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The Honorable Tyrone E. Medley

Judge Tyrone E. Medley was born on December 21, 1951 in Camden, New Jersey, and graduated from Camden’s Woodrow Wilson High School in 1970. He was awarded a basketball scholarship to University of Utah, and credited for his role in helping to lead the Utes team to the 1974 National Invitational Tournament championship. He received his B.S. degree in 1974, and his J.D. degree in 1977 from S.J. Quinney College of Law, from the University of Utah.

In 1978, Medley was hired as a law clerk for the Utah attorney general's office. That same year, Medley was also admitted to the State of Utah Bar, the State of Utah Federal District and the 10th Circuit Bar. He served as Deputy Salt Lake County Attorney from 1978 to 1981. He was then hired as an associate at the law firm of Cotro-Manes, Warr, Green & Shand in Salt Lake City where he worked from 1981 to 1984. His responsibilities included litigating civil matters, including transportation, personal injury, business, domestic relations, and criminal matters. Medley was appointed judge to the State of Utah Fifth District Court by Governor Scott Matheson in December 1984 and served in this capacity for eight years where he was assigned to the civil department. He presided over settlement conferences, jury and bench trials in areas of personal injury, medical, dental and legal malpractice, construction, commercial and domestic relations matters. In 1992, Medley was appointed by Utah Governor Norman H. Bangerter as a State of Utah Third Circuit Court Judge, serving Salt Lake, Summit and Tooele Counties, presiding over criminal and civil matters until July 1, 2012 when he retired and served as an active senior District Court Judge, handling private arbitration and mediation.

Medley’s affiliations included membership in the Utah State Bar, Utah Board of District Court Judges and David K. Watkiss-Sutherland II Inn of Court, Salt Lake City Chapter. Medley served as Co-Chair for The Utah Task Force on Racial and Ethnic Fairness in the Legal System, and past member of Utah Courts Alternative Dispute Resolution Team.

He has been the recipient of numerous honors and awards including the NAACP Albert B. Fritz Award in 1996, Utah State Bar Judge of the Year Award in 1998, Utah State Bar Raymond S. Uno Award in 2000, University of Utah Crimson Club Hall Of Fame in 2000, The National Conference for Community and Justice Humanitarian Award in 2005, and NAACP Dr. Martin Luther King Civil Rights Award in 2012.

Tyrone E. Medley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.015

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/17/2018

Last Name

Medley

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

William F. Powell Elementary School

Pyne Point Family School

Woodrow Wilson High School

University of Utah

S.J. Quinney College of Law

First Name

Tyrone

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

MED01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere That Has An Ocean

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Birth Date

12/29/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Favorite Food

Chicken Wings

Short Description

Judge Tyrone Medley (1951- ) was appointed Third Circuit Court Judge by Governor Norman H. Bangerter in 1992, and Fifth District Court Judge by Governor Scott Matheson in 1984.

Employment

Third District Court

Salt Lake County

Fifth Circuit Court

Favorite Color

Green

Bruce Gordon

Corporate executive and civic leader Bruce Gordon was born on February 15, 1942 in Camden, New Jersey. His parents, Walter and Violet Gordon, were both educators. Gordon attended Gettysburg College in Gettysburg and graduated with his B.A. degree in 1968. He later enrolled in the Sloan Fellows Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management and graduated from there with his M.S. degree in management in 1988. He was awarded an honorary Doctorate degree from Gettysburg College in 2006.

In 1968, Gordon was hired by Bell of Pennsylvania. He also wrote a weekly column for a suburban Philadelphia paper, Today’s Post. Gordon became a sales manager in Bell Atlantic’s marketing department in 1972. By 1976, he was a management supervisor in marketing, and earned a promotion to divisional operations manager in 1981. From 1983 to 1985, Gordon’s role involved oversight of the company’s phone center stores. Following that position, he was promoted to general manager of marketing and sales, and then became vice president of marketing in 1988. After Bell Atlantic merged with GTE Communications in 2000, Gordon was promoted to president of the Retail Markets Group of the company then known as Verizon Communications. He retired after thirty-five years of service in 2003. Gordon was elected president of the NAACP in 2005, and served in that capacity until 2007. He has also served on a variety of boards, including CBS Corporation, Northrop Grumman Corp., and Tyco International Ltd. In September 2012, he became the chairman of the board of ADT Corporation.

In 1998, Black Enterprise magazine named Gordon as its “Executive of the Year;” and, in 2002, Gordon was ranked number six on Fortune Magazine’s list of the “50 Most Powerful Black Executives.” He was recognized as one of “100 Most Influential Black Americans and Organization Leaders” in Ebony Magazine in 2006. Gordon is married to his second wife, Tawana Tibbs, a former Verizon employee who serves as president of the Board of Trustees of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City. He has one son, Taurin, from his first marriage.

Bruce Scott Gordon was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.214

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/10/2013

Last Name

Gordon

Maker Category
Middle Name

Scott

Occupation
Schools

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Bruce

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

GOR04

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/15/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate executive Bruce Gordon (1946 - ) known as a key marketing executive at Bell Atlantic and GTE Communications – Verizon Communications. He also served as president of the NAACP from 2005 to 2007.

Favorite Color

Blue

Leon Huff

R&B record company owner Leon Huff was born in Camden, New Jersey on April 8, 1942. Huff was first exposed to music through his mother, who played the piano and the organ for the 19th Street Baptist Church choir. Huff began playing the piano at the age of five; he received basic lessons from his mother as well as formal teaching through the school system and private lessons. As a teenager, Huff participated in several “doo-wop” music groups throughout Camden. One of his groups, “The Dynaflows,” auditioned for the popular television show, Ted Mack’s Original Amateur Hour.

In 1950, Huff and Kenneth Gamble came together in a vocal group called “The Romeos.” Huff had already worked in sessions with music producer Phil Spector in New York, including the Danny and the Juniors hit “Let's Go to the Hop.” Returning to Philadelphia, Huff did sessions for local label Cameo who were already successful with Chubby Checker and Bobby Rydell. Fellow Romeo, Kenny Gamble, co-wrote a song for Candy and the Kisses on which Huff performed. In 1966, Gamble and Huff formed Excel Records; and, in 1967, they produced the Soul Survivors’ hit single, “Expressway to Your Heart.” They continued working as independent producers with acts like Archie Bell and the Drells and Jerry Butler. They also had their own Neptune Label (through Chess Records) and Gamble records.

In 1971, Gamble and Huff formed their own label, Philadelphia International Records, and secured a distribution deal with CBS. The label produced #1 R&B hits such as The O’ Jays’ “Love Train,” Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes’ “If You Don't Know Me By Now,” Lou Rawls’ “You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine,” and “TSOP,” which became the theme to the TV show Soul Train. Their signature sound incorporated sophisticated touches like strings, horn sections, and an always-insistent groove. A precursor to disco, when the clubs started playing an important role in the music business, Philadelphia International helped shape the direction with hits like 1974’s “TSOP,” which became the theme to the TV show Soul Train. During the 1980s, Huff continued to collaborate with Gamble, writing and producing tracks for Patti LaBelle, Phyllis Hyman, Lou Rawls, and The O’ Jays.

Gamble and Huff have been awarded the highest accolades in the music industry. In 1993, Huff, along with his songwriting and producing partners Kenny Gamble and Thom Bell, was inducted into the Philadelphia Music Foundation’s Walk of Fame; brass plaques with their names were placed on the sidewalk of Broad Street’s Avenue of the Arts in Philadelphia not far from Philadelphia International studios. Gamble and Huff were inducted into the National Academy of Songwriters’ Hall of Fame and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 1999, they received the Trustees Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

Musician Leon A. Huff was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 26, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.085

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/26/2013

Last Name

Huff

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Charles Sumner Elementary School

Cooper B. Hatch Middle School

Camden High School

First Name

Leon

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

HUF01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami, Florida

Favorite Quote

The Beat Goes On.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

4/8/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Moorestown

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Rice, Broccoli

Short Description

Music producer Leon Huff (1942 - ) cofounded the Philadelphia International Records label, which produced #1 R&B hits like The O’ Jays’ “Love Train,” Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes’ “If You Don't Know Me By Now,” Lou Rawls’ “You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine,” and “TSOP,” which became the theme to the television show Soul Train.

Employment

Delete

Philadelphia International Records

Excel Records

Golden Fleece Records

Uncensored Records

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leon Huff's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leon Huff lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leon Huff describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leon Huff talks about his early exposure to music

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leon Huff remembers his mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leon Huff describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leon Huff talks about his paternal family's migration to Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leon Huff talks about his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leon Huff describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leon Huff describes his earliest child memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leon Huff remembers playing drums in the school band

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Leon Huff recalls playing piano at the Tenth Street Baptist Church in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leon Huff describes his mother's role in his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leon Huff remembers his father's barbershop

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leon Huff recalls playing in the marching band at Camden High School in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leon Huff remembers his early musical influences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leon Huff describes his neighborhood in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leon Huff describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leon Huff talks about his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Leon Huff remembers forming The Dynaflows

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Leon Huff remembers watching 'American Bandstand'

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Leon Huff remembers the music venues in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leon Huff remembers Lola Falana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leon Huff talks about his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leon Huff recalls the entertainment of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leon Huff remembers the music of The Dynaflows and The Lavenders

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leon Huff remembers the black radio stations in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Leon Huff remembers his aspiration to become a studio musician

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Leon Huff recalls joining Kenny Gamble and the Romeos

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Leon Huff talks about his time with Kenny Gamble and the Romeos

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Leon Huff remembers meeting Kenny Gamble

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Leon Huff remember working with Phil Spector and The Ronettes

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leon Huff describes his challenges during his early recording career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leon Huff talks about his income as a songwriter and musician

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leon Huff remembers writing 'Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leon Huff talks about developing Gamble and Huff's unique sound

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leon Huff recalls writing for the Soul Survivors and The Intruders

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Leon Huff remembers producing records for Archie Bell and the Drells

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Leon Huff recalls writing songs for Jerry Butler and Dusty Springfield

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Leon Huff describes his songwriting process, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Leon Huff talks about Thom Bell's work with The Delfonics

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Leon Huff recalls writing 'Drowning in the Sea of Love' for Joe Simon

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Leon Huff remembers meeting The O'Jays

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Leon Huff describes his songwriting process, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Leon Huff remembers discovering Teddy Pendergrass

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Leon Huff describes the music of Melvin and the Blue Notes

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Leon Huff talks about The O'Jays' album 'Ship Ahoy'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Leon Huff remembers producing the MFSB orchestra

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Leon Huff talks about the songwriting process at Philadelphia International Records

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Leon Huff describes the formation of Philadelphia International Records

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Leon Huff recalls working with Wilson Pickett

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Leon Huff remembers recording with Michael Jackson

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Leon Huff remembers Patti LaBelle

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Leon Huff reflects upon his favorite group to produce

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Leon Huff talks about his favorite composition

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Leon Huff recalls recording the long cuts of 'I'll Always Love My Mama' and 'Wake up Everybody'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Leon Huff remembers Teddy Pendergrass' car crash

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Leon Huff talks about his mentor, Quincy Jones

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Leon Huff remembers signing a production contract with Columbia Records

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Leon Huff talks about the challenges of songwriting

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Leon Huff describes the impact of rap on his record sales

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Leon Huff talks about the recording sessions at Philadelphia International Records

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Leon Huff recalls the effects of his career on his family life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Leon Huff reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Leon Huff talks about contemporary music

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Leon Huff talks about his favorite music

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Leon Huff reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Leon Huff talks about his interest in producing a Broadway musical

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Leon Huff remembers meeting Berry Gordy

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - Leon Huff talks about his admiration of other black music producers

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Leon Huff remembers the payola investigations

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Leon Huff talks about the founding of the Black Music Association

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Leon Huff reflects upon the impact of his music

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Leon Huff describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Leon Huff narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

10$8

DATitle
Leon Huff describes his earliest child memory
Leon Huff describes his songwriting process, pt. 1
Transcript
Do you have an earliest childhood memory?$$An earliest?$$Um-hm.$$Yeah, yeah, being curious about that piano that was sitting in my living room. I sort of, like--because I was, I was, I started being curious about that piano. And my mother [Beatrice Alberta Huff] used to tell me, she used to pick me up--because the piano stool was so high, she used to pick me up and put me on the piano stool. And she used to tell me I used to like bang on it. You know, I was a kid, just banging on it. But, so the way I look at it, I must have got curious with the sounds that was coming from out of those white and black things I was beating on as a child. And I figured the more I did that, the more I developed that gift of wanting to play it. I started playing by ear. And five years old, six years old, I was playing the boogie woogie. I was playing, I was playing, I was playing stuff that I was just making up. And then my mother took me to the Apollo in New York [New York], and she, and she took me to see a young guy named Sugar Chile Robinson who played piano. And he just tore the house up, Apollo Theater. And that was an experience I never forgot. And I was learning (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Sugar, Sugar Chile Robinson?$$Yeah.$$Okay. And how old were you then?$$Oh, I was like a preteen. I must have been like seven or eight years because my grandfather [Herbert Alberta] had a sister that lived in Harlem [New York, New York], and my mother used to visit my aunt [sic. great-aunt]. And she would take me and my sister [Jean Huff] to the Apollo when we would go there and visit, and that was wonderful. I got a chance to experience that Ha- Harlem, Apollo vibe early; and it was fantastic, those shows.$So during this period of time it seemed like there's so--how many--back to the songwriting process. I've read that in a day, you all would maybe write ten songs in a day.$$So- yeah, sometimes it was like that sometimes. What we used to do is--okay, we're going to plan a writing session. Say, we're going to, going to plan a writing session for, say, Thursday. So we'll compile a lot of titles, ideas, you know, put them on paper. Then we'll, we both will bring them to the session and we'd just compare notes. I had, I might have about maybe fifty titles, and Gamble [HistoryMaker Kenny Gamble] the same thing. And we'll pick, out of those fifty we'll pick which we think is interesting to write about and--$$So you picked them by--you choose the title first of all?$$Yeah.$$And then you try to flesh it out?$$Then we just--I started playing it. Sometime, sometimes, you know, sometimes I'd come in Gamble's office and I'd just start, just playing. I could sit down, I could just play whatever comes to my head. I'd just play it. And Gamble might say, "Oh, that sounds good. What is that?" I'd say, "Oh, no, ain't nothing, really." And the next you know, we're sitting down and we done put some meat to that music. And, or we'd both sit down and I'd just start jamming, Gamble would just start free styling. But at the same time we're doing that, the tape recorder is running, so everything is recorded.$$Okay. So you can always run back to whatever--if you miss something (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, we'd get into a zone. Just say--well, say we're in a writing session and we're going to write a song, and 'For the Love of Money' was on that list. And we'll get into a jam, for the love of money, you know, and I'd come up with a bass line or whatever kind of groove I'm going to get into. And Gamble would start free styling a song about for the love of money. And the next thing you know, we're in the studio cutting it with The O'Jays.$$Okay.$$That's how we was rolling, you know. The studio was right next to--after we bought that building--that at one time we weren't allowed to go in, on 309 Broad Street [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]--the studio was right next to Gamble's office. So, we'll rehearse and go get the musicians, and it was like this (snaps fingers). It was like (snaps fingers) a process that just--from Gamble's office to the studio and then record the record.$$Okay.$$That was the process.$$Now another white artist you worked with was Laura Nyro.$$Laura Nyro.$$Nyro, okay.$$It was great.$$Yeah.$$Laura was, she was different. And we also had Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles doing the background, and that was a great, great album. It's a classic album. Working with Laura was, I learned a lot from her songwriting--$$This is 'Go- Gonna Take a Miracle' ['It's Gonna Take a Miracle'].$$--structure. Yeah, it was great.$$Nineteen seventy-one [1971].

Fatin Dantzler

Singer and songwriter Fatin Dantzler was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1973. Dantzler attended the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA) before transferring to Overbrook High School. Dantzler began his musical career in the early 1990s as a performer with a group called "Side by Side." He also became a producer and songwriter, contributing to the 1993 album by R&B pop stars "Bell Biv DeVoe." Dantzler left "Side by Side" to pursue songwriting and producing opportunities and later becoming affiliated with burgeoning Philadelphia hip-hop group "The Roots." In 1997, Dantzler met his future wife and musical collaborator Aja Graydon and two years later, they went on to form an R&B and Soul music duo called "Kindred the Family Soul." After being discovered by Jill Scott at a Philadelphia music showcase, "Kindred" signed a recording contract with Hidden Beach Recordings (HBR) in 2001. In March of 2003, the group released its first studio album titled, Surrender to Love, which peaked to seven and twenty nine on the Billboard Heatseekers and R&B albums’ charts, respectively. Two years later, the duo released their second studio album, In This Life Together, which climbed to number fifteen on the Billboard R&B chart. In 2006, Kindred’s song "My Time" was named the official song of the National Education Association’s Read Across America campaign. Kindred then released The Arrival, its third album on Hidden Beach, in 2008. The album rose to number seven on the Billboard R&B albums’ chart. The duo released its fourth album Love Has No Recession in 2011, which rose to number nineteen and fifteen on the R&B and Independent Albums’ charts, respectively. The group also launched a web-based reality television show in 2010.

Dantzler and his wife, Aja Graydon, have garnered critical acclaim with their work as "Kindred the Family Soul." In 2003, the duo garnered a Soul Train nomination. Three years later, the group was nominated for a BET Award. They have worked with Grammy Award-winning recording artists like Jill Scott, The Roots and Snoop Dogg. Dantzler and Graydon reside in Philadelphia and have six children.

FatinDantzler was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on May 22, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.102

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/22/2012

Last Name

Dantzler

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Overbrook High School

Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA)

Rudolph S. Walton School

Dean Rusk Elementary School

Thomas Fitzsimons Junior High School

First Name

Fatin

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

DAN06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

France

Favorite Quote

Keep It 100.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

12/7/1973

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

R & B singer and songwriter Fatin Dantzler (1973 - ) was best known along with his singing partner and wife, Aja Graydon, as the critically acclaimed R&B and Soul music group, Kindred the Family Soul.

Employment

Kindred the Family Soul

Self Employed

Media Shack

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Fatin Dantzler's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his relationship with his biological father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler describes his relationship with his stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler describes how his mother met his father and stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his stepfather's incarceration

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Fatin Dantzler describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler descries the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler recalls his early musical influences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his early experiences in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler describes his schooling, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler describes his schooling, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Fatin Dantzler describes his experiences of discrimination as a Muslim

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Fatin Dantzler remembers H. Rap Brown

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Fatin Dantzler recalls the music of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Fatin Dantzler remembers moving to Alabama with his stepfather and brother

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler remembers the aftermath of his stepfather's arrest

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler talks about Thomas Fitzsimons Junior High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler remembers his classmates at the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler remembers his musical mentor, George Williams III

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler recalls his expulsion from the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler remembers his music teacher, George E. Allen

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his performances at Overbrook High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler recalls writing for Bell Biv DeVoe's 'Hootie Mack'

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Fatin Dantzler remembers his first gold record

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Fatin Dantzler remembers his work with LaFace Records in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler describes his songwriting work in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler talks about his early work with The Roots

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler remembers meeting and marrying Aja Graydon

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler talks about the Black Lily showcase

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler remembers forming Kindred the Family Soul

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler remembers the Black Lily showcase, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler remembers the Black Lily showcase, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler talks about the early performances of Kindred the Family Soul

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler remembers signing a contract with Hidden Beach Recordings

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler describes Kindred the Family Soul's first album, 'Surrender to Love'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler remembers recording the album, 'Surrender to Love'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler recalls shooting the music video for 'Far Away'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler remembers Kindred the Family Soul's first tour

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler talks about the accomplishments of Kindred the Family Soul

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler talks about the album, 'In This Life Together'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler remembers reuniting the Black Lily

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Fatin Dantzler talks about the song, 'My Time'

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Fatin Dantzler remembers the birth of his twin daughters

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler describes his family's reality web series, 'Six Is It'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Fatin Dantzler talks about balancing his family and career

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Fatin Dantzler remembers Kenny Gamble

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Fatin Dantzler reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Fatin Dantzler reflects upon Kindred the Family Soul's discography

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Fatin Dantzler describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Fatin Dantzler describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Fatin Dantzler reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Fatin Dantzler reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Fatin Dantzler describes his children

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Fatin Dantzler describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Fatin Dantzler remembers meeting and marrying Aja Graydon
Fatin Dantzler talks about his performances at Overbrook High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Transcript
Nineteen ninety-seven [1997] you met Aja.$$I did.$$All right, this is your wife, [HistoryMaker] Aja Graydon.$$Um-hm.$$And, tell us how did--you all met and what happened.$$Well, I met Aja, I went to New York [New York]--there was a loft that The Roots had at the time where they were doing a lot of their production and jam sessions and things like that. And, they had--I guess, Aja had reached out to them or her record label at the time had reached out to them about writing some songs for her. So, she had come to town to, you know, check them out and see what their production and things like that was. And, they brought me up. When I got there she was there with another guy, it was this other guy, Eugene [Eugene Hanes], I believe his name was Eugene, and he was there to help her to write the songs that the--her label had sent. But, I was like The Roots' guy. You know, like The Roots felt comfortable with me being the guy to help her out with the songs. So, that was kind of a little conflict. There was also this thing like where the dude had written like some risque song for another artist, which we definitely did not see Aja going in that directions. And, so, we were all kind of concerned. "Well, do y'all want him to write one of them kind of of songs for her because that ain't gonna even fly on The Roots production," which was weird, you know. Again, not disrespecting him in any way because, you know, he, he made his money, he did his things, and you know, he got a hit song. But, it definitely was not the kind of hit that I felt like this girl, who could really sing, who was really awesome, would be into. But, I, so I, when I got there again, I, I remember she sang a Donny Hathaway song or something like that, and I might've sang a Donny Hathaway song. And, you know, we just had a mutual respect for each other's voice immediately, and we kind of hit it off. And, I don't know what happened with Eugene, but somehow he got filtered out. And, she just started coming to Philly [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and New York, and Philly and New York, and Philly and New York, and we just started working on songs for her and her project. And, kind of one thing led to another and we started liking each other, you know what I mean. And, you know, of course, we have both been in those kinds of situations before. You know, you work in close proximity with people, males and females, somebody gonna like somebody, you know what I mean. But, it was more than just liking her when we really started to realize how much we had in common and how similarly we thought about so many different things and just, we was connected. And, we were connecting a lot more than the music was connecting. And, I think that we were both in similar places in our life, as well, that we had been music for quite some time, even though we were young people, and had not had the success of the music that maybe we had thought we going to have by that time in our careers. And, again, even though we were young, we had been doing it and been around stuff and people and da, da, da, da. And, we connected from there and it was just like, well, maybe music is not what's going to take us where we gonna go. And, we started thinking about our relationship and hooking up and like the seriousness of that. And, like, maybe you--we're just on this path to meet each other kind of thing and get together. And, then we'll be a collective and then we gonna retire the music and just get the picket fence and get a regular job and start raising some kids, you know. 'Cause mom [Delica Dantzler Sulaiman] always use to say, you know, not just her mom [Susan Knox Graydon] or my mom or whatever, just, "You might need a regular job," you know, that whole thing, that music might not wa- work out, you know. Those kinds of things were always in the back of your mind. And, so, because, I think our love and our affection for one another and as well as this connection was so strong, it was so strong that it made us feel like, you know what, "Let's think about us and stop thinking about this music so much." And, we put our music on the backburner and got married. And, I got a regular job. And, started leaving music alone. I really thought that we were, I don't know if I thought completely we were leaving it behind or we were abandoning it--abandoning it or something. But, it was just like, the purpose of life felt like it shifted to family life at that time, you know what I mean. And, it wasn't as hard to say goodbye to it as I thought that it was going to be for that time. And, we rolled with that, and we had a son [Aquil Dantzler]. And, like I said, I started--and we got married, had a son, and I started working a regular job, you know, selling appliances (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Well, what is it--what did you do? You said, you sold appliances?$$I--yeah, I was, I was an appliance salesman. I end up being a manager at an appliance store. It was called American Appliance [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]. You know, the funny thing is it's right down the street from this business that we're in today [Media Shack, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], you know. Less than about a mile or two down the road. And, all here of businesses (laughter), they've all been on this block. So, it's so interesting to me like the other part of my life, you know, where I have to have another business outside of music in some way, you know. Not have to, but I do, you know. And, I've had stores, and now I have this place. And, but, they've all been on that road to Amer- towards American Appliance (laughter).$$So, what, when did you all get married? Nineteen--$$Nineteen ninety-eight [1998], September, 1998 we got married.$So you were focused on music completely; and when it was time to graduate, was there anything significant that happened in school at Overbrook [Overbrook High School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] that you were a part of before we graduate you?$$Significant what like--well, yeah. I mean at, my first show (laughter) at Overbrook was a talent show and I sang (laughter), I sang 'I Wanna Sex You Up' by Color Me Badd. And (laughter), I came out on stage, I had a little cane and a nice suit on and I went to sing and all of the girls went crazy, and it was like, this is it. I'm not going backwards. I ain't playing that saxophone. I ain't playing the clarinet. Nothing el- I'm just--I'm a singer. I know I can do this. This is it, you know. And, I went to school not too long ago to do a career day or something like that. And, was talking to the kids from that stage and just telling them, you know, that feeling. It's just like I cannot believe that this was the training ground for everything that I'm doing now, you know what I mean. And, it was this moment here that made me have the conf- or that gave me the confidence to do this. And, it was like, from here on out, like, I'm going to do this, and I know it. And, that was my first time performing (background noise) as me, you know, like in front of everybody. Like not in a group, not on a cho- you know, in a choir, and my voice can be low and you don't hear me da, da, da, da, it's like, it's all me. And, everybody's focused on what I was doing. It was just a great feeling. And, then later I would sing, 'It's Written All Over Your Face' ['Written All Over Your Face'] by The Rude Boys another time. And, you know, some of my other guys did--the musicians and stuff and we would play and go and do other high schools and stuff and put on our little show. And, then all the girls would go crazy and we would be singing the popular hits of the day and (laughter), it was, it was nice. It was, it was a good time.$$Okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Good times.$$So, were you were in a group in high school?$$I wasn't in a group, per se, but there was a group of musicians who were, who was around me, Little John Robert [sic. Lil' John Roberts], Jermaine Childs, and Damon Bennett, and Lawrence Pitchburg [ph.], and Alfonzo Jones [ph.], and Hayward Hamilton, not Hayward Hamilton; Hayward [ph.], I can't think of Hayward's last name, I'm sorry. But, just different guys that was real good and you know, they would play the music and we would go around. But, we wasn't concentra- like, we weren't a name or a band. It was just, we was a group of guys who just really liked what we did. And, whenever we could find someplace to do or rehearse and practice, and da, da, da, and then show people what we was doing, we would do that. It just, it's kind of like jamming, you know, just jamming together. We like to jam together.$$Okay.$$I didn't get to a group 'til a little later on.$$Did you consider going to college?$$I venture to say, not venture, no, I did not think of going to college. I think that by the time, by the time I was graduating high school, I was hell bent on music, music, music, music, music. I didn't think I needed anything else. I really didn't think I needed anything else because it felt as if I was making it already. And, you know, you go to college, or what it seemed like at that time, you go to college so you can get a degree so you can go make it. And, I'm like, "Look, I'm already making it," you know. That's what it felt like at that time, you know. Unbeknownst to me how much time that goes in between the time of you making it, you know what I mean. And, different skillsets that you might've needed to have to fall back on in case things don't work out that I would have done differently, possibly now, if I had it to do over.

Jeanne Brayboy

Civil rights activist and elementary school music teacher Jeanne Martin Brayboy was born on February 23, 1930, in Camden, South Carolina. Her father, John Wendell Martin, was a high school teacher and football coach; and he started the first African American athletic conference in South Carolina. Her mother, June Singleton Martin, was a librarian. Brayboy and her younger sister, Thomasina, grew up under strict segregation, and they recognized the disparities between whites and blacks in Camden’s educational system. She attended Mather Academy, an African American boarding school founded in 1867 by the Women’s Division of the Northern Methodist Church in Camden, where the teachers stressed academic excellence and community responsibility. Brayboy graduated from Mather Academy in 1947.

Brayboy went on to attend Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina, as a music major, where she became active in the Bennett Choir among other campus activities. In 1951, Brayboy graduated from Bennett College with honors and received her B.A. degree in music. She entered Boston University to pursue her M.A. degree in music education. During her tenure at Boston University, Brayboy met Martin Luther King, Jr. Brayboy and King were a part of a small group of friends that attended black social gatherings on campus. She graduated from Boston University in 1953, and started her teaching career in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 1954, she married the late Dr. Jack Brayboy, who was an administrator at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Brayboy spent forty years as a teacher in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System, from 1953 to 1993. While she worked in the segregated Charlotte schools, she witnessed bus boycotts and sit-ins during the Civil Rights Movement. In 1969, Brayboy became one of the first African American teachers to integrate the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools. Brayboy retired in 1993.

The mother of two adult children, Jack and Joyce, Brayboy devotes her time to many civic organizations including the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Levine Museum of the New South and the Foundation for the Carolinas. In 2011, Brayboy was awarded the Marie R. Rowe Award by the Symphony Guild of Charlotte, Inc.

Jeanne Martin Brayboy was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 20, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.179

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/20/2007

Last Name

Brayboy

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

Schools

Boylan-Haven-Mather Academy

Boston University

Bennett College for Women

First Name

Jeanne

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

BRA08

Favorite Season

Winter

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

2/23/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Charlotte

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Civil rights activist and elementary school music teacher Jeanne Brayboy (1930 - ) taught for forty years, and was the first African American teacher to integrate the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Employment

Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System

Johnson C. Smith University

Elementary Music Workshop

Barber-Scotia College

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jeanne Brayboy's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her parents' education and professions

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jeanne Brayboy describes segregation in Camden, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers Mather Academy in Camden, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her sister

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers the holidays with her family

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her great-aunt

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Jeanne Brayboy describes racial discrimination in Camden, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her aunt's sewing business

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her teachers at Mather Academy

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Jeanne Brayboy describes Trinity Methodist Church in Camden, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her activities at Mather Academy

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy talks about her family history of college education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her interest in music

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her great-aunt's land ownership

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers polo and steeplechase races

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers traveling with the Bennett College choir

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her studies at Bennett College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jeanne Brayboy describes segregation in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jeanne Brayboy recalls her social acitivties at Bennett College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers Boston University in Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jeanne Brayboy describes Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a young man

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy recalls dating Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her social life at Boston University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy recalls teaching music in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her music curriculum

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers teaching in segregated schools

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy describes McCrorey Heights in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jeanne Brayboy recalls Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit to Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jeanne Brayboy recalls Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s speech at a school in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy describes the Civil Rights Movement in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers school integration in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her daughter's experience of school integration

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her husband, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her children

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her teaching career in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her husband, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her retirement from teaching

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her involvement in the Foundation for the Carolinas

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers her father's community service

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jeanne Brayboy talks about her parents' community involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her activities in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers parenting after her husband's death

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy describes the changes at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy reflects upon her teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy describes the aftermath of the school busing program

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jeanne Brayboy describes the changes in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jeanne Brayboy talks about her grandson

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jeanne Brayboy reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Jeanne Brayboy describes the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Jeanne Brayboy talks about Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jeanne Brayboy remembers the racial violence in South Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jeanne Brayboy talks about her husband's U.S. military service

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jeanne Brayboy describes her neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jeanne Brayboy describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jeanne Brayboy reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jeanne Brayboy shares her advice to future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jeanne Brayboy narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Jeanne Brayboy remembers school integration in Charlotte, North Carolina
Jeanne Brayboy describes the aftermath of the school busing program
Transcript
So tell me about the schools, integration.$$Well, as I said, I was, I was first sent to two white schools, all white schools, and I was the only black teacher for the first year and, of course, because they sent the special teachers, art and music, physical ed [physical education], and it was interesting. Some of the teachers went out of their way to be nice to me. Some just ignored me. One or two, I mean, ignored me, I mean, they couldn't ignore me but so much but I remember the principal was very nice to me and the secretary and some of them, you know, just acted matter of fact, which was fine. Most of the children didn't, you know, they didn't react at all. I remember once, one little girl asking me, was I Indian and I said, "No, I'm not Indian, I'm--," I don't know whether I said African American or black probably then and she said, "Well I just asked because the lady across the street from me is Indian and she looks kind of like you." Okay.$$So no problem from the students?$$Well, yeah, the ones who maybe had a problem, they didn't say it, they might have, I'm sure there were some whose parents had a problem, and all, but it wasn't overt and I remember, my same aunt, my [paternal] great aunt [Jessie Dinkins Wright] then was coming visiting and she was very concerned about me going, going into the white schools teaching but I, (laughter) I guess I was naive, I went on and did what I've been doing.$$Do you remember the names of those white schools?$$The first two schools where I worked, Park Road [Park Road Elementary School, Charlotte, North Carolina] and Sedgefield [Sedgefield Elementary School, Charlotte, North Carolina] and I stayed there awhile and then I was switched to some other schools and some white and some, well by that, it was, they were in--after that, they were all integrated, one way or the other (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So, well did, how did that go over the actual integration of all these schools, the busing of white kids and black kids?$$Oh, there was some big protest about, about it, the high schools mainly and there was some parents. You could always tell the children whose parents were negative but, you see, most of them couldn't afford to send their child--and, of course, there were some more private schools that popped up but some children, you know, most parents couldn't afford to send the children to private schools. So, I can remember Oaklawn [Oaklawn Elementary School, Charlotte, North Carolina], which is near my house where I worked for years, I remember having a chorus and we had, of course, the black and white kids and I have a lot of pictures of those and I can remember a parent sitting and crying and I remember the teachers, one of the children asked me about that later and I said, "Well you know sometimes you all just sounded so good that the people were moved to tears." And we were asked to sing at different little occasions around town. So, you know, and I made, I still have, run into kids now, black and white, who I taught years ago, who all grown like that young lady.$Tell me about the tensions in the '90s [1990s] in the school system in Charlotte [North Carolina], '90s [1990s] and early 2000, 2001, weren't there some--$$The tensions had been because they changed the school plan and they, which has resulted in some of the, some all-black schools, some re-segregation in some cases. You see, I retired in '93 [1993] so I haven't been a part of it really and I hate seeing the re-segregation. I think it's a step backward.$$How did that happen?$$Parents who lived other places, a lot of people we said, moved into Charlotte. Okay, so you live in a little suburban town and, you know, your child doesn't have to be bused and the school is all white or whatever. So they came and they brought suit against Charlotte-Mecklenburg [Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools] because some of the students were being bused to different places and it, it's just really interesting because the natives, so to speak, of people who've been through integration and know all the problems we went through and came through and survived and made a better school system, you know, we, we were content, so to speak, and these people were outsiders who came from other places and they brought suit and they got a judge, Judge Potter [Robert D. Potter, Sr.] who is now dead, who was sympathetic and he upset the whole plan and went back to, it's not totally neighborhood schools but it's close to it. What they have done, for example, the school that's in my neighborhood [McCrorey Heights, Charlotte, North Carolina], they made it, what they call a language emersion school. They renovated the school, they built practically a whole new school, in my neighborhood there're not ten, ten children 'cause we're all old and the children have grown or go, so now they emphasized Spanish and French and they started out K [kindergarten] through one, and then I guess this year they have third grade, all up to third grade. The school's half empty, or more than half empty. In the suburbs, there are a lot of people who moved, the schools are very crowded and they have all these trailers. And so there's this dialog now about whether they should renovate inner-city schools, which are almost all black, but a lot of them need work because they're getting older and whether building new schools and there's this constant--$$Okay.$$--talk about it.

Peg Alston

Private art dealer Peg Alston was born in Camden, New Jersey on December 31, 1938. As a child, Alston always wanted to make a difference. Prior to starting her private art dealership, Alston worked as a social worker from 1969 to 1975. She obtained her B.A. degree from New York University in 1960 and obtained her M.S.W. degree from Columbia University in 1964. She has also continued to study various art classes at the New School for Social Research. Her career in art began in 1969 as a council member for the Studio Museum of Harlem in New York. Inspired by art and private dealing, she became the publicity director for Cinque Gallery. Becoming frustrated because of the lack of visibility for African American artists, she established the Peg Alston Gallery in 1975, a private art dealership, specializing in African American art and sculpture.

Alston has held numerous art-related positions. In 1978, she served as a panel member on the New York State Council for the Arts where she helped to bring visibility to African American artists. In 1980, Alston became the curator for Retour Aux Sources, the first exhibit of African American artists in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and West Africa. In 1989, she was the coordinator for the Celebration of Tokyo and New York City as Sister Cities Art Festival, which led to her receiving the Distinction of Honor Award by the New York Coalition of Black Women that same year. From 1990 to 1992, she and Dr. Kaye E. Davis co-sponsored Established Art Seminars in New York City, which helped to bring African American art to a broader audience.

Alston continues to work to promote the works of African American artists. In 1995, she was Honorary Chair Person for Black Pearls: Treasures of African American Women Artists, an exhibit presented by the New York Coalition of 100 Black Women at New York City’s Cinque Gallery. Also in 1995, she was a panel speaker for Collecting African American Art at the Montclair Art Museum in New Jersey and she was also a panel speaker at the Conference on Female Entrepreneurship at the Fashion Institute of Technology, which was sponsored by the National Association of Female Executives. Alston has received several awards for her work in African American Art including a Certificate of Recognition from National Scene Magazine.

Alston lives in New York with her husband and continues to run the Peg Alston Gallery of African American art and sculpture.

Accession Number

A2006.032

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/2/2006 |and| 3/7/2006

Last Name

Alston

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Sumner

Camden High School

Columbia University School of Social Work

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Peg

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

ALS01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Thank You, God.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/31/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Vegetables

Short Description

Art gallery owner Peg Alston (1938 - ) is a private art dealer who established the Peg Alston Gallery in 1975. Alston's gallery has received recognition for promoting the artwork of African American artists and sculptors.

Employment

Seamen's Society for Children

City University of New York

Peg Alston Fine Arts Gallery

Favorite Color

Neutral Colors

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Peg Alston's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Peg Alston lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Peg Alston describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Peg Alston describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Peg Alston describes her paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Peg Alston describes her paternal grandmother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Peg Alston describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Peg Alston describe her genetic makeup

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Peg Alston describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Peg Alston remembers her grandmother's influence

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Peg Alston recalls her childhood neighborhood in Camden, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Peg Alston recalls her difficult childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Peg Alston remembers quitting her violin lessons

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Peg Alston remembers childhood Christmas celebrations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Peg Alston recalls her teachers at Charles Sumner Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Peg Alston recalls her organizational participation in Camden

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Peg Alston recalls her decision to study social work

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Peg Alston describes people who influenced her in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Peg Alston describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Peg Alston remembers New Jersey's Camden High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Peg Alston remembers her childhood understanding of racism

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Peg Alston describes her extracurricular activities at Camden High School

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Peg Alston recalls her experience of racial discrimination at the YWCA

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Peg Alston remembers being refused service at a Camden restaurant

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Peg Alston remembers deciding to attend New York University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Peg Alston recalls adjusting to life at New York University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Peg Alston remembers living in Greenwich Village in New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Peg Alston describes the African American community at New York University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Peg Alston recalls discovering art while babysitting in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Peg Alston describes the woman who employed her as a babysitter

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Peg Alston remembers entering the art world

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Peg Alston describes her career in social work

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Peg Alston talks about the Spiral group

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Peg Alston describes her early interest in African sculpture

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Peg Alston remembers holding an African sculpture show at her apartment

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Peg Alston remembers being mentored by Romare Bearden

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Peg Alston recalls showing Edward Clark's artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Peg Alston describes the novelty of exhibiting African American art

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Peg Alston talks about the demarcation of black art

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Peg Alston recalls holding a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Peg Alston remembers educating herself and others about black art

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Peg Alston describes the public's ignorance of black art

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Peg Alston describes her response to Jean-Michel Basquiat's popularity

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Peg Alston shares her opinion on Jean-Michel Basquiat's art

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Peg Alston's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Peg Alston talks about her mother's family history

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Peg Alston talks about her uncle's experience as a Tuskegee Airman

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Peg Alston recalls finding photographs for the Black Theatre Festival-U.S.A.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Peg Alston recalls contributing to an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Peg Alston talks about Edward Clark

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Peg Alston talks about Merton Simpson

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Peg Alston recalls selling the artwork of Elizabeth Catlett and Jacob Lawrence

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Peg Alston remembers discovering Romare Bearden and Jacob Lawrence

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Peg Alston remembers an exhibit at City College of New York in 1964

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Peg Alston talks about African American art and history

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Peg Alston talks about the role of the Studio Museum of Harlem

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Peg Alston describes her mission for Peg Alston Fine Arts Gallery

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Peg Alston describes how she chooses art

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Peg Alston talks about William T. Williams

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Peg Alston talks about Al Loving

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Peg Alston talks about Howardena Pindell

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Peg Alston describes African American art galleries in New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Peg Alston describes the broadening audience for black art

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Peg Alston describes the National Black Fine Art Show

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Peg Alston describes her hopes for the Peg Alston Fine Arts Gallery

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Peg Alston recalls promoting the artwork of Norman Lewis

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Peg Alston reflects upon her career

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Peg Alston talks about her selection as HistoryMaker

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Peg Alston reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Peg Alston describes her vocation in art

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Peg Alston narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

13$3

DATitle
Peg Alston remembers being refused service at a Camden restaurant
Peg Alston describes the novelty of exhibiting African American art
Transcript
Another time, well again that was before I graduated [from Camden High School, Camden, New Jersey]. Graduation, the prom it was, I planned where we as a group, there may have been about twelve of us were going after, after the prom for dinner and to celebrate. It was a place called the Hawaiian [Hawaiian Cottage, Cherry Hill, New Jersey]--I can't remember now, I guess I've really blocked it now, and this was like you know you're passing out of Camden [New Jersey] and you see this and it was the front of it was the shape of a pineapple and it looked great and I guess black people I never knew of a black person going there, but this was certainly a place to go. Your prom, you know, you want something that's really fantastic. I called and I never made reservations any place before, but I figured here twelve people, at least twelve people I made reservations, we went after the prom, and then they told me they didn't have my name and I'm one, you know, I said, "Well let me see the book," and then my friends said, "Come on Vonnie [HistoryMaker Peg Alston]," you know as they all told me, "Let's not, let's you know, we'll go somewhere else." I was crying I was so upset, very upset, but and you know after that, years after it was integrated, but I didn't know, but you know I had never set and would never want to. I don't think it exists now, but anyway.$So, that did a lot for Ed [HistoryMaker Edward Clark] in the black community, introducing his work. What did that do for you as an art dealer hosting his first show (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I learned, I learned a lot just in terms of presenting an, an exhibit, and it was always, you know, I knew that I was in the right field; it all felt good. What I was doing, you know, just felt right for me. I mean I was doing what I enjoyed, even though mind you, you know, we're not talking about successful, often successful monetarily because there were many, many months when I didn't know how I was gonna pay my rent, but I also learned not to worry. I also, something told me you know that you know that, that was, you know, would be work--working against me and, but just to believe that it would work out and it did. So, it was always an uphill. This was, this business was, 'cause I mean it was sort of unprecedented in terms of as I look back and what I was doing. There, there was not another dealer doing what I was doing that I could speak to, that I could get some tips from. I just learned as I went along. I tried to buy, and at that time in the '70s [1970s] very little documentation on black artists, so I purchased whatever I could in terms of catalogs, I mean you know I had just reams of now, whenever, even African sculpture I would just buy whatever books were available on African sculpture and the first book I knew that came out about black artists with the exception of an art, somebody from, from Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.]--now I can't think--his mind--I just can't think, in the '40s [1940s]. I can't think of the, the, the book now or the name of the person, but it'll come to me. But, after that there was no information and early '70s [1970s] there was a book or mid-'70s [1970s] that came out called 'The African American'--'Afro-American Artist' ['The Afro-American Artist: A Search For Identity'] by Elsa Honig Fine. And up to that point Bearden [Romare Bearden] did a lot of writing because again there was just this dearth of, of material. There was none available and so he contributed what he could. So, there were about two or three books that have been, you know, co-written, by Romare Bearden in the '70s [1970s]. So, I was just saying that there were, you know, very little information written, et cetera, and also no galleries, no galleries that specialized in African American art--

Charles F. Johnson

Charles Floyd Johnson was born in Camden, New Jersey, to Bertha Ellen Seagers, a teacher, and Orange Maull Johnson, who went off to fight in World War II shortly before Johnson was born and returned to tell his son stories of the Tuskegee Airmen, although he himself was in the American cavalry in North Africa. Johnson's family initially encouraged him to be a lawyer; in order to give him the best possible educational preparation he was sent to Stony Brook in 1956 where he became the second African American student to attend the prestigious school. Johnson was an ambitious student, and was accepted at both Howard and Brown Universities after his graduation from Stony Brook.

In 1958, Johnson began attending Howard University alongside some well-known classmates that included Stokely Carmichael. Johnson worked in New York during the summers as a teacher for young children. During the Civil Rights Movement, Johnson was active in marches; he majored in political science, minored in history and education, and worked at the Library of Congress. Johnson was also involved in John F. Kennedy's presidential campaign, and was even invited to Kennedy's inauguration. Despite his political aspirations, Johnson demonstrated a growing interest in communications, and joined the Howard Players upon arriving at Howard; he graduated with honors from the school in 1962.

That same year, though drawn to the New York theater world, Johnson was accepted to and enrolled in Howard University Law School with a full scholarship. While at law school, Johnson was published in the Howard Law Journal, and flourished under professors Herbert Reed and Patricia Harris. Shortly after taking the bar exam, Johnson was drafted during the Vietnam War; soon after, he married his girlfriend at the time, was sent to work as a clerk in New Jersey, and then shifted to work as a defense counsel largely for AWOL soldiers, for which he received an Army Commendation Medal.

After leaving the military, Johnson moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked as a copyright lawyer for three years; his work schedule allowed him to work in theatrical companies and study communications in his free time. Johnson also did some work in television for a show entitled Harambee and worked for Howard University's radio station. At the end of his tenure with the copyright office, Johnson worked with a justice from Sweden, who invited him to work as a law intern in Stockholm. After working in Stockholm, Johnson almost took a job working in France, but changed his mind to follow his dreams and move to Los Angeles in early 1971.

With the aid of the G.I. Bill, Johnson applied to and attended the Professional Theater Workshop in Santa Monica, California, where he took acting classes for nine months. Thanks to his law degree, Johnson found an entry-level position at Universal Studios working in the mail room; two days after his mailroom experience began, a new job opened up, and Johnson began his climb to the top of the ladder, becoming a production coordinator in late 1971.

In 1981, Johnson moved to Hawaii, where he married his second wife, who stayed in Los Angeles. Johnson’s career in Hollywood was accomplished and diverse; it included roles in such television programs as JAG and Navy: NCIS. Johnson also worked as a writer and producer in a wide variety of television programs, which included working as a prominent figure behind the notable television programs The Rockford Files and Magnum, P.I.

Accession Number

A2005.239

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/8/2005

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Floyd

Organizations
Schools

Howard University School of Law

Howard University

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

JOH24

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern France

Favorite Quote

That's The Way Life Goes.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

2/12/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Television actor and television producer Charles F. Johnson (1942 - ) produced the hit television series, Magnum, P.I., in addition to enjoying a successful acting career.

Employment

Universal Studios Hollywood

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles F. Johnson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles F. Johnson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles F. Johnson describes his mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles F. Johnson describes his mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles F. Johnson describes his family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles F. Johnson describes his community in Middletown, Delaware, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles F. Johnson describes his mother's education and how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles F. Johnson describes his father's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles F. Johnson describes his father's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charles F. Johnson describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles F. Johnson describes his father's time in the U.S. Cavalry during WWII

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles F. Johnson recalls learning about the Tuskegee Airmen

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles F. Johnson describes his community in Middletown, Delaware, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles F. Johnson describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles F. Johnson remembers segregation in Middletown, Delaware

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles F. Johnson describes his favorite classmate and teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles F. Johnson describes his high school years in Middletown, Delaware

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles F. Johnson describes attending The Stony Brook School in Long Island, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles F. Johnson remembers deciding to attend Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles F. Johnson recalls his experience at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charles F. Johnson describes his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles F. Johnson describes his work in Washington, D.C. during college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles F. Johnson recalls developing his interest in theater

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles F. Johnson remembers the Howard University School of Law, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles F. Johnson remembers the Howard University School of Law, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles F. Johnson recalls his time in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles F. Johnson recalls his foray into theater in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles F. Johnson recalls traveling to Sweden and France

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles F. Johnson remembers studying acting in California

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles F. Johnson recalls becoming production coordinator at Universal Studios

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charles F. Johnson describes his role as production coordinator at Universal Studios

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Charles F. Johnson describes his early career as a producer

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Charles F. Johnson describes joining the production team for 'Magnum P.I.'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles F. Johnson describes producing 'Magnum P.I.'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles F. Johnson describes the role of an executive producer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles F. Johnson describes his support for African Americans in Hollywood

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles F. Johnson describes his relationship with Tom Selleck

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles F. Johnson describes his involvement in 'JAG' and his idea for a new project

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles F. Johnson describes the movie 'Red Tails'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles F. Johnson describes his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles F. Johnson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charles F. Johnson describes his idea for a book on African Americans in television

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

11$1

DATitle
Charles F. Johnson describes his early career as a producer
Charles F. Johnson describes producing 'Magnum P.I.'
Transcript
--And I worked with a man named Harve Bennett, who was doing 'Six Million Dollar Man,' that I later was one of--in fact, he offered me my first job as--to move out of that department as an associate producer on '[The] Six Million Dollar Man.'$$Wow!$$But I had worked for Stephen [J.] Cannell, who was--his first major job as a producer was 'Toma,' and I was the production coordinator. So by 1974, when Harve offered me a chance, Stephen Cannell also offered me a chance to be an associate producer on 'The Rockford Files.'$$Wow!$$And because I had an association with Stephen for--since '71 [1971] in 'Toma,' I decided to go with Stephen, Anita Rosenberg and James Garner. And that's how I got started on 'The Rockford Files' as an associate producer. And, and I remember I was still thinking (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Was that your first associate producing--$$Yes, and I was, actually, I'd been at Universal [Universal Studios; Universal Studios Hollywood, Universal City, California], believe it or not, I had actually done, because of my experience since having studied acting, I had done about four or five guest shots with probably four or five line per--on a show; on, on 'Toma' because I was on that show, 'Six Million Dollar Man'; 'The Rookies' and 'Kojak.'$$Okay.$$And, so I was thinking of maybe leaving and becoming an actor because now I'd made contact and all. But I think sanity kicked in and I don't--I think the, the, the unstableness of acting sort of--so when they offered me the job I thought about it for all of a day. I said, "I can probably always become an actor, I can't always become an associate producer."$$Exactly.$$And that's how I ended up doing that and of course--$$'Rockford Files' was the first--$$--was the first.$$--as an associate producer?$$And I became a producer in '76 [1976].$$Okay.$$Within two years I was a producer on that show. And in '78 [1978] I won my first Emmy [Award]--because we won the Emmy as best dramatic series in '78 [1978] and I was then, by then I was a producer, along with David Chase--$$Right.$$--who later became the, you know, the creator of 'The Sopranos'--$$Right.$$--and Steve Cannell and Anita Rosenberg. And we were the four of us who were--produced the show.$$Now, I notice that you do a lot of the shows that James Garner--$$Right.$$--stars in. Was that because of a personal relationship?$$Well, yes, I'd been friends with him for, since I was an associate producer on 'The Rockford Files.' And he, he's just an incredible man. He's very supportive of his crew and very supportive of his writers and producers. And my association with him started then and then went on when in 1979 when the series ended, he started to do 'Maverick.'$$Right.$$I actually stayed at Universal and produced 'Simon and Simon,' the pilot, another series with Telly Savalas after 'Kojak,' Colchas' [ph.] wife produced. And I did a number of movies a week for them. And then when Garner started to do 'Bret Maverick,' he and Anita Rosenberg, they called me up and said, "You want to come to Warner Brothers [Warner Bros. Entertainment]?" And I'd done the pilot of 'Simon and Simon' and Universal had lost a lot of hours and I wasn't sure they were going to pick me up--my contract up.$$Um-hm.$$So it was very easy for me to know--not knowing that I wasn't going to be there necessarily, to go over there. Also, when you--when I'd been at Universal from '71 [1971], now this is '79 [1979] and when you're working in in-system, your pay is one thing because you've been growing up in that system. And suddenly Warner Brothers offered me a, a substantial increase--$$Um-hm.$$--because I wasn't--and I had an agent who got me a salary. So I--but then my association with Garner continued.$$Right.$$We only did that for a year.$$Okay.$$And I, then I went back to work with him in '94 [1994] when we did eight, I think we did eight 'Rockford Files' movies, it took us two years, we did the movies.$$Um-hm.$$And then again in 2000 [sic. 2002], we did a series called 'First Monday.'$$Right.$$Which I was then with Belisarius Productions. But he became the chief justice and that. So we've had a long association. And Anne [Anne Burford Johnson] and I are very close to he and his family.$Things are looking up for you; you're at the right place, at the right time. Let's--we, we were talking about 'Magnum, P.I.'$$Um-hm.$$And they asked you to stay on until somebody else could come on?$$Right, and, and, and nobody else showed up on the horizon, but in the meantime, I was able to go into that situation and, and one of the things that's always been said about me in terms of the industry is, "Charles [HistoryMaker Charles F. Johnson] is a great diplomat." And there were some (unclear) kind of things going on, warfare going on in the show. And I sort of came in and helped to, to cool the waters. And I think that's why they asked me to stay. But I was petrified because I had been a producer for a few years, but mostly on the Universal [Universal Studios; Universal Studios Hollywood, Universal City, California] lot. In a situation where I was in town--with a cot- with a coterie, or congeries of producers who were all around me--and suddenly I was put into Hawaii, where you were the only producer who was running the show, dealing with all the actors, dealing with the local crews, and having to produce on-location shows. I had never done it. I had no experience doing it. It wasn't like I got there and had training before. It was like you're there.$$But your instincts were good.$$But my instincts were good. My instincts were good and, and I, I, I think I always knew you had to just, when you're thrown in those situations, you know, you just had to go do it. And, and I was able, and I was always good at dealing with people. And I--of course we had Tom Selleck and Roger [E.] Mosley and Larry Manetti and John Hillerman and I, so I had to work with them. And I had to work with the local crew. But I think, you know, a lot of the Hawaiians liked me also because I was an African American. They thought they could relate to me. And I went to the local, local, the local customs, customs and did the local things with the local people because you had to forge that with the community because the show was a very big draw in Honolulu [Hawaii]--because it was, you know, it was, the show was big at the time. Tom was almost the biggest television star for a couple of years in the '80s [1980s]. And you've--that red Ferrari driving around Honolulu. So you had to also do a lot of community, community relations and, and, I did all of those things, both with the show and then ran the show and very successfully, I must say, we were nominated three times for the Emmy [Award]--$$Right.$$--didn't win for that show. We were nominated three times as best drama. And I learned as much as I was, I think good for the show. I also learned an enormous amount because suddenly I was learning to produce something on my own. We shot in London [England], and did a two hour show in London, which I had to go to London and casting and find your crew and put it together and shoot the show. And then the next year I went to Hong Kong to scout the show and we were going to shoot in Hong Kong and at the last minute cost didn't do it. But I, I learned a lot about how to put location shows together and how to go and put, organize that and, and so that was all enormously of value to me. In the meantime also turning out 162 episodes of it, of a series that was--it ran for eight years.$$Wow.$$Yeah.$$Wow.$$So it was a great learning experience for me as well--

Joseph Donovan

Edward R. Murrow Award-winning journalist Joe Donovan was born Joseph James Donovan on March 29, 1936, in Camden, New Jersey, to Willie Virginia Jones and Phillip James Donovan. Donovan grew up in rural Chislehurst and attended Chislehurst School, Belmont Elementary School, Sulzberger Junior High School and Edward Bok Vocational Technical High School, from which he graduated in 1954. In October of 1955, Donovan enlisted in the United States Air Force, and by 1959 he had been promoted to the rank of staff sergeant. Leaving the military in 1960, Donovan, after he was refused admittance to Temple University, returned to Edward Bok High School and enrolled in cartography and photography.

In 1960, Donovan was hired as a librarian at the Philadelphia Daily News. In 1963, Donovan worked as a background writer for a story on the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba; six months later he replaced the newspaper’s only African American reporter. In 1970, Donovan joined the staff of KYW News Radio and covered George Wallace’s speech in Philadelphia’s Fishtown neighborhood. Donovan also co-hosted Black Edition with Malcolm Poindexter in 1970. In 1972, Donovan began to appear with Reggie Bryant on the television show Black Perspectives on the News. In 1976, Donovan was awarded a Ford Foundation Fellowship and wrote the critique of the public education system Why Can’t Johnny Read?

From 1978 to 1980, Donovan served as assignment manager for CBS affiliate WCAU-TV10. In 1979, Donovan covered the Three Mile Island nuclear emergency, and in 1980, he received the Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in electronic journalism. That same year, Donovan left CBS and joined the Environmental Protection Agency as Regional Superfund Information officer. From 1990 to 2000, Donovan was employed by Waste Management, Inc; he was the first African American at the Lisle, Illinois, corporate headquarters, where he served as corporate director of community relations. Donovan was also a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

Donovan passed away on February 26, 2009 at the age of 72.

Accession Number

A2005.176

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/1/2005 |and| 8/3/2005

Last Name

Donovan

Maker Category
Middle Name

James

Schools

Belmont Charter School

Mayer Sulzberger Junior High School

Edward W. Bok Technical High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Joseph

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

DON02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

Tell It Like It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/29/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Death Date

2/26/2009

Short Description

Author and television and radio correspondent Joseph Donovan (1936 - 2009 ) wrote Why Can't Johnny Read?, a 1976 critique of the public school system. In addition to his activities as an award-winning journalist, Donovan held high-ranking positions at CBS affiliate WCAU-TV10, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Employment

U.S. Air Force

Philadelphia Daily News

Environmental Protection Agency

Waste Management

KYW Radio

WCAU-TV

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:4232,47:5380,62:5708,143:12268,234:15876,392:23342,467:23786,474:42881,568:43754,579:44142,584:52108,637:52837,648:53242,654:66609,749:73700,853:85181,972:98068,1117:98680,1129:99836,1151:100516,1163:102488,1197:103100,1208:103712,1217:116992,1349:122892,1407:123312,1413:143515,1645:149248,1695:156445,1753:156777,1758:191064,1984:192546,2015:200244,2093:200622,2100:203142,2158:210574,2231:211588,2249:212290,2259:212914,2268:214084,2287:221822,2305:222174,2310:222702,2318:226684,2338:227428,2345:230280,2375:235544,2394:253226,2525:253542,2530:254332,2543:254964,2553:259820,2598:264916,2633:271525,2698:279040,2774$0,0:4930,77:5704,87:7854,138:25334,272:57024,625:58050,637:58848,645:59304,653:60216,662:72200,714:95976,888:96304,893:97370,912:108056,992:112123,999:112729,1006:113941,1019:114749,1028:125658,1128:126098,1134:127242,1148:133670,1261:134030,1266:165792,1546:166356,1554:166732,1559:178040,1617:178664,1628:179522,1641:179912,1647:180770,1659:181472,1672:182018,1680:188620,1729:188880,1734:189270,1741:189530,1746:191620,1756:196220,1804:197382,1823:197714,1828:198876,1860:199208,1865:200038,1886:200370,1891:200702,1896:205490,1906:233906,2114:234518,2125:236270,2141
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joseph Donovan's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan talks about his mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan talks about his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan describes his paternal family's involvement in the Underground Railroad

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes his father's background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan describes his paternal grandfather's work as a truck farmer

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan talks about his father's employment at Scott Paper Company during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan describes how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan describes his parents' personalities and whom he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes his relationship to his sisters

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joseph Donovan remembers his neighbors in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Joseph Donovan recalls businesses in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Joseph Donovan remembers churches he attended growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan remembers visiting Woodside Amusement Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan talks about his early interest in engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan talks about his exposure to music growing up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan describes his elementary and junior high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan remembers his early interest in the media

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan explains why he attended Edward Bok Vocational School in Philadelphia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan remembers learning optical mechanics and watchmaking at Edward Bok Vocational School in Philadelphia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes his employment while attending Edward Bok Vocational School in Philadelphia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Joseph Donovan remembers his employment search after graduating from Edward Bok Vocational School in Philadelphia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan remembers working as an optician

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan remembers racial discrimination in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan describes his experience at Ernest Harmon Air Force Base in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan describes his experience at Ernest Harmon Air Force Base in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan describes his studies after delisting from the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes the real estate industry's blockbusting practices

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan remembers his 1960 hiring as a display advertiser for the Philadelphia Daily News

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes working in display advertising at the Philadelphia Daily News

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan describes his transition to the Philadelphia Daily News' editorial staff

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan describes his role as police reporter for Philadelphia Daily News

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan remembers working at KYW Radio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan remembers the Black Communicators Associated, Inc. in Philadelphia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan describes the Association of Black Journalists' founding

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan reflects upon issues facing African American journalists in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan describes the impact of African American journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes the development of African American professional organizations in the 20th century

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan describes the founding members of the Association of Black Journalists, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan describes the founding members of the Association of Black Journalists, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan remembers the impact of the Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan talks about HistoryMaker Chuck Stone

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan recalls receiving an Edwin R. Murrow Award in broadcast journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes challenges faced by African American journalists

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan remembers the fallout when a colleague rewrote his quotes

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan remembers Frank Rizzo's view of Philadelphia journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan describes the Association of Black Journalists' accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan remembers HistoryMakers Vernon Jarrett, Lutrelle "Lu" F. Palmer, II and Paul Brock

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan describes the Association of Black Journalists and others' view of it

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan remembers 'Black Perspectives on the News,' pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan remembers 'Black Perspectives on the News,' pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes the national impact of 'Black Perspectives on the News'

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan describes the evolution of black journalism from the 1970s

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes co-hosting 'Black Edition' with Malcolm Poindexter

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Joseph Donovan describes the impact of the FCC's revised rules on black news shows

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan talks about Bill Cosby and the role of the 400 Ministers organization in his hiring

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan describes Philadelphia Daily News' increased coverage of African American issues

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Joseph Donovan details his career in the 1970s

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Joseph Donovan describes his work at the EPA Superfund

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Joseph Donovan describes his transition from broadcasting to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Joseph Donovan describes his work at the EPA in the 1980s

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Joseph Donovan describes his work as director of community relations for Waste Management, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Joseph Donovan describes his hopes for the African American community and reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Joseph Donovan reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Joseph Donovan reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Joseph Donovan talks about his unpublished work, 'The Magic Word'

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Joseph Donovan narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Joseph Donovan narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$7

DAStory

7$6

DATitle
Joseph Donovan describes the impact of African American journalists
Joseph Donovan describes the national impact of 'Black Perspectives on the News'
Transcript
Weren't the places that were integrating black people saying, your interests are the same as our interests? If you're a black police officer, your interests should be that of the police department, right?$$They were saying--$$Or the newspaper. I mean the Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] evening news [Evening Bulletin; The Bulletin]--$$[Philadelphia] Daily News.$$Then your interests should be that of the, of the evening news, right? Isn't that--$$Yes, but you had a larger responsibility. A journalist must keep the journal. And to do that, you need--you must have people who will take the necessary risks to get the story. You see, during the urban riots in Philadelphia, for example, and my firsthand coverage of that, there were those in the black community who said, "Why should I talk to you? You work for the man."$$And they're assumption is your loyalty is with the paper, right?$$You betcha, you betcha.$$That overrides everything, you're with the man.$$"You guys are plums," okay. "You guys have plum jobs." But some of us did not and would not move out of the principally minority community. And we went to the schools and urged the children to learn to read and to write and we showed our faces in places where our faces hadn't been seen before. (Laughter) When George Wallace was campaigning to run for president, or to get the nomination to run for president, he went to a principally white section of Philadelphia called Fishtown [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and held one of his meetings there in a white church with an all-white audience. And I walked in from the Daily News with my color intact and my hair tight and I walked right down the center aisle and sat in the first pew, the deacon's bench in that church. And got to work with my notebook and my pen. And Mr. Wallace's campaign speech changed from decrying black power and boosting white power, to recognizing that most colored people are just good, hard workers and had been denied and they were looking right at me to see how much of that I was getting. I got it all and reported it all. Later in life George Wallace, after he had been shot, came on our show, 'Black Perspective on the News.' When he could no longer stand on his own, but with the aid of a specially designed wheelchair, if you remember. And we were able to attract a good many people from government, politicians, educators, factory workers and unionists like 1199c [SEIU Healthcare 1199] founded [sic.] by [Reverend] Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.], okay. And we were able then to portray a black community, which some people looked at with sheer disdain and hatred as a place where most people who banded together did so for their own protection, as we did in forming the Association of Black Journalists [ABJ].$In any event, we were able to take the show on the road from time to time to different places and do a 'Black Perspective[s on the News]' from there. One such series we did took us to Boston [Massachusetts].$$WGBH[-TV, Boston, Massachusetts], yeah.$$WGBH loaned us their facilities to do the show. Went out to Los Angeles, California; San Francisco, California, went to--oh we were all over the place (laughter). But because of what we did, okay, what led to taking the show on the road was that, that WHYY[-TV, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], PBS [Public Broadcasting Service] in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], found that the show was so popular that it actually generated ratings and had a share. And then it was offered to other PBS stations. And at its high point, 'Black Perspective on the News' had 107 PBS stations airing 'Black Perspective on the News.' Pretty heady stuff. The only show coming out of Philadelphia, WHYY PBS with that kind of reputation, appeal, acceptance, if you will. Public broadcasting stations always need good material, and they're supposed to be public broadcasting stations. And so we, the Black Communicators Associated [Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] before we became the ABJ [Association of Black Journalists], okay, were able to move in some circles among the broadcasters, remind them of their responsibilities and we learned--sure we got some camera people, cinematographers who happened to be black. We got them on board at Westinghouse [Broadcasting Company; Group W] and at CBS and at ABC. And some of them were so good that we were able to pull film in those days that would illustrate a black perspective that we were talking about, okay. We could show the tenement housing that people were living in which helped to spark the urban riots. We were able to absolutely show some of that stuff. And at the same time we were able to show some blacks in business doing so well with large conference rooms, very nice offices and holdings and such. So that through ABJ and others who joined in with us and so on, we were able to help change the attitudes of some people who were uninformed.

Renee Powell

Professional golfer and educator Renee Powell is one of only three African American women to ever play on the Ladies Professional Golf Association's (LPGA) Tour. She is the daughter of William Powell, owner of the Clearview Golf Course in Canton, Ohio, the first such facility designed, constructed, owned and operated by an African American. Renee Powell graduated from high school in Canton in 1964 and attended Ohio University and Ohio State University.

She began competing as a golfer at age twelve, and continued perfecting her game during her college years. She made her professional debut on the LPGA Tour in 1967, and her first tournament was the U.S. Women's Open conducted by the United States Golf Association. In 1980, when she finished competing on the Tour, she taught golf in Africa and Europe and later returned home to Canton where she currently serves as the head professional golfer at Clearview Golf Course. In 2000, Clearview Golf Course was named to the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

The Powell family established the Clearview Legacy Foundation for education, preservation and turf grass research. In 2003, Renee Powell received the First Lady of Golf Award from the Professional Golfers' Association. In 2007, she received the first Rolex "For the Love of the Game" Award.

Accession Number

A2004.024

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/16/2004

Last Name

Powell

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Central Catholic High School

Ohio University

The Ohio State University

St. Benedict School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Renee

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

POW03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ That Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

5/4/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Meatloaf

Short Description

Golfer Renee Powell (1946 - ) was one of only three African American women to ever play on the Ladies Professional Golf Association's Tour. In 2003, she received the First Lady of Golf Award from the Professional Golfers' Association.

Employment

Clearview Golf Course

Ladies Professional Golf Association

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:8228,138:8704,146:9316,156:9588,161:9860,166:10132,171:14280,271:17748,342:24002,399:24410,406:24682,411:25294,421:32570,638:32842,643:37466,734:48807,860:55814,1000:58971,1042:60126,1064:92166,1614:94168,1641:113030,1925:116599,1983:145602,2247:150940,2353:153910,2417:165108,2524:165400,2529:165984,2538:166787,2551:167590,2568:170875,2678:171605,2699:172481,2706:173284,2725:177810,2833:184448,2904:193495,3065:193993,3072:194906,3092:201256,3156:203128,3189:203920,3204:204784,3219:209540,3248:215540,3325:218670,3332:219460,3343:221593,3371:222383,3383:222699,3388:224200,3403:224911,3415:239255,3627:245888,3715:246386,3723:246718,3728:253745,3799:256726,3840:257030,3845:258778,3885:270784,4047:272808,4083:273336,4090:277300,4101:288616,4314:290134,4341:291031,4360:291445,4367:293653,4413:294136,4434:299937,4515:309664,4726:310445,4738:312504,4767:312930,4774:313427,4782:313782,4788:314279,4801:319070,4822$0,0:803,19:1095,24:1387,29:1825,36:6935,238:12337,332:12921,351:13432,358:19637,463:22900,470:23548,480:23872,485:24358,492:24844,499:25411,507:49820,858:56940,988:65020,1115:75845,1244:101405,1648:102595,1666:105485,1701:110312,1715:115412,1803:115792,1809:118984,1866:119364,1872:125824,1991:136768,2114:150154,2322:151067,2336:152146,2354:152561,2360:152893,2365:153391,2372:160695,2510:161359,2520:171484,2672:171849,2678:180672,2798:184704,2856:209383,3094:217424,3204:227680,3365:232148,3402:238586,3558:239918,3594:252868,3732:253500,3748:256739,3824:258793,3877:260057,3893:260610,3902:263217,3956:263533,3961:264323,3973:272905,4071:274405,4098:274855,4105:280180,4216:284005,4280:285130,4296:286255,4314:302513,4533:308354,4568:309368,4583:309836,4591:312020,4625:316934,4717:322706,4828:323018,4833:334150,4925:340030,4979:341220,4991
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Renee Powell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Renee Powell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Renee Powell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Renee Powell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Renee Powell describes her earliest memory

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Renee Powell describes her experiences with racism while attending St. Benedict's School in Canton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Renee Powell describes her childhood home on the Clearview Golf Club in East Canton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Renee Powell describes her father's love of golf and experiences with racial discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Renee Powell describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Renee Powell describes her experiences in elementary and high school in Canton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Renee Powell remembers her awareness of the Civil Rights Movement and President John F. Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Renee Powell describes her college experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Renee Powell talks about joining the LPGA Tour in 1967

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Renee Powell describes the culture of the LPGA Tour during her professional career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Renee Powell talks about working for Clearview Golf Club as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Renee Powell describes facing racial prejudice as a professional golfer

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Renee Powell talks about her role models as a trailblazing African American female athlete

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Renee Powell talks about the African American golf community during her professional career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Renee Powell talks about the history of African Americans in professional golf

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Renee Powell reflects upon the importance of maintaining historically black organizations' involvement in golf

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Renee Powell reflects upon the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in an integrated society

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Renee Powell explains how national golf associations began pressuring private golf clubs to allow women and minorities in the 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Renee Powell explains the significance of Tiger Woods winning his first major at the Masters Tournament in 1997

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Renee Powell talks about Senator Strom Thurmond and his African American daughter

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Renee Powell talks about Fuzzy Zoeller's racist comments at the 1997 Masters Tournament

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Renee Powell talks about living abroad in England during the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Renee Powell describes her efforts to promote golf in Africa in the 1980s, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Renee Powell describes her time as a golf instructor and goodwill ambassador in Zambia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Renee Powell describes her efforts to promote golf in Africa in the 1980s, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Renee Powell describes working at Clearview Golf Club in East Canton, Ohio during the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Renee Powell talks about golf's growth within the African American community and African Americans' growing acceptance within the golf community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Renee Powell describes publications that focus on golfing history and culture

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Renee Powell talks about how Clearview Golf Club became named a historical site in 2001

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Renee Powell offers advice to aspiring golfers

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Renee Powell talks about the awards she has received for her achievements in golf

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Renee Powell reflects upon the legacy of her family

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Renee Powell narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Renee Powell narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

8$6

DATitle
Renee Powell describes her father's love of golf and experiences with racial discrimination
Renee Powell describes facing racial prejudice as a professional golfer
Transcript
I wanted to ask also about the time period, you're coming of age in the 1950s, where there is such a sense of the real possibilities that African Americans will gain full citizenship, with that optimism that sort of comes out of the World War II [WWII] victory era. Did your father [William Powell] seem to have that kind of vision as well, that, "Yes, I can build a golf course," and, "Yes, I can create this community here at Clearview [Golf Club, East Canton, Ohio], and my children won't have to suffer perhaps some of things that I suffered" (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Well, well yes and I think that's the reason he built the golf course because growing up in the little town that he's from, actually their family was the only family of color in the town.$$And that's Minerva--$$Minerva.$$--Ohio.$$And today his sister is the only African American that lives there, and so it hasn't changed a whole lot, but when he grew up and discovered golf at the age of nine, and he started caddying because it brought in extra money for the family and he--but he also learned to play the game at the same time. He was fascinated by the game of golf. And so growing up as a youngster--and so it was sort of interesting cause I asked him and we talked and I said, "Well when you were nine years old and you hitchhiked all the way to--with another friend, all the way to the golf course," and I said if you look at--and I said, "What did your mother [Massaleaner Powell] say?" Well, the first time he did it, he said he had the worst licking of his entire life ever, and my grandmother loved willow switches, so I unfortunately had only one switching ever (laughter), it was from my grandmother with the willow switch, because they are very flexible and bend a lot (laughter), but anyway my--you know, you wouldn't think of a nine year old hitchhiking eight miles today to a golf course, I mean that just doesn't happen. So that tells you how things have changed from the--actually from the '20s [1920] to now, but my father when he, he discovered the game of golf and then their--he and his older brother started a golf team at the high school and my father was the captain of the golf team, so he played golf then, and--but after he got out of school and they played around all the different courses, but after he got out of school he wasn't able to play because of the color of his skin. And when he went away to school at Wilberforce University [Wilberforce, Ohio], and they started the first golf team there also. And what happened after, after that though, and after he went away to the [U.S. military] service and went away to war [World War II, WWII], and when he came back he thought that things would have changed because he was over in the European Theater, and at different times he was able to play golf in England and Scotland, but when he came back to the United States he found out that things had not changed. And at that time as we all know that, you know, when--during World War II they had a segregated [U.S.] Army and so, but he thought that things would have changed, because as a black soldier being overseas and fighting for your country and when he came back he found out that things had not changed and that many of the prisoners of war were treated better than the black soldiers, and so he then became determined that he was not going to go through the same situation, and that he was going to, to--he loved--he had developed a passion for the game, and wanted to play, and did not think that his--that anyone should be denied an opportunity to play a sport that they loved and he just--I mean he just loved this game, and so that is how he came about building the golf course, and so when we came along he taught all of us in the family to play the game. But I think that, you know, in thinking back, he--at that time there weren't as many golf courses around and there weren't as many people playing, although with a golf course being built then, you know, most--'cause most of our clientele was white until civil rights time. And then people got a little nervous of going to a facility that was a black owned, and my dad said that even friends of his from Minerva would say, "Well, what should we call you, we don't know what to call you now," and because when all the riots and things occurred, and black power, and it made people that were white uncomfortable of coming here, because they didn't, they just didn't know.$$Okay, and when you say we don't know what to call you is that colored or Negro or black (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Right, exactly.$$Oh, okay, or mister or can we still call you Bill, that kind of thing?$$Yeah, one of those things.$$Okay, and it must have been an interesting time.$$Yes.$$Okay, this is a pretty special place even on this snowy day (laughter).$We've talked about your high school years [at Central Catholic High School, Canton, Ohio] and a little bit about the college years at OU [Ohio University, Athens, Ohio] and [The] Ohio State [University, Columbus, Ohio], can we talk now a little bit about your years as a pro golfer? You said that was from '67 [1967] to 1980, that first round in the United States. Did you experience any of the, the kind of blatant discrimination that you associated with your school years, or were things really getting better towards the end of the 1960s?$$I--well I experienced a lot of different things. I mean I experienced things such as--'cause I traveled through the South a lot, I mean a lot of the tournaments were in the South, a lot of the players were from the South, and I didn't have any problems with any players on the tour, because most of them knew me when I--having played junior golf tournaments, and playing collegiate and amateur tournaments. But I mean, I would run into such situations as, of people not wanting to serve you in restaurants, and I have a friend who, we were roommates on the tour for a long time, and she is a Canadian, from Canada, and so several years ago she was talking, she goes, "You know I use to wonder why people wouldn't serve us in restaurants," (laughter) it was because she was with me. But, and housing situations, I ran into a lot of housing situations. I ran into things where people tried to run me off the highway, or in hotels a lot of times I would receive obscene phone calls in the middle of the night. I received a lot of threat letters on my life so, so no things didn't get any better for me because I was one person, who was a person of color, traveling and going to a lot of--some courses were public, but a lot of private country clubs where a black person, an African American, had never played before and going into other situations probably where they didn't allow African Americans to stay before, didn't serve very many in the restaurants and so but here I was. And I would run into other situations just like, you know going into the club house and going into the locker room and having the same credentials as my colleagues that were walking beside me, and the guard at the door would stop me and want to quiz me, and not want to let me in. So for me, no things didn't change, they were worse than before because I was out there by myself, and I can remember one time I had received these threat letters on my life and I was in Florida, and I called my parents [William Powell and Marcella Oliver Powell] and I just cried and cried on the telephone because I thought that someone was going to, you know I could just envision somebody, envision somebody jumping out from behind a tree and killing me, and my parents didn't say come home (laughter), which I--you know I, but I think that, I think they were just trying to make me be tougher and stronger and I--they probably thought that I was safer than I thought I was. And I can remember even taking, taking--going to our tournament director at the time, and because I was so frightened, and our officials saying well there is nothing they can do, but I was receiving these letters and somehow they were being delivered to the locker room, and I would open my mail and it would have like, you know like, "Dear nigger, if you want to live then you need to leave here," so. But so then your question did things get easier, no, they didn't get easier, they just sort of escalated, and I think it was because of the fact--I mean if I were in a situation where there were a lot of people of color in a situation, and if I weren't playing in a sport that was at that time very much a non-minority oriented sport then it would have been different, but that's why I say, you know, I've always been confronted with racism my entire life.$$Okay, so it's primarily then because of race that the discrimination is there, or is it--do you think it is also because you were a woman--$$Oh, no.$$--sort of trailblazing?$$Oh no, not at that time because I was within an organization which was the Ladies Professional Golf Association [LPGA], so it was all women.$$Okay.$$So mine was just be- simply because I was a person of color that was there and ran into incidents. I don't think they were telling the white people, "Dear nigger," (laughter), and because it--and, and but it was--and not because I was a female, but because it was a female organization, but it was just a lot of unpleasant situations.$$And in the midst of all that, then how do you acquire this reputation for being a professional, and not necessarily reacting only to the racism but focusing on the game, is that through newspaper accounts or magazines for the profession itself?$$Oh no, just from my background and my parents, and knowing what they had gone through and, and always--you know, them just, you know, I think just making us stronger in, just in, in, just in talking and seeing what they had experienced.

Robert Beale

At the age of ninety-one, Robert Beale was still teaching. Born in Camden, New Jersey, on November 19, 1911, Beale moved with his family to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1919. After graduating from high school, Beale went to West Virginia State University in 1929, and graduated cum laude in 1932. From there he attended the University of Pennsylvania, earning his M.S. degree in chemistry in 1934. He returned to school at Penn State University, where he received his PhD in chemistry in 1942.

Beale began his teaching career at what is now known as Hutson-Tillotson College in Austin, Texas, working in the chemistry department. After serving as a teacher and administrator at eleven different colleges during his career, including North Carolina A&T, the University of Maryland and Virginia Union, Beale retired in 1986. In 1990, Beale returned to teaching in the Prince George's County School District after hearing there was a shortage of black male teachers.

He taught at Suitland High School and took students on an annual "college tour," a five-day trip to various colleges in the South. He stayed active in the lives of his students, going to meet with parents and encouraging his students to further their education. His daughter, Joy Beale Mitchell, worked with him, serving as a media specialist at the school. He also had a son, Robert Beale, Jr.

Beale passed away on October 9, 2006 at age 94.

Accession Number

A2003.234

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/25/2003

Last Name

Beale

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

South Philadelphia High School

West Virginia State University

University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Camden

HM ID

BEA02

Favorite Season

None

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

My Skin Covers Me Very Well. I Fit In It And I Don't Let Anyone In It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/19/1911

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cheesecake, Pig Feet

Death Date

10/9/2006

Short Description

Chemistry professor and high school chemistry teacher Robert Beale (1911 - 2006 ) served as a teacher and administrator at eleven different colleges during his sixty-year career, and continued to teach high school into his nineties.

Employment

Hutson-Tillotson College

North Carolina A&T State University

University of Maryland, College Park

Virginia Union University

Suitland High School

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Beale's interview, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Robert Beale's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Beale lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Beale describes his maternal family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Beale describes his maternal family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Beale describes his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Beale describes his father's occupation, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Beale describes his father's occupation, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Beale describes the sights, sounds and smells of 1920s Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Beale describes the sights, sounds and smells of 1920s Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Beale describes the sights, sounds and smells of 1920s Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 3

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Beale describes his childhood interests, activities and attending church in Camden, New Jersey and south Philadelphia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Beale describes his family's musical abilities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Beale remembers the Sesqui-Centennial International Exposition in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1926

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Beale describes attending James Logan Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Beale describes attending Southern Manual Training High School for Boys, later South Philadelphia High School, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Beale describes his post-high school career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Beale explains how he attended West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Beale explains the significance of the second Morrill Act in 1890 to the establishment of southern black colleges and universities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Beale describes his experience as an undergraduate student at West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Beale describes his experience working in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania after graduating from college in 1931, during the Great Depression

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Beale talks about earning a master's degree and his first teaching job at Samuel Huston College in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Beale describes his tenure as an educator at Samuel Huston College in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Beale describes his tenure as an educator at Princess Anne College in Princess Anne, Maryland from 1936 to 1939

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Beale talks about earning his Ph.D. in chemistry from Pennsylvania State University in 1942

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Beale describes meeting his wife and the birth of his two children

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Beale lists the twelve institutions where he taught chemistry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Beale describes his tenure as an instructor at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Beale describes one of his most memorable teaching moments in the chemistry department at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Beale talks briefly about his retirement from the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Beale remembers civil rights activity in Greensboro, North Carolina and Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Beale talks about joining the faculty at Suitland High School in Forestville, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Robert Beale describes his concerns and challenges as a high school educator

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Robert Beale describes the most rewarding aspect of teaching

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Beale shares his teaching philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Beale describes how education has changed

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Beale describes how he maintains the energy to teach at ninety years old

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Beale describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Robert Beale reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Robert Beale remembers his childhood girlfriend

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Robert Beale considers what he would have done differently in his life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Robert Beale describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Robert Beale describes his tenure as an instructor at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland
Robert Beale describes one of his most memorable teaching moments in the chemistry department at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Transcript
Alright, and the last college you taught at was not a historically black college, the University of Maryland, right in College Park [Maryland]?$$Right what happened was I decided when I was at Knoxville College [Knoxville, Tennessee]--I decided that well first of all I went there along with the philosophy that had guided me through years and that is that the black professionals should go south to work and help the black people, you see. So you noticed I was in the south all the time. Now I'm at Knoxville College and they ran out of money.$$They ran out of money?$$They ran out of money and a Presbyterian church owned the school and it didn't have enough money to pay me so I left there. Now I'm still living in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]--no well let me see, I'm a little confused there--however I left and through some connection in Maryland--I forget what it was--I was put on a project assignment at College Park and then I went on there as a teacher of chemistry and then as an assistant to provost as they call them.$$How long did you stay at the University of Maryland?$$Eleven years.$$Okay that's a long time.$$That was the longest tenure I had had (laughter) and now I have a tenure here of thirteen, this is my fourteenth year here.$$So you've been here [Suitland High School, Forestville, Maryland] longer than any other place, that you've ever taught (simultaneous).$$Any other place, right.$Before we get to this, I just want to ask you if there is something remarkable about your teaching career in colleges that you want to tell us about or some of experience that you--(simultaneous) (unclear)?$$Well for the most part in these colleges as I moved around, I was the chemistry department and I developed the chemistry department however you want to put it and I was well received. When I went to Southern University [Baton Rouge, Louisiana] as head of the chemistry department, the department had a reputation that nobody could pass, you see and I--and they also couldn't even get into classes in chemistry. So I told the president, I said well look set the class up for the chapel and I will meet them in the chapel and I would get up on the stage with a board and go on teaching them chemistry. I enjoyed that very much. Interesting thing about it is there was a piano in there and before they came in, I would get down there and play the piano (laughter). They would be coming in and I was banging away on the piano. But I did that sort of thing to help the situation, to cooperate and get it going. I'm talking about taking the large class in the chapel. So I have enjoyed my whole career ever since I almost messed up at Samuel Huston [College, later Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, Texas] (laughter) but my guardian angel gave up her life to rescue me.