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Derek Anthony West

Lawyer Tony West was born on August 12, 1965 in San Francisco, California to Franklin West and Peggy West. He grew up in San Jose, California and graduated from Bellarmine College Preparatory School in 1983. West earned his B.A. degree in government from Harvard University in 1987; and his J.D. degree from Stanford University in 1992.

West first became involved in politics in 1976, when he worked with his father on President Jimmy Carter’s presidential campaign. In 1988, he worked as the chief of staff to the treasurer of Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis’ presidential campaign. In 1992, he was hired as an associate at Bingham McCutchen’s office in San Jose. In 1993, he joined the United States Justice Department as part of the Clinton administration and served as special assistant to the Deputy Attorney General. West was then hired as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Northern District of California the following year. In 1999, he became a Special Assistant Attorney General in California. West then joined Morrison & Foerester LLP as a litigation partner in 2001, where he defended the “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh in federal court. He became active in the Obama campaign in 2007 and co-chaired the fundraising committee for California. Two years later, West was appointed as Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice by President Obama, the first African American to hold that position. During the next four years, he rose to the position of Associate Attorney General of the United States under Attorney General Eric Holder. In 2014, West left his public service career and became the executive vice president of governmental affairs, general counsel, and corporate secretary for PepsiCo, Inc. In 2017, he became general counsel for Uber. During his career, West was also featured as a legal analyst for ESPN, CBS-5, CNN, and many other media networks.

In 2004, West was named as one of California’s “Top 20 Lawyers under 40” by The Daily Journal. He also received the Edmund J. Randolph Award, the Department of Justice’s highest honor, in 2014.

West and his wife, Maya, have one daughter, Meena Harris.

Tony West was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 24, 2017 and August 25, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.141

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/24/2017 |and| 08/25/2017

Last Name

West

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Stanford Law School

Harvard University

Bellarmine College Preparatory

First Name

Tony

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

WES13

Favorite Season

Summer-Fall

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Chance favors the prepared mind.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/12/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian

Short Description

Lawyer Tony West (1965 - ) served as the associate attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice and joined PepsiCo. as executive vice president of governmental affairs, general counsel and corporate secretary. In 2017, West became general counsel for Uber.

Employment

PepsiCo

U.S. Department of Justice

Morrison and Foerster LLP

California Department of Justice

U.S. Department of Justice, Northern District of California

Favorite Color

Blue

Danny Glover

Actor Danny Glover was born on July 22, 1946 in San Francisco, California. His parents, Carrie and James Glover, were both postal workers and active members of the NAACP. Glover was a student at Daniel Webster Elementary School and Roosevelt Middle School. He graduated from George Washington High School in 1964. Glover went on to attend San Francisco State University in the late 1960s, where he played a role in the 1968 student strike, which led to the creation of the first ethnic studies department in the country. Glover went on to work for the City of San Francisco as an evaluations specialist and program manager in the Model Cities Program from 1972 to 1977. Glover trained as an actor in the Black Actors’ Workshop at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, as well as with Jean Shelton at the Shelton Actors Lab.

Glover’s career as an actor began in college, where he acted in a play by artist-in-residence Amiri Baraka. He went on to act in his first feature film, Escape from Alcatraz in 1979. Glover has been noted for his roles in The Color Purple, the popular Lethal Weapon series (1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998), Predator 2 (1990), To Sleep With Anger (1990), and Angels in the Outfield (1994). He served as a narrator of the animated films of The Prince of Egypt (1998), Antz (1998), and Our Friend, Martin (1999). In 1994, Glover co-founded the Robey Theatre Company, a Los Angeles-based non-profit with the mission of developing new plays about the Black American experience. In 2005, Glover co-founded Louverture Films, a company expressly dedicated to production of socially-conscious films from around the world. As a humanitarian, Glover has lent his voice and aid to the American Postal Workers Union, United Auto Workers, and Service Employees International Union, amongst many other causes.

Glover was the recipient of countless awards and honors, including the BET Humanitarian Award in 2004, an NAACP Image Award – Chairman’s Award in 2003, the 2002 Marian Anderson Award, several NAACP Image Awards for Outstanding Actor, an Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead in 1991, and a 2011 Pioneer Award from the National Civil Rights Museum. Glover also received the prestigious Medaille des Arts et des Letters from the French Ministry of Culture and was honored with a tribute at the Deauville International Film Festival in 2011.

A noted humanitarian, Glover served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program from 1998-2004, during which time he focused on issues of poverty, disease, and economic development in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. He was a UNICEF Ambassador.

Glover lives in San Francisco with his wife, Eliane Cavalleiro. He has one daughter, Mandisa Glover, from a previous marriage.

Danny Glover was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 20, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.014

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/20/2015

Last Name

Glover

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

George Washington High School

Roosevelt Middle School

San Francisco State University

Daniel Webster Elementary School

Irving M. Scott School

City College of San Francisco

First Name

Danny

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

GLO02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

I'm Too Old For This...

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/22/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Berkeley

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mother's Cooking

Short Description

Actor Danny Glover (1946 - ) portrayed the detective Robert Murtaugh in the 'Lethal Weapon' franchise. His activism extended to the 1960s, when he was involved in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College.

Favorite Color

Beige, Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Danny Glover's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Danny Glover lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Danny Glover describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about his parents' activism, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Danny Glover describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Danny Glover remembers his early influences

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Danny Glover describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Danny Glover lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Danny Glover describes his maternal grandparents' farm in Louisville, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Danny Glover talks about his early educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Danny Glover recalls his start at Roosevelt Junior High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Danny Glover recalls his early experiences of bullying

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Danny Glover describes his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about his relationship with his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Danny Glover talks about his parents' activism, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls his parents' employment at the U.S. Post Office Department

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Danny Glover remembers his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Danny Glover describes his teenage years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Danny Glover talks about his long term friendships

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Danny Glover recalls his decision to attend San Francisco State College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Danny Glover recalls his decision to attend San Francisco State College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Danny Glover describes his involvement in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Danny Glover remembers the student led strike at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls the trials of the strike leaders at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Danny Glover describes the popular music of his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Danny Glover remembers his parents' perspective on his activism

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Danny Glover describes his connection to the Black Panther Party

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Danny Glover talks about his activism

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Danny Glover talks about the Black Power movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Danny Glover remembers the black studies movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Danny Glover recalls the founding of the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about the political views of African American scholars

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Danny Glover talks about his political ideology

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls his early work with the Model Cities program

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Danny Glover remembers the start of his acting career

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$4

DATitle
Danny Glover remembers his early experiences of religion
Danny Glover describes his involvement in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College
Transcript
So, is education--what about religion in the hou- ? Are your parents religious or not?$$Yeah.$$Okay.$$Yeah. My mother [Carrie Hunley Glover] came out of, she, my grandparents--my f- my grandfather [Mack Hunley], Baptist. My grandmother, A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal]. Pine Hill [Pine Hill Baptist Church] was my grandfather's church in Louisville, Georgia. Lofton [Lofton A.M.E. Church] in Wrens, Georgia was my grandmother's church. And my mother converted, from my understanding, and it's to C.M.E. [Christian Methodist Episcopal] because she went to a C.M.E. college [Paine College, Augusta, Georgia]. And so, we went to C.M.E. church from my earliest memories, and still I'm a member of Missionary Temple [Missionary Temple C.M.E. Church], right on, right here in the city, in the heart of the black community in the Fillmore [Fillmore District, San Francisco, California]. And I remember going there from the child- from childhood, you know. Before we moved from the projects to buying a home, it was just--once we bought our home in the Western Addition, in Haight-Ashbury [San Francisco, California], it was closer; the church was closer. I didn't have to, we didn't have to come all the way across the other side of town to go to church. But yeah, my mother was very much involved in the church. She, her involve- the level of involvement--our level of involvement did not match my mother's level of involvement (laughter), or her desire. Because in the church, the church performed certain other things just besides spiritual uplifting. It gives you status, permanent status. And, and my mother would always try to put me and my sister and my brother in these pl- (laughter) in the Easter play or the Christmas play. And we'd be up there in the back holding a palm or something (laughter) in the corner or something like that. Mama would say, "How come I come to these and you have--you never have nothing to say? None of y'all never have nothing to say." We said, "Shoot, Ma, we don't even want to, we don't want to be here," (laughter). And then--because you, you know, you're anointed through your children. They'd say, "Oh, Ms. Riley [ph.]." (Cough) Or, "Oh, Ms. Hanberry [ph.], oh, Ms. Hanberry, your--," I don't think Ms. Hanberry had children, or whoever this member was, "your child was so wonderful." She never, my mother never got that from nobody (laughter) because I had--like, neither one of us never had, we never had a lead in a play. We never had the lead in a hymn. We were always in the background, and all that stuff like that. We were--it was me, Connie [Connie Glover Grier], and Reggie [Reginald Glover], you know. In fact it's funny, because for a long time--so this is 1958, '59 [1959] when 'Raisin in the Sun' ['A Raisin in the Sun,' Lorraine Hansberry] came out. And I was like--there was a woman named Lorraine Hansberry, and I was just enamored with her. I just watched it, and nobody ever come up to her. I said how come people don't come up to her and tell her how great her play is, you know (laughter)? I had heard about the play, I had read about the play and everything else.$$You read about the play and heard about the play?$$Huh?$$You heard about the play?$$Oh, I heard about the play. This is Lorraine Hanber- I thought--I didn't get the last--it's (pronunciation) Hansberry (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Hansberry.$$Hansberry. And I said, nobody ever--and I'm sitting up in the church, and I watch her. Moment I read it, I said--and I connected the name, because she was prominent in the church. But nobody ever said nothing. Nobody ever would ever come to her and say, and I thought--it was, it was funny. I thought that she, that she was the woman who wrote the play--$$(Laughter) Okay. Right.$$--'Raisin in the Sun'--as a kid you know (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$And (unclear) this is my secret, you know, as a twelve year old kid; you know, twelve year old kid, or eleven year old kid whenever this comes out I said, man, she goes to our church! (Laughter) You know, it's the thing--you know then somebody--I'm glad I found out. I forgot how I found out that it wasn't the same woman. But I'm glad I didn't kind of like announce it or (unclear) (laughter). But I wasn't that kind of person. I wasn't going to go out and say, "You know who goes to my church? Lorraine Hansberry," you know and everything. And I wasn't that kind of person, you know, and everything else. I just waited and I found out, boy, that's not her, you know.$So, there's just amazing--then, you, you'd hear, read everything. Like, like I remember--now that we've become good friends, Don L. Lee.$$Oh, right.$$Don, I remember him when he was Don L. Lee (laughter).$$Now, he's Haki--$$Huh? [HistoryMaker] Haki Madhubuti (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) Madhubuti. Right.$$Remember, I remember when he was Don L. (unclear) Don L. (laughter). So, all this stuff--he had to calm us down, all your stuff, it's just, it's terrific. And you're just saying, now--you're saying, there's a cat--okay, what's, what do I read, you know? Sort of struggling, what do I read? What is the conversation? What is, what is the narrative that's going on here? You're trying to figure--you don't put it in that terms and everything else. So, you have your first major book that you struggle through, Franz Fanon, 'Wretched of the Earth' ['The Wretched of the Earth'].$$Right.$$Nineteen sixty-seven [1967]. Say, whoa. Then you try to read it over and over and over to get the concepts and chara- learn the concepts, what he's talking about. And, and, and, really, your relationship to the concept is visceral the first time. You just feel it, the way he talks about the colonizing, the colonizing, everything else, in some sense. So, you have to, you have to now put on a little hat, and see yourself as a coloni- colonizer as well. So, all these kinds of things are the kind of things that San Francisco State [San Francisco State College; San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California], in a sense, began to shape there. I remember reading Nkrumah [Kwame Nkrumah] you know. I remember, I remember reading Julius Nyerere's African socialism. I wanted to major in economics, now. You know, I'd come out there with the idea I wanted to major in engineering because I was good at math. But it was economics now. So, all these kind of things. And, and it was always--I mean that three years, that three years through 1969, from the spring of--the summer of 1966 through the fall of 1969 and into 1970 were some of the most intense years of my life.$$Right, because there's a lot of activity.$$We brought [HistoryMaker] Nathan Hare out in 19- in the fall of 1967.$$Well, talk about that. Because this, when I was reading about this, I was thinking this would make a really good movie.$$Huh?$$I was thinking it would make a really good movie. Because this--first of all, what you're talking about with Nathan Hare and the takeover--$$Yeah.$$--you know is really the start of black studies. And--$$Well, I think on the one hand, Nathan Hare was the primary voice. He was at Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. And like I said, we know, we controlled the budget, the student budget, let's bring Nathan Hare out there, sp- fall of 1967. And Nathan Hare--and the strike came out of--. And we had Summerskill [John Summerskill], who was the president, who seemed to be one of--kind of like Kennedy liberals and everything else, and everything. He'd lived in Africa, worked in Africa and everything, was (unclear). So, you know, we got a lot of leeway. We'd go in there, and we're young and obnoxious in some way. You know, we go in there, in a meeting with him. And somebody--I'm not going to name who--would take their, have their bullet bandolier on, and then throw it on the table before the meeting (laughter). We'd do stuff like that. We planned stuff like that. We'd go into the meeting and say (laughter)--we would come in, we'd be meeting and someone would take off their bandolier, you know, the bullet--then throw it on the table first and start--you know what I'm saying (laughter). Some (unclear) (laughter). I mean (unclear). And I remember that stuff. You know, I remember we did that stuff, you know. We set the tone of the meeting, right here: "Now we have to have--," this and all, you know. And he was our friend, and--as much as he wanted to be a friend within the narrative and context of the school itself. And then, but the other things that came out of there--since they were organizers back as far as 1966, they were involved in the Western Addition Community Organization, WACO, another organization that were mobilizing in the black community, in the Fillmore [Fillmore District, San Francisco, California]--the traditional black community, in the Fillmore, mobilizing for the fight against redevelopment. So, we would attend meetings and sit there in meetings and just simply be observers; as students, as gophers, or runners, or whatever (unclear), whatever, and facilitate the meeting. So, we were assigned as the BSU meeting--as the BSU, as a part of the Black Student Union, to go to certain meetings in the community and re- and report back. That's how, that's how we functioned. So, we weren't just simply thought of us as students; we had an off-campus office. We got redevelopment agency, who we're barking at to give us an off-campus office right on Ellis [Street] and--between Fillmore, between Fillmore [Street] and Steiner [Street]. We had an office there right around the corner from the really wonderful soul food place. And there were all these things that were there. I think, I think on the one hand, to be--if you look at it now, it's certainly driven by our orientation and commitment, but, and driven--for those who were young, we followed those who had been in the struggle and everything else. And, but, a lot of that was sponsored by our own kind of, like bravado and naivete of youth, you know, all of that stuff.

Charles Collins

Community leader, association branch chief executive and Harvard trained lawyer Charles Collins was born on November 22, 1947 to Daniel Collins and DeReath Curtis James in the Fillmore community of San Francisco, California. After graduating from Tamalpais High School in 1965, Collins pursued higher education at Williams College, where he earned his B.A. degree with honors in 1969. Four years later, Collins earned his M.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and subsequently his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1976.

Upon completing his education, Collins began his professional career working with the law firm of Steinhart and Falconer, and then the law firm of Berkeley and Rhodes. An active member of the San Francisco and California communities, Collins led a comprehensive study for the City and County of San Francisco in 1979 and subsequently became the deputy secretary of the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency for the State of California in 1980. Collins has also served in leadership capacities as president and chairman of WDG Ventures, Inc., a real estate development firm in San Francisco; president and chief executive officer of the Family Service Agency of San Francisco; and president and chief executive officer of the YMCA of San Francisco. In his work with the YMCA, Collins has supported its mission to strengthen the foundations of communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility.

Collins has received much recognition for his work in community development, including the 2003 Bicentennial Award from Williams College. In 2005, Collins was named the senior vice chairman of the National Urban League. For his dedication to the organization, the National Urban League established the Charles Collins Award in his honor. Collins was the author of The African Americans, a collection of photographs recognizing the accomplishments of African Americans in various capacities. He was also the senior editor of A Day in the Life of Africa.

Collins is married to Paula Robinson Collins. They have two daughters, Sara DeReath Collins and Julia Elizabeth Collins.

Collins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 10, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.010

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

3/10/2011 |and| 11/9/2012

Last Name

Collins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Old Mill Elementary School

Edna Maguire Elementary School

Tamalpais High School

Williams College

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Flexible

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

COL20

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Youth, but all ages

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mediterranean

Favorite Quote

Must Be A Responsible Adult Guiding Youth.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

11/22/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Association branch chief executive and community leader Charles Collins (1947 - ) was a Harvard trained lawyer known for his dedication to the San Francisco community, primarily in his position as president and chief executive officer of the YMCA of San Francisco.

Employment

YMCA of San Francisco

Family Service Agency of San Francisco

WDG Ventures Inc.

San Francisco Art Institute

National Urban League (NUL)

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Berkley and Rhodes

State of California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:960,13:1604,21:8780,202:19403,357:23273,385:27967,424:28451,429:33039,459:33434,465:33829,471:34145,476:35488,505:37384,535:37700,540:39280,566:39596,608:40860,627:41176,632:42677,662:47733,708:49629,739:50103,746:51604,772:52078,779:53895,800:54369,807:54843,814:60267,878:64030,961:76281,1153:76613,1158:77609,1172:78688,1190:79269,1199:80514,1226:87055,1281:87805,1292:89230,1322:90580,1349:91180,1358:93430,1405:94330,1418:95380,1435:97255,1470:104048,1544:104516,1551:105764,1567:106076,1572:106544,1579:107246,1590:111928,1628:112616,1643:112960,1649:113304,1654:115282,1685:121256,1746:123500,1779:124316,1792:126458,1822:126866,1828:130420,1837:131320,1847:132120,1857:136388,1918:137108,1933:137900,1948:138692,1961:138980,1966:142780,2001:144940,2031:145390,2037:145840,2043:149988,2110:152640,2165:152952,2170:153420,2177:153732,2182:160526,2256:161818,2280:162502,2291:163414,2304:164098,2322:164706,2331:165542,2347:166378,2362:167062,2372:167518,2379:168354,2402:168734,2411:178210,2545:178684,2555:182615,2583:183460,2598:183720,2603:183980,2608:184305,2614:185020,2626:188140,2700:190155,2744:190415,2749:192430,2785:192755,2792:193405,2803:194705,2828:195030,2834:196070,2862:200635,2883:201085,2890:201460,2896:203035,2916:204610,2955:205810,2971:206335,2979:206785,2987:207310,2996:208960,3028:209410,3034:211885,3110:212185,3115:217330,3167:218422,3181:219332,3196:223550,3261:224980,3294:230907,3379:232256,3413:232611,3419:233250,3429:233818,3439:237213,3458:237781,3471:240692,3540:240976,3545:241473,3554:242183,3565:243390,3585:244029,3600:244313,3605:247366,3680:254912,3778:255327,3784:255742,3790:257153,3816:258066,3839:258564,3846:259394,3861:259975,3869:260722,3888:261552,3906:267023,3957:267607,3966:268191,3976:268848,3988:269432,3999:270308,4014:270746,4022:273082,4072:274396,4092:284470,4205:284730,4221:284990,4226:290060,4344:295455,4494:309680,4704:309960,4709:310310,4715:310590,4720:313174,4733:317762,4854:318280,4863:318576,4868:319760,4892:320130,4898:321388,4925:326325,4963:326665,4968:327515,4979:329130,5004:329470,5009:329810,5014:332030,5027$0,0:7542,202:7977,208:19973,427:26042,504:27446,532:29630,575:30020,581:30488,591:38910,706:39230,714:60580,1080:68500,1209:81175,1382:81475,1387:82525,1412:83125,1421:87850,1529:90850,1589:94640,1601:97940,1656:103115,1755:111256,1868:114337,1922:114890,1930:115206,1935:119314,2010:120262,2146:123738,2217:131377,2315:136560,2405:136986,2412:138832,2522:145932,2651:146571,2661:160274,2838:161429,2858:162584,2875:164432,2908:171524,2969:177385,3046:179356,3082:180086,3094:180597,3102:183152,3169:195078,3392:198042,3440:202526,3533:203818,3555:207086,3619:213338,3699:213978,3714:216026,3755:217818,3806:218074,3811:218330,3816:218586,3852:220826,3910:223514,3942:224090,3953:224922,3976:230060,4001:232580,4064:235520,4121:237130,4156:244175,4234:244491,4239:245913,4263:253339,4438:269721,4699:272206,4750:275440,4759:276352,4777:279772,4839:281520,4867:281976,4875:284788,4921:285244,4929:285928,4939:286460,4947:295480,5048:296088,5058:296392,5063:296772,5069:301180,5172:312873,5326:314861,5362:319831,5468:336744,5741:337079,5747:337682,5757:338151,5766:342070,5771:343045,5786:346045,5856:349195,5929:353020,6015:356040,6022
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Collins' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles Collins discusses his maternal lineage and the history of their family business

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles Collins discusses his maternal family history, his grandparents, and his maternal great grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles Collins discusses his family's relationship with Howard Thurman and his mother's, Dereath James Collins, upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles Collins describes his paternal family and his father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles Collins talks about his father's education, how his parents met, and his early childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles Collins discusses his developmentally challenged brother, Craig Collins, and their upbringing in the Fillmore District of San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles Collins discusses the sociopolitical aspects of San Francisco, California during the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles Collins describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, and his family's leisure activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles Collins discusses his early education and his family's move to Mill Valley, California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles Collins describes his experience living in Washington, D.C. in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles Collins describes his experiences living in Washington, D.C., segregation, and his parents' civil rights involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about the shift in his perspective after returning from Washington, D.C. and his summer experience in Finland.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles Collins discusses his parents' political party affiliation, and his junior high school experience and his father's work

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles Collins describes his high school experience in Mill Valley, California and his classmates

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles Collins discusses his teen years and the musical influences in his home

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles Collins describes his college application process and experience attending Williams College in Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about his father's trade business in West Africa, and the challenges of importing and exporting and West African Politics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles Collins describes his first impressions and experiences at Williams College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles Collins talks about his art history education, African American Art and his relationship with Romare Bearden

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles Collins describes Williams College's political and social environment

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles Collins discusses his experience in the later years of the Civil Rights Movement and his extracurricular activities at Williams College

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about his post graduation plans, receiving the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship and meeting his wife Paula Robinson

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles Collins discusses researching migration and city planning in South America and Rio de Janeiro, and the death of Whitney Young

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles Collins discusses cinematic depictions of Brazil and the impact of rapid urbanization in Rio de Janeiro

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles Collins talks about his educational influences, time spent in Athens, Greece and transitioning to Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles Collins discusses his time attending Harvard Law School, his classmates and professors

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about working with Steinhart and Falconer, and Berkeley and Rhodes

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles Collins gives his thoughts on the People's Temple suicide, urban renewal and displacement, and draws connections between these phenomena

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Collins' interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Charles Collins remembers Jim Jones and the massacre in Georgetown, Guyana

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Charles Collins describes his position at the law firm of Berkley and Rhodes

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Charles Collins talks about the study he conducted for the San Francisco Planning Department

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Charles Collins describes his role at the State of California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Charles Collins recalls his accomplishments at the State of California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Charles Collins describes his reasons for starting Western Development Group

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Charles Collins talks about Western Development Group's construction projects, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Charles Collins talks about Western Development Group's construction projects, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Charles Collins describes San Francisco's Fillmore District, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Charles Collins describes San Francisco's Fillmore District, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Charles Collins remembers the 1989 earthquake

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Charles Collins talks about his book, 'The African Americans'

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Charles Collins remembers John Hope Franklin

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Charles Collins describes the process of selecting photographs for 'The African Americans'

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Charles Collins describes Venus Williams' photograph in 'The African Americans'

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Charles Collins talks about individual photographs in 'The African Americans'

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Charles Collins remembers acquiring a photograph of Arthur Ashe

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Charles Collins talks about the initial idea for the book 'A Day in the Life of Africa'

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Charles Collins describes the shooting process for 'A Day in the Life of Africa'

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about one of the photographs in 'A Day in the Life of Africa'

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Charles Collins recalls the reception of 'A Day in the Life of Africa'

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Charles Collins describes how he came to work for the Family Service Agency of San Francisco

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Charles Collins remembers his accomplishments at the Family Service Agency of San Francisco

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Charles Collins describes how he became the president and CEO of the YMCA of San Francisco

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Charles Collins recalls the state of the YMCA of San Francisco upon his arrival

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Charles Collins talks about the YMCA of San Francisco's programs

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Charles Collins talks about his work with the YMCA Sri Lanka

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Charles Collins talks about the importance of youth programming at the YMCA of San Francisco

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Charles Collins describes the growth of the YMCA of San Francisco

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Charles Collins talks about publicity for the YMCA of San Francisco

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Charles Collins describes the National Urban League's Charles Collins Award

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Charles Collins lists his organizational involvement

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Charles Collins talks about his interest in art

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Charles Collins talks about his future plans for the YMCA of San Francisco

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Charles Collins describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Charles Collins reflects upon his life

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Charles Collins reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Charles Collins talks about his family, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Charles Collins talks about his family, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Charles Collins describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

9$8

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Charles Collins describes the shooting process for 'A Day in the Life of Africa'
Charles Collins talks about his book, 'The African Americans'
Transcript
Yes, we were talking about the--'A Day in the Life of Africa' [David Elliot Cohen and Lee Liberman], how, you know, one of my questions is another quan- a quantity question. Ho- how many photographers were employed on this?$$We had close to 100 photographers.$$And I guess you had to sit down and decide like where are they gonna go in Africa, right?$$You have to have an outline for such a big project and the outline was both geographic and thematic. The thing about this book ultimately that made it important and the impetus for this book was the then looming AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] crisis in Africa. Time magazine had put on its front cover, you know, the scourge of AIDS, and the decimation of the continent of Africa because AIDS had not been really focused on as a huge public health hazard. And this is an epidemic, a pandemic, and you--you, you have to--sometimes you just have to get up and do something about things. And our response and the impetus for this was that, you know, David [David Cohen] and Lee [Lee Liberman], you know, really felt that, you know, that something had to happen. We had to shine light on this continent and really let people know how important it is, you know, that Africa is not expendable. And it's certainly not expendable from the point of view of its people. And so all of the proceeds from the 'A Day in the Life of Africa' went to support AIDS education on the continent. So that was the cause, that was the reason, you know, for doing this. That we needed to shine a bright light on Africa that people would care more, that they would see the face of Africa through many, many lenses and understand how, how much we all share in its outcome. And so, you know, how you tell that story is, you know, to slice it and dice it. North, south, east, west, central, different cultures, religious, you know, themes, and, and how do you--how do you then pull that together. You bring in the best photographers in the world and you essentially ask them to go to their sweet spot. These are photojournalists, they know how to get into tough spots, they know how to get out of it. So they can go into places that would be remote or could be perilous or hazardous. But, but their, their skills, you know, their social and professional skills, and their artistic vision would be able to render something really important. They could find the moment and really define it. And so we all met in Paris [France]--there was a huge amount of planning, but we all met in Paris for a couple of days and we briefed all the photographers, gave them their equipment. Their equipment was all digital, and that was new then, you know, digital technology and photog- and photography were just beginning to fuse. And so that was just a tremendous opportunity for a lot of these photographers that had been basically, you know, taking their pictures on film to learn digital photography. And it was then gonna be a project that we could do electronically. We worked with Apple Computer [Apple Computer, Inc.; Apple Inc.] also. And so we could fuse all this technology now in the new way of storytelling. The storytelling, itself, is, is still you know rooted, you know, in humans, but we would use new technology, you know, to get the output. So we all met in Paris, we briefed them and then we sent them, you know, on planes, you know, to go to all of these different places in Africa. We had to have lots of connections. We had to have a whole command center. We had to make sure that any situations that got tight, you know, we could work through. We informed all of the embassies, all of the--all of the nations from which all of these photographers came to make sure that all of their visas and all of their, their basic needs could be met on the spot. So there was an entire logistical and support unit, you know, in case somebody got into trouble. So the photographers fanned out and they had about two days to get into their situation, two days to figure out, you know, what they were gonna do and then on the 28th of February in 2012 [sic. 2002], you know, they took those pictures.$$So, so they arrived four days ahead of time?$$They were--they were there probably, you know, yeah in some cases, you know, two to three days ahead of time just to get themselves on the ground and to get their logistics straight and how they were gonna go and what they were gonna photograph. And then they went in and they took these pictures on that day.$$Okay. This--that must've been really expensive. (Unclear)--(simultaneous)--$$It was an expensive project. It was a very expensive project because then we had to get them all back from, from where they were back to Paris. They had to deposit all their film and then we had to get them back to where they came from. So that, you know, that was just wonderful, you know, to think about, you know, getting a chance to see, you know, these, these just incredible people who wanted to co- make this contribution.$I don't know if it's time to ask you about the development of the book or not. But the book came out in nine--1993, 'The African Americans' [Charles Collins and David Cohen].$$Yeah.$$Did--when did you start working on 'The African Americans'? (Unclear)--(simultaneous)--$$That's--you know, that's--this is one of the happiest chapters of my life, you know, me doing these books. My neighbor, David Cohen, who lived literally next door to me, and his wife were very good friends of ours. And David had just completed, you know, a great set of books and he and his wife and their kids were setting off to go to Bali [Indonesia]. And we were talking over the fence and they said, "Well why don't you come over to Bali and visit us." I'd never been to Indonesia and Paula [Collin's wife, Paula Robinson Collins] hadn't either, and so we thought well what a great invitation, we--we're gonna go to Bali. And so there we were, you know, we got on the plane, went to Hong Kong and then we ended up in Indonesia and--on this beautiful island of Bali where we stayed for a couple of weeks. And in that type of space it's again amazing how creative your mind can be, when it's calm and what I always say sort of flat and horizontal and you get a chance to see new patterns. And so David and I were out playing golf in an impossibly horrible rain storm, we were the only people on the golf course. We just started thinking about, you know, books and you know, what would the shape of a book that we would do together be. And so I said, you know, "Let's do a book that really celebrates the significant achievements and contributions that black people--that African Americans have made not only to the American landscape, but to the world." And so we just committed right then and there, we said when we get back we're gonna do this book, and we did.$$Okay, okay. Now there have been other such books way back, I mean not exactly like yours but, but similar in some ways. There--(simultaneous)--$$'Songs of My People' ['Songs of My People: African Americans: A Self-Portrait,' Eric Easter and Dudley M. Brooks].$$Yeah, 'Songs of My People.' Way back Langston Hughes and Milton Meltzer actually produced 'A Pictorial History of the Negro in America'--$$That's right.$$--which a, you know, dealt with more, I think, historical pictures but then had a--had contemporary pictures done in black and white. A couple others, I think Ebony had a set, 'Black America' ['Ebony Pictorial History of Black America'], you know, with black and white pictures. Now were you--had you seen those and--$$Sure, I grew up with that type of literature. I grew up in a household where everything, you know, that was published about black people was sitting there in the bookshelves or on the table or beside the chair. So the idea of this type of ongoing celebration, a real storytelling was important to me. But one of the reasons why this book became important to me was that it was also at the beginning of the hip hop generation. And you know, young people were redefining themselves and, and brushing up against culture in really different ways and voicing who they are and what they saw and what they were concerned about, very powerfully. And my daughters [Sara Collins and Julia Collins] are of that generation. And I wanted, at the same time as they were developing their own voice and their own culture which is absolutely important for every generation to do, is to again self define and look at their own creativity and their own way that they're going to express themselves. I wanted them also to know where they came from and who they are, and to make sure that they are grounded in pride and not working from a deficit. So no matter how hard that you work, you know, as a parent to make sure that your kids feel good about themselves and they know about themselves, that they know that they're not unique, that they know that they're not really all that special, but they come from a long line of people that have been forging the story of America. You know, this was a time to create a new book that would tell the story, you know, in new terms, and that was what 'The African Americans' was all about.$$Okay, okay. So it's an idea that we've been working with for a long time, but this is a refreshment of that idea for another generation?$$I think that it's very much like HistoryMakers. You know, if you don't tell your story, somebody else is gonna tell it or they're gonna interpret it or misinterpret it, or at least you have the opportunity to have an interpretation. And in this case, I wanted 'The African Americans' not only to have the historical roots and references, you know, that we have been a part of the foundation of this country, that this country would not be the America that it is if it hadn't been for the blood, sweat, tears, labor, effort, intelligence, genius and vision of all of its people, including African Americans. And so as, as you in this great project, you know, called The HistoryMakers are allowing people to tell their story, I wanted to put it in--in a book form. I--I would've loved to have done it and there were many offers in fact for us to begin to tell the stories in other ways, but in a sense, you know, I'm really ultimately not a storyteller, I'm ultimately not a book maker, I happen to have done a couple of these things, but it takes that persistence to be able to really map it out and, and to see the future, you know, through story telling. But this was my stab at it and I wanted it not only to be grounded in the historical matter, but I also wanted to tell contemporary stories so that people could see the new heroes and sheroes are being made every single day in all these different walks of life throughout our country, throughout the landscape in all these different dimensions. That, you know, it's not over, that the best can lie ahead of us, but we need to be able to ground ourselves in the past and then also to see our way into the future.

Ronald Gerald Coleman

African American Studies professor Ronald Gerald Coleman was born on April 3, 1944, in San Francisco, California, to Gertrude Hughes, a San Francisco School District food service manager, and Jesse Coleman, a railroad waiter/bartender for Southern Pacific and Amtrak. He attended San Francisco’s Pacific Heights and Emerson Elementary Schools and graduated from George Washington Senior High School. In 1966, Coleman graduated from the University of Utah with his B.A. degree in sociology. He was hired to teach in the San Francisco Unified School District and then at Sacramento City College.

In 1973, Coleman received his M.A. degree in social science from California State University, in Sacramento. Coleman joined the University of Utah faculty as an instructor of history and ethnic studies in 1973 where he taught courses on African American history. His work in history and ethnic studies has been presented at various professional meetings. He has also lectured on topics ranging from African American history to contemporary race relations in the United States. Coleman has written several publications including articles on western black history.

Coleman has served as a member of the University of Utah Senate; the Athletic Board; the faculty mentoring program; and the faculty affirmative action committee. He is also a member of the Phi Kappa Phi Fraternity and is a life member of the NAACP. He has received numerous awards and recognitions including the Calvin S. and Jeneal N. Hatch Prize in Teaching, the 2000 Governor’s Award in Humanities and the Albert B. Fitz Civil Rights Worker of the Year Award.

Coleman lives in Cottonwood Heights, Utah.

Accession Number

A2008.057

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/17/2008

Last Name

Coleman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Gerald

Schools

George Washington High School

Pacific Heights Elementary School

Emerson Elementary School

California State University, Sacramento

University of Utah

William E. Gladstone Elementary School

First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

COL18

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

San Diego, California

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Birth Date

4/3/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beans (Red), Rice

Short Description

African american history professor Ronald Gerald Coleman (1944 - ) taught history and ethnic studies at the University of Utah from 1973. Coleman specialized in the history of African Americans in the American West, and received numerous awards for his teaching, scholarship and civil rights work.

Employment

General Mills

San Francisco Unified School District

Sacramento City College

University of Utah

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:903,10:1935,20:3483,34:8350,70:8598,75:11140,115:11636,125:12008,132:12318,138:12752,146:18880,333:21685,358:24656,388:29356,464:29920,471:42779,653:44990,660:45670,671:53978,710:54726,722:57040,732:57400,737:58120,751:62370,820:62919,830:64505,880:75718,992:77008,1009:82426,1123:82770,1128:83544,1142:84146,1150:89928,1175:90614,1183:94611,1198:95458,1213:100431,1278:103893,1322:104928,1341:106308,1360:106653,1366:109250,1399:109625,1405:110000,1411:110525,1419:112820,1430:115561,1457:117478,1501:120034,1564:120744,1585:125229,1660:125922,1672:126769,1687:127385,1697:127847,1704:130465,1761:133237,1827:141693,1931:143140,1937:143625,1943:144304,1951:146270,1965$0,0:28150,382:36500,468:37260,477:53780,672:54550,688:55390,702:61480,806:69024,890:69492,897:70272,912:71130,926:72300,943:72612,948:83415,1071:93120,1169:94980,1178:95785,1184:106240,1290:109845,1328:110846,1341:112211,1360:113030,1370:131323,1486:136020,1563:153707,1750:163303,1865:163801,1872:165876,1900:166291,1906:171850,1929:174372,1955:204268,2319:217080,2469:217776,2476:225580,2611:225852,2620:226464,2631:242160,2802:257286,3021:257670,3028:258310,3047:267979,3129:268515,3138:279180,3341
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ronald Gerald Coleman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ronald Gerald Coleman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about his maternal grandmother's employer

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about his research on his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls living with his maternal grandparents in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls his earliest experience of southern segregation

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls the murder of Emmett Till

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about his early neighborhood and mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes the sights, sounds and smells of his community in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls attending Pacific Heights School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes the famous people in his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ronald Gerald Coleman remembers George Washington Senior High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his parents' experience with housing discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls his post high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about playing football at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes the civil rights activities in Salt Lake City, Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ronald Gerald Coleman recalls his deferment from the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ronald Gerald Coleman remembers working at General Mills Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ronald Gerald Coleman remembers his teaching experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his graduate education

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about race relations in Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about the African American members of the Mormon faith

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about his favorite historians

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ronald Gerald Coleman remembers Allen Allensworth

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ronald Gerald Coleman reflects upon his life

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ronald Gerald Coleman reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his family

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ronald Gerald Coleman talks about the African American community in Salt Lake City, Utah

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ronald Gerald Coleman describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ronald Gerald Coleman narrates his photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Ronald Gerald Coleman describes his early religious experiences
Ronald Gerald Coleman remembers Allen Allensworth
Transcript
We were a member of Bethel A.M.E. Church [San Francisco, California], also attended bible school at my godparents' which was Second Union Baptist Church [Second Union Missionary Baptist Church, San Francisco, California]. So we back forth Baptist or A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal] it didn't make any difference and in, in the church the women of that church I mean they, they--I'm indebted to them. They took me when I was very young and immature and they always made me feel I was very special.$$Now what was the name of the church again?$$Bethel A.M.E.$$Bethel A.M.E., okay.$$They nurtured me, trained me, I mean that's for--you know that one time. Oratorical skills were important and it's kind of interesting today how some people try to minimize that or try to make light of it by implying that there's no substance behind a good speech if you know what I'm talking about. Don't hate, congratulate, and so I--they just helped me. I mean I certainly wasn't gonna get it in the schools. I mean schools were okay, I went to predominately--I didn't go to white--I didn't go to school with white people for the most part. It was African Americans, Asians, a few Mexican Americans, but very few white people, and it was--I went to Bethel A.M.E., I mean it wasn't an option. You had to go every Sunday and the Sunday school--and there I, I made my first addresses. Had my first, really first black history lesson and that I didn't have to do a report but I learned a song that sang about Richard Allen, one of the founders of the A.M.E. Church, and I still know that song today man.$$How does it go, I've never heard this.$$(Singing) "Come gather around your children and a story you should hear of a man we all know and love, his name was Richard Allen and they say he was a slave but he steady rose to great--to heights above, Richard Allen, Richard Allen," and that's (laughter) you know, yeah, that's, that was my first black history lesson.$$Okay.$We were talking about Allen Allensworth is one of your favorite characters?$$Yeah, I'll tell you when--if--there was some discussions as to whether or not to bring the soldiers to Salt Lake City's [Salt Lake City, Utah] Fort Douglas in 1896 and early that year The Salt Lake Tribune which is still in existence today and a vehemently anti-LDS news- and it was a vehemently anti-LDS newspaper along with the Utah Senator Frank Cannon [Frank J. Cannon] tried to get the military officials to not send the entire regiment here, and there was--it was claimed that at certain times of the year the soldiers would have to ride on the same streetcar line with some of the better citizens of the community and that drunken black soldiers behaved far worse than drunken white soldiers. But the unit had never been together in its entirety and they'd been out on the front western frontier for some thirty years, so as a reward for an extended service they wanted to give them a good post and Fort Douglas was considered to be one of the better western forts in the 1890s, and so when they sent those soldiers here in the fall of 1896 the entire regiment it was about 475 black soldiers along with wives, children, camp followers. I mean it quadrupled the black population here in the city--in the county here, excuse me, and certainly enriched the lives of the black community here for a three year period of time and so colonel--no, Chaplain Allensworth wanted to make sure that the soldiers were on their best behavior and went to the local authorities and asked that they do everything they could to make sure that unwanted, undesirable people didn't come up around the fort. And you ask about what makes me really get turned on to him is that he was a great bridge builder, he was very articulate, he carried himself, handsome man, spoke well, worked actively in the larger community, white as well as black community and when the soldiers in 1898 when the drums of war began to beat for what came to be known as the Spanish American War and they decided to send the, the infantry [24th Infantry Regiment]. Man, he gives this wonderful, wonderful speech to the regiment as they're there and periodically he said, "Quit yourself like men, quit your--." I mean you know he was calling and appealing to them to man up, and when he, when they, they returned he was gone and the self-discipline and control that they had exercised from '96 [1896] to '97 [1897] to '98 [1898] coming back at the end of '98 [1898] you know you've been out the war and you done put it all out on the line, you're not gonna be willing to take too much stuff from anybody, and so when they'd run into some hostility, some of the salons didn't wanna serve them, they talked about getting their guns and on one occasion the--on one occasion the local authorities asked the, the sold- the officers to come get the soldiers. The unit had, had grown larger but they didn't have an Allensworth. Allensworth went on to do a lot of other things, but I've always just thought about that address that he had made, 'cause he drew from history, drew from in terms of military history and he kept appealing to them to, "Quit yourself like men," very--and then the brother went on to do some other wonderful things.$$He founded the town Allensworth, California you said?$$Yes, yes.

Antoinette Malveaux

Born March 19, 1958, in San Francisco, California, Antoinette Malveaux has spent most of her career helping others. The youngest of five children, Malveaux attended public schools in San Francisco. In 1981, she graduated with a B.A. in economics from the University of San Francisco. As part of the management track, she worked in the financial analysis and management division, specializing in international markets.
In 1985, Malveaux earned an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and was hired by American Express Bank as director of global marketing and strategic planning.

Malveaux left American Express in 1991 to assume the position of director of operations for the National Black M.B.A. Association. From there, she was named executive director in 1993 and was then promoted to president and CEO. Under her leadership, the National Black M.B.A. Association developed into a multinational organization and its membership tripled. She left the group in 2003 to pursue other interests, including traveling through Europe.

Malveaux is actively involved in the community, serving on the Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco; the Better Business Bureau; and the Girl Scouts USA, Chicago chapter. She has been listed in Who's Who in American Business; received the Rainbow/PUSH Reginald Lewis Trailblazer Award and served on the Council on Graduate Minority Education.

Accession Number

A2003.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/21/2003

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Paul Revere Elementary School

Aptos Middle School

Lowell High School

University of California, San Francisco

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Paul Revere College Preparatory K-8

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antoinette

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

3/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream (Rocky Road)

Short Description

Association chief executive Antoinette Malveaux (1958 - ) served as the director of global marketing for American Express, and in the capacities of director, president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association.

Employment

Bank of America

American Express Bank, LTD.

National Black MBA Association

Favorite Color

Green, Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antoinette Malveaux's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux shares stories from her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her mother's personality and her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about how her parents met and their divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antoinette Malveaux names her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls food from her childhood and attending the local Catholic church as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux lists schools she attended in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux explains how developing a racial consciousness affected her academic studies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her educational mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her family's civil rights activism and recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her experience at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls her mother's decision to teach at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the University of Mississippi's campus atmosphere in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux explains her decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her mentors and the curriculum at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about working for American Express Bank after graduating from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the culture and management of American Express Bank in the late 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her relationship with George Carmany, chief administrative officer for American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the corporate citizenship projects she worked on at American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her work as executive director of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her successes as president and chief executive officer of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America
Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director
Transcript
Okay, so, so you were at Bank of America?$$I was at Bank of America. I had started--when I was at univer- when I was at City College [of San Francisco, San Francisco, California], Bank of America was one of the three jobs that I had, and I quit the other two jobs and kept Bank of America. Then, when I went back to school to the University of San Francisco [San Francisco, California] I continued to work at Bank of America. By then I had gotten a promotion. I had moved forward and now I was working in the collections department collecting on credit cards as opposed to processing the payments. So, I worked there in the evenings. Again, one of the strongest, strongest and best individuals in the, in the department and while I was at University of San Francisco my supervisor had, he and I'd had a conversation and he, he was pretty good. He was always looking out for--as opportunities came up he always made sure that he would talk to employees about putting them forward. And an opportunity had come up to be a student loan officer, and he sat down and talked with me and put me forward for that position. I said yes that's something I wanna pursue, and so I became a student loan officer which was a different kind of position then. Bank of America had created a position in this, in two branches in the city where there would be students who were trained to be loan officers and their portfolio would be student loans. They would also carry the title of student relations representatives, very much a community relations representative, and we would represent the bank at college campuses and high schools, and so I would go to high schools and talk to high school students about savings accounts and credit and banking, about student loans and how to pay for your education, how to pay for cars and what you might want for yourself in life, but primarily about savings and investments and loans and then I would also manage the student loan portfolio and, and extend loans to students. And so I was a student loan officer. And so I worked and went to school.$Your involvement with the National Black MBA Association begins to grow in the early '90s [1990s] and--$$Yeah, after the late '80s [1980s] I joined, I joined in '86 [1986], late '86 [1986]. I became the chapter president in '87 [1987] of New York. I went on the board, I think it was in '89 [1989] and, and then came to a crossroads, and I had when I came to the board I was asked because of my background in strategic planning I was asked to take the organization through a strategic planning process. And up to that point, they hadn't had--they hadn't had anybody or too many people that I was aware of who, who was involved in strategic planning, who had discipline in strategic planning or experience in strategic planning, and you typically that's one of those parts of corporate America you typically didn't find African Americans in. You might have your little ghettos, but you, you typically didn't find them there. So, I took the, created a committee and, a strategic planning committee and my committee and I took the organization through a strategic planning process, and we took them through a process from start to finish, so we extended the process into--after we finished with the strategic plan got them into business planning and action planning so that we could really make sure that the, the plan was not just a piece of paper, it was not just something that we could hold up and say okay we got a plan, but we wanted to keep driving the discipline into the organization so that we could really focus and--on what it was we wanted to do and we could understand what it was going to take to do what we wanted to do, so we weren't as much of an organization that was full of talk, but one that could move to action. And when we got to the end of that process, we did some visioning with the executive committee, worked with a gentleman by the name of Horace Smith [ph.] who was an advisor to the group and he, he worked with me to do some visioning and with the executive committee and get them to a place of decision-making around what we were going to do with this plan and how we were going to take this plan forward. And so the decision was made that the organization would change, that it would build its own management capability. At that point, we had a lot of outsourcing managed by an association management firms and had just begun to bring some things in house and so they made a decision to hire an executive director, and they asked me and another person if we would do that and the other person decided--we were supposed to go in together--the person decided that he couldn't do it. He had a family, I didn't. The organization could not meet his expectation and his needs in terms of what he needed for his family. You know, I was either young and dumb or I had the angel sitting on my shoulder and I made the decision to go forth and, and it took us, but it took us about a year and a half to get through that dialogue and that discussion and get to that decision that I would leave corporate America and come head the National Black MBA Association.$$Okay.$$But by the time that I had made that decision, George Carmany had left the bank [American Express Bank, New York, New York]. He was still with American Express; he had gone to another division of American Express in Boston [Massachusetts]. He had asked if I wanted to go, I said no. I was not interested in moving to Boston, and I wanted something different and this opportunity came, so I was at a crossroads and this was the opportunity that was put before for me at the time that, you know, things were moving. You know, they were moving at parallel paths and then they went like that and so.

Julianne Malveaux

Dr. Julianne Malveaux is a true pioneer in the field of economics, focusing her research on the labor market, public policy, and the impact of policy on women and people of color. Malveaux was born on September 22, 1953, in San Francisco, California. She studied economics at Boston College, obtaining a B.A. in 1974 and a M.A. in 1975. Malveaux obtained a PhD in economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980.

After finishing her studies at MIT, Malveaux returned to San Francisco, where she worked as an assistant professor at San Francisco University from 1981-85. She then worked as a visiting scholar and visiting professor at the University of California-Berkley from 1985-92, teaching economics, public policy and African American studies.

Malveaux has made effective use of the media, addressing such issues as: national affairs, the economy, and the American workplace. More than twenty newspapers have syndicated her weekly column since 1990, through the King Features Syndicate. She also hosts the weekly radio talk show, Julianne Malveaux's Capitol Report. She is a regular contributor to several national magazines, Ms., Essence, Emerge and The Progressive. Malveaux also contributes regularly to the journal Black Issues in Higher Education, USA Today and the San Francisco Sun Reporter. Malveaux can be seen on such television shows as Politically Incorrect, Lehrer News Hour, To the Contrary and Howard University Television's Evening Exchange. She is also a frequent contributor on CNN and BET.

Malveaux is President and CEO of Last Word Productions, her own multi-media production company. She has designed educational and issue-based seminars and diversity training for Fortune 50 companies and others. Malveaux co-edited the book, Slipping Through the Cracks: The Status of Black Women (1986), and is the author of a two collections of columns: Sex, Lies and Stereotypes: Perspectives of a Mad Economist (1994) and Wall Street, Main Street, and the Side Street: A Mad Economist Takes A Stroll (1999).

Accession Number

A2001.045

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

6/20/2001

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Julianne

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

All

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Availability Specifics: Contact Barbara Vance at Speakers Unlimited, 8201 16th Street, Suite 708, Silver Spring, MD 20901: (301) 608-3522
Preferred Audience: All

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Accra, Ghana

Favorite Quote

Don't believe the hype.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/22/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Community leader Julianne Malveaux (1953 - ) is President and CEO of Last Word Productions, her own multi-media production company and hosts the weekly radio talk show, "Julianne Malveaux's Capitol Report". Malveaux is a regular contributor to several national magazines, Ms., Essence, Emerge and The Progressive. Malveaux also contributes regularly to the journal Black Issues in Higher Education, USA Today and the San Francisco Sun Reporter.

Employment

San Francisco State University

University of California, Berkeley

Last Word Productions

Favorite Color

Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Julianne Malveaux interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Julianne Malveaux states her favorite things

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her siblings' education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Julianne Malveaux discusses the tradition of storytelling in her family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Julianne Malveaux recalls the family that owned her family during slavery

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her father and her parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Julianne Malveaux recalls growing up in San Francisco

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her fondness for reading

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her personality

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about her personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about her personality and her school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about her school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Julianne Malveaux reflects on her life in San Francisco

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Julianne Malveaux talks about racism in San Francisco and her own political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her personality

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Julianne Malveaux recalls her involvement in the Black Power Movement in San Francisco

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about the Black Power Movement in San Francisco

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Julianne Malveaux reflects on her Boston College experience

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Julianne Malveaux details more of her Boston experience

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Julianne Malveaux recalls her decision to pursue a degree in economics and her mentors in the profession

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about the Black Economic Research Center

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her MIT experience and the economic patterns of African Americans

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her career choices and political leanings

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Julianne Malveaux discusses her political aspirations and her career mix of academics and economics

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her career as an economist

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about being an economist and the story of 'Free Frank'

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about 'Free Frank' and economic entrepreneurship

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Julianne Malveaux talks about economics and the political landscape

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Julianne Malveaux discusses economics and financial wealth in the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about financial wealth in the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Julianne Malveaux talks about economics and the responsibility of the black church

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Julianne Malveaux talks about the financial well-being of the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Julianne Malveaux talks about wealth and reparations in relation to the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Julianne Malveaux talks about the reparations to African Americans

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Julianne Malveaux discusses African American youth and crime

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Julianne Malveaux talks about crime, education and the black middle class

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her hopes for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about her hopes for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Julianne Malveaux discusses her role models in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Julianne Malveaux talks about her career aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Julianne Malveaux discusses skin color prejudice amongst African Americans

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Julianne Malveaux talks more about skin color prejudice

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Julianne Malveaux discusses what her legacy might be

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Collage created by Julianne Malveaux's mother with images of Julianne throughout her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Two images of Julianne Malveaux as a baby, ca. 1953-1954

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux in a photo from 'Essence' magazine, 1973

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux by the 'The Bay Guardian' when she was running for public office, San Francisco, California, 1984

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux as President of the NANBPW, ca. 1995-1999

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with Randall Robinson and others at the WLIB radio station, New York, New York, 1998

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with Billy Dee Williams and others at WPFW radio station, Washington, D.C., 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with former Washington, D.C. Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux's eighth grade graduation photo from Immaculate Conception Elementary School, San Francisco, California, 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux dancing at the convention party of the NANPBW, Norfolk, Virginia, 1999

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with Susan Taylor of 'Essence' magazine and others at the NANPBW convention, Norfolk, Virginia, 1999

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux and her godfather at her book signing at the NANPBW convention, Norfolk, Virginia, 1999

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with her siblings

Tape: 5 Story: 16 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with her mother, sister and a nun, Biloxi, Mississippi, 1986

Tape: 5 Story: 17 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux and her family at her mother's seventieth birthday

Tape: 5 Story: 18 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux, Alexis Herman and Catherine Sykes at the NANBPW convention, Norfolk, Virginia, 1999

Tape: 5 Story: 19 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with Dr. Harry Edwards and Pat Russell-McCloud, St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 20 - Photo - Julianne Malveaux with her godson, Matthew Brown, San Francisco, California, 1998