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Carl Hines

Carl Hines was born in Wilson, North Carolina, the son of educators. His mother was an elementary school teacher and his father, was a math teacher and a self-taught musician. Hines would also become a math teacher and musician.

Music played an instrumental role in this young boy's life. In fact, he started out playing the bugle and was active in his high school band until he discovered jazz and a totally new world opened up to him. When Hines’s interest focused on jazz music he began to play the piano. He immersed himself in jazz, reading and listening to everything he could get his hands on especially Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thelonious Monk.

Hines played music throughout his life but chose a career as a math teacher. He taught for thirty-five years in the Indianapolis area. For him, the world of teaching math was synonymous with the world of music and the interplay between the two fascinated him. Hines retired from teaching but continues to play music. He works as a pianist/keyboardist, either solo or with his own trio, The Carl Hines Band. The band plays swing, blues, country, latin and R & B music.

Accession Number

A2000.021

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/11/2000

Last Name

Hines

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Tennessee State University

University of Tennesee

Charles H. Darden High School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Carl

Birth City, State, Country

Wilson

HM ID

HIN01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium not required, but would accept it.

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Wilson, North Carolina

Favorite Quote

To Each His Own.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Indianapolis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard Greens

Short Description

Math teacher and jazz musician Carl Hines ( - ) taught for thirty-five years in the Indianapolis area. Coming from a very musical family, Hines played music from an early age, but began to focus on playing jazz piano while in high school. Later he formed the Carl Hines Band and performed around Indianapolis.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carl Hines' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carl Hines lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carl Hines describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carl Hines talks about his parents' educational backgrounds and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carl Hines talks about growing up in Wilson, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carl Hines describes his favorite childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carl Hines talks about attending Catholic school

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carl Hines talks about his parents' expectations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carl Hines talks about his childhood musical influences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carl Hines describes his home town of Wilson, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carl Hines describes how Wilson, North Carolina has changed over time

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carl Hines describes his parents' personalities, and his likeness to them

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carl Hines talks about his love of Rhythm & Blues and jazz music as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Carl Hines talks about how the music of trumpeter Clifford Brown influenced him pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Carl Hines talks about how the music of trumpeter Clifford Brown influenced him pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Carl Hines talks about the influence of his father's favorite jazz musicians

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Carl Hines talks about learning to play the piano

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carl Hines describes spending the summers of his youth working in New York City, New York pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carl Hines describes spending the summers of his youth working in New York City, New York pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carl Hines describes his motivation for attending Tennessee State University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carl Hines talks about his college major and being a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carl Hines talks about learning to play music at Tennessee State University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carl Hines describes the gigs he played as a college student

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carl Hines talks about some of the well-known musicians he played with as a college student

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carl Hines talks about what he learned about being a musician

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carl Hines talks about his musical influences during college

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Carl Hines talks about John Coltrane and Charles Mingus

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Carl Hines talks about developing an appreciation for mathematics at Tennessee State University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Carl Hines describes the relationship between music and mathematics pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Carl Hines describes the relationship between music and mathematics pt.2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carl Hines compares music theory and math theory

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carl Hines talks about the creativity in mathematics and music

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carl Hines talks about his first teaching job and attending graduate school at the University of Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carl Hines talks about the challenges of going to graduate school at Tennessee State University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carl Hines talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carl Hines describes his experiences with Civil Rights unrest in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carl Hines talks about his teaching career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carl Hines talks about what working with white teachers, and from his students

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carl Hines describes what he likes about Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carl Hines talks about developing as a musician in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Carl Hines describes how his musical repertoire has evolved, and some of the musicians he has played with

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Carl Hines talks about the historical significance of Indiana Avenue

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Carl Hines talks about well-known musicians from Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Carl Hines describes how Americans' perception of jazz has evolved since the 1920s pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carl Hines talks about the intellectual tradition, and impact of, of jazz music

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carl Hines comments on music's significance to American society

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carl Hines describes how he developed an interest in poetry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carl Hines talks about Arna Bontemps publishing one of his poems

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carl Hines recites "Two Jazz Poems"

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carl Hines talks about writing "Two Jazz Poems", and the relationship between poetry and mathematics

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carl Hines talks about the evolution of his writing, and Mari Evans and Etheridge Knight

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carl Hines talks about his future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carl Hines recites his poem "Now That He is Safely Dead", and talks about his modesty

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Carl Hines talks about his parents

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Carl Hines talks about his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carl Hines narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carl Hines narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

9$8

DATitle
Carl Hines talks about his childhood musical influences
Carl Hines talks about what working with white teachers, and from his students
Transcript
Let's talk about music, because I know education was very, you know, predominant, were your parents--your father [Carl Hines, Sr.] taught at the local (inaudible).$$My father was a math teacher for many years, then he became principal of an elementary school in our home town [Wilson, North Carolina], he was a self-taught musician, although I don't ever recall, I don't ever recall hearing him play, I mean, in the band he would teach the kids how to play, he would say, well, you hold the horn here and you do this. I never heard him play an entire song, or anything like that. Around the house we listened to the classical music, mostly, Nat King Cole. In those days I listened to rhythm and blues was the thing, there wasn't--we would listen to Nashville, Tennessee late at night, this is before the era of rock and roll, of course, we would listen to people like, I would, although my parents would like, my father liked classical music, and march music and that kind of stuff. My mother liked Nat King Cole and the popular singers, Billy Eckstine and people like that, and I discovered rhythm and blues early in my youth and in my hometown, there was one station that played Black music for an hour or two during the day. CPS Serenade was the name of the program, and us teenagers would listen to CPS Serenade during that time, and then we would listen to Nashville, Tennessee, Randy's Record Mart, I don't know if you know about that, but, this was the days before rock and roll, so, we would listen to Randy's Record Mart late at night, and we would hear rhythm and blues, the Black music of the day.$$(Inaudible). Okay.$$And I played a little bit of trumpet, after I played the bugle, in the German Bugle core in the Catholic school, when I got to high school, actually sixth grade through 12th, was considered the high school, I mean, the classes were all in the same building, Darden High School [Wilson, North Carolina] and I played the trumpet, I never really got to be very good on the trumpet, I enjoyed being in the band, although it was a little bit embarrassing, my father was the band director, but, we did have a very good band and I enjoyed playing in the band, and we would do marches, and play at the football games and that kind of stuff.$And do you have any--I'm surprised that--I didn't know they bussed teachers into places, I thought that was (inaudible).$$That was just a figure of speech. But, at the time I went to Marshall High School, there were five Black teachers and four Black students, so, they had just gone through and said, you're going to go, and you're going to go, and you're going to go. So, we went to Marshall, not knowing what to expect and at that time it was very conservative, Barry Goldwater, was the hero for a lot of people, so, we felt a little out of place, one teacher quit and became a lawyer. But, I stuck it out, and I enjoyed it, overall, it was a learning experience for me, it was my first time, actually, although I had gone to the University of Tennessee I would go to class and then go back home, and I developed a few friendships that were primarily musicians, but, this was my first experience being around members of the other group, so, I would just, at the cafeteria, I would just sit at a different table each day, and talk to kids at the table, trying to learn, you know, what they were about, cause I didn't really know, I didn't have a clue, so, I would just talk to the kids, and the kids remember that, and they I see them on the streets today, and they talk to me about how we did that, but, that was not liked, by the administration, they frowned on that. Everyday, I took my tray, sit in the cafeteria at a different table full of kids and just talked to the kids about the music they liked. This was the era of psychedelic, you know, psychedelic era, so, I would just talk to the kids, you know, that's how I learned and I enjoyed it, I learned a lot and it benefitted me in a lot of ways.$$In what ways?$$$$Well, I learned about the dominant culture in the ways that I had not--whereas before I had the theory, here I was actually meeting people, talking to people, learning about attitudes, learning about the things we had in common and some of the differences that we had about things.$$Can you talk about some of the similarities and some of the differences?$$There were, I mean, the type of music listened to was all together different, it was different from this was the era in which the kids were saying, hey, don't trust anybody over 30, remember that? So, there was a lot of things going on in society at the time, so, I don't know if they were just racial, or mere cultural differences, but, there were also differences between these kids and their parents, so. The similarities were that we were all basically human, and they're teenagers and I went through my teenage period, and you know, a lot of things you worry about, like acne, and you know, just, you worry about these things. So, it was a learning experience for me in many, many ways.