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Jabari Asim

Author and magazine editor Jabari Asim was born on August 11, 1962 in St. Louis, Missouri. He graduated from Southwest High School in 1980, and attended Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois.

In 1988, Asim was hired by the startup African American publication, Take Five magazine, as a contributing writer. By 1990, he was promoted to senior editor of the magazine where he ran the magazine’s literary section until 1992, when he became a copy editor for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Here, he would take on the additional role of arts editor of the weekend section; and, in 1993, he was made book editor. In 1996, Asim moved to Washington D.C. when he was hired by the Washington Post to serve as an assistant editor before becoming senior editor of the newspaper’s Book World in 1999. The Washington Post Book World was a weekly book section in which Asim wrote, assigned, and edited reviews. He remained in this role until he became editor-in-chief of the NAACP’s magazine, The Crisis, in 2007. From 2008 to 2010, Asim served as a scholar-in-residence in African American Studies and in the Department of Journalism at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign; and, in 2009, he was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowship in the general nonfiction category. Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts hired Asim in 2010 to work as an associate professor of writing, literature, and publishing. He left The Crisis in 2017.

Asim is the author of nonfiction, fiction, children’s and adult’s books, and poetry. His children’s literature includes The Road to Freedom: A story of the Reconstruction (2001), Whose Toes are Those? and Whose Knees are These? (2006), Daddy Goes to Work (2006), Girl of Mine and Boy of Mine (2010), Fifty Cents and a Dream: Young Booker T. Washington (2012), Preaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis (2016), and A Child's Introduction to African American History: The Experiences, People, and Events That Shaped Our Country (2018). His adult works include Not Guilty: Twelve Black Men Speak Out on the Law, Justice and Life (2001), The N Word: Who Can Say It, Who Shouldn’t, and Why (2007), What Obama Means: …For Our Culture, Our Politics, Our Future (2009), A Taste of Honey (2010), Only the Strong (2015), and We Can’t Breathe (2018). Asim’s poetry has also been featured in the Black American Literature Forum, The Furious Flowering of African American Poetry, Step Into A World: A Global Anthology of The New Black Literature, Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social and Political Black Literature & Art, Beyond The Frontier: African-American Poetry for the 21st Century, and The Harlem Reader: A Celebration of New York's Most Famous Neighborhood from the Renaissance Years to the 21st Century.

Asim lives in Massachusetts with his wife, Liana Asim, and the couple has five children.

Jabari Asim was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 13, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.100

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/13/2019

Last Name

Asim

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Wade Elementary School

Central Visual and Performing Arts High School

Northwestern University

First Name

Jabari

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

ASI01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Newport, RI

Favorite Quote

Writing Is Work, But It's Joyful Work

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/11/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Author and magazine editor Jabari Asim (1962 - ) was editor-in-chief of the NAACP’s magazine, The Crisis, from 2007 to 2017, and became associate professor of writing literature and publishing at Emerson College in 2010. He has also authored fifteen books.

Employment

Sears

Take Five Magazine

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Washington Post

Washington Post Book World

The Crisis

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

John Guggenheim Foundation

Emerson College

Favorite Color

Green

Cecilia A. Conrad

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad was born on January 4, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri to Dr. Emmett James Conrad and Eleanor Nelson Conrad. She moved with her family to Dallas, Texas after her father was hired at St. Paul’s Hospital. Conrad went on to receive her B.A. degree in economics from Wellesley College in 1976 and her Ph.D. degree in economics from Stanford University in 1982.

Conrad began her career in academia in 1981 when she was hired as an assistant professor of economics at Duke University. From there, she taught at Barnard College and then Pomona College as a Stedman-Sumner professor of economics. In 2002, Conrad was named California’s Carnegie Professor of the Year. Two years later, she became associate dean of Pomona College. During her time as a college administrator, Conrad continued to publish on the issue of race and gender on economic status. After taking a two year hiatus to serve as interim vice president and dean of the faculty at Scripps College, Conrad returned to Pomona College as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the college. In 2013, Conrad left Pomona to join the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation as the vice president of the MacArthur Fellows Program. After two years at the foundation, Conrad became the managing director of both the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change. In 2019, Conrad became chief executive officer of Lever for Change, an affiliate of the MacArthur Foundation focused on high impact philanthropic opportunities.

Conrad served as editor of The Review of Black Political Economy and an associate editor of Feminist Economics. She has published articles on economics, liberal arts education, and philanthropy in peer-reviewed journals and popular media. While working at Pomona College, Conrad also directed the American Economic Association’s “Pipeline Mentoring Program,” matching students enrolled in a Ph.D. program in economics with mentors in the field. In 2007, Conrad became the president of the International Association for Feminist Economics. She is on the board of trustees at Muhlenberg College, Bryn Mawr College, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Academy of Social Insurance.

Conrad has received numerous awards for her work. Her co-edited collection of essays, African Americans in the US Economy, was named a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2005. Three years later, she received the National Urban League’s 2008 Woman of Power Award. She has also received honorary doctorates from Claremont Graduate University and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Conrad and her husband, Llewellyn Miller, have one child: Conrad Miller.

Cecilia Conrad was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/12/2019

Last Name

Conrad

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

A

Schools

Wellesley College

Stanford Graduate School of Business

First Name

Cecilia

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

CON08

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/4/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Foundation executive and academic administrator Cecilia Conrad (1955 - ) served as managing director of the MacArthur Fellows Program and 100&Change before becoming chief executive officer of Lever for Change.

Employment

Pomona College

Scripps College

American Economic Association

Barnard College, Columbia University

Duke University

The Review of Black Political Economy

Feminist Economics

MacArthur Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr.

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was born on November 7, 1954 in St. Louis, Missouri to Arlena Scott Franklin and Dr. John E. Franklin, Sr. His family moved to Detroit, Michigan in the late 1950s and he graduated from the Interlochen Arts Academy in 1972. He studied theater at New York University School of the Arts before obtaining his B.S. degree in zoology from Michigan State University in 1976. In 1980, Franklin received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. He later earned an M.Sc. degree from the Harvard University School of Public Health in 1999 and an M.A. degree from Northwestern University in 2014.

Franklin began his career as an instructor in psychiatry at New York Hospital Cornell University Medical College in 1984. At the affiliated Westchester Division facility in White Plains, New York, he served as the attending physician in the substance abuse and eating disorder units. In 1986, Franklin moved to Newark, New Jersey to join the faculty of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - New Jersey Medical School. He worked with substance abuse patients at two Newark area institutions, the Institute for Counseling and Training and St. Barnabas Hospital, and held consultancies with the State of New Jersey and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. In 1993, Franklin began a long-term career at Northwestern University and achieved the rank of full professor. He held faculty appointments in the departments of psychiatry, surgery and medical education/medical humanities and bioethics. Franklin provided psychiatric services for medical/ surgical inpatients, directed the Addiction Division and fellowship, had a general psychiatric practice and was the transplant psychiatrist for the Kovler Organ Transplantation Center. In 2002, Franklin was named associate dean for minority and cultural affairs at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and in 2016, he became associate dean for diversity, inclusion and student support.

In 1985, Franklin helped found the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, and he has co-authored numerous papers, chapters, books in the areas of addiction, organ transplantation and health disparities. Franklin served on national committees for the National Institute for Drug Abuse, Institute of Medicine and Federal Drug Administration. He has served on community boards, including Lakefront Supportive Housing, Community Counseling Centers of Chicago, Westinghouse Scholars and did psychiatric disability examinations for the State of Illinois for 20 plus years. Franklin is a 2002 Leadership Greater Chicago fellow. He has served as a member of numerous professional organizations including the American Psychiatric Association, the National Medical Association and Black Psychiatrists of America. In 2017, he was elected into the Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honors medical society. Franklin has been recognized for his teaching contributions with awards and commitment to issues of diversity; in 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Franklin and his wife, Terri West Franklin, have three children.

Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.111

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/21/2018

Last Name

Franklin

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

FRA17

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If it ain't broke don't fix it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/7/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Psychiatrist and professor Dr. John E. Franklin, Jr. (1954- ) became an expert on addiction and organ transplants and has an over twenty five year career at Northwestern University Hospital and Medical School. In 2016, the Marco Ellis Legacy Award was renamed the John E. Franklin, MD Commitment to Diversity Award in his honor.

Favorite Color

Brown

Kevin Shurn

Entrepreneur Kevin Shurn was born on October 20, 1956 in St. Louis, Missouri to Mattie Lou Shurn and Luther Clarence Shurn. He graduated from Sumner High School in St. Louis, Missouri in 1974, and enrolled at Forest Park Community College in St. Louis, Missouri, where he studied mechanical engineering technology and accounting.

In 1974, Shurn began his career as a draftsman for Zurheide-Herrmann Consultant Engineers Company. He then accepted a design and draftsman position at Fulton Iron Works, designing punch presses. In 1976, he became assistant sales manager at Fulton Iron Works and attended his first trade show, the International Machine Tool Show in Chicago, Illinois. Shurn was later promoted to manager of contract manufacturing in 1979, before he was hired at I.W. Industries in Kentucky in 1983. In the same year, he also incorporated his own business, Shurn and Associates. In 1988, he founded Superior Maintenance Company (SMC), and then in 1990, he attended Toyota Motor Corporation’s first Opportunity Exchange Program. By 1993, Superior Maintenance Company partnered with Toyota Motors, first supplying janitorial services to Toyota and then to provide Toyota’s die manufacturing equipment in Georgetown, Kentucky; Erlanger, Kentucky; Princeton, Indiana and San Antonio, Texas. In 2017, his company was awarded part of the Toyota’s North American headquarters facility in Plano, Texas.

Shurn has been featured in MBE magazine, Fortune, Black Enterprise and Ebony magazine.

Shurn was active in numerous state and local organizations, as a member of the Elizabethtown Rotary Club having served as president and assistant district governor. He was a Paul Harris Fellow and served on the Advisory Board of Republic Bank & Trust Company, the Vaughn Reno Starks Community Center and Big Brothers Big Sisters, the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, North Central Educational Foundation and Board of Trustees of The DePaul School. Shurn was a Bingham Fellows 2009 graduate and served on the University of Louisville Board of Overseers. Shurn was appointed by the Governor of Kentucky to the Kentucky Workforce Investment Board.

Shurn, and his wife Ivvy, have three children.

Kevin Shurn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 13, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.127

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/13/2017

Last Name

Shurn

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Kevin

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

SHU03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruising

Favorite Quote

Do all you can and then some.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Kentucky

Birth Date

10/20/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Louisville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Entrepreneur Kevin Shurn (1956 - ) was the founder and president of Shurn and Associates and Superior Maintenance Company, located in Elizabethtown, Kentucky.

Favorite Color

Red

Billy Davis, Jr.

Singer Billy Davis, Jr. was born on June 26, 1938 in St. Louis, Missouri to William Davis, Sr. and Norris Wilbur. Davis started singing in gospel choirs at an early age. He attended Washington Technical High School in St. Louis and sang with a band called the Emeralds. In 1958, Davis and his father opened a nightclub, where he worked and performed music. In 1961, he was drafted into the United States Army and formed another band, The Kingsmen, while stationed in Germany.

In 1965, Davis moved to Los Angeles, California seeking a recording opportunity with Motown Records. While waiting for his chance to go into the studio with one of their producers, he and friend Lamonte McLemore decided to start a singing group as a hobby. The Versatiles was formed, which included Davis, McLemore, Marilyn McCoo, Florence LaRue, and Ron Townson. The group signed to the Soul City label, changed their name to The 5th Dimension, and recorded their first hit in 1966, "Go Where You Wanna Go." In 1967, they released “Up, Up, and Away,” which won four Grammy Awards and was the title track to The 5th Dimension's first hit album. In 1969, The 5th Dimension released The Age of Aquarius. The album's first single, "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In," became a mega-hit and occupied the number one spot on the charts for six weeks. It earned the group two more Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year.

In 1969, Davis married bandmate Marilyn McCoo, and in 1975, they left The 5th Dimension. Together, they released 1976's I Hope We Get To Love In Time, featuring the single, "You Don't Have to Be a Star (To Be in My Show)." The song went straight to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and earned the duo a Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus. Davis and McCoo went on to host The Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr. Show on CBS in 1977.

In 1982, Davis returned to the studio and recorded a solo gospel album called Let Me Have a Dream, which was co-produced by the world-renown Gospel artist, the Rev. James Cleveland. In the 1990s, he continued to sing and explored a career in musical theatre, starring in Dreamgirls in North Carolina in 1993, and Blues in the Night, at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, California in 1994. He later founded the Soldiers For the Second Coming Music Ministry and co-authored the book Up, Up and Away…How We Found Love, Faith and Lasting Marriage in the Entertainment World with McCoo in 2004.

Davis has also earned a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and The 5th Dimension was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. He received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore in 2012.

Billy Davis, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 29, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.179

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/29/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Washington Technical High School

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Coleman Elementary School

First Name

Billy

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

DAV33

Favorite Season

None

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/26/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Singer Billy Davis, Jr. (1938 - ) is a Grammy Award-winning musician and an original member of The 5th Dimension. He is also co-author, with his wife Marilyn McCoo, of Up, Up and Away…How We Found Love, Faith and Lasting Marriage in the Entertainment World.

Employment

Self Employed

U.S. Army

Various

5th Dimension

McCoo & Davis

Favorite Color

None

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Billy Davis, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his paternal family's experience in Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his father's lumber company

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his childhood neighborhood in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his varied religious experiences as a youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about musical traditions in different churches

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. recalls memories from his grade school years

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his love for baseball and professional baseball teams in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about how he met HistoryMaker Lamonte McLemore and Ron Townson

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his favorite subjects in school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about musicians he looked up to as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his grade school education

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his high school band, the Emeralds

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about dropping out of high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his job and musical trajectory after dropping out of high school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his decision to sing popular music

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about developing his music and performance skills at the Havana Club in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. describes being drafted into the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about being stationed at Fort Knox in Kentucky and the Merrell Barracks in Germany while serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about playing music while in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about performing at the Apollo Theatre and the events of 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about opening the Oriole nightclub in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about separating from his first wife

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about meeting HistoryMaker Lamonte McLemore and moving to California

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about forming the Versatiles with Ron Townson and HistoryMakers Lamonte McLemore and Florence LaRue

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo describe their singing style and the origin of The Versatiles' names

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about the mentorship of Rene DeKnight

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The Versatiles' manager, Marc Gordon

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their first hit, 'Go Where You Wanna Go' and renaming The Versatiles as The 5th Dimension

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's first album and meeting songwriter Jimmy Webb

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about the significance of The 5th Dimension's first album 'Up, Up and Away'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's second album, 'The Magic Garden'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about working with Bones Howe on The 5th Dimension's second album, 'The Magic Garden;

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's television performances

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's album, "The Age of Aquarius"

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about how they saw 'Hair' the musical on Broadway

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about life on the road and falling in love with each other

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr and Marilyn McCoo talk about the television special, 'The 5th Dimension: An Odyssey and the Cosmic Universe of Peter Max'

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about 'One Less Bell to Answer' and 'Love's Lines, Angles and Rhymes'

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about 'Wedding Bell Blues' and connecting with audiences

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their record contract and the 1971 television special, 'The 5th Dimension Travelling Sunshine Show'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's contract with ABC Records

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about leaving The 5th Dimension and recording the original group's final album

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo reflect on their last album with The 5th Dimension, 'Earthbound'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their joint album and television show

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their second and third joint albums and their international success

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marilyn McCoo talks about recording a solo album and hosting 'Solid Gold'

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about recording a gospel album

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marilyn McCoo talks about being cast on 'Days of Our Lives'

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo describes performing for Pope Saint John Paul II and President George H.W. Bush

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about reuniting with The 5th Dimension in 1990

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about The 5th Dimension's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their Christian faith

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marilyn McCoo talks about winning a Grammy and performing on Broadway's 'Show Boat'

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about going on tour and working with Jamie Foxx

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about Davis' prostate cancer diagnosis

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their book 'Up, Up and Away: How We Found Love, Faith, and Lasting Marriage in the Entertainment World'

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their recent work and touring with Sir Cliff Richard

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their legacy and their relationship

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about what they would do differently

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Billy Davis, Jr. talks about his theatre performances

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about Davis' son and their praise ministry

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their community service in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo talk about their relationship with the original members of The 5th Dimension including HistoryMaker Florence LaRue

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Billy Davis, Jr. and Marilyn McCoo describe how they want to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

7$10

DATitle
Billy Davis, Jr. talks about the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood
Billy Davis, Jr. talks about meeting HistoryMaker Lamonte McLemore and moving to California
Transcript
I asked the same question of your wife [HM Marilyn McCoo], but what were some of the sights, and sounds, and smells of growing up?$$Well, I would, I would say the, the, I, I, I would say smells of, you know, what, what, in St. Louis [Missouri], you, you know, we, we, we--it was a steel mill. You could smell smokes, you know, the smells of, of steel burning. And 'cause that's what, it was the Scullin Steel was one of the major places where, where a lot men would work, and you would, you could, you could smell it, you know. And, and, and if you were fortunate enough to, to, to live in, in an area that, that wasn't deep in the city, that just had an area where there were trees, and, and, and, and, and, and, and birds, and, and, and the blue jays, and robins, and all those kind of birds, I mean cardinals. That's where the St. Louis Cardinals came from. (Unclear)--cardinal bird, you would see all of them in, in St. Louis, you know. And, and sights, it was just, just, just trains and, and things like that, you know, trucks. There was a lot of, lot of industry there.$$Okay, okay, now was there, was there a lot of music in, in your home?$$Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, it was a lot of music in the house. I mean, my sisters and, and, and, and me, we would sing. We would sing songs. We would sing songs, get together and, and, and harmonize. And I just, I know [HM] Marilyn [McCoo] talked about--we talked about it because we did the same thing in our family. And it was, it was beautiful, beautiful to be able to get together and sing because during those years you didn't have a lot of things to entertain ourselves with, not like they do today. But, but one, one--which I think is missing today because they need to be entertaining themselves with each other instead of with the, a lot of the stuff that they entertain themselves with. But it's brought the family closer together. We, we enjoyed each other. We couldn't wait to get together and sing and show off in front of each other. It was just, it was just a lot of fun. And yeah, so there was always music in the house. I remember listening to albums and old blues songs, you know, like I was, I was, I was a, I was a--[clearing throat]--excuse me--I was the type of kid that I loved all kind of music. I want, I wanted to, to--once I knew I could sing, I wanted to sing everything. And so I would get into, I would listen to jazz. I would listen to blues and, and Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, and, and I would listen to all those kind of guys, Memphis, Memphis Slim. And then, then on the other hand, I'd, I'd be listening to Snooky Lanson on the Lucky Strike Parade [Officially Your Hit Parade] and, and people like that. And, and, and then I would, I, I would, I remember my mother would, would take us to the opera out at Forest Park. And, and, and I remember the first time I went and experienced an opera. It blew my mind. You know, it was like wow, these people are on stage, and they're changing outfits. And it's, they're painting a picture, they're paint a picture for us of life and how all these went, what used to be years ago. I remember seeing the 'King and I' in the Forest Park on stage.$$So this is a big park in the middle of the city?$$In the, in the--Oak Forest--$$Yeah.$$--Park is one of your major, major parks in the United States. I mean it's world-known.$$And beautiful park.$$And beautiful park, and plus it's got a world-known zoo, you know. But they also had an opera house out there. And we would go out there and my God, I was just, I mean, to see the opera, it, it, it fascinated me. I mean I couldn't believe all this beauty and all this stuff--[clearing throat]--excuse me--was happening on stage. And, and it was, it was just, it was just, it was just I knew then that, that, that where I wanted to be, 'cause I didn't know if I--but I enjoyed opera. I still enjoy to this day, classical music. I, I, I, I'll tell you, I listen to everything, but, and I enjoy it all. But I never thought I would be an opera singer.$$Now St. Louis is one, but Houston [Texas]--(simultaneous)--$$$$--there's an opera in a park, and I can't think of too many other places that have an opera in the park. In fact, I can't think of any right now, but they were like, what, the Mooney's Theater out there and all that, you know, so--$$Mm-hmm.$$Yeah.$$Well, during those years I didn't know, I, I didn't know it was an opera in the park until we--that my mother [Norris Oldham Davis] took us. And once, once she took us out there, then I wanted to keep going because it interest me. It was the music, you know. And I don't what other parks had operas in 'em or, or nothin'. I never thought about it after that. But it's one of the things that stuck in my mind and my heart, that, that, that, that it was a part of the music that I would love, you know. And so that was a good experience for me for, for preparation for, for what I wanted to do in my life.$Now you left St. Louis [Missouri] in '65 [1965]. Now, did you, did you know your friends were out there, you know--$$Yeah.$$--[HM] Lamonte [McLemore] and--$$Yeah, well, well, Lamonte's brother, Donald, he was coming through St. Louis. And I had talked to him, and I had, I had called Lamonte and asked him, you know, if he knew anybody at Motown Records on the West Coast, and he said yes. He said I know the president on the, of the West Coast. I said wow, that's great. I said do you think you can get me a, a, an appointment with him. I said I wanna go, I wanna meet him, so I go see about getting with the company. Lamonte asked me, said well, can you sing? I said, I said yeah, yeah. I say, I said you get the appointment. I'll do the rest, you know, and so he did. And at that particular time, his brother was coming through St. Louis visiting some of the, his people. So that was my ride out to Los Angeles [California]. So Dunk came through--Donald--$$He actually drove, he drove back from L.A. [Los Angeles, California] and was going back, huh?$$Yeah, he drove--$$Yeah.$$--from L.A. coming to see his family. And then we got--he picked me up now on the way back and, and drove back to California. I drove with him--$$How, how--$$And--$$--how many hours is it from St. Louis to Los Angeles?$$Oh it's--$$Or how many days is it?$$It's about a day or so, or, or more. It's according to how long you wanna stay on the road, you know, 'cause we stopped in Denver [Colorado] and stayed overnight in Denver. And then we left Denver and came, came into L.A. the next day. But what, what happened was a, a, a, a, a crazy story happened because the night before I left to come to L.A. [Los Angeles, California], I played in a club with another friend of mine. His name is Jasper Thomas. Jasper used to be the drummer for Chuck Berry. So, so, but, but both of us were hitting the sauce at the time. And so we, we, we, we played, and, and, and when we finished the job that night, I know I was going to be going out to California the next day. So what happened is I had my guitar and my amp, and instead of--he, he packed his drums in the, in the trunk. Usually, I would have put my guitar and amp in the trunk of the car, but I put 'em in the backseat. And drinking, I, I didn't think about it. And so on the way home we decided that we was gon' stop and get some barbecue. So we stopped, and when we stopped somebody broke in the car and stole my amp and the, and, and, and my guitar that I was taking to California, 'cause that was gon' be my working tools. And so, what happened was, I came out of the barbecue place, and they got me home. And I opened the trunk, and I said hey, man, my guitar and my amp's not in (laughter)--so, it was, it was, in, it was in the car that we figured out, so. Anyway, I came on out to California anyway. But once I came out to California without a, without a, something to work with, I knew I had to get a job, you know. So I got a job when I came out there. And then once I got a job, I, I ended up buying another guitar and an amp, so, to start, to start--see, you buying what you need to get started again. Then I started playing in some clubs, yeah.$$Okay.$$And then wasn't long after that that Lamonte and I sat down and started talking about starting a group. But I, I, at the time, I didn't wanna start a group. We talked about it. I said Mack, I said you know, I'm out here looking for a contract. I said now, if we wanna do this for a hobby, that's fine, you know. I said 'cause I like group singing. I've always done group singing. I say but if anything happened with this, with, with this audition, you know, I'm gone, you know, so.

The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr.

Bank executive and United States ambassador Dwight L. Bush, Sr. was born on February 4, 1957 in St. Louis, Missouri to Charlie and Jessie Bush. He was raised in East St. Louis, Illinois, and attended Clark Junior High School and East St. Louis High School. He graduated from Cornell University in 1979 with his B.A. degree in government and economics.

Upon graduation, Bush joined Chase Manhattan Bank as a trainee in the management development program, and went on to become the bank’s first African American managing director. His tenure at Chase included international corporate banking assignments in Latin America, Asia and the Middle East, and corporate finance and project finance in New York and Washington, D.C. In 1994, he was named vice president of corporate development and chief credit officer of Sallie Mae, where he served until 1997. From 1998 to 2006, Bush worked as a principal at Stuart Mill Capital, LLC; vice president and chief financial officer at SatoTravel Holdings, Inc.; and vice chairman at Enhanced Capital Partners, LLC.

In 2002, Bush founded D.L. Bush & Associates, a financial advisory and private investment firm located in Washington, D.C., where he serves as managing partner and president. Bush then helped establish Urban Trust Bank in 2004, and went on to serve as president and CEO of Urban Trust Bank, Urban Trust Holdings and president of UTB Education Finance, LLC from 2006 until 2008. On August 1, 2013, Bush was nominated by President Barack Obama to serve as the United States Ambassador to the Kingdom of Morocco; and, in March of 2014, the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment.

Bush was appointed a director of EntreMed Inc. in 2004, and was named vice chairman in 2010. He has also served on the boards of the GAVI Alliance, Cornell University, The Vaccine Fund, ICBC Broadcast Holdings Inc., The Georgetown Day School, and The National Symphony Orchestra. He served on the boards of directors of Urban Trust Bank Holdings, UTB Education Finance, LLC, U.S. Education Finance, LLC, and Urban Cableworks. In addition, Bush was a director of JER Investors Trust Inc., and a member of The White House Fellows Selection Committee.

Bush is married to Antoinette Cook Bush, executive vice president and global head of government affairs at News Corp. They have two children: Dwight Bush, Jr. and Jacqueline Bush.

Dwight Bush was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 22, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.116

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/22/2014

Last Name

Bush

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lamar

Schools

Cornell University

East St. Louis High School

Clark Junior High School

Park Elementary School

First Name

Dwight

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

BUS04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic

Favorite Quote

Pride Breeds Determination And Determination Breeds Pride.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/4/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Bank executive and united states ambassador The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. (1957 - ) was the first African American managing director at Chase Manhattan Bank. He served as vice president of corporate development at Sallie Mae, president and CEO of the Urban Trust Bank, and president of D.L. Bush & Associates. He was named U.S. Ambassador to Morocco in 2014.

Employment

Department of State

D. L. Bush & Associates

Urban Trust Bank

Stuart Mill Capital

Sato Travel

SLM Corp

Chase Manhattan Bank

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his mother's family background and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his father's career and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his early home life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes the prominent figures from East St. Louis, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his neighborhood in East St. Louis, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his parents' views on parenting

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his parents' religious faith

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his parents' work ethic

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his early schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his early mentors and career aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls his decision to attend Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about the impact of the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes the diverse student body at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his initial challenges at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls his early career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his work experiences during college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his notable classmates at Cornell University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls entering the training program at Chase Manhattan Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes the training program at Chase Manhattan Bank, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers his college graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes the training program at Chase Manhattan Bank, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his first full time position at Chase Manhattan Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls working in Puerto Rico for Chase Manhattan Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls his colleagues in the banking industry

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. reflects upon his initial success at Chase Manhattan Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. shares a story from his honeymoon

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls commuting between New York City and Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls resigning from Chase Manhattan Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about joining the SLM Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls founding Stuart Mill Capital, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about the acquisition of Sato Travel

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his work in corporate restructuring

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls his efforts to acquire a bank

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. remembers acquiring Urban Trust Bank

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about the urban banking market

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. reflects upon the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls joining the board of Cornell University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about the higher education system in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his relationship with his stepfather-in-law, Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls joining the board of Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes Norman Francis

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his appointment as ambassador to Morocco, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his appointment as ambassador to Morocco, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his children

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his extended family

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. reflects upon his generation's legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. reflects upon his marriage to Antoinette Cook Bush

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. recalls his efforts to acquire a bank
The Honorable Dwight Bush, Sr. talks about his appointment as ambassador to Morocco, pt. 2
Transcript
So you have these two--I was just trying to remember okay--these two things back to back that have tremendous up- upside, well realized upside potential, I mean tremendous, tenfold (laughter) or more. And so, after that what do you, what do you do after that because that's, that's--$$So, after Sato [Sato Travel; CWTSato Travel], I always have been interested in owning my own bank, because I felt that urban consumers still weren't fully participating in the banking system and therefore they weren't creating the sort of wealth that other families were creating, and so at that point, I have the capacity to start to think about acquiring a bank and so I left Stuart Mill Capital [Stuart Mill Capital, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia] in two thousand- the latter in 2003, yeah, and I spent my time on my advisory work [D.L. Bush & Associates, LLC, Washington, D.C.] and also trying to identify a bank to purchase and Independence Federal in Washington, D.C. was in financial trouble and I was interested in buying Independence Federal, and as I was looking at it myself, it's announced that Bob Johnson [Robert L. Johnson] is interested in buying Independence Federal Savings and Loan [Independence Federal Savings and Association; Independence Federal Savings Bank, Washington, D.C.], and I had known Bob for probably about eight years at that point, both through my wife, Toni's [Antoinette Cook Bush] engagement as his lawyer on certain transactions, and socially around Washington, D.C., and so I called Bob and I said, "Bob, we should talk because I'm interested in buying Independence." And he said, "That's great. We should talk, because I don't know what we would do with it, but I do think that this bank has historically served the needs of African Americans in this community and if we can get a hold of it, we can use that as a platform to support this community more broadly," and so we got together and we talked about buying Independence, and for a variety of reasons, we could not find a way to acquire it, but in the process of considering Independence, we concluded that there was a space for a nationwide African American controlled financial institution that would be looking to meet the core financial service needs of urban based consumers, whether in Washington, D.C., or Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] or Detroit [Michigan] or L.A. [Los Angeles, California], because people need access to credit, people need the process of having access to credit which is having things like bank accounts, et cetera. We know that homeowners, if you own a home, your net worth in America is about three hundred thousand dollars. If you don't, your net worth is about thirty-five thousand dollars in America and a disproportionate part of our population was not making that wealth creation effort.$So the appointment is until the president [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama] serves, right? At the end of the term. How long is the appointment?$$So, your, your appointment is--two things happen. You serve at the pleasure of the president and typically what you would do is you will serve until the end of the term. If the party in power continues in power, you remain in your position until either you choose to leave or the new administration chooses to replace you. If there's a change in the party of the president, you submit your resignation on Inauguration Day, and they determine whether they want to keep you around or not, and, again there are situations in which you are asked to continue until they find a replacement, or you could, you stay longer. But, what I am prepared to do is to be in this position for the next three and a half years and do all I can to make sure that our relationship with the Moroccans is to our mutual benefit and that the mission and the vision and the values of our president are manifested in my behaviors every day.$$It's a country with a lot of, you know, very rich history, topography--$$Yeah.$$--there is a lot going on in neighboring countries.$$Yes, yeah. So, many people ask me the question, "Well did you choose Morocco?" And, the answer is unequivocally yes. It was my first choice and it was my first choice for several reasons. Number one, I wanted to be in a place where I could have an impact and where there are important things, significant things going on. So, Morocco has been, Morocco was the first country to recognize the United States in 1777. Morocco is the furthest point west that the Roman Empire went. When you think of history and the trade routes, there were two trade routes from Africa to Europe, either through Carthage, Tunisia, or through Morocco. Morocco has a progressive Islamic government. When the Jews left Spain to come to Morocco, it was a large, one of the largest groups of Jewish people any place. In fact, Morocco represents the third largest point of movement of Jewish people to Israel after Poland and Russia. Morocco was the third. It has a history of inclusiveness unlike, and progressiveness, that you don't see in many neighboring countries. It is a beautiful country with a beautiful history with beautiful people and I'm looking forward to serving them.$$That's wonderful. Oh, congratulations on that (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm.

Charles Thomas

Broadcast journalist Charles Thomas was born on May 3, 1951 in Webster Groves, Missouri to Clarence and Oneida Thomas. He grew up in the St. Louis area and graduated with his B.A. degree from the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism in 1973.

Upon graduation, Thomas was hired as a broadcast journalist, and worked as a reporter in Kansas City, Missouri before being hired at KGO-TV in San Francisco, California in 1978. In 1982, he was hired as a reporter for WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Then, in 1986, Thomas joined WTAF-TV as a general assignment reporter until 1988, when he joined the ABC News bureau in St. Louis, Missouri as a Midwest correspondent. Thomas was then hired as a general assignment reporter by ABC 7 News in Chicago in 1991.

Thomas has worked for ABC 7 on the O.J. Simpson trials, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Rodney King trials, and the Chicago White Sox 2005 World Series Championship. He has reported from Europe and Asia for ABC 7, and, in 2006, accompanied then U.S. Senator Barack Obama to Africa. In all, Thomas has traveled to every state in the United States and to five continents during his journalism career. In 2009, he was promoted to the position of political reporter at ABC 7.

Thomas has won two Emmy Awards for reporting: one in 1983, and another in 1992. He has been a member of Alpha Phi Alpha since 1969.

Thomas and his wife Maria live in downtown Chicago. They are the parents of two adult sons and one adult daughter.

Charles Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 24, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.029

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/24/2014 |and| 1/25/2014

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Homer

Schools

Frederick Douglass High School

Steger Junior High School

Webster Groves High School

University of Missouri

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

THO21

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/3/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Charles Thomas (1951 - ) has been a reporter for Chicago’s ABC 7 News for over twenty years. He was named ABC 7’s political reporter in 2009.

Employment

WLS TV

ABC News

WTKR TV

WCAU TV

KGO TV

KCMO TV

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1512,28:1800,33:10625,109:11015,116:13160,170:15842,209:16280,216:16718,223:27966,387:30197,426:30682,432:31361,446:33980,486:37250,497:43610,597:45942,628:46472,634:58344,814:69410,906:91054,1162:91891,1172:92635,1181:93007,1190:94770,1197:97090,1247:97570,1267:97890,1272:100850,1346:102130,1359:106859,1398:108137,1433:109273,1457:109770,1466:110054,1474:110551,1483:111332,1495:112042,1511:112894,1527:115450,1570:117722,1614:118148,1621:122748,1652:124376,1684:124746,1690:125560,1702:129693,1741:130689,1757:137177,1845:137591,1852:137936,1860:139178,1957:147590,2047:150553,2066:151588,2085:152623,2108:155107,2198:155590,2206:174850,2471:178130,2478:178526,2490:179021,2511:184480,2598:184720,2603:185320,2617:185860,2629:186160,2635:186580,2643:188530,2659$0,0:727,4:3004,70:3487,78:4177,93:12968,230:13724,245:16370,296:16622,301:17252,316:18323,340:19457,368:22985,453:25442,514:26009,526:26576,536:32130,552:37960,589:38360,595:38680,600:39320,609:40440,648:40840,685:44244,708:44460,713:47608,750:47924,755:48477,765:48793,770:49346,778:53549,821:55390,838:55990,844:59730,859:60126,864:60819,872:61314,878:61809,885:64130,897:66708,907:67128,913:67800,923:73090,987:74781,1017:75938,1035:76561,1043:80195,1058:81265,1070:82121,1079:83084,1091:88645,1114:89170,1122:89695,1130:92139,1142:92616,1152:92987,1161:95321,1168:107250,1315:112659,1400:118873,1448:119168,1454:119758,1472:120289,1482:121056,1498:131075,1675:133030,1706:133370,1711:138110,1754:138775,1762:149497,1833:150301,1849:159311,1992:162178,2075:166078,2122:167558,2139:168372,2153:169038,2163:169852,2175:170148,2180:172664,2279:173034,2284:177920,2316:179720,2356:180872,2390:182096,2407:182384,2412:182672,2417:188092,2458:189184,2471:190276,2489:191704,2519:192292,2531:198838,2577:199248,2583:199904,2592:202528,2637:202938,2643:203512,2655:206238,2704:206718,2716:223376,2953:224384,2976:224744,2982:225032,2997:225536,3012:226400,3038:227264,3053:227624,3059:231473,3114:233617,3169:238441,3308:238709,3313:240920,3359:241389,3367:241992,3378:242662,3391:249858,3462:250562,3471:252484,3483:252796,3488:253810,3493:256228,3530:256618,3536:258100,3559:259738,3592:265498,3646:266578,3685:266938,3691:267658,3704:267946,3709:269890,3744:270250,3750:271474,3781:271762,3786:272626,3800:273418,3816:274066,3832:278170,3924:281144,3952:281440,3957:282402,3977:285066,4045:285362,4050:289136,4144:289432,4149:290098,4169:290394,4174:290690,4179:294554,4193:295794,4218:296166,4226:296786,4238:297344,4248:298150,4266:300080,4277
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Thomas' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas describes his maternal family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas describes his maternal family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas describes his mother's childhood in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas describes his paternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas talks about his maternal family ancestry and his father's limited understanding of race and ethnicity

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas describes his father's background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas describes how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas describes which parent he takes after most

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes growing up in Webster Grove, St. Louis, Missouri surrounded by his extended family

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas describes his father's background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas talks about his father's family life during the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas talks about his relationship with his paternal aunts and uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles Thomas describes the sights, sounds and smells of Webster Groves, Missouri, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charles Thomas remembers walking to high school in Webster Groves, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas describes the sights, sounds and smells of Webster Groves, Missouri, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas talks about his first job delivering the St. Louis Argus, Ebony magazine and Jet magazine to black communities in Webster Groves

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas remembers starting his first newspaper, The Hotline, in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas talks about publishing The Dark Side, a paper serving Webster Groves High School's black community

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas remembers organizing a walkout at Webster Groves High School in protest of a no-smoking policy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes Webster Groves, Missouri's socioeconomic demographic and how he used The Dark Side to influence a student government election

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas remembers being arrested for entering a Black Nationalist float in the Webster Groves Independence Day parade

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas describes starring in his high school production of 'A Raisin in the Sun,' and developing an interest in the dramatic arts

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas talks about being accepted into the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri and beginning his studies in the summer of 1969

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charles Thomas remembers his fifth grade teacher Henry Givens, former president of Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Charles Thomas describes the aftermath in St. Louis, Missouri following the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas describes the aftermath in St. Louis, Missouri following the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas describes his experience as an undergraduate student at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas talks about transferring to Forest Park Community College in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas describes transferring back to the University of Missouri and declaring a journalism major

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas remembers African American broadcast journalists in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas talks about hosting a top forty radio station show as an undergraduate student at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas recalls interviewing for his first full-time job in radio at KCMO Talk Radio out of Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas talks about television reporting for KCMO-TV and covering the 1976 Republican National Convention

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas talks about meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Charles Thomas describes going to KGO-TV in San Francisco, California

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Charles Thomas describes covering a story about a shooter targeting interracial couples and being fired from KGO-TV, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas describes covering a story about a shooter targeting interracial couples and being fired from KGO TV, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas describes how he got to WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas remembers reporting a story about a BDSM-practicing couple for KGO-TV in San Francisco, California

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas describes his experience as a reporter for WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas talks about the 1985 MOVE bombing and police riot in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes his experience as a reporter for WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas talks about briefly becoming a weekend anchor person at WTAF-TV and developing Thomas Productions freelance reporting company

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas describes how he got to ABC network

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas talks about influential black figures in journalism, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Charles Thomas talks about influential black figures in journalism, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Charles Thomas talks about his limited involvement in the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Charles Thomas talks about HistoryMaker Vernon Jarrett's legacy in journalism

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Thomas' interview, session two

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas describes joining the ABC News Midwest bureau as a national correspondent in 1988

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas talks about his father's ALS diagnosis

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas talks about buying a house in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas talks about life lessons he learned from his father

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes his tenure as an ABC News national correspondent

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas talks about other African American journalists at ABC News network during his tenure

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas talks about the 1989 ABC News special 'Black in White America'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas remembers a production meeting of HistoryMaker Carole Simpson and talks about codeswitching

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas talks about diversity and programming in network television

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas describes his coverage of the Velvet Revolution in Europe in 1989

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas describes his observations of anti-Semitism on-assignment in Europe

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas describes how his duties as national correspondent for the ABC network adversely affected his family life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas talks about choosing not to relocate to Los Angeles, California bureau

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas talks about joining WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas talks about his family's adjustment to relocating to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas describes an aggressive climate of political reporting in Chicago, Illinois in the 1980s and 1990s

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas talks about his coverage of the Rodney King trial and riots in Los Angeles, California in 1992

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas talks about his coverage of the O.J. Simpson investigation and trial in 1994, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas talks about his coverage of the O.J. Simpson investigation and trial in 1994, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas remembers doing an investigative report on alcoholism in Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes covering homicides and gang activity in Chicago, Illinois in the 1990s

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas critiques former Mayor Richard M. Daley's administration and its relationship to black communities in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas critiques former Mayor Richard M. Daley's administration and its relationship to black communities in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas remembers the 2003 Duff scandal involving Mayor Richard M. Daley's administration

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas talks about former Chicago mayor Harold Washington's legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas talks about contemporary race relations in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas describes his plans for the next phase of his career

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas describes winning an Emmy for coverage of the 1983 recession in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas describes winning an Emmy for coverage of the 1983 recession in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas talks about his preference for reporting over anchoring

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Charles Thomas considers what he would have done differently in his life

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Charles Thomas describes his hopes and concerns for contemporary journalists of color

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Charles Thomas reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Charles Thomas lists his favorite political reporters

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Charles Thomas talks about Chicago politicians he's developed strong ties with, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Charles Thomas talks about Chicago politicians he's developed strong ties with, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Charles Thomas remembers meeting with HistoryMaker President Barack Obama while covering Rahm Emanuel's departure as chief of staff

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Charles Thomas talks about his family

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Charles Thomas describes traveling with HistoryMaker President Barack Obama on his trip to Kenya in 2006

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Charles Thomas describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

3$8

DATitle
Charles Thomas remembers starting his first newspaper, The Hotline, in elementary school
Charles Thomas talks about the 1989 ABC News special 'Black in White America'
Transcript
By the time I got to junior high school, I was in eighth grade, yeah, and I was actually--because I had some pretty strong, I had good grades at the all-black elementary school that I went to. And I had some pretty strong language skills, as I've told you, from my mom [Oneida Marie Franklin Thomas]. And I read a lot. So they put me in an advanced class. And so I was in there with these pretty much, well-off, you know, white kids. It was myself and another black kid who I know today. He became an attorney later in life, but he was my good buddy in there. And it was just us, these two black boys and all these other white kids.$$So this is about 1964 or so?$$This would be '63 [1964], '64 [1964], '64 [1964], yeah. So we would be in this class, and they--we would take French. And it was an advanced class. It was an advanced section. But I can remember starting a newspaper (laughter). I started typing 'cause we had typing too. We took typing. And I can remember typing a little newspaper. I called it The Hotline. I mean I'm in eighth grade, man. And all I would do in The Hotline was I was, you know, this pre-pubescent kid. And I was basically flirting with the girls, with this Hotline. And I would have a cartoon in there. And I would talk about who was cute and who was liking on who and all this. And I'd write this stuff. Kids loved it. And they would pass it around. Of course, I would get in trouble because I would spend my time at home not necessarily doing all of my homework, but I would be on this typewriter that we had at home. And I would have mimeograph or these carbon copies (laughter), real carbon copies. And I would maybe make three copies of a page. And I would make it, and then I would staple it together, and they'd--kids would pass it around. They loved The Hotline, man. But the school made me stop doing it. But I can remember The Hotline. It was nice. I mean I had a nice header on it, Hotline, and then I would have a cartoon that I would draw. And I'd have a little sports section.$$Now, was there a reason the school made you stop? That was, I mean--(simultaneous)--$$Yeah, because they found it disruptive. And I wasn't talking about stuff. I was talking about who was cute and who was liking on who and, you know. And I remember I had a little, I had a little--and this came from Jet, I'm sure, I had Fox of the Week (laughter). Whichever girl I thought was really hot, she was Fox of the Week. They didn't like that, and, man, this is 1964, man, and you know, they didn't go for all that, man. So they stopped me from doing it, but that was my first venture into publishing.$The reason they [ABC News] set up a bureau in St. Louis [Missouri] is because they could use nonunion technical crews in St. Louis where they couldn't use 'em in Chicago [Illinois].$$That's right. (Unclear)--(simultaneous)--$$So they moved the operation, enough of the operation to St. Louis so that they could use these cheaper technical people. But that's another story all unto itself. You need to do a HistoryMaker about ABC News to do that, but that's why I was in St. Louis. And that's why they moved so much of the operation down there. But they did, in 1989, I think they were under some question about, "How come y'all don't have more black people working here?" I think people were asking ABC News that because they really didn't. So what they did, they decided they were gonna do a revolutionary program called 'Black in White America.' And this program would take a look at the status of black people in America in 1989. And the principal correspondents on the piece would be [HM] Carole Simpson, George Strait and Charles Thomas. And I remember my role, my part of the piece was to live in a Chicago housing project and basically tell the story, having lived there. And I lived in a CHA [Chicago Housing Authority] development at, around 61st [Street] and Wabash [Avenue], with a family, and basically, day-to-day. And I interviewed members of the family and we talked, and I told the story--told their story. And it was a great program. It, the executive producer on the program was Ray Nunn. Callie, I can't--why don't I remember her name? Is it Crosby maybe. I think it's Crosby [sic, HM Callie Crossley]. She was one of the producers, field producers. I think she worked with Carol. A brother named Anthony Mason, not Anthony Mason. Was it--yeah, it was, Mason is his last name. He produced for George, and you know the sister that did mine, she actually grew up in St. Louis. I can't remember her name, but anyway, the document is out there, 'Black in White America.' You probably can get a tape of it somewhere if you ever wanted to watch it. But we did this show, and it, and I think we did the broadcast, an hour-long documentary from nine [o'clock] to ten [o'clock], at least in the Midwest, ten [o'clock] to eleven [o'clock] on the East Coast. And we did 'Nightline,' after it. All of us were in the studio talking to Ted [Koppel] about our experiences, and what this program meant. It was, it had to be the highlight of what I did at ABC News. But, you know, I never watched the program. I still--till this day, twenty-four years later, I never watched-twenty-five years later now, I never watched the show.$$Okay,--(simultaneous)--$$'Cause it's just something I never did. I, to do it was so exhausting, I didn't even--I might watch it at one point in the future. And I heard it was good. I won awards, but I'm not that kind of guy. I'm not into awards and I'm not into, you know, seeing what a great job I did. I've never done that.$$So that means too that you didn't--now, you didn't see the other segments, right, 'cause you weren't in those. But you know the one that you were in, but all the footage you shot, didn't necessarily make the show.$$Yeah, I wrote it. I wrote it--$$Okay.$$--so I knew what was in my segment.$$Okay.$$And I kind of knew what was in Carole's segments and in George's segment because we talked a lot about what we were doing. I think George's segment had to do with the Tuskegee Airmen. He told that story, and I think that Carole did a story about self-image, with dolls and such and who chose the black doll and who chose the white doll.$$The Kenneth Clark--$$Yeah, the Kenneth [and Mamie] Clark experiment. That actually had been done by CBS in a White Paper [sic, 'NBC White Paper'] some time, decades earlier. I was always a little shaky about that 'cause I said, hey, I've seen this before. Charles Kuralt or somebody did this--$$That's right--$$--a long time ago. But, you know, she did it. And she did it well. And the story needed to be told again 'cause I think CBS did it in the '60s [1960s]. She did it in the '80s [1980s], and you know what? There wasn't that much difference in terms of what she found, which I thought was something that needed to be documented.

Carol Randolph-Jasmine

Television anchor, journalist and literary agent Carol Randolph-Jasmine received her B.A. degree in biology from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and her M.A. degree in science education from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. She went on to earn her J.D. degree from the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine entered television broadcasting in the early 1980s as the co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WDVM-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C. While there, she also worked as an anchorwoman and interviewed politicians and celebrities such as Senator Ted Kennedy, comedian Richard Pryor, former first ladies Roselyn Carter and Nancy Reagan, and musician Stevie Wonder. Randolph-Jasmine then joined Court TV, where she served as an anchorwoman, and as the host and moderator of the show, “Your Turn,” until 1986.

In 1987, Randolph-Jasmine joined the literary firm of Goldfarb, Signer & Ross (now Goldfarb, Kaufman & O’Toole), where she specialized in representing authors and clients in television from 1988 to 1991, and, during that time, she also wrote a bi-weekly column, “Metropolitan Life,” for the Washington Times. She then served as general counsel for New African Visions, Inc., the non-profit organization responsible for editing the book, Songs of My People (1992). She is the co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, a firm that represents authors, artists and athletes. Randolph-Jasmine was later appointed as the vice president of strategic communications for Miller & Long Concrete Construction, and was then named senior vice president of legal affairs for Walls Communications, Inc., a minority-owned public relations firm in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, the District of Columbia Bar Association, and The Links, Inc., where she served as chair of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Committee. In 2005, she launched a “Construction Academy” at Cardoza Senior High School in Washington, D.C. for students interested in the construction business. Randolph-Jasmine is also a member of the board of directors for the Center for Dispute Resolution.

As co-host of “Harambee” in the 1980s, Randolph-Jasmine won several awards including an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming.”

Carol Randolph-Jasmine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.335

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/5/2013

Last Name

Randolph-Jasmine

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Catholic University of America

Washington University in St Louis

Fisk University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

RAN11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Better To Wear Out Than To Rust Out.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/10/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Television anchor, newspaper columnist, and book publisher Carol Randolph-Jasmine (1941 - ) , co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, is the former co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WUSA-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington D.C. She received an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming."

Employment

Miller & Long Concrete Construction

New African Visions, Inc.

Walls Communications

Akin & Randolph Agency

Court TV

Washington Times

Goldfarb, Kaufman & O' Toole

WDVM TV

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:37400,493:45856,563:72740,829:94590,1200:105746,1330:108650,1366:109266,1375:112611,1404:113007,1409:117140,1471:120092,1529:120666,1574:153860,1964:159790,2026:175066,2314:182416,2376:185188,2449:187234,2501:187696,2509:217639,2983:229690,3216:236830,3349:244860,3424$0,0:2001,66:11560,202:15129,263:15627,270:15959,275:16540,284:17951,304:18366,311:18698,316:35045,559:35450,597:51804,813:55089,888:66888,1028:73155,1097:74104,1150:85076,1309:89407,1400:89762,1406:90117,1412:90472,1418:91821,1447:103335,1604:108226,1743:116698,1862:138410,2211:138896,2218:143108,2284:144647,2311:146348,2348:157050,2501:157405,2507:165845,2633:167495,2686:168095,2697:176120,2872:178970,2923:192290,3145:201192,3295:201852,3306:204162,3364:207200,3379
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Randolph-Jasmine's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her maternal grandfather's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the neighborhood where her parents grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her grandfathers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her similarities to her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood neighborhood in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning to read and beginning kindergarten at age four

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning about black history at Riddick Elementary School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers a social science project in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her early desire to become a psychologist and her high school biology class

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about St. Louis, Missouri's black entertainment scene during her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood career ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her decision to attend Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee as a married woman

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about various professions as well as her professors at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes going to the 1963 March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about teaching at McKinley High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about life in Washington, D.C. and working for the United Planning Organization

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the 1968 riots in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about auditioning for the television show 'Harambee' in 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls her early days on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes a black history segment on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the African American community of Washington, D.C. during the early years of 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the impact of producer Beverly Price on the show 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the organization Blacks in Broadcasting group

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes 'Harambee's AIDS segment

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about earning her law degree and taking the bar exam

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls traveling to Israel to cover the First Intifada

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about working at Goldfarb, Kaufman, & O'Toole

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her role in the publication of "Songs of My People"

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she was hired at Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine analyzes the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she came to work with Miller and Long Concrete Construction

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her civic engagement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects on her hopes and what she would do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the portrayal of black people in the media

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the importance of teaching black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recounts a memorable experience from her time as a teacher

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her family and second husband

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes how she would like to be remembered

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Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake
Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV
Transcript
Okay, okay. So now 'Harambee' lasted until?$$I don't remember when it went off the air.$$Okay. But it morphed?$$Yeah, it did. I morphed into "Everywoman" was (unclear) the show that followed and it had Rene Carpenter as the hostess and she at one time had another person hosting with her, I think it was JC Hayward. Well I came over and replaced JC, so I would get off the set of Harambee and then go over and walk across the studio and get on the set for "Everywoman". And then they put that together and it became "Nine In The Morning". They added a male host. It was 90 minutes that we did and Doug Llewelyn was the male host. Then they cut it back to an hour again for "Morning Break" and I did that by myself. And then I did the Carol Randolph Show by myself.$$Okay. Did the format change?$$It was still very much like you see today. You know, we had--sometimes we would--we'd have, sometimes a theme, dependent upon what the topic was, segments, musical, phone-in. I remember doing a show, and I don't know why this sticks in my mind, but we were talking about homosexuality and there was a tendency for the members of the panel that was up there to be condescending to some of the questions that were coming in, cause some of them could be really rather ridiculous and show a definite lack of knowledge. And I remember saying that if you hear it from one person then you know there's many more behind him that believes this. You need to give them an answer. And the guy on the program said she's absolutely right. And then he went around and answered that question. Now stands out in my mind simply because it was an open phone question. One of the best fun shows I ever did was with Billy Eckstine and Joe Williams. That was--cause as a teenager I had a crush on Billy Eckstine. And who didn't love Joe Williams with that deep voice of his and they performed. So it was a great show that I'm so sorry that we don't have. And we did a special with Eubie Blake. Claude Matthews was the co-host at that time. And we did a--that was just before Eubie actually died and he played. It was a wonderful, wonderful experience.$$Now he's a pioneer black (unclear). How old was he when he died?$$Was he in his nineties or something like that when he died, I think he was. His fingers could still move up and down the piano, you know, so. Yeah, I think they did this show. What was the Broadway show did in his--$$Oh, "Scott Joplin." Oh no, "Ragtime." Was that what you were talking about. Oh, no, not "Ragtime".$$--It was a Eubie Blake show and he was on '60 Minutes.'$$Yes. Uh-huh, but we were before them. And I don't know how we happened to get him before them, but we did, you know, and we did a special with him that aired at night time. Now I remember doing a show, who was the co-host of that one. I don't even remember now, but we did a late night show cause somebody had decided that there was an audience for late night, and we were talking about sex and a whole bunch of things on that one. That was an interesting show. That was a fun show.$$So it lasted for a few years, or--$$That was only for a pilot. We just did it just to see if there was an audience out there. There was. I don't remember now why they didn't decide to go on and, in fact, just sitting here talking to you about it has brought that back to me, you know, to my mind. But I had forgotten about it, yeah.$So did you have to move out to L.A. [Los Angeles, California] for that?$$No. They had a reporter out there. Actually, I was on the air when they had just gone into making the decision, cause you know these views about what was gonna happen and so forth. And I always felt that the prosecution had not done a very good job in terms of laying out their case. They'd over done it in terms of the DNA evidence, etc. And I remember one of my professors in law school said, "If you gonna go out to shoot a king, you better have a kings-sized rifle." I didn't think they had it and especially with that bit about with the glove, you know, if it doesn't fit, you must have acquit which is the way it was presented in the closing arguments.$$Yeah, by Johnnie Cochran?$$By Johnnie Cochran. And I thought--I remember when O.J. Simpson put on those gloves, I think he was just as surprised as anybody that the things didn't fit. 'Cause you know, I had done domestic law, not a lot of it when I was in Washington [D.C.], and the one thing I always thought, when a woman--when a man finally understands that a woman may really, one who has been abused, is really leaving you, she's in the most danger at that point. Because they don't see whatever, the beating up or any of these other things that they've done as being criminal because she deserved it, I'm entitled, that kind of thing. And so when the first story broke that she was dead and he was arrested, I thought he had done it. I just didn't think the prosecution ever proved it. So I was on the air talking to Ricky Clemmon [ph.], she was out in California, and all of a sudden they said, oh, oh, we got a verdict. But they didn't know what it was 'cause they had to bring in all the people, but it was very quick. So everybody thought it was gonna be a guilty verdict. And Steve Brill [ph.] had sent around this notice to saying there would be no outburst, you know, if you did that, you would be fired. But that was Steve Brill, you know, he would give you these extreme kind of you know notifications. And then when it came in, it was a not guilty thing. It was like most amazing to a lot of people. But it really wasn't to me because I think Marcia Clark thought she could handle that kind of a jury. I understand black people, I understand black women, whatever. Well, I have been, since, on a jury here and I can't tell you I can understand black people because we don't march in the same way. You know, you can say, you know, black people are gonna do this that and the other as she thought she could identify with and what they did was, you know, they were waiting for some kind of a hook, and Johnnie Cochran gave it to them with this, "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit." And there you have it. But it was on the air, and then O.J. Simpson called in and I was on the air one time. I didn't recognize his voice. I don't remember now exactly what it was he wanted to talk about-$$Did he call incognito or did he-$$--He even--no, he said this is--I was on the air and somebody came flying into the studio and said, O.J. Simpson is on the air. And he was trying to explain, I think, this was when his--the second trial was up, you know about the civil trial. I don't remember his question, but he and I got into a discussion about that, so those are things that stand out in my mind about Court TV.

David James

Army Air Corps officer and attorney Lt. David F. James was born on November 17, 1923 in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1941, after graduating from Lane Tech High School in Chicago, James attended Loyola University. During his freshman year in 1942, James entered the U.S. Army Air Corps Aviation Cadet Training Program in Tuskegee, Alabama. Upon arrival at Tuskegee Air Field, James was assigned to the 332nd Fighter Group where he trained to fly single seat fighter planes.

From 1944 to 1945, James flew combat missions with the 332nd Fighter Group over Germany as well as other countries in Eastern Europe during World War II. In 1946, James completed his tour of duty with the Army Air Force and re-enrolled at Loyola University. Later, in 1949, James graduated from Loyola University with his B.A. degree. James was hired by business machine manufacturer Burroughs Corporation in 1950 and became the company’s first African American salesman. In 1956, James found a job with the University of Chicago before he was appointed as a deputy director with the State of Illinois in 1961. While there, part of his responsibilities involved working on the “War on Poverty.” James then graduated from DePaul University College of Law with his J.D. degree in 1963. James was hired by the American Bar Association (ABA) in 1967 and became the first African American attorney to be hired by that organization. He worked at the ABA until 1984.

In 1967, James became the first African American homeowner in Winnetka, Illinois. Soon after moving to Winnetka, James became involved in groups that were forming on the North Shore to promote better race relations and open housing. In 1967, James and his wife, Mary, established Together We Influence Growth (TWIG) Day Camp that brings together children from South Side neighborhoods and children from the North Shore. In 1972, James helped found the North Shore Interfaith Housing Council (now the Interfaith Housing Center of the Northern Suburbs), which is organized to fight housing discrimination. In the late 1980s, James was appointed as an administrative law judge for the U.S. Department of Labor. In 1990, James went into private practice as an attorney and remained there until 2000. In 2009, James, along with more than one hundred other Tuskegee Airmen, attended the Inauguration Ceremony of President Barack Obama.

Army Air Corps Officer Lt. David F. James was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 21, 2013.

James passed away on July 23, 2016.

Accession Number

A2013.201

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/21/2013

Last Name

James

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

F.

Organizations
Schools

De Paul University School of Law

Loyola University Chicago

Lane Technical College Prep High School

McCosh Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

JAM06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Fon Du Lac, Wisconsin

Favorite Quote

Don't look back. Someone might be gaining on you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/17/1923

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tempura Fried Calamari

Death Date

7/23/2016

Short Description

Military officer and lawyer David James (1923 - 2016 ) served as a Tuskegee Airman with the 332nd Fighter Group. In 1967, James was employed as the first African American attorney at the American Bar Association.

Employment

Alterman Drug Store

Burroughs

University of Chicago

State of Illinois

American Bar Association (ABA)

Department of Labor

Delete

Favorite Color

Light Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David James' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David James lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David James talks about his mother's education and career as a teacher in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David James talks about his mother's personality and his maternal grandfather's business in St. Louis

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David James talks about his maternal family's migration from New Orleans, Louisiana to St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David James talks about his mother's upbringing in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David James talks about his maternal grandmother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David James talks about his maternal grandparents marrying in St. Louis, and his grandmother's death

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David James discusses his maternal family's Creole heritage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David James talks about his mother's personality and her sheltered upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David James talks about his father's personality and his goals and ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David James talks about his siblings' education and his own likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David James talks about his father's Native American heritage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David James describes his earliest childhood memories in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David James talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David James talks about the high achievers in his neighborhood of West Woodlawn in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David James talks about the high achievers in his neighborhood of West Woodlawn in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - David James talks about the smells of growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David James describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David James talks about his family's mealtimes together and attending Holy Cross Catholic Church in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David James describes his experience in elementary school, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David James describes his experience in elementary school, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David James describes his decision to attend Lane Technical College Prep High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David James describes his experience in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David James describes his commute to high school and his extracurricular activities in school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - David James talks about his high school friend, Jim Onitas, and his decision to attend Loyola University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David James talks about becoming interested in aviation while he was in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David James talks about the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, during World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David James talks about African Americans training for and serving in World War II, in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David James talks about being drafted into World War II

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David James talks about his trip from Chicago, Illinois to Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David James talks about his trip from Chicago, Illinois to Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David James describes his experience at basic training at Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - David James talks about his pilot training with Alfred "Chief" Anderson

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David James talks about Alfred "Chief" Anderson, and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's visit to Tuskegee Airfield

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David James talks about his first solo flight and reflects upon flight training school

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - David James talks about relying on instrumentation in flying planes

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - David James talks about Albert Stewart, the first African American admitted to the U.S. Navy's Officer Training Program

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - David James talks about race relations stationed at Tuskegee Airfield in Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - David James talks about becoming a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army and serving in Europe with the 15th Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - David James talks about the fighter planes he flew during his assignment in Europe with the 15th Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - David James talks about the engineering of the fighter planes flown during World War II

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - David James talks about the end of World War II in 1945, and the end of his tour in 1946

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - David James talks about returning to Loyola University, graduating in 1946, and the Great Migration during the 1940s

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - David James talks about meeting his wife in 1946

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - David James talks about his wife and their involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - David James talks about being hired as the first African American salesperson at Burroughs Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - David James talks about working at the University College at the University of Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - David James talks about his role as the Minority Representative of the State of Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - David James talks about the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. Martin Luther King's visit to Chicago in 1964, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - David James talks about the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. Martin Luther King's visit to Chicago in 1964, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - David James talks about becoming the first African American attorney to work at the American Bar Association and to purchase a home in Winnetka, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - David James talks about his decision to move to Winnetka, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - David James talks about his children transitioning into their new schools in Winnetka, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - David James talks about his and his wife's involvement in community activities in the North Shore area of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - David James talks about his service as an administrative law judge for the Department of Labor, and his private law practice

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - David James talks about attending President Obama's inauguration with the Tuskegee Airmen, the "Dodo Club" and his high school alumni meetings

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - David James talks about his children's education and their careers

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - David James talks about his grandchildren

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - David James reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - David James reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - David James talks about his high school history teacher, Dr. Walner

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - David James describes his photographs

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David James talks about Alfred "Chief" Anderson, and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's visit to Tuskegee Airfield
David James talks about his and his wife's involvement in community activities in the North Shore area of Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
Okay. Mr. James, you were just talking about [Alfred] "Chief" Anderson before our break. I asked you what you thought about him, you know, as a person and an instructor of, whatever he was.$$He was partly responsible for the fact that the Tuskegee Airmen--. He was a guy--there was a--Tuskegee had a civil, civilian aide program. And he taught there. And a very distinguished white lady visited Tuskegee. Her name was Eleanor Roosevelt.$$President [Franklin D.] Roosevelt's wife, right?$$Yes.$$Thank you.$$And she had heard the legend that African Americans weren't intelligent enough to fly. And she heard about this experiment that Tuskegee. No, wait a minute. The general was telling me that. She asked somebody, "Why aren't there African American pilots?" "Oh, no, they can't. They're too dumb. They're not, they don't have any intelligence to fly." But she had read about this civilian air program at Tuskegee. She was a contributor. "This doesn't make sense." So, being Eleanor, she arranged to go to Tuskegee Air and see what this program was all about. And though--she asked Chief Anderson, "Would you take me up?" (laughter) And she did, and he did. And the rest, of course, is history. You know, she told Franklin, you know, (laughter) of all the tricks these guys are trying to tell me--of all the myths I had to--I just--you know--(laughter). And it became (unclear).$$Well, thanks for telling me that story and confirming it, because sometimes people think those are just legends.$$No, this is a fact. That's Eleanor.$$And I think during the pause you also said that Chief Anderson trained more pilots--$$Right.$$At Tuskegee.$$Than any other person, yeah, responsible for it.$And your wife [Mary Gallaway], both of you apparently became very active, maybe in part because she was radicalized before, in North Shore community activities. One in particular was TWIG, "Together We Influence Growth." And I'll talk about another one in a little bit. But what was that about, TWIG? Was it a day camp or?$$It was a day camp. But more than that, my kids were--having been dropped among all of this privilege, wondered about, "What about my kid? What about my friends back on Indiana Avenue? What about them? You know, they don't have, you know, this." And so, we invited--we got together a group of kids through the public school system in Winnetka [Illinois], using their facilities. Eventually, I began a summer camp where we invited children from the south side to a day camp--an eight week day camp where they--and it has its own history. But it has survived.$$It still exists today?$$Oh, we have a--we had a problem getting suburban campers initially when we started out. This year we had 125 campers, probably 75 white, and the rest of them from the city. Unfortunately, it's become--fortunately--we used to draw from the various public housing projects. And now, the base is in the Jackson Park Highlands. (laughter) It's become a middle class thing, just about.$$And I think you were talking about Dr. [Martin Luther] King before, speaking at the Village Green. Was that Winnetka's? Where was the Village Green when he spoke?$$Oh yeah, in Winnetka, right.$$It was back in the mid-60s [1960s]?$$Uh huh.$$Okay. And there was another organization that you helped found, the North Shore Inter-Faith Housing Council. What was that?$$Well, the whole purpose was to attract, open up, the communities on the North Shore to people of color. And it's still going. And I got into all kinds of activities that--making housing opportunities available to people who would not otherwise have that opportunity.$$And that's in the North Shore?$$It's based in Winnetka.$$Right.$$Right.$$But in terms of sort of trying to help African American or other folks of diverse backgrounds--you're talking about the North Shore--$$Right.$$--and integration?$$Right. Opening up the communities and making them welcoming.$$Excellent.

Anthony Reed

Marathoner Anthony R. Reed was born in St. Louis, Missouri on July 2, 1955. At the age of eight, Reed was diagnosed with a pre-diabetic condition. He graduated from John Burroughs High School in St. Louis, Missouri in 1973. Reed graduated from Webster University with his B.A. degrees in mathematics and business management in 1978. After enrolling at Abilene Christian University in Dallas, Reed received his M.B.A. degree in business administration in 1982. He went on to earn his M.S. degree in accounting and his certification in supply chain management from the University of Texas at Dallas in 1992 and 2008, respectively. Reed is a Certified Public Accountant and certified Project Management Professional.

In 1977, Reed began his professional career as a computer programmer. He moved from St. Louis to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area in 1978, and worked in IT management and executive positions for various Dallas-based organizations. In these roles, Reed was responsible for overseeing US or worldwide information technology applications. As an adjunct professor, Reed taught management, IT, accounting, and project management courses; and has authored over fifty books and articles. Since 1994, he has managed his own international accounting and project management consulting firm, Anthony R. Reed, CPA P.C. In addition to his academic and professional achievements, Reed is an accomplished marathoner. He began long-distance running in 1975 to combat his pre-diabetic condition. Reed, a certified running coach, is the first African American to compete in marathons (26.2 miles/42.2K) on all seven continents, including Antarctica. He also completed over one-hundred and twenty marathons in forty-eight states, and won trophies in various age groups and weight divisions. Reed is also on the Dallas (formerly White Rock) Marathon board of directors.

Reed’s published memoir is Running Shoes Are Cheaper than Insulin: Marathon Adventures on All Seven Continents. Additionally, he has written for publications such as Runner’s World and Computerworld. Reed has been featured in Southern Living, Ebony, the Journal of Accountancy, the Black MBA Magazine, and Runner’s World, among others.

In 2004, Reed, along with Charlotte Simmons-Foster, co-founded the National Black Marathoners Association (NBMA), which is the nation’s largest not-for-profit organization that promotes distance running in the Black community. Reed is a charter member of the Black Data Processing Association’s (BDPA) Dallas Chapter and was active in the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA). Reed has worked as a professional speaker for corporations, educational institutions, and professional organizations and was a member of the National Speakers Association. Reed is a member of Transforming Life Christian Church, where his wife, Deborah, is a minister.

Anthony R. Reed was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 28, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.027

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/28/2013

Last Name

Reed

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Schools

University of Texas at Arlington

Albilene Christian University

Webster University

Madison Elementary School

Ashland Elementary School

Clark Elementary School

Enright Middle School

John Burroughs School

Texas Christian University

Washington University in St Louis

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

REE07

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Hills Build Character.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/2/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spam

Short Description

Marathoner Anthony Reed (1955 - ) was the first African American to compete in marathons in all seven continents of the world. He also co-founded the National Black Marathoners Association (NBMA).

Employment

Texas Instruments

Efficient Networks

Motel 6, Accor North America

United Advertising Publications

Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Board

Ernst & Young

Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, EG&G

Amberton University

DeVry University

El Centro College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Anthony Reed's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his maternal family's connection to the Windsor plantation

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed describes his paternal family's move to Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed talks about his father's young adult years and career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers his uncle Prince Coleman, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed describes his childhood household

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about his relationship with his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed remembers his childhood interests

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers visiting Washington, D.C. after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed remembers visiting Mississippi as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his early interest in bowling

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his childhood in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed recalls his early interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed remembers his church activities

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls attending John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers being diagnosed with prediabetes as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about overcoming his speech impediment

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed remembers the impacts of race and class on his experiences at John Burroughs School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers influential figures from John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed recalls enrolling at Washington University in St. Louis in Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed remembers the death of a friend

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed describes how he managed his prediabetes condition through running

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about his running habits during college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed remembers influential peers from Washington University in St. Louis

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls attending Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers applying to Texas Christian University for graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed recalls transitioning from Texas Christian University to Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed talks about working at Texas Instruments Incorporated in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed recalls studying business at Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed remembers a business philosophy course at Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed remembers his decision to run in his first marathon

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about influential black marathoners

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes distance runner Ted Corbitt

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about the technological changes in running gear

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers training for his first marathon

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about pacing himself while running

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed describes the phases of distance running

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed talks about his plans to run in the Boston Marathon

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed remembers running marathons in China, Antarctica and Kenya

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed talks about his sponsorship deal with Spira Footwear, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed remembers becoming the first African American to run a marathon on each continent

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about his most challenging marathon

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes experimental running procedures

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls competing in a biathlon

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed talks about his running mentors

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed recalls forming the National Black Marathoner's Association

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed describes his consulting and professional speaking work

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed talks about his book, 'Running Shoes are Cheaper than Insulin'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed shares his advice to young runners

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Anthony Reed remembers influential figures from John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri
Anthony Reed describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood
Transcript
Tell us about Bernice [Bernice Curlett]?$$It's when I started at John Burroughs [John Burroughs School, Ladue, Missouri]. Like I said, I had a--had a job working there every day after school cleaning up the--cleaning up the paint room. And Bernice was a lady, a black lady there who worked on the janitorial staff. And so she was the one that was responsible for assigning me my work and looking over the different things that I was doing. And Bernice was what I would call a very strong--a very strong black woman. She basically took me under her wing. And I can remember my--my first year there at Burroughs. Bernice would see me walking down the hall and she would say, "Tony [HistoryMaker Anthony Reed], look up, don't look down at the ground. Don't let these people see you looking down at the ground." I mean she put her foot squarely up my rear end and was really pushing, she was saying, 'cause she knew black history and I knew black history, and it's like, you know, you're representing, you have to do good here. You can't let them see you sweat, you can't let them see you fail. And so Bernice was a person who drove me for four years while I was there. And I think without her being there, I probably would not have graduated from the school. When I left Burroughs she was the only reason that I would go back to the school, to check up on her and to see how she's doing. So she for me was a major inspiration while I was there at Burroughs.$$Now that raises another question too, was there any instructor or administrator or any--any adult at Burroughs that took any interest in you succeeding or recognized talent in you or?$$No. There were some teachers there that I liked, Mrs. Ferber [ph.], Mr. Schmertz [ph.], and ironically they were both English teachers. I think I liked them because of--with them wanting to--to read books. I think they read more books about African Americans and I think they were able to sympathize more with my plight then the other teachers.$$But there's no real relationship?$$Right, but there wasn't any real relationship. In fact, at Burroughs they wrote a book about the athletes there at Burroughs, 'The Athletes Through the Decades' [sic. 'Teammates for Life: A History of Burroughs Athletics, 1923-2011,' Jim Lemen and Jud Calkins] and they talked about the different football teams that they had that, for example, won state in track and all of that. And then they talked about famous athletes who had since graduated from Burroughs and went on to--to doing other great things. And ironically when they wrote the book, they never wrote about my--my achievements as a distance runner. And yet they were aware of me being the first black in the world to run marathons on all seven continents, being one of the few people in the world who has run over 100 marathons, who has won trophies for running marathons. They never wrote anything about it. So to me that said a lot about the school.$$Yeah, well it's not much of a relationship there so, I guess. But, now did you make the National Honor Society yourself?$$No I didn't. It was just--it was a struggle for me to keep up there at the school. I made the national accounting honor society [Beta Alpha Psi] as a graduate student [at the University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas], but again that was years after I left Burroughs.$$Okay, at Burroughs, so at the time of graduation from Burroughs, you had played soccer, you ran some track, you were taking, you know, math courses. What were you, what was your counseling? What did the counselor tell you at Burroughs?$$Not much. They were, I think they were pleasantly surprised that I was still there. I was like--I was in the bottom 10 percent of my class. And so they were just, I think shocked and surprised that I made it there for four years. And like I said, the thing I learned there was just how to fight, just how to stick in there. You know, when other kids were able to go out and you know, have fun, I was going to school full time, working two part time jobs and studying as much as I could in order to try to keep up. I will kind of compare it to being in a 100 yard race and I have to start 125 yards back. So it was just struggling to stay up and catch up. All the students there graduated and went to college. It was like as soon as you set your foot in the door in your freshman year, you know, in high school, everyone there goes to college, it's just a given. So when I graduated from Burroughs, I got accepted to Washington University there in St. Louis [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri]. And I stayed there for two and a half years before I got kicked out.$Okay so it was a lot of moving too involved. And one question we always ask and just considering all the places you moved in St. Louis [Missouri], just kind of tell us about some of the neighborhoods, and what were some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up?$$Okay. My first recollection of where we lived was when we lived in the Blumeyer projects in St. Louis [Arthur Blumeyer Village].$$That's Blue--$$Blumeyer.$$M-I-R-E?$$I believe it's M-Y--$$M-Y-E-R?$$--I believe it's M-Y-R-E [sic.].$$M-Y-R-E.$$Yes. So there were two major housing projects in St. Louis, there was Pruitt Igoe and there were the Blumeyer projects. And I can remember we had concrete floors in the projects, I think they were about twelve to fifteen stories tall. I can remember there being fires in the trash chutes. I can remember smelling urine in the elevator having to go up to our apartment. It was--it was rough. Then we moved from there to north St. Louis where we lived in a duplex, and I can remember walking to school, which was kind of interesting 'cause a lot of kids today don't walk to school. And it would be snowing outside and they still had school. I can remember at Ashland [Ashland Elementary School, St. Louis, Missouri] when it would be heavy snowfall, we'd still go outside to play and I can remember us building forts and having snowball fights between the forts in the schoolyard. When I returned to St. Louis to run a marathon, unbeknownst to me, the course literally ran by places in St. Louis I used to live. And I remember running by the area where the Blumeyer projects used to be at that time, and they had since torn them down and built low rise government housing there. And I remember running by there and there were some black kids that were sitting on the curb. And they got up and they started running along with me. And I got real emotional 'cause I was thinking, oh my goodness, am I being an example to these kids, kind of being a role model to them, and they're sitting up there thinking, wow, you know, if this black guy can run this marathon, maybe we can run it too. And that actually planted the seed for us organizing the National Black Marathoners' Association, was if we can be out there en masse, we can be role models for black kids to get out of their communities and to start seeing the rest of the world and realize that there was more to life than just, you know, the half square mile that they were growing up in. So for me that was really emotional. Other parts of St. Louis we lived in, it was--it was pleasant being there, and I guess one of the things that I say about growing up not--not having a lot is you never realize how much you don't have. 'Cause everyone around you has the same thing, everyone is experiencing the same things, but it wasn't until I went to high school, went to John Burroughs [John Burroughs School, Ladue, Missouri] that I realized how much more was out there and got an opportunity to see how very wealthy white people lived and how--$$Well, before we get there, I just want to have you just describe like, you know, some more about where you grew up?$$Okay, because we were moving every couple of years, it was really hard to establish friends with people in the neighborhood. It's--I can almost compare it to some people who--who are in the [U.S.] military. You really don't want to get to know people very well because they may be dead. So it was the same thing as we would move into a neighborhood. We really didn't get to know a lot of people that were living around us.