she completed her post graduate work in the humanities at New York University and Georgia State University, where she became certified in supervision and administration.

From 1982 to 1984, Scott served as the regional director of the Atlanta branch of the AKA Sorority. Later, in 1986, Scott became the first Anti-Basileus elect at the Boulé in Detroit, Michigan. In 1990, Scott was elected as the 23rd International President of AKA Sorority, Inc., at the Boulé in Richmond, Virginia. As international president, Scott was instrumental in the first non-military memorial to World War II veterans at Pearl Harbor, dedicated to the unsung hero, Doris Miller. She also completed the building and financing of the third story addition to the AKA Sorority national headquarters. Then, in 1992, Scott used her position to establish an international chapter in London, England, which existed until 2006. During her administration, she formed a partnership with the Library of Congress in a national campaign to promote reading. She also renewed the AKA Cleveland Job Corps contract.

Aside from her leadership roles in the AKA Sorority, Scott has worked as an educator, elementary school music specialist and motivational speaker. She has received many awards and recognitions including the Prominent American Personality Award from the President of the Republic of Benin. In 1990, Scott received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Miles College in Birmingham, Alabama.

Mary Scott passed away on April 15, 2013.

Accession Number

A2008.026

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/24/2008

Last Name

Scott

Maker Category
Middle Name

Shy

Schools

Edwin P. Johnson Elementary School

David T. Howard Elementary School

Booker T. Washington High School

Spelman College

First Name

Mary

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

SCO06

Favorite Season

None

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Love Thy Neighbor As Thyself

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/19/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Apples

Death Date

4/15/2013

Short Description

Association chief executive and elementary school music teacher Mary Shy Scott (1930 - 2013 ) was the 23rd International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Sorority. Under Scott's leadership, AKA established the first non-military World War II veterans' memorial at Pearl Harbor, dedicated to the unsung hero, Doris Miller. She used her position to expand the sorority's headquarters, to establish an international chapter in London, and to promote reading in a national campaign with the Library of Congress. She was also a motivational speaker.

Employment

Atlanta Public Schools

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:3870,42:12438,182:12774,187:14034,201:30064,397:30701,405:33613,449:34341,458:41912,514:44768,541:45272,549:45860,559:46700,571:48044,593:48632,607:49052,613:49472,619:50228,668:50648,693:51992,705:62688,777:70724,879:81742,1013:82330,1021:83170,1036:87410,1063:87900,1072:90420,1113:90980,1122:95250,1206:106690,1330:107330,1340:109970,1408:110770,1420:111170,1426:111730,1435:116370,1514:117970,1542:118290,1547:121090,1594:130152,1705:130656,1713:130944,1718:131520,1729:131880,1735:132312,1743:132600,1748:133176,1757:149598,1993:151258,2018:152005,2031:152669,2041:157690,2074$0,0:1840,35:2944,50:7104,95:7920,104:8940,117:9348,122:13624,150:14176,157:14544,162:14912,167:20634,211:21688,238:26940,313:27570,324:27990,331:46717,677:47143,685:47427,690:48989,728:49841,753:50196,760:50693,768:55962,798:56898,814:57210,819:57600,825:60174,876:60564,882:63918,932:64230,937:65244,956:67428,1001:76400,1068:83874,1227:84762,1241:85132,1247:90778,1291:96530,1344:96980,1351:97610,1359:101660,1468:103680,1491
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mary Shy Scott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mary Shy Scott describes her ascension to supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mary Shy Scott talks about her vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mary Shy Scott recalls implementing her vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mary Shy Scott describes her leadership style

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mary Shy Scott remembers the influence of Margaret Davis Bowen

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mary Shy Scott recalls lessons from her Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority leadership

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mary Shy Scott describes the Ivy Center in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mary Shy Scott recalls an irritation leading Alpha Kappa Alpha

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Mary Shy Scott remembers a lesson from her father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Mary Shy Scott reflects upon her success as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Mary Shy Scott reflects upon her tenure as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mary Shy Scott recalls paying the mortgage on the Ivy Center in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mary Shy Scott reflects upon her legacy at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mary Shy Scott talks about her accomplishments at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mary Shy Scott describes her hopes for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's future

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mary Shy Scott talks about the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's commitment to service

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mary Shy Scott describes her ideal of the perfect sisterhood at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mary Shy Scott lists her favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mary Shy Scott describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Mary Shy Scott describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Mary Shy Scott remembers her mother

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mary Shy Scott talks about her mother's education, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mary Shy Scott talks about her mother's education, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mary Shy Scott describes her father's family background

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mary Shy Scott remembers her paternal grandparents

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mary Shy Scott describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mary Shy Scott talks about how her parents met

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mary Shy Scott describes her parents' professions

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Mary Shy Scott remembers the Summerhill neighborhood in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Mary Shy Scott recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Mary Shy Scott describes Edwin P. Johnson Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Mary Shy Scott lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Mary Shy Scott describes her elementary school experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mary Shy Scott describes her primary education

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mary Shy Scott remembers Grady Homes in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mary Shy Scott recalls her childhood music lessons

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mary Shy Scott remembers World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mary Shy Scott talks about her high school aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mary Shy Scott describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Mary Shy Scott talks about Capitol Homes in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Mary Shy Scott recalls her teachers

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Mary Shy Scott remembers segregation in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Mary Shy Scott describes Brooklyn School of Dance in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Mary Shy Scott recalls studying ballet and tap dance in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mary Shy Scott remembers learning about race in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mary Shy Scott recalls living in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mary Shy Scott remembers Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mary Shy Scott describes her social life at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mary Shy Scott remembers her introduction to Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mary Shy Scott recalls her early teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mary Shy Scott remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Mary Shy Scott recalls her active participation in Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$12

DATitle
Mary Shy Scott describes her leadership style
Mary Shy Scott describes her elementary school experiences
Transcript
As far as your leaders- leadership style, what leadership style did you use to bring your vision to fruition?$$First of all, I worked very, very, very carefully to let every soror I know that love was gonna be the theme of my administration. I sent every message out with love, and they felt it. I touched sorors: sorors who were in wheelchairs, sorors who were taller than me, sorors who were smaller than me. But they felt the love that I was offering them, and so we were able then to get together and work together and know together that we were on a mission and that was to serve the world through Alpha Kappa Alpha [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.]. And I think that was the thing that helped because sorors still write me now and sign their letters, love.$$As the individual with the ultimate responsibility for making decisions which would shape Alpha Kappa Alpha, what was the fundamental test you applied?$$Well, the fundamen- fundamental test was to see after a suggestion was made, after it was carried from the board table into each chapter, I would go into regional conferences, I would visit chapters across the world, I would speak to chapters and I couldn't get a feel. Once I'm in that chapter, or once I'm in the aggregation of the people they got together, I could get a feel of what was out there as a result of what I had put out there with my directorate. And it was excellent because you could feel the response, you could feel the love. You could also feel the seriousness of the program entities. Families were coming to worship with us. As I spoke over in Nassau [Bahamas], the ladies who were in charge of getting us in the island were right on top of us, you know, showing that they cared about what we were bringing into their island. When we went to England to do the chapters there, and set up the charters for those chapters, many, many, ladies who were non Alpha Kappa Alpha women knew about Alpha Kappa Alpha and came to help us and support us. That was my real test of what we were doing and making a decision, is it working?$Tell me more about your elementary school days in school. What about the books, and was there anything that you can look back on and say could've or should have been better?$$Sure. First of all, if you ask me about my elementary school days, I was too young and too inexperienced to know that the books we were using were passed down to us. When I got to David T. Howard [David T. Howard Elementary School; David T. Howard High School, Atlanta, Georgia], I was yet so busy, I knew I had a textbook, I'm not sure that I knew and I, I think I can say I didn't know that we didn't have all the textbooks we needed because there again, the teachers created enough for us to get what we were supposed to get and feel that we were getting it. It was only when I started teaching right out of college that I realized that every book that came through my desk was from one of the white schools and every elementary majorette suit I got came from another white school and they passed them down to us. Now that was when my fight started with the system. I didn't want the children to put those dirty suits on and didn't let 'em put it on. I talked to the parents and very early in my young teaching career, I found parents in the community who could make majorette suits and I really was upset about the books, but we were at that point--in 1950, when I started teaching, they were still handing us books from Sylvan High [Sylvan Hills High School, Atlanta, Georgia] and from the other schools.

Robert H. Jordan, Jr.

WGN-TV News anchorman Robert Jordan was born Robert Howard Jordan, Jr. on August 31, 1943 in Atlanta, Georgia to Millicent Dobbs Jordan, a college professor, and Robert H. Jordan, Sr., a dentist. Jordan began his career in broadcast journalism by serving as a booth announcer for WSM-TV in Nashville, Tennessee. That same year, he was married to Sharon E. Lundy. Then, in 1973 he was hired as a general assignment reporter for WGN-TV in Chicago, Illinois. Jordan worked for the WGN-TV One o’clock news while pursuing his B.A. degree at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

After graduating from Roosevelt University in 1977, Jordan joined the CBS News Midwest bureau in Chicago. He worked there for two years, covering stories throughout the Midwest, for the Evening News with Walter Cronkite. In 1980, Jordan returned to WGN-TV’s news team where he wrote and produced several stories including a documentary on the Atlanta Child Murders. He also went on to write a series on the nationalization of the U.S. dollar entitled “Peso Rich; Dollar Poor”. During the 1980s, Jordan served as a board member and trustee for the Chicago Sinfonietta, John Shedd Aquarium (where he currently continues to be an active trustee) and Evanston Hospital.

In 1994, Jordan decided to further his education by earning his M.A. degree in speech from Northeastern Illinois University. He would later earn his Ph.D. in philosophy of education with a minor in ethics in 2000, from Loyola University Chicago.

Aside from working as an anchorman, Jordan has written two screenplays, Anthony’s Key and Multiman. In 1995, he joined the board of the Safer Foundation and the following year, Jordan became a board member at the Night Ministry. He founded his own production company, Jordan & Jordan Communications, Inc. in 1997.

Jordan lives with his wife, Sharon, in Lincolnwood, Illinois. They have one daughter, Karen, also a reporter/anchor in Chicago. Her husband, Christian Farr, is a reporter/anchor with the PBS station in Chicago.

Jordan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 18, 2007.

Accession Number

A2008.018

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/18/2008

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Schools

David T. Howard High School

Henry McNeal Turner High School

Nathan Bedford Forrest Elementary School

Ford Green Elementary School

Roosevelt University

Northeastern Illinois University

Loyola University Chicago

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

JOR05

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cuba, Paris, France

Favorite Quote

God Gave Us Memory So That We Might Have Roses In December.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/31/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Thai Food

Short Description

Television news anchor Robert H. Jordan, Jr. (1943 - ) was an anchor and reporter for WGN-TV News in Chicago, Illinois. He founded his own production company and has written two screenplays.

Employment

CBS

WGN TV

WSM-TV

Meharry Medical College

Jordan and Jordan Communications, Inc.

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert H. Jordan, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about his maternal grandfather, John Wesley Dobbs

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about the history of the Pullman Company

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his maternal grandfather's travels

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about the history of Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his maternal grandfather's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. lists his maternal family members, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. lists his maternal family members, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers living with his maternal grandfather, John Wesley Dobbs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his maternal grandfather's childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his maternal family's Sunday dinners

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about his mother's interest in African art

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his mother's demonstration at Spelman College

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his parents' personalities and his likeness to them

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes the smells and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers the First Congregational Church of Atlanta

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his religious philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his family's religious activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his early interest in sports

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers his parents' employment in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls returning with his family to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his early interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers playing varsity basketball with Walt Frazier

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes the basketball court at his home in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers his early interest in biology

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers being drafted into the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls serving with the U.S. Army in Puerto Rico

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers working at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his start in the broadcasting industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about his marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his experiences as a television reporter in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers the civil unrest of 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers developing an appreciation of country music

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes the changes in the media industry

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about diversity in the television industry

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes the lack of diversity among broadcast executives

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his transition to WBBM-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers reporting for the 'CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls a memorable news report

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his pursuit of higher education

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about his dissertation research

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes the television news industry's crime coverage

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his reporting style

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about the anchors and audience of WGN-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about WGN-TV's worldwide popularity

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers founding Jordan and Jordan Communications, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers writing about his cancer treatment

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about his daughter

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. talks about the importance of The HistoryMakers

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Robert H. Jordan, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

7$10

DATitle
Robert H. Jordan, Jr. recalls his maternal grandfather's emphasis on education
Robert H. Jordan, Jr. remembers meeting his wife
Transcript
He [Jordan's maternal grandfather] was known to walk from one part of Auburn Avenue to the next, stopping in stores and talking to people, he'd go in the barbershop. I can, to this day, remember him in the barbershop and he would be there, and there'd be some discussion going about something and he get in--these would be heated discussions and he was almost preaching. But he was a scholarly gentleman who had a library in his home, the first home that I can remember going in that had a library. My father [Robert H. Jordan, Sr.] had a library, my mother [Millicent Dobbs Jordan] had a library and I have a library. And books have been important to all of us and learning and reading. And so, I mean, here's a man who was born the son of slaves but had enough savvy to realize the importance of books and learning and reading that he had a library in his home. And so, he was well known up and down the strip of Auburn Avenue, and gave it the name Sweet Auburn [Atlanta, Georgia], which lives to this day. So, if there was an unofficial mayor of Auburn Avenue, it was probably John Wesley Dobbs. So, that was how he was so well known. Amassed a fair amount of money from his speaking engagements traveling all the time, driving to churches and places all over the South. So he lived comfortably. He had six daughters, no boys. He adopted a boy later on who was kind of adopted from some other family. But, all of his daughters, he was able to put through Spelman College [Atlanta, Georgia] and graduate school, and some post-graduate school. But this was almost unheard of at that time, I mean, most black people didn't even go to college or many didn't even go to finish high school. We're talking about a time, when most colored people didn't finish high school, he was sending his daughters on to graduate school. So, it was quite an accomplishment, and they all did well and all married well. And that helped to continue the growth of the family in prosperity. And his values and principles of education and church and civic affiliations, and giving back to the community, all of that continued through his progeny which were his six daughters. And they in turn were able to pass that on to my generation, and we, hopefully, have continued to pass it on through our generations.$So you graduated from Turner High School [Henry McNeal Turner High School, Atlanta, Georgia] then (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$--in '61 [1961]?$$That's right.$$Okay. All right.$$But I'll backup, I'll tell you an interesting story. In the marching band, we used to go to Fort Valley, Georgia every year for a big band concert. And there would be marching bands from all over the state and they would convene in Fort Valley, Georgia for a day of marching and we'd have our concert season there as well. But we--the big triple-A school, the triple-A schools in Atlanta [Georgia] would march through first and then the smaller schools would follow. And I remember my junior year, we'd already marched into an area there in Fort Valley and I walked back out to watch some of the other schools come by. And I saw this majorette. I looked at this woman when she walked by and I thought, ah, be still my heart.$$(Cough).$$Yeah, I know, man. It's nothing worse than that. So, let me back up. The marching bands would go to Fort Valley, Georgia in the spring for our concert season and to march. (Background noise) And I remember seeing the--(laughter) let me go back once more.$$(TAPE INTERRUPTION)$$(OFF CAMERA VOICE): And speed.$$When I was in high school, the marching bands would have a big convocation each spring and they'd meet in Fort Valley, Georgia, which is in central Georgia outside Macon [Georgia]. We'd have our concert season there and then we'd watch the other bands as they'd march around. I walked out to watch some of the other Georgia high schools walk by and I saw this majorette. This girl went marching by and I looked and I couldn't believe my eyes. If there is such a thing as love at first sight, it happened. I became haunted by this woman. Because I walked along the sidewalk following them just looking at her. And, finally, they marched on out of sight, I never saw her again. But her image was burned in my mind and I never forgot it. At least I thought I hadn't forgotten it. So, anyway, two years later I graduate from Turner High School, I go to Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] and with my buddies we would always go over and hang out at Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia], the women's institution right across the street. So, I'm over there and we're kind of sitting on the railing watching all the girls walk by, heading to the cafeteria in the afternoon. Who should walk by but the majorette that I had seen two years earlier. I didn't know it, but something in my subconscious knew it. Because I saw her and again I was thunderstruck, and I kind of (makes sound), she just kind of looked at me and walked on by and ignored me. But I went after her and I, you know, kept finding--had to find out "Who, who is that?" Said, "That's Sharon Lundy [Sharon Lundy Jordan]." "Sharon Lundy, huh? Man!" So I tracked her down. Come to find out, she was in one of my mother's [Millicent Dobbs Jordan] classes. And in a few--I didn't get to catch up with her until a few months later and a few girlfriends later (laughter) but I eventually did. Found out that she was from Waycross, Georgia. I remembered it was Center High [Center High School, Waycross, Georgia] when they came marching by and sure enough that was Sharon that I had seen marching by two years earlier and who had haunted me for all that time, the mystery woman. And we ended up dating for a number of years and a long time, and eventually got married. And we've been married now thirty-seven years.$$That's quite a story.$$Yeah (laughter).$$Okay, Waycross, Georgia, that's where [HistoryMaker] Ossie Davis is from.$$That's right, he sure is. Very good.

Larry Huggins

Pioneering construction executive Larry Andrew Huggins was born on February 5, 1950 in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois to Mary Hightower. The second of four siblings, he graduated from Englewood High School in 1968 and continued his education at Washburne Trade School, where he got his painter’s certificate in 1972.

Huggins began his career as a painter for the black-owned Brown’s Drywall Company in 1975. His own company, Riteway Construction, began as Riteway Painting and Decorating in 1983, and with help from mentoring by larger firms and projects set aside in affirmative action programs, Huggins’ company acquired several of the most pivotal construction projects of the time including the Harold Washington Library, the United Airlines terminal at O’Hare Airport and the Chicago Board of Trade building. Huggins’ company, Riteway Construction, saw continued success in the 1990s and landed a joint deal as contractor for the Unicom Thermal Technologies, Inc., the $6 million district cooling plant. Huggins was a founding member of Black Contractors United, which continues to support and pave the way for African Americans in the construction industry.

Huggins and Riteway Construction have committed to many projects on Chicago’s West and South Sides. Riteway Construction continues to flourish as an award-winning construction service, obtaining major municipal, residential and commercial ventures each year, including the 2005 McCormick Place expansion and remodeling an apartment complex defaulted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1997. In 1997, Huggins became the first African American to sit on the board of Chicago’s commuter rail system, Metra. In 2001, Riteway Construction was contracted on the ten-year re-development of the Ida B. Wells housing projects, which a team including Riteway Construction have worked to rebuild into market-rate, affordable housing for the Chicago Housing Authority.

Many of Huggins’ numerous philanthropic efforts lead back to his childhood community in Chicago. He gives scholarships to single-parent children and created a $10,000 yearly scholarship at Englewood High School. Huggins is a continuous participant in the Chicago Public School’s “Principal for a Day” Program. In 1996, he gave $7,000 worth of toys to children in his old neighborhood of Englewood. Many organizations have recognized Huggins for his groundbreaking career and service to the Chicago community, including the Chicago Defender, the Chicago Urban League, the African American Contractors Association, Bank of America and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation. He is still a resident of Chicago and was honored by Englewood High School with the Larry Huggins Basketball Shootout.

Huggins was interviewed by The Historymakers on February 4, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.007

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/4/2008

Last Name

Huggins

Maker Category
Schools

Englewood High School

Wesley Avenue School

Beale Elementary School

Washburne Trade School

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

HUG06

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Emilie McKendall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

At The End Of The Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/5/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Construction entrepreneur Larry Huggins (1950 - ) owns Riteway Construction Company founded in Chicago, Illinois. Ritway Construction Company was contracted to re-develop the Ida B. Well Housing Projects.

Employment

Riteway Huggins Construction Services, Inc.

M. Ecker and Company

The American Company

R.S. Bailey and Associates, Inc.

R. Jack Construction Company

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins narrates his photographs

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Larry Huggins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins describe his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins describes his father's work ethic

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins describes his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Huggins describes his brothers' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Huggins talks about his grandmothers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins recalls the summers in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins recalls his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins recalls living with his aunt

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins remembers moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins describes the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins remembers the gang activity in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Larry Huggins recalls his influences at Englewood High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Larry Huggins remembers the impact of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins recalls his decision to attend the Washburne Trade School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins describes his training at the Washburne Trade School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins remembers integrating the Washburne Trade School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins recalls his first position as a professional painter

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins recalls his painting apprenticeship at the Washburne Trade School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins describes lessons from his career as a painter

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins recalls his decision to become a self-employed contract painter

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins remembers the African American general contractors in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins recalls the founding of Riteway Painting and Decorating, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Larry Huggins describes his role as the president of Riteway Painting and Decorating Company, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Larry Huggins describes Chicago Mayor Harold Washington's minority business initiative

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins remembers founding the Black Contractors United

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins recalls the election of Chicago Mayor Jane Byrne

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins talks about the construction contracts at Chicago O'Hare International Airport

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins remembers his contracts at Chicago O'Hare International Airport

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins recalls his political activism in the City of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins recalls a conflict within the Black Contractors United

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins recalls his role in Harold Washington's mayoral administration

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins recalls the end of Chicago's minority business initiative under Mayor Richard M. Daley

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins recalls his contract to paint the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins recalls his contract to paint the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins remember the mentorship of Gerald McCollam

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins describes his firm's relationship with the Tribco Construction Company

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins recalls lessons from his career as a general contractor

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins talks about his bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins describes his relationship with the Turner Construction Company

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins recalls his first project as a general contractor

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins recalls his collaboration with Nelson Carlo

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins describes the difference between a joint venture and subcontracting

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins recalls his endorsement of Jim Edgar's gubernatorial campaign in Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins recalls his work on the McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins recalls the divisions within the Black Contractors United

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins recalls his decision to leave the Black Contractors United

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins talks about his departure from the Black Contractors United

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins remembers his nomination to the Metra board

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins recalls the issues during his tenure on the Metra board

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Larry Huggins remembers organizing the Chicago Football Classic

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Larry Huggins recalls the creation of the Chicago Football Classic

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Larry Huggins talks about the Chicago Football Classic

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Larry Huggins describes the Christmas in Englewood Foundation

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Larry Huggins talks about his civic activities in the Englewood community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Larry Huggins reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Larry Huggins reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Larry Huggins describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Larry Huggins reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Larry Huggins describes his advice to aspiring construction company founders

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Larry Huggins describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Larry Huggins remembers founding the Black Contractors United
Larry Huggins recalls his contract to paint the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, pt. 1
Transcript
--Campaign for Harold Washington, were you, you were really just an entrepreneur trying to make money, right--$$But--yes, I was.$$Okay.$$Well, let me, let me go back to-$$Okay.$$Well, you know, in 1979 when we formed Black Contractors United.$$So you, that, okay.$$I was one of the founding members of Black Contractors United.$$Can you talk about that, then? Oh, you are gonna talk about that, okay.$$Yes, I definitely--well, Murray Brown, Murray Brown who was my partner at the time [at Riteway Painting and Decorating, Inc., Chicago, Illinois], James Martin [ph.] of, which is Robert Martin's brother, C.F. Moore [Charles F. Moore, Sr.], and Lawrence Woods [ph.], and a guy by the name of Reverend A.I. Dunlap [Alexander I. Dunlap], and of course, there was Taylor Cotton [Taylor Cotton, Jr.] with Chicago Urban League [Chicago, Illinois] and Glenn Harston [Glenn M. Harston] and Rufus Taylor from the West Side. You know when (background noise), what's essentially Dearborn Park [Chicago, Illinois]-$$Hold on one second. Hold on. While you're talking about Black Contractors United, what, was, was Paul King [HistoryMaker Paul J. King] in that at all?$$(OFF CAMERA VOICE): No, that's your office calling.$$Paul King came later. Paul King had another organization [West Side Builders Association; The United Builders Association of Chicago], which was before Black Contractors United.$$That was Black, Black--$$Was it community builders?$$Okay.$$Not community builders, but they were on the West Side [Chicago, Illinois], so they had another organization.$$Okay.$$But BCU was actually formed and came together after the success of Dearborn Park where, when he was building that, the Urban League was able to get the developer to use black contractors down there, and like Ernie Bush [Ernest Bush, Sr.] built so many of the homes, James Martin built a lot of the homes and now the first time that you have a lot of black contractors working on a single project at one time, but with the success of Dearborn Park, the Urban League decided let's come together and form another contractors association [Minority Contractors Alliance], and, of course, our first meeting was at Army and Lou's [Chicago, Illinois], where we met for lunch one day and, of course, I was there, Steve Garth [Steven A. Garth, Sr.] was there at the time, and of course Taylor Cotton [Taylor Cotton, Jr.], James Martin, Glenn Harston [Glenn M. Harston], Rufus Taylor, Lawrence Woods [ph.], and like I said, Reverend A.I. Dunlap [Alexander I. Dunlap]. And, what we talked about is putting together an organization and we decided to name it Black Contractors United and the purpose of that was to make sure that African Americans got an opportunity to participate mainly in a lot of the downtown projects which, at that particular point in time, just really did not exist for us. So that's how we became more advocates, so one of the things that we did is that, of course, in the early stages of that, you know, if we went and we identified a project and they weren't using contractors, you know if we have to march or picket, we were always prepared really to do that so it was, of course, during the time when Harold Washington decided to come to run for mayor was when, from a political standpoint, we began to have help raise money during Harold Washington's candidacy which, at the time, when I think you had Bush, was a real strong supporter of Harold Washington and also Charlie Moore, so a lot of the money that we raised as contractors, we gave it to Ernie Bush and Charlie Moore, and they, in turn, contributed to the campaign.$Let me ask this and I want to back to '83 [1983], but just a couple thin- you know, you mentioned several things that I'd like to address. What, how were you guys showing discrimination [in the predicate study]? What were the stories, like when you brought people in front to testify before, what were they, what things of discrimination were they talking about?$$Let me give you the best example that really happened to me. When, under, during the Washington [Harold Washington] administration, as I said, when minority contractors got an opportunity to go downtown to do work in the Loop [Chicago, Illinois], at the time I was painting the Federal Reserve Bank [Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois]. I was the only minority contractor that was working at the bank at the time and there was another guy, I can't think of the contractor's name. He had a little small masonry job, but we had to contract to paint the entire Federal Reserve Bank under Pepper Construction Company [Pepper Construction Group, LLC, Chicago, Illinois]. Everything that I did, if there was a little spot on the wall, you know, when the architects came to punch list my work, anything that he saw he made me do it over and over again. And because I was the only contractor there, you know, there was a lot of change in the work, you know, Pepper wouldn't process to change orders and I remember going to Gene Sawyer [HistoryMaker Eugene Sawyer], Congressman Savage [HistoryMaker Gus Savage], Chicago Urban League [Chicago, Illinois], John Stroger [HistoryMaker John H. Stroger, Jr.] was the county board commissioner at the time, Allan Streeter, Bob Shaw [HistoryMaker William E. Shaw], Beavers [William M. Beavers], and I was telling them about the fact that Pepper wouldn't pay me, and this architect [Bertrand Goldberg] kept making me do work over and over again, and what they were doing, they were going to bankrupt me into bankruptcy because when I submitted a pay application to get paid, instead of them saying I was 30 percent complete, they would say I was only 20 percent complete, so which meant that I was taken another whole thirty days, they have to bill for the additional 10 percent. The unions came at me because when I went downtown, at one time, I used to have an all-black crew that made me put on a lot of white employees, so between the unions telling me that to a certain extent, you can't bring all these African Americans down here and work and made me put on some of their members at a Local 147 [Chicago Painters District Local 147], which was that downtown local, from the architect that scrutinized my work. As a matter of fact, I even got a letter from the union saying that basically my work, the work that I was doing was up to painting standards, so I even had a letter from the union that said that this architect was very picky.

The Honorable Stephanie Davis

Magistrate Judge Stephanie Cecile Davis was born on May 22, 1958 in Atlanta, Georgia to Myrtle Reid Davis and Albert Miles Davis. Davis graduated from Northside High School in 1976, before receiving her B.A. degree from Stanford University in 1980, and her J.D. degree from Emory University in 1985.

Just after receiving her degree from Stanford University, Davis was involved in a life changing car accident that left her a paraplegic. The trauma from the experience was not enough to stifle her career goals; just five years later, she received her law degree. One year later, in 1986, Davis began working for the Superior Court of Fulton County as a law clerk and staff attorney.

In 1990, Davis worked as a staff attorney for the Georgia Court of Appeals. During her tenure, she became involved in several civic organizations, including the Atlanta Women’s Foundation, which is focused exclusively on the issues of women and girls in the metropolitan Atlanta community.

In 2000, Davis began serving as the Fulton County Magistrate Judge in Atlanta.
In 2001, Davis filed the first lawsuit against Atlanta’s public transportation system, MARTA, to improve access to public transportation for all Atlanta residents with disabilities. In 2005, she began serving on the advisory board of the Virginia C. Crawford Research Institute.

Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 13, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.262

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/13/2007

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Schools

Stanford University

Emory University School of Law

St. Paul of the Cross Catholic School

North Atlanta High School

First Name

Stephanie

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

DAV21

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

San Francisco, California

Favorite Quote

Tomorrow Is Another Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

5/22/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

County magistrate judge The Honorable Stephanie Davis (1958 - ) served on the Magistrate Court of Fulton County in Atlanta, Georgia.

Employment

Magistrate Court of Fulton County

Georgia Court of Appeals

Fulton County Superior Court

Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Stephanie Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis talks about her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her maternal grandmother's upbringing and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her father's decision to attend medical school

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her father's U.S. Army service

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her father's encounters with Lena Horne

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers Collier Heights in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls boycotting Rich's department store in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers Collier Heights in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls St. Paul of the Cross Catholic School in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her father's civil rights activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls the St. Paul of the Cross Catholic School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls integrating Northside High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her experiences at Northside High School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her experiences at Northside High School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her decision to attend Stanford University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers WIGO Radio's broadcasting program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis talks about her early travel experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her orientation at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her housing at Stanford University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her activities at Stanford University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers Kofi Lomotey

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls protesting for divestment from South Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes the history of Stanford University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers pledging Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls working for the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis talks about the San Francisco Bay Area

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her decision to attend law school

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers her car accident, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers her car accident, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her spinal cord injury

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her spinal cord injury rehabilitation, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her spinal cord injury rehabilitation, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls applying to the Emory University School of Law in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers moving home to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her studies at the Emory University School of Law

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her mother's campaign for Atlanta City Council

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers graduating from law school

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls her disability accommodations at the Emory University School of Law

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers passing the Georgia State bar examination

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers clerking for Judge Clarence Cooper

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls clerking at the Georgia Court of Appeals

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls advocating for disability access at the Fulton County Courthouse

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes the Fulton County Commission on Disability Affairs

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls being diagnosed with bladder cancer

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis talks about her cystectomy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis recalls the 1996 Summer Olympics and Paralympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers her father's death

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers the transit accessibility issues in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes the federal lawsuit against the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers learning to drive while paralyzed

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her career at the Magistrate Court of Fulton County

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis reflects upon her judicial career

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her casework at the Magistrate Court of Fulton County

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes the Atlanta Women's Foundation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her involvement at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her plans for the future

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her concerns for the African American community in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis reflects upon her life and legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis shares a message to future generations

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - The Honorable Stephanie Davis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$7

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
The Honorable Stephanie Davis remembers her car accident, pt. 2
The Honorable Stephanie Davis describes her career at the Magistrate Court of Fulton County
Transcript
So tell me about the, the accident.$$Well, we were, it was about maybe eleven o'clock, twelve o'clock at night and we had decided to go to Lake Tahoe. And, I think the highway to Lake Tahoe is highway 80 [Interstate 80], so you'd go from Oakland [California] to San Francis- to Sacramento [California], the Sacramento area and at some point you, you go on highway 50 [U.S. Route 50]. Well, Marty Bennett [ph.], the guy who was driving the car, who had been a chef who had cooked the food at the party, I don't think was that familiar with getting to Lake Tahoe. And at some point we did not, we never made it to highway 50. He stayed on 80 and during this, in this part of California, it's near the California, Nevada border where the accident was, it's in Truckee, California, and it's in the mountains. And at the time we were really on our way to Reno [Nevada], rather than Lake Tahoe because he missed the turn for 50. At some point on the way up there, we stopped for gas and I got out and went to the restroom and got something to drink and then got back in the car and we were in a Toyota station wagon and had the--I had worked all week and was tired and the, in the station wagon, we had pushed the backseat down, and so I really was asleep. When I got back in the car, I was asleep in the back, and my boyfriend was asleep in the back and then Jenny [ph.], his sister, was in the passenger seat and Marty was driving. And at some point, I, I was awakened by the fact that the car was moving around, but wasn't sure what was going on because I was still kind of waking up out of a sleep and I just heard somebody say, "Oh no, oh no," and then the car stopped. And, I don't have a real concept of the time that elapsed in, in leaving the road, but we did flip over several times. We hit a guardrail and the guardrail had a fan at the end of it that ordinarily would keep a car from going off the road, but this one was bent in a certain way and the way the car hit it, it caused the car to flip over the guardrail and it flipped over several times and went down an embankment. And in the course of flipping over one of the times, when the car was on, was upside down, the latch on the back of the station wagon opened up and I was ejected from the car, wasn't in the seatbelt because I was lying down and so, I was out on the ground. At some point I woke up and people were around me saying, "It'll be all right." And I just was conscious that I was lying down but, and that had been in an accident, was really not aware of what had happened, was feeling a pain in my neck but was kind of in and out of consciousness. And so there was a period of time where I heard people around me saying everything was going to be okay, and then at one point I woke up again and I was in a hospital and they were asking me what my name was, and then I lost consciousness again, and I woke up again, I was in a hospital. Later found out that I had been taken to a small hospital in Truckee, California and I was, at that point, with Ralph [ph.], my boyfriend had had injury to his foot, and Jenny, who was in the front seat, had had, had her seatbelt on and had some abrasions on her chest from the seatbelt. I think it hit her chin on the dashboard. And Marty had not been injured. He said that there was a light from a truck that came by that caught him and he was temporarily unable to see, and that's why he lost control of the vehicle, but the three of us were asleep in the car, and I tend to think that maybe he was tired and fell asleep, too. He was not charged with anything.$So the lawsuit with MARTA [Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority] was in 2001.$$Um-hm.$$Okay.$$And, and just before that time, of course, I was still, had in mind, and Judge Thompson [A.L. Thompson] had in mind, appointing me to the magistrate court [Magistrate Court of Fulton County]. There was, he was waiting for a vacancy to--there were three full-time judges at the time and he decided not to wait and to appoint me as a part-time judge and that happened at the beginning of 2000. And so, I was called to court to preside over plea hearings at the jail where people who were convicted of misdemeanors had been in jail a sufficient amount of time and they were ready to take pleas. So I would go to the jail and hear calendars just to, to take their guilty pleas. At this point, the, the benches, the courtrooms that were used by magistrate court judges, none of them were accessible. The one lift that we had installed in the courthouse was in a courtroom that was occupied by a, another judge, and I could not use her courtroom. So here I am, after all these many years, advocating to try to get the benches accessible, it was actually my time to be a judge and the bench needed to be accessible for me. And I could not do anything in the courthouse until the courtroom that magistrate court used was accessible and, fortunately, the court administrator agreed that they needed to expedite ordering the lift for, at least one of the courtrooms that I would be using. And so, you know, I complained because I was only doing calendars at the jail, that was only one calendar and the bulk of the work was being done at the courthouse. So, by, I think by June of 2000, they had installed a ramp system that takes forever for county government to work to actually figure out what kind of lift to install, but they did have a ramp going up to the bench so I started doing the regular work of magistrate court by 2000, by the summer of 2000. And so then I was still part-time but they would call me in to do calendars, two and three days a week, and it was enough to get my, my foot in the door. I was doing criminal, first appearance calendars for misde- well, for all the cases that involved Fulton County police [Fulton County Police Department] and police from other jurisdictions. Atlanta [Atlanta Police Department] had their own court for, for first appearance hearings and then Fulton County [Superior Court of Fulton County] would hear the hearings for Fulton County police and all the other police departments that are in Fulton County, that would be the, all the university police departments and all the other cities in Fulton County. So I was doing those hearings, I was doing small claim court hearings. There's a child support calendar, the abandonment calendar. I was doing that calendar and on different days, I did, I had different calendars and finally there was a new position created, one judge had been appointed in that position before me and when she left to go to the state court [State Court of Fulton County], I was, been appointed a full-time magistrate in 2002. And I just had my five year anniversary as a magistrate court judge on September 11th of this year.