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Lorna Simpson

Photographer Lorna Simpson was born on August 13, 1960, in Brooklyn, New York to Elian and Eleanor Simpson. She graduated from the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan; and earned her B.F.A. degree in photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 1983, and her M.F.A. degree in visual arts from the University of California, San Diego in 1985.

Simpson held her first solo exhibit in 1986 at the Just Above Midtown Gallery in New York. She went on to form a partnership with the Josh Baer Gallery in 1989; and, in 1990, she exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art as part of the Projects 23 exhibit series. Simpson’s 1992 solo exhibit Lorna Simpson: For the Sake of the Viewer was displayed at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. She also had a series of solo shows at both the Sean Kelly Gallery and Salon 94 in Manhattan. In 1996, Simpson served as artist-in-residence at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, where she developed her first film piece Interior/Exterior, Full/Empty. In 2013, Simpson became the artist-in-residence at the Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, Massachusetts, and held an exhibition of drawings entitled Lorna Simpson: Works on Paper at the Aspen Museum in Aspen, Colorado.

Simpson’s photographic work includes The Waterbearer, Necklines, 1978-1988, Wigs, the “Public Sex” series, Photo Booth, and 1957-2009; and her film work includes Interior/Exterior, Full/Empty, Call Waiting, Duet, 31, and Chess. Simpson’s work has been published in several exhibit catalogues, including: Untitled 54 (The Friends of Photography): Lorna Simpson, Lorna Simpson: For the Sake of the Viewer, Lorna Simpson: Interior/Exterior, Full/Empty, Lorna Simpson, and Lorna Simpson: Works on Paper. Her work has also been displayed in museums around the world, including the Guggenheim Museum, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Consejo Nacional Para la Cultura y las Artes, the Studio Museum in Harlem, Jeu De Paume, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Simpson’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, among others.

Simpson and her husband, photographer James Casebere, have one child named Zora.

Lorna Simpson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.126

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2016

Last Name

Simpson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

High School of Art and Design

School of Visual Arts

University of California, San Diego

First Name

Lorna

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

SIM13

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Turks and Caicos

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/13/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Miso soup

Short Description

Photographer Lorna Simpson (1960 - ) was known for several of her photographic works including The Waterbearer, Necklines, and 1978-1988, among others. Simpson’s work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Employment

Jamaican Art Center

Josh Baer Gallery

Wexner Center for the Arts

Addison Gallery of American Art

American Federation of the Arts

Favorite Color

Blue

Isisara Bey

Corporate entertainment executive and event producer Isisara Bey was born on July 18, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York to Shirley and Eustace Jones of Guyana. She graduated from the Academy of St. Joseph in Brentwood, New York with honors in 1970. Bey earned her B.A. degree in theater in 1976 and her M.A. degree in media communications in 1980, both from Antioch University.

Bey’s career began as an on-air personality for WEAA.FM at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. She then worked as an award-winning news writer and producer for WJZ-TV. In 1988, Bey began working at Sony Pictures Entertainment in Los Angeles, California as a management associate. She was promoted to director of corporate affairs in 1992, later becoming the senior director. She then transferred to Sony Music Entertainment in New York City as vice president, corporate affairs. She retired from the position in 2007, and became the vice president of programs for the non-profit organization, Count Me in For Women’s Economic Independence. She also founded her own consulting company, Journey Agent Productions, serving as a keynote speaker, live events producer and workshop facilitator. Her U.S. and international clients included the Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the Apollo Theater, New York Public Radio, American Society of Transplantation, New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Odyssey Media Business Women’s Retreat, Association of Southeast Asian Nations Women of the World (WOW) Festival, Vital Voices and Pathways to Prosperity. She served as the artistic director of the March on Washington Film Festival in Washington, D.C. since 2014.

Bey served on the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation board, and organized the first Congressional Tri-Caucus retreats of Black, Hispanic, and Asian & Pacific Islander members of Congress. Bey also served on the boards of the National Book Foundation, Tony Bennett’s Exploring the Arts Foundation, Rhythm & Blues Foundation and the e-Women Network Advisory Council.

As a news producer for WJZ-TV, Bey received the National Unity Award for reporting on social issues and Maryland’s Associated Press award for best investigative/documentary. She was also awarded the Outstanding Radio, Producer, Short Form award from Associated Press.

Bey has one daughter named Makara Bey.

Isisara Bey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 29, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.013

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/29/2016

Last Name

Bey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Schools

St. Peter Claver Elementary

St. Pascal Baylon School

Academy of St. Joseph

University of Connecticut

Antioch College

First Name

Isisara

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BEY03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Someplace New

Favorite Quote

The Rest Of My Life Is The Best Of My Life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/18/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Curry

Short Description

Corporate entertainment executive and event producer Isisara Bey (1953 - ) worked as the director of corporate affairs of Sony Pictures Entertainment and the V.P. of corporate affairs at Sony Music Entertainment. She also founded the business consulting agency Journey Agent Productions.

Employment

WEAA.FM

WJZ-TV

Sony Pictures Entertainment

Sony Music Entertainment

Count Me In for Women's Economic Independence

Journey Agent Productions

March on Washington Film Festival

Favorite Color

Orange and Amber

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Isisara Bey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey talks about the history of Guyana

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey talks about her mother's education and immigration

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about her extended family in Guyana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey describes her upbringing in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey talks about the establishment of the St. Peter Claver School in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey remembers the Academy of St. Joseph in Brentwood, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her experiences of discrimination at the Academy of St. Joseph

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey remembers developing an interest in radio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey talks about her college scholarship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey recalls her start at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey remembers the social movements of the late 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey describes her parents' perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers her decision to leave the University of Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey recalls how she came to attend Antioch College in Columbia, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey recalls joining the Theatre Project in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her introduction to the Moorish Science Temple of America

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey describes the history of the Moorish Science Temple of America

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey recalls her activism with the Moorish Science Temple of America

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about the reparations movement

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey talks about the influence of the Moorish Science Temple of America

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey describes her current affiliation with the Moorish Science Temple of America

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey remembers her influences at Antioch College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey talks about Take Our Daughters to Work Day

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey remembers her employment during graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey recalls hosting the morning show on WEAA Radio in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey remembers the programming on WEAA Radio

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls teaching at Morgan State College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey remembers her internship at WJZ-TV in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey talks about the growth of black radio

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey recalls receiving an award for her news coverage

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey talks about the death of her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey remembers the management training program at Columbia Pictures

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Isisara Bey describes her position in corporate affairs at Columbia Pictures

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Isisara Bey talks about Sidney Poitier's impact on the film industry

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Isisara Bey recalls her mentors at Columbia Pictures

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Isisara Bey recalls creating a diversity symposium for film executives, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey recalls creating a diversity symposium for film executives, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey reflects upon the legacy of H. LeBaron Taylor

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers the speakers at her diversity symposium

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls the response to her diversity symposium

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls her exhibition of portraits from the Columbia Records archives

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey recalls her promotion to head of corporate affairs at Sony Music Entertainment

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey recalls hosting a retreat for the Congressional Tri-Caucus

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey remembers her decision to adopt a child

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers traveling to Cambodia to adopt her daughter

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey describes how adopting her daughter changed her life

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey remembers adjusting to single parenthood

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey recalls her challenges at the Sony Music Diversity Council

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey recalls her role in the founding of the Congressional Tri-Caucus

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey describes her work at Count Me In for Women's Economic Independence

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey remembers her TEDx talk

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey recalls founding Journey Agent Productions

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Isisara Bey talks about the March on Washington Film Festival, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Isisara Bey talks about the March on Washington Film Festival, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Isisara Bey remembers the Women of the World Festival

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her career, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her career, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Isisara Bey describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Isisara Bey reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Isisara Bey talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Isisara Bey describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Isisara Bey narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Isisara Bey remembers developing an interest in radio
Isisara Bey recalls hosting a retreat for the Congressional Tri-Caucus
Transcript
Now in light of what your career is about, in terms of media--$$Yes.$$--and so, what was your exposure to media growing up? I know--$$Oh, this was (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) I know there was a lot of education, and--but did you go to the movie, did you watch television, listen to the radio?$$It was Guyana. When I was growing up, Guyana didn't get television until the mid-'80s [1980s] and so there were two radio stations and those radio stations provided everything in the country. And when I was younger, my mother [Shirley Jones], one of her batch mates [from Queen's College, Georgetown, Guyana], was a writer for one of the daily papers and he had a program on the air. You know, Guyana is such a small country that whenever people came to visit, someone would put them on a program and have them on the air. So I remember Uncle Basil, Basil Hinds was his name. He led, he was the head of the American library there and he wrote for one of the papers [The Guyana Annual] and he had a jazz show ['Just Jazz']. And I came to Guyana once with my 45s [45 rpm record]. And I brought several 45s on the air. So I had the--I had The Jackson 5, 'I Want You Back.' And he'd play his song--music and I'd play one of mine and we would talk about them. So I played that song and he said, "Well you know they sound good, but I don't think they're gonna last very long." So what was fun was years later coming back, even a few years later and him saying, "I guess I was wrong about that." But I remember once being asked to be on one of the morning shows and the engineer was a young woman. And this is when everybody did their own records and they would play--the radio stations in Guyana provided all the entertainment because that was all there was. So there were--the radio plays from England, these were in seven year cycles. They were like soap operas on the air. And then they had classroom on the air so people could learn things who were in the rural parts of the country. They had the farm report and one other program that stuck out to me was the death announcements. So this funereal music would come on--an organ playing. And a gentleman would then recite the names of any Guyanese who had died anywhere in the world, except in Guyana. So who died in England, who died in New York [New York], who died in Canada. Back then those were the only places Guyanese went to. New York, Toronto [Canada] and London [England]. And so radio on the air was on all day long because it was something different, radio plays, Guyanese plays after independence, a lot of programming that Guyanese made themselves, popular music, it was the lifeline. I remember one time we took a trip into the interior which is what it was called going from the country down into the remote parts. And on a big ferry boat that was on the Essequibo River and then people would come on to the boat. It would start and then it wouldn't stop, it would slow down. So folks would take a launch from the bush and they would transfer their produce to go to the market and the boat would slow down so they could jump on. And I could hear the radio from stop to stop out in the interior. Once cousin Gertie [ph.] and I were walking from our house to go play bingo and we were concerned because we would miss 'Dr. Paul' who was on in the evening. But everybody was listening, and because it was always warm weather there were no windows with glass, it was all shutters. People were outside and we heard the whole program walking to bingo. So I realized--it fired my imagination how important radio was and how much people could visualize and learn, and be connected through radio. So that's what sparked my interest in working in radio.$So when he asked to do that, the idea I came up with was to do a retreat for those three minority groups [Congressional Tri-Caucus]. And so that we would fund. The first one was held outside of Washington [D.C.] in Virginia at a hotel. It was over a weekend. We--I hired someone to do--to facilitate some of their work together, and also had entertainment. So I went to [HistoryMaker] Russell Simmons. At the time they had the 'Def Poetry Jam' and we created a 'Def Poetry Jam' evening during their retreat and had some of the poets that later were on 'Def Poetry' on Broadway to come and perform. A multicultural group of poets. We had Sarah Jones come who is the actress who does, she won a Tony [Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre] for her one woman performance where she represents a number of different cultures. Her first piece was called 'Surface Transit.' She has this uncanny ability to replicate any accent under the sun and she tells the story of different immigrants coming to New York [New York] in America, and their--their influence with each other. So she performed. She had a piece called 'This Revolution will not be Televised' [sic. 'Your Revolution']. It was kind of based on the one that Gil Scott-Heron song ['The Revolution Will Not Be Televised'] that he did that had been banned from the air, and so she was able to perform it in front of members of [U.S.] Congress who was going, "Why was this banned?" And we're able to work with helping her reverse that. The other moment in that retreat that stands out for me was the facilitator had had them--we had a timeline on there and she asked them to go up and to indicate when they got involved in public service. And one of them on the Hispanic caucus [Congressional Hispanic Caucus], one of the congressmen, talked about his political career started as a border guard. He was a border police. And in Sarah's monologue, she replicated a young man whose family had been arrested by the border police and used a term that they use to describe the border police [La Migra], a Spanish language term. So later when the congressman is talking about it, he talked about how he had heard this term and it was derogatory in a sense, and moved him to tears. You know, he got emotional about it and in that came this whole conversation of everyone talking about what brought them into public service. So we had those who were the children of migrant workers with the grandchildren of sharecroppers with the--the descendants of immigrants with the same universal approach to public service and now in the Congress and that was started because they were in the same room together talking about it and because they heard a theater piece that urged them to--that was the catapult to that. That was the culmination to me of everything that I think is important in the work that I do.$$Okay, and this retreat was in what year?$$Oh you're asking me years, I remember when I was thinking about--$$About 2001, 2000--$$--preparing this. It was after LeBaron [H. LeBaron Taylor] died, so it might've been around 2002 or three [2003].$$Okay.$$So we did three actually with them. That first one and then a year later or so we did one that was in Puerto Rico, and then the third one was in Texas right around the time of Hurricane Rita. So it was not as--we had to switch the focus of it more into a town hall in Houston [Texas] because of the devastation and the need.$$Okay, okay. Now you were the founder of Sony's [Sony Music Entertainment] diversity--?$$Yes, they did not have affinity groups then, and so I helped form a black, Hispanic and Asian affinity groups; and then that was the year I was one of the founding members of the diversity council for the company [Sony Music Diversity Council].

Stephen Robinson

Lawyer and Federal District Court Judge Stephen C. Robinson was born on January 25, 1957 to Yvonne Lee Robinson in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. His mother was a payroll clerk at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and his father was a probation officer. Robinson grew up in a housing project in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, and in second grade was bused to predominantly white schools. Robinson graduated from Cornell University in 1981 with his B.A. degree in government. He went on to receive his J.D. degree from Cornell Law School in 1984.

Robinson began his legal career in 1984 as the first black lawyer hired at the law firm of Alexander & Green, a corporate firm based in New York City. He moved on to his first federal position as assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York in 1987 working under then U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani. In 1991, Robinson was hired at Kroll Associates, an international private investigations firm, where he became associate general counsel and later managing director. In 1993, he was asked by the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to serve as special assistant to the director and general counsel. In 1995, he became counsel and subsequently chief compliance officer for Aetna, Inc. in Hartford, Connecticut. Robinson was then appointed U.S. Attorney for the District of Connecticut, in 1998, by President William Clinton, after being unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate. During this time, he also served as interim manager and chief executive officer of Empower New Haven, a non-profit organization, and taught at Yale Law School as a senior research fellow. President George W. Bush appointed Robinson as a federal district court judge in the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York in 2003. In 2010, Robinson resigned his position on the bench and joined the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP as a litigation partner.

Robinson was recognized by the Department of Justice for Superior Service for his work on the prosecution of U.S. v. Galanis, a securities and tax fraud trial in 1990. In 1997, he was the recipient of the Chairman’s Award while working at Aetna US Healthcare. In 2011, he was named chair of the New York City Bar Association’s Committee to Enhance Diversity in the Profession. Robinson also serves on the board of directors for the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, the Cornell Law School Dean’s Advisory Committee, and the board of directors of Fordham Law School’s Louis Stein Center for Law and Ethics. Robinson has one daughter, Victoria.

Stephen C. Robinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 17, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.186

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/17/2014 |and| 09/12/2014

7/17/2014

09/12/2014

Last Name

Robinson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widower

Middle Name

Craig

Schools

John Dewey High School

Cornell University

Cornell Law School

First Name

Stephen

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

ROB28

State

New York

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/25/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Short Description

Lawyer and federal district court judge Stephen Robinson (1957 - ) was a partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP, and a U.S. District Court Judge for the Southern District of New York.

Employment

Alexander & Green

Southern District of New York

Kroll Associates

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Aetna, Inc.

District of Connecticut

Empower New Haven

Yale Law School

U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

Madeleine Moore Burrell

Marketing executive Madeleine Moore Burrell was born in 1940. She received her B.F.A. degree from New York University and studied industrial design at the Parsons School of Design. She also received her M.F.A. degree in writing from Columbia University.

Moore Burrell’s first carrier spanned ten years as an industrial designer with Henry Dreyfuss Associates and Goretz Industrial Design, where she designed products ranging from John Deere tractors and Datsun dashboards, to American Airlines interiors and the first snowmobile for AMF. She also designed the first plastic hangers in the United States, pay phones for Bell Atlantic, industrial cameras for Polaroid and sewing machines for Singer.

In 1985, Moore Burrell founded and spearheaded Moore Creative, a New York marketing firm with clients that included Anheuser Busch, the Apollo Theater, and the first of several hospital based HMOs that she marketed in the United States. In 1994, Moore Creative was the first African American marketing firm awarded a post-apartheid contract with South Africa, launching the Sister City agreement between New York City and Johannesburg, South Africa. Moore Burrell’s clients also included the annual Essence Music Festival in New Orleans, the Essence Awards on FOX TV and Dawn Magazine, the Sunday supplement to The Afro-American newspaper.

Moore Burrell served as chairman of Public New York, a SoHo based advertising firm, as well as president of Moore Creative @ Austin & Williams, Inc. She served as president of AARP for the State of New York and the founding chapter of The New York Coalition of 100 Black Women; and was a trustee of New York's Central Park Conservancy. In addition, she co-founded The National Professionals Network (NPN), convening leadership conference cruises for over twenty years.

As co- founder of the 21st Century Women's Leadership Center, a cultural collaboration of Black, Hispanic and Asian women’s organizations, Moore Burrell developed numerous scholarships, role model and mentoring initiatives for inner-city girls. She is an officer of the Board of Columbia College Chicago and has received an honorary doctorate degree from the City University of New York.

Moore Burrell and her husband, advertising icon and author Tom Burrell, reside in Chicago, Illinois, where they partner in The Brainwashed Resolution Project.

Madeleine Moore Burrell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.120

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/22/2014

Last Name

Burrell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Moore

Occupation
Schools

New York University

Columbia University

Parsons School of Design

First Name

Madeleine

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR22

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans, Louisiana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/10/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Healthy Soul Food

Short Description

Marketing executive Madeleine Moore Burrell (1940 - ) founded the New York-based marketing firm, Moore Creative. She was a founder of the 21st Century Women's Leadership Center, and co-founder of the National Professionals Network, Inc. She served as president of the New York Coalition of 100 Black Women and AARP of New York State, as well as chairman of Public New York.

Employment

Henry Dreyfuss Associates

Goretz Industrial Design

Moore Creative

Favorite Color

Orange, Yellow, Warm Colors

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Madeleine Moore Burrell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's involvement in advocacy and social activism

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her half-siblings and being an only child until the age of sixteen

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her life in her grandparents' home in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the central role of church in her community while growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about attending elementary school in Brooklyn, New York and junior high school in Westtown Township, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's strong influence on her life

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience on her family's farm in Reading, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes being reunited with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience in junior high school in Westtown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her childhood friends and her mother's premature death

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her family's life after her mother's premature death

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon mentors, and her attendance at Northfield League in Westtown, Pennsylvania in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her family's perspective on race relations in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her dyslexia and how it led to the development of her artistic talent

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell remembers coping with dyslexia during her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her experience as the only African American student at Northfield League in Westtown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's premature death and how it impacted her family

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about starting college at New York University in New York, New York after her mother's death

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience at New York University in New York, New York and her decision to pursue industrial design

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains how studying industrial design at Parsons School of Design in New York, New York helped her with her dyslexia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as an industrial designer at Henry Dreyfuss Associates, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as an industrial designer at Henry Dreyfuss Associates, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience working with Dr. Edwin Land, the inventor of the Polaroid camera

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the evolution of the industrial design industry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her stepfather getting remarried

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the roles of engineering and marketing in the design and manufacturing of products

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her transition into a career in marketing

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about designing plastic hangers to ship clothes without wrinkles

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains why she left her position at Henry Dreyfuss Associates to get married

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her work with health management organizations (HMOs) and Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about founding her marketing firm, Moore Creative, and establishing a client base

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her work with Apollo Theater in New York, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her involvement in transforming Beekman Downtown Hospital into a successful hospital system in the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the first National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN) cruise

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about co-founding the National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN), pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about co-founding the National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN), pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about planning programming and musical talent for the National Professionals Network, Inc's (NPN) cruises

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the Sister City agreement between New York City and Johannesburg, South Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about marketing the annual New Orleans Essence Music Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her experience as president of The New York Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes a collaboration between the African America, Asian and Hispanic women's leadership groups in New York, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes a collaboration between the African America, Asian and Hispanic women's leadership groups in New York, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the impact of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on her personal and professional life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her decision to preside over the New York Chapter of AARP

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as the president of the New York Chapter of AARP

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains how she met her husband, HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her decision to marry HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell in 2008

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her husband, HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell's book, 'Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the Resolution Project

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon the legacy of her generation, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon the legacy of her generation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her mother's and grandmother's influence on her accomplishments in life

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her transition into a career in marketing
Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her decision to preside over the New York Chapter of AARP
Transcript
And so I went back to Columbia University [New York, New York] intending to get into marketing as the next notch on my career ladder. But I got involved with writing because I felt I could write about it and I could in so many ways begin to speak directly with consumers about things that they needed to be cautious of, things that they needed to know about these machines and this environment in which they're being placed, you know without any thought about what the impact will be. And in so doing, I was coming out of a marriage where to, to a position where HMOs [health maintenance organization] were just on the horizon. And the whole notion of empowering women as healthcare consumers was something that I found intriguing. So I got involved in marketing HMOs and Mayor [Ed] Koch appointed me to do one of the first hospital-based HMOs in New York [New York]. And it turned out to be in the United States.$You were just saying that it [September 11, 2001 (9/11)] made you reassess and what your focus was so that--$$Right, right. And legacy building was where I wanted to take it. I was already dealing with CEOs [chief executive officer] and, and people who were ultimate decision makers, or who had inherited companies you know, who were dealing with decision making that possibly could use a, a new direction or a clarification. There was a moment where all of our civil rights organizations we discovered were--had been found the--during the same era and were having the same challenge of mission. Are those missions--still those mission statements, are they still relevant, you know. And so too with a lot of companies that were created for a time that no longer exists. So what would one as a head of one of these corporations, say to their grandchildren about what their legacy is? And it can be, you know a market segment that they you know, were successful in, in winning. So legacy building became something that I took to heart. I still believe that we all have a legacy. If we don't shape it ourselves, somebody else will. So why not make a decision about what kind of legacy you're going to have, that you want to have? And from day one on the job, if it's in the mail room, or if it's in the boardroom, you know it should be purposeful. Your decisions should somehow or other be leading you in the direction of where you say you want your legacy to be. And so that took me to situations where I was talking about legacy and I, I had talked to any number of organizations about their legacy. And I came to the attention of AARP [American Association of Retired Persons], and they asked me to come in and talk to Bill Novelli and I've forgotten the ad agency that he was with. But he was--$$Novelli?$$Novelli, yeah, but it's got a multi--yeah. Anyway you know I talked about legacy and he asked me would I be interested in being involved in AARP. And then I met with, and I said yes because I was heading down that road anyway. And I always admired what AARP stood for. They always were as far as I was concerned, on the right side of the issue. And so legacy in terms of members saying okay, you want a legacy. Come, join AARP and we'll help you build your legacy. Essentially was the, the thing that I believed we could do so that it wouldn't just be wearing the t-shirt and showing up at hearings. But really on a personal level, shaping the legacy of people who had to reach that point in life where they looked at it.

Irving Burgie

Songwriter and performer Irving Burgie was born on July 28, 1924 in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, to a Barbadian mother and a Virginia-born father, who worked as a day laborer. In 1943, Burgie was drafted into the U.S. Army and served for three years in the China, Burma, and India Theaters. When Burgie returned to the U.S., he took advantage of the newly passed G.I. Bill, which allowed him to attend the Juilliard School, the University of Arizona, and the University of Southern California.

In 1953, Burgie performed as a singer and guitarist at the Blue Angel in Chicago, Illinois. After playing at the Village Vanguard in New York City in 1955, he was introduced to Harry Belafonte, and the two began a collaboration with Burgie as songwriter and Belafonte as performer. A year later, they released the album Calypso, for which Burgie composed eight of the eleven songs, including the hit “Day-O.” Calypso became the first American record to sell over one million copies. In 1957, Burgie wrote the song “Island in the Sun” for the film of the same name, which starred Belafonte and Joan Fontaine. Burgie was then credited for ten of the eleven songs on Belafonte’s 1957 album Belafonte Sings of the Caribbean, and eight of the twelve songs on 1961’s Jump Up Calypso. In 1963, Burgie composed the music and lyrics for the off-Broadway show, “Ballad for Bimshire,” which starred Ossie Davis. Then, while on a trip to Barbados, Burgie was invited to write the lyrics for the Barbados national anthem, which he completed in 1966. In 2011, he signed a fifteen-year publishing deal with BMG Rights Management.

Burgie released The West Indian Song Book in 1972, and the Caribbean Carnival song book in 1993. He also released the solo album, Island in the Sun, in 1996, which included many of his own renditions of the hits that he wrote for Belafonte. In 2007, he published the autobiography, Day-O!!!: The Autobiography of Irving Burgie.

Burgie developed the Caribbean Day Assembly Program for New York-area public schools in 1973; and, in 1975, helped organize the United Black Men of Queens County Federation, Inc. He has received the Silver Crown of Merit from the Barbados government, and was awarded honorary doctorates from the University of the West Indies and St. John’s University in New York. Burgie was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007.

Burgie passed away on November 29, 2019.

Irving Burgie was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 9, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.123

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/9/2014 |and| 4/10/2014

4/9/2014

4/10/2014

Last Name

Burgie

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

The Juilliard School

University of Arizona School of Law

University of Southern California

First Name

Irving

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR23

State

New York

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/28/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Death Date

11/29/2019

Short Description

Songwriter and performer Irving Burgie (1924 - 2019) was a songwriter for three Harry Belafonte albums and wrote the lyrics for the Barbados national anthem. He authored Day-O!!!: The Autobiography of Irving Burgie, and was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007.

Employment

U.S. Army

BMG Rights Management

Derek Dingle

Publishing executive Derek T. Dingle was born on November 2, 1961 in New York City. He graduated from Norfolk State University with a B.A. in journalism and also completed the Magazine Management Program at New York University.

Dingle joined Black Enterprise magazine in 1983 as an assistant editor and was promoted six months later to associate editor. After he completed the New York University magazine management program in 1985, he was made a senior editor. In 1987, Dingle was promoted once again to managing editor, a position he held until 1990. He then joined the staff of Money magazine, where he wrote articles about mutual fund investment and served as senior writer and a member of the planning team for Money Special on Small Business. In 1991, Dingle co-founded Milestone Media Inc., the nation's largest black-owned comic book company, with childhood friends Denys Cowan, Dwayne McDuffue, Michael Davis and Christopher Priest. After resigning from Money magazine in 1992, he was named Milestone’s president and CEO. One Milestone character, Static Shock, was developed into an animated series that ran from 2000 to 2005 on the WB Network and the Cartoon Network. In December of 1999, Dingle returned to Black Enterprise magazine as editor-at-large. Within a year, he was promoted to vice president and executive editor, serving until July of 2008. That year, Dingle was appointed as the senior vice president and editor-in-chief of Black Enterprise magazine, where he was responsible for the strategic planning and editorial direction of the magazine. In 2014, Dingle was named a Chief Content Officer of Black Enterprise. In this capacity, he oversaw content development and strategy for the "Black Enterprise Entrepreneurs Conference Expo," as well as other custom events, including the Black Enterprise/Walmart 20/20 Vision Forum on Supplier Diversity, the Black Enterprise/Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Education Symposium Series, the American black Film Festival, and the Baltimore African American Film Festival. In addition, Dingle had executive oversight of both Black Enterprise television shows: "Black Enterprise Business Report" and "Our World with Black Enterprise."

Dingle authored countless Black Enterprise magazine cover stories and editorials and appeared as a business expert on numerous television networks and radio programs, including CNN, CNBC, NBC's "Weekend Today," and National Public Radio. An award-winning editor, Dingle is the author of three books: Black Enterprise Titans of the B.E. 100s: Black CEOs Who Redefined and Conquered American Business (1999), Black Enterprise Lessons from the Top: Success Strategies from America’s Leading Black CEOs (2007), and First in the Field: Jackie Robinson, Baseball Hero (1998), which received a 1999 International Reading Association Award. Dingle serves as a general member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME). He also serves as a member of the board of directors for Norfolk State University's School of Communications, and on the advisory board for the New York Urban League’s Manhattan Chapter.

Dingle lives in Guttenberg, New Jersey.

Derek T. Dingle was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 20, 2014 and on December 14, 2016.

Accession Number

A2014.091

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/20/2014 |and| 12/14/2016

3/20/2014

12/14/2016

Last Name

Dingle

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Terrence

Schools

Norfolk State University

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Derek

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

DIN04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

mediterranean

Favorite Quote

Unbelievable.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/2/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Hamburger

Short Description

Magazine publishing chief executive and publishing executive Derek Dingle (1961 - ) co-founded and then served as president and CEO of Milestone Media Inc., the nation’s largest African American-owned comic book company, in 1992. In 2008, Dingle was appointed as the senior vice president and editor-in-chief of Black Enterprise magazine.

Employment

Black Enterprise

Money Magazine

Milestone Media

Favorite Color

Blue

Ernie Suggs

Journalist Ernie Suggs was born in 1967 in Brooklyn, New York. He entered into college at North Carolina Central University in 1985, where he was editor and chief and sports editor for the college’s award winning newspaper, The Campus Echo , and a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. He graduated in 1990, with his B.A. degree in English Literature.

In 1990, Suggs was awarded an internship by the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) to work for Gannett Newspapers based in White Plains, New York. He returned to Durham, North Carolina in 1992, as a writer for The Herald-Sun . In 1996, Suggs was awarded a fellowship from the Education Writers Association, which culminated in his seventeen piece series Fighting to Survive: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Face the 21st Century . He went on to become a reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 1997, where he covered politics, civil rights and race. In 2001, Suggs authored the Aetna African American History Calendar, which was focused on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Suggs’ series on HBCUs was the most in-depth newspaper examination of the topic ever undertaken, and was recognized for many awards: Journalist of the Year from the American Association of University Professors; First Place, Salute to Excellence Journalism Award for Investigative Reporting from the National Association of Black Journalists; Journalist of the Year from the North Carolina Black Publishers Association; Journalist of the Year from the North Carolina Press Association; and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. In 2002, he was named director of Region IV of the NABJ, and became vice-president of the organization in 2005. Suggs was chosen for the prestigious Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University in 2008, and in 2009, he joined the Nieman Foundation’s board. In 2010, he was the keynote speaker at 61st Annual Honors Convocation at North Carolina Central University; and he was given the Pioneer Black Journalist Award by NABJ in 2013.

Ernie Suggs was interviewed by The History Makers on February 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.073

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/18/2014

Last Name

Suggs

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Terrell

Occupation
Schools

PS 241 Emma L Johnston School

J W Parker Middle School

G R Edwards Middle School

Rocky Mount High School

North Carolina Central University

Harvard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ernie

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

SUG02

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Be The Best You Can Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/18/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Journalist Ernie Suggs (1967 - ) is a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the former vice president of the National Association of Black Journalists, and author of the award-winning series Fighting to Survive: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Face the 21st Century.

Employment

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Durham Herald-Sun

Gannet Westchester Newspapers

Favorite Color

Gold

Timing Pairs
0,0:2414,46:7499,118:10552,196:21983,459:22409,465:22693,479:22977,484:26385,556:35778,612:36306,619:37362,634:38154,644:39474,668:39914,674:40882,686:44754,749:48010,820:50210,957:60190,1046:70620,1250:70900,1255:71950,1296:72580,1306:73070,1315:82075,1395:82645,1412:83215,1419:85400,1496:97218,1587:98496,1598:101505,1614:101961,1623:104983,1661:105720,1674:114715,1936:136098,2216:137599,2242:149748,2419:150124,2424:150688,2432:151722,2445:158715,2549:159430,2563:161888,2586:164078,2619:165027,2629:166511,2639:168370,2650:168883,2660:169282,2669:169810,2676$0,0:9290,193:12028,244:13434,269:14100,274:14396,279:15062,290:17134,352:20094,442:21056,464:21426,470:21722,475:22166,482:22462,487:24608,532:26458,569:26902,576:27642,591:29196,622:37505,672:39919,708:40700,726:43420,746:45030,771:58880,1014:61280,1051:62080,1062:73110,1256:74555,1276:82205,1455:82545,1460:87013,1498:89848,1552:90253,1558:93493,1632:94222,1650:97520,1655:98170,1668:99080,1686:99600,1696:100250,1713:105890,1784:108590,1824:109490,1835:110390,1846:111090,1854:111590,1859:121769,1970:122267,1977:124093,2011:125255,2029:127081,2067:128409,2094:129820,2120:131065,2143:134501,2159:137228,2164:137648,2174:139076,2196:139496,2203:140672,2224:141176,2231:141680,2239:142520,2250:144284,2284:147589,2304:148359,2315:149129,2325:150053,2339:150515,2348:152286,2372:152594,2377:157738,2448:158330,2457:158848,2472:159144,2477:162622,2537:163362,2550:164028,2560:165656,2589:166618,2608:166914,2613:170390,2629:171580,2653:172280,2679:173050,2689:173750,2702:174100,2708:174380,2713:175780,2741:176550,2755:179212,2775:181092,2816:183630,2847:184194,2858:188330,2930:188800,2936:196810,3054:197370,3063:198330,3077:198890,3089:199610,3104:200170,3112:200970,3123:210972,3260:211638,3274:212230,3293:213710,3344:214006,3349:214598,3359:216152,3386:216448,3391:217188,3403:218372,3434:219408,3448:227740,3556:228356,3566:228818,3588:235932,3665:239217,3746:241115,3782:241553,3790:242721,3806:243743,3822:244327,3853:248990,3868:252142,3906:252872,3927:253237,3933:260099,4152:260391,4158:260902,4167:261413,4176:261851,4184:267350,4241:268386,4264:268682,4269:269496,4281:270458,4304:274786,4350:275690,4355
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ernie Suggs' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs talks about his maternal grandmother's education at an all-black boarding school in Whitakers, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs describes the people who raised his mother: his maternal grandfather, his great aunt Clarene, and Alice Wells

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs describes his mother's childhood in Edgecombe County, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ernie Suggs talks about his father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ernie Suggs describes his parents' relationship and his similarity to his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs talks about being reunited with his sister

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs describes his sister's disappearance

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs talks about his sister and her upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs reflects upon his childhood neighborhood and his early academic ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs talks about growing up in Brooklyn, New York during the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs talks about his early interest in the news and attending P.S. 241 in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ernie Suggs talks about his favorite teachers and his favorite subjects in elementary school at P.S. 241 in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs describes his interest in comic books and the Marvel Universe

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs explains his mother's decision to move to North Carolina in 1979

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs talks about the early New York City hip hop scene

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs talks about his school experiences in North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs talks about taking college prep courses at Rocky Mount High School in Rocky Mount, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs talks about his high school extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs explains the social relations at Rocky Mount High School in Rocky Mount, North Carolina during the 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ernie Suggs describes his college application process

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ernie Suggs recalls his decision to attend North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ernie Suggs describes HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs talks about his mentors at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs talks about writing for the Rocky Mount Telegram and the Campus Echo, the student newspaper at North Carolina Central University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs explains his English literature major at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs talks about his National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) internship at Gannett Westchester Newspapers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs talks about graduating from North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina and his post-college job plans

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs describes working for Gannett Westchester Newspapers in Westchester County, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs explains his responsibilities as a journalist for the Herald Sun in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ernie Suggs recalls the stories he covered as a reporter for the Herald Sun in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ernie Suggs talks about reporting on historically black colleges and universities in the late 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ernie Suggs explains the challenges facing historically black colleges and universities

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs talks about the future of historically black colleges and universities

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs talks about his award-winning series on historically black colleges and universities

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs talks about volunteering at and reporting on the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs talks about North Carolina Central University's sports programs

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs talks about joining the Atlanta Journal-Constitution as a staff journalist in 1997

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs talks about his membership in the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs talks about stories and individuals he reported on for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ernie Suggs describes the movie industry in Atlanta, Georgia and the opportunities the city offers

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ernie Suggs talks about Georgia state and Atlanta city politics in the early 21st century

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ernie Suggs talks about Martin Luther King, III's presidency of the SCLC and the organization's activism in the early 21st century

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ernie Suggs talks about how Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy has impacted his children

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ernie Suggs talks about the controversies surrounding the Martin Luther King, Jr. family

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ernie Suggs talks about the legal battles waged by the children of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ernie Suggs talks about the children of Martin Luther King, Jr. and their control over his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ernie Suggs describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ernie Suggs recalls his time at Harvard University as a Nieman Journalism Fellow in 2008

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ernie Suggs talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ernie Suggs reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

8$8

DATitle
Ernie Suggs talks about his early interest in the news and attending P.S. 241 in Brooklyn, New York
Ernie Suggs talks about stories and individuals he reported on for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Transcript
Back to the newspapers though, you would--why would you be so desperate to get a newspaper?$$I liked to know what was going on so I would--you know, back in those days and I'm sure it's still now they had the newsstands where the newspapers would just basically be out and I would just walk by and pick one up and just keep walking (laughter). So that was my--that was the existence of my life of crime. So I would steal the [New York] Post, the [New York] Daily News, the New York Times to just kind of read what was going on. I enjoyed--I think I was able to understand the Post and the Daily News a little better because it was about New York, and it always had those spectacular headlines. The New York Times is a little bit high-brow for a preteen. But yeah I would just read it, pick it up and take it to the house, let somebody else read it but you know that was one of things I would do, steal newspapers.$$So there wasn't a particular part, I know you were a sports writer at one point in high school.$$No, it wasn't anything--$$It wasn't because of the sports necessarily.$$No, I would read everything. I would read what was going on in the city, you know, the blackout.$$The blackout was yeah go head.$$The '70s [1970s] there was so much stuff going on in New York City with the blackouts with the bankruptcy, the Bella Abzug and [Mayor] Ed Koch. For me it was a very exciting time. There was always stuff happening. So I would want to know what was going on. I would want to know what was actually going on in the city in terms of murders, the [New York] Yankees of course, TV shows. I loved watching television so reading was probably an extension of that. So yeah I wanted to read everything. I wanted to know what was going on particularly in the city.$$Okay.$$So I imagine I stole the Post and the Daily News more than the Times.$$Did you have any favorite writers in the newspaper?$$No it wasn't any--it was just like what's going on in the news today. I would just go by and snatch it and just keep walking and that was it (laughter).$$Okay.$$I wasn't trying to go see what Bill Madden wrote or anything.$$So at P.S. 241 [Emma L. Johnston School, Brooklyn, New York] you're in a gifted program and like who's in school with you? Is it mostly African American or is it mixed?$$It's mostly African Americans. It's a Brooklyn neighborhood so it's mostly African American but it was--it had a good deal of diversity as well particularly in the gifted program.$$Okay.$$So, yeah as I said the diversity was there. I mean, I learned a lot about diversity in New York in, at P.S. 241 in terms of different cultures, languages, different types of people.$I know you said James Mallory was here already at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution but what else attracted you to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution?$$Atlanta [Georgia], you know Atlanta at that time was the black mecca, so to speak, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. It was only five hours away from North Carolina--my home in North Carolina so I can drive quickly. I had a lot of friends who were moving here and people were always just talking about Atlanta as this place that people were coming to that you can make a lot of money. There was a big music scene that was coming about that was kind of changing. Atlanta was becoming a focus of that. Not that I was a music person but Atlanta was becoming the focus of a lot of things and it was a place that--it was a big city and you know as I said, you always want to go to a bigger city when you work for a newspaper. So Atlanta was at the top of my list. It was always at the top of the list and you know New York [City], of course, going back to New York to work in the city. But Atlanta was a reasonable place that was close and it was kind of southern and I had kind of gotten used to the whole southern thing living in North Carolina so this was the place where I wanted to come.$$Okay what were some of the notable stories that you've been involved in with your writing here in Atlanta?$$Well I've been here since 1997 as you said so that's about seventeen years so I've covered everything. I came here as a night cops reporter. So my first job--it's weird because after covering all this great stuff in Durham where you're kind of the big fish in the little pond, you become the little fish here. So my first job for the first six months was night cops. So I would come in every day at 3:00 and work until 12:00 until after the news went off covering cops. Shootings, accidents, traffic jams just you know you name it, I did it. So I did that for about six months then I moved on to education, covered higher education and then K-12. So I've basically covered everything at this paper that you can cover. I've covered cops, education, I've done some sports, I've done some features. I've done crime, of course, but the thing that I cover that's kind of always been an overriding theme of all my coverage has been race. I've covered government politics, elections but race has always been kind of the main area that I've become--that I've become an expert in, that a lot of my coverage always kind of goes back to. So if I'm covering government or if I'm covering politics and something racial happens or there is a racial or an event that happens or some situation that involves race, I'm usually the guy that gets pulled in to cover that because of my expertise and because of my interest in it. So with Atlanta being the home of the Civil Rights Movement because of the people who live here. So I've covered [HM] Joseph Lowery and [HM] C.T. Vivian and Hosea Williams and [HM] Andrew Young and [HM] Fred Shuttlesworth and you know, [Reverend Dr.] Martin Luther King [Jr.], his life and legacy hovers over all of that. So I've covered everything about the King legacy since day one. Since I've gotten here that's kind of been what I've been in charge of doing. So I'm that guy who covers all of that and it's been great 'cause these are the kind of people when you talk about the history, I've always had a keen interest in history, these are the kind of people I read about growing up. These are the people that I--and to be able to meet Coretta Scott King and [Andrew] Andy Young and Joseph Lowery--Joseph Lowery performed my wedding. So these are the kind of people that I've read about who I kind of consider the second founding fathers of the country that I'm covering now on a regular basis who call me every now--it's funny we talked about [HM Reverend] Jesse [L.] Jackson and my first kind of experience watching his campaign. You know, Jesse Jackson has my cell phone number and I--sometimes I look on my phone and I see, oh man Jesse's calling and I don't have time to talk to him right now (laughter). You know what I'm saying so it's kind of weird that you know, this guy that you grew up idolizing now becomes kind of a peer or someone that you kind of can, you know, feel comfortable talking to and kind of reaching out to and, and associating yourself with.

Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr.

Publishing executive Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr. was born on January 5, 1962, in Brooklyn, New York to Barbara and Earl Graves, Sr., founder of Black Enterprise magazine. Graves graduated from Scarsdale High School in 1980. He went on to attend Yale University, where he was captain of the basketball team and became the school’s all-time leading scorer and the second leading scorer in Ivy League history. In 1984, Graves graduated from Yale University with his B.A. degree in economics, and was drafted into the National Basketball Association in the third round by the Philadelphia 76ers.

After a brief professional career in the NBA, where he played for the Milwaukee Bucks and Cleveland Cavaliers, Graves enrolled in Harvard Business School and graduated in 1988 with his M.B.A degree. Upon graduation, Graves joined Black Enterprise as Vice President of Advertising and Marketing. In 1991, he was promoted to Senior Vice President of Advertising and Marketing, and was named Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer in 1995. In 1998, Graves was appointed President and Chief Operating Officer of Black Enterprise and, in January of 2006, was named President and Chief Executive Officer, where he is responsible for the strategic positioning and overall profitability of the corporation, which includes magazine publishing, television production, digital media, and business and lifestyle events.

In 2000, Graves co-founded the Black Enterprise/Greenwich Street Corporate Growth Fund. He also serves as a managing director of the Pinnacle Minority Supplier Development Fund. Graves serves on the board of directors of AutoZone, Bermuda Tourism Authority, and is a trustee for The Committee For Economic Development. In addition to serving on numerous non-profit boards, Graves is a national advocate for the importance of education and athletics, and has served as an AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) Head Basketball Coach for more than ten years.

In 2002, Graves was inducted into the American Advertising Federation (AAF) Hall of Achievement; and in 2009, he was honored with the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award. He was also awarded the Jack Avrett Volunteer Spirit Award from the Boy Scouts of America in 2006.

Earl Graves, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.028

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/21/2014 |and| 7/2/2014

2/21/2014

7/2/2014

Last Name

Graves

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Scarsdale Senior High School

Yale University

Harvard Business School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Earl

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

GRA15

State

New York

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/5/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Short Description

Publishing chief executive Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr. (1962 - ) was president and chief executive officer of Black Enterprise.

Employment

National Basketball Association

Black Enterprise

James Phillips

Visual artist James Phillips was born in 1945 in Brooklyn, New York. Phillips attended the Fleisher Art Memorial School in Philadelphia in the 1960s. He then went on to study at the Philadelphia College of Art (University of the Arts for Philadelphia) from 1964 to 1965, followed by a brief affiliation with the Lee Cultural Center in 1968. Phillips then attended the Printing Trade School in New York City. From there, he became a member of the Harlem-founded Weusi Artist Collective, a group of young artists who made African iconic imagery and symbols a central part of their work, from 1969 to 1973.

In 1970, Phillips met the founding members of AfriCobra (African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists), a group that was committed to incorporating African aesthetics, iconography and positive political imagery into African American art. Phillips also became a member of AfriCobra. From 1973 to 1977, he served as an artist-in-residence at Howard University with duties as a mural consultant. Then, from 1977 to 1979, Phillips was affiliated with C.E.T.A., a nationwide arts initiative of the Carter Administration. After participating in the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Exchange Fellowship in Tokyo, Japan in 1980, he was appointed as a visiting lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley from 1983 to 1984. Phillips went on to teach courses at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Hampton University. Phillips earned his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1998. In 2001, Phillips re-joined the faculty of the art department at Howard University as a lecturer, eventually becoming an associate professor of foundation and painting where he oversees all the graduate coursework.

As a painter, Phillips has participated in over seventy group and solo exhibitions in galleries and museums both nationally and internationally. His work is included in several well-known collections, including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Arts and Artifacts Collection of the New York City Public Library and Hampton University. Phillips’ works have also been specially created for public art projects for the city of Baltimore, Howard University, the Department of Parks in New York City, and the transit system for the City of San Francisco. In 1994, he was commissioned by the Philadelphia Airport to create a permanent piece of art for their domestic wing. The Art in Embassies program of the United States Department of State purchased two of Phillips’ paintings in 2006 for the American Embassy in Togo, West Africa. Phillips was also honored with the Creative Artists Public Service Award in 1971.

James Phillips was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.210

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/5/2013

Last Name

Phillips

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Henry

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Harriton High School

Philadelphia Museum College of Art

Printing Trade School

Maryland Institute College of Art

Search Occupation Category
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

PHI06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Studio

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

4/29/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Short Description

Visual artist James Phillips (1945 - ) a member of the Weusi and AfriCobra artist groups, has participated in over seventy art exhibitions around the world. His work is included in several well-known collections.

Employment

Howard University

Museum Institute College of Art

Hampton University

University of California, Berkeley

Suitland High School

Favorite Color

All Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:3910,25:7650,47:8030,52:29217,428:81580,901:108070,1089:117108,1174:141175,1386:142171,1410:161610,1686:170826,1818:182749,1954:186686,1995:240530,2454:240822,2459:253906,2573:256490,2612:273029,2816:273645,2831:293400,3095:293800,3101:310150,3310$0,0:3785,65:4748,79:25204,193:27756,228:42868,378:43808,389:128818,1468:131567,1473:161169,1793:161792,1805:177010,1938:182350,1969
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Phillips' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Phillips lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about his family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Phillips talks about attending Northside School in Gretna, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about his affinity for art as a child at Northside School in Gretna, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about moving from Gretna, Virginia to Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the differences between Gretna, Virginia and Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about going to school in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes life in Gretna, Virginia and living next door to white sharecroppers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes his experience of racial discrimination in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about how he became involved with the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Phillips describes his teenage years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his activities at Harriton High School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his activities at Harriton High School in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Phillips remembers meeting HistoryMakers A.B. Spellman and Amiri Baraka, and Ted Jones

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about the origins of black art

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his experience at the Philadelphia College of Art

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about moving to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Phillips describes the music scene in New York City during the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about the music he listens to while painting

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Phillips describes becoming serious about creating visual art

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his brief return to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and his involvement with the Lee Cultural Center

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about his return to New York City and his work as an opaquer and printer

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes meeting members of the Weusi Artists Collective

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Phillips describes the origins of the Weusi Artists Collective which preceded the East Community Center

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about the East Educational and Cultural Center for People of African Descent

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Phillips talks about The Last Poets as well as other poets and musicians in New York City during the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - James Phillips talks about his artwork and meeting HistoryMaker A.B. Spellman

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his painting "The Dealer"

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about Harlem, New York in the mid-1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about artistic influences on the development of his painting style

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about the Studio Museum, the Weusi Artists Collective, and AfriCOBRA

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about incorporating African motifs and color contrast into his artwork

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Phillips remembers painting a backdrop for a John Coltrane award concert at Town Hall in 1973

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Phillips describes his art exhibitions in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James Phillips gives a history of AfriCOBRA

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about AfriCOBRA and the evolution of his painting style while an artist-in-residence at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about HistoryMaker Jeff Donaldson

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about musician Donald Byrd

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James Phillips describes the atmosphere at Howard University in Washington, D.C. during the 1970s

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about the pitfalls of making album cover artwork

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about his time as an artist-in-residence for the CETA Arts Program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his experience as an artist-in-residence at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about his NEA fellowship experience in Japan and his interest in mandalas, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James Phillips talks about his NEA fellowship experience in Japan and his interest in mandalas, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about exploring new ways to present his ideas through art

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about the relationship between cosmograms across cultures

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his time living in California

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James Phillips describes his commissioned mural for Philadelphia International Airport, "Gateways to the World"

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James Phillips talks about the logistics of government-funded public art, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about the logistics of government-funded public art, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - James Phillips describes earning his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about the requirements for an M.F.A. degree at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - James Phillips describes earning his M.F.A. degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - James Phillips talks about his early teaching career

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - James Phillips talks about teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C. and his career highlights

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - James Phillips describes highlights from his time at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - James Phillips talks about his students' artistic philosophies

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - James Phillips talks about his own artistic philosophy and practices

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - James Phillips reflects on his life

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - James Phillips reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - James Phillips talks about his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - James Phillips talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - James Phillips reflects on how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - James Phillips narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
James Phillips describes life in Gretna, Virginia and living next door to white sharecroppers
James Phillips talks about exploring new ways to present his ideas through art
Transcript
Okay. So, now you're in school and, you're in high school, and you graduated in '62 [1962] or '63 [1963]?$$Sixty-four [1964].$$Sixty-four, [1964], okay, '64 [1964]. Now, you're in school when the March on Washington takes place [in 1963].$$Oh, yeah, I was here.$$Okay. So, you actually came to the March?$$Yeah.$$Well, tell us about that. How did you get a chance to go to the March?$$Well, I actually didn't finish talking about things when I was in [Gretna] Virginia.$$Okay, well, go ahead.$$Like I said, I was saying we had our farm. We had what I thought was our forty acres, which turns out to be twenty-two acres. And there was this white family, and they had a sharecropper. And the sharecroppers that they had, they had about three of them during the time that I was there, they were all white. Now, the house that I grew up in, it was basically a log cabin. And then they added on a kitchen, and a porch, and several other rooms, and upstairs. The house that the sharecroppers lived in was about the same. The only difference was, I mean, what I saw visually was they, they kept it painted. They painted the logs white, and where the dirt--they painted that brown. So, you had this brown and white posh looking cabin. Ours was just a cabin. And then later on, they would put that brick siding on it to uplift, spiff it up. So, so, the sharecroppers, they would have families, they had kids. And then of course, the Ingram [ph.] family, which owned--where the sharecroppers worked from--they had kids. And they were all a little older than me. So, they'd want to play, or I'd want to play, because I had nobody else to play with unless I went into town. And wasn't old enough at that time to go into town on my own, which was about a mile away. So, we would play. And we would have these little incidents. And they'd, of course, end up using the "N" word, right, and we'd end up fighting. So, and they would come back the next day. "Can..." they called me Jimmy then. "Can Jimmy come out and play?" So, this went on. And of course, if they saw me in town, you know, they'd look the other way, and I'd ignore them, too. So, this went on back and forth. And then the old--Mr. Ingram, the old man, he used to work for the railroad, and he only had one arm, so he was scary. There was another family called the Clays [ph.] that lived at the end of the road, and I used to play with their two sons. And Miss Ingram was very nice. She would invite me in the house, and he'd come home and chase me out. He had a son, Frank, Jr., he was a schoolteacher; I used to play with his kids. And his wife, I was okay with. But he'd come home and he'd chase me out. (Laughter). So, this thing went on. It was either--somebody--the mother or the father, it was either one or the other. Like, the Clay kids, the mother didn't like me associating with them, but I kind of grew on her, so then she said it was alright. So, I had this back and forth thing. And like I said, the town was a mile away. So as I got older, I started going into town hanging out with the black kids. And of course, I went, I would see them in school. And of course, we'd go, we all went to church together. So--$$Was that--you said it was, what kind of church was it?$$Baptist.$$Baptist, okay.$$Yeah.$All right.$$All right. So, this, we're talking about--but we're talking about what you learned in Japan.$$Oh, I just started to see a different direction for me to take my work. Because even back in the days when I was in New York [City], I had somewhat of a problem. Because I didn't really fit--the way I was working, with the work-- even though, you know, it had a strong connection with the African imagery and had a strong connection with the music--I had, I didn't fit in, because the uptown artists felt that it wasn't political enough. So, they had issues with it. The downtown artists--because there's two divisions of artists in New York [City], probably in Chicago [Illinois], too. You got the uptown artists and you got the downtown artists. And the downtown artists, most of them are in the galleries, and then people in uptown at the time were more political. They felt that my work was too African and too political. So I didn't really fit, because they weren't really looking at what I was doing, or they weren't aware of what I was doing. And the same thing happened when I did the mural at Cramton [Hall at Howard University in Washington, D.C.]. So, I was looking at this new way of presenting my ideas and making my statement, and still maintaining my sense of abstractionism. And see, one of the things--since I was in this limbo, one of the things that attracted me to AfriCOBRA [African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists] was the fact that they were very much into abstraction. Because they had--one of their principles is mid-point mimesis, which means that it's like a place between realism and abstraction. So, that was one of the reasons why I gravitated towards them and eventually stopped associating with Weusi [Artists Collective]. Well, one of the reasons was distance, particularly when I got to California, you know, it was too far away. So, this was a new--I guess you would call it a new search, a new direction for me.

Hattie Carwell

Physicist Hattie Carwell was born on July 17, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. Carwell grew up in a nurturing black community in Ashland, Virginia, which encouraged her interest in science. After graduating from high school in 1966, she enrolled at Bennett College for Women. Carwell earned her B.S. degree in chemistry from Bennett College in 1971. She went on to earn her M.S. degree in health physics from Rutgers University in 1971.

Throughout her career, Carwell has worked nationally and internationally for the U.S. Department of Energy and the International Atomic Energy Agency as a health physicist and nuclear safeguards group leader. From 1980 to 1985, she went on leave to Vienna, Austria where she served as a nuclear safeguards inspector and group leader at the International Atomic Energy Agency. In 1990, she became a program manager for high energy and nuclear programs with the DOE San Francisco Operations Office. She then became a senior facility operations engineer at the Berkeley Site Office in 1992. In 1994, Carwell was promoted to operations lead at the Berkeley Site Office, a position which she held until 2006. She became a senior physical scientist before retiring in 2008.

Carwell has written numerous research articles and two books including, Blacks in Science: Astrophysicist to Zoologist. Carwell is a Board Member of the Northern California Council of Black Professional Engineers, an organization of which she is a past President. She is treasurer for the National Council of Black Engineers and Scientists, co-founder and chair of the Development Fund for Black Students in Science and Technology, and Director of the Museum of African American Technology (MAAT) Science Village. MAAT Science Village archives information on the achievements of Africa American in science and engineering.

Carwell is the recipient of numerous performance awards from the Department of Energy, and is recognized as a community leader. She is a distinguished alumna of Bennett College and included in the Black College Hall of Fame. Her achievements are annotated in biographical

Accession Number

A2012.239

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/5/2012

Last Name

Carwell

Maker Category
Middle Name

Virginia

Schools

Bennett College for Women

Rutgers University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Hattie

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

CAR25

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

I Am Not Fattening Frogs For Snakes.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/17/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Oakland

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pie (Apple)

Short Description

Environmental scientist Hattie Carwell (1948 - ) was a health physicist for the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the International Atomic Agency.

Employment

United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)

Energy Research Administration

United States Department of Energy

International Atomic Energy Agency

Department of Energy Headquarters

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hattie Carwell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell talks about her maternal great grandmother, Edmonia Tunstall

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about her family's educational background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about her mother's life in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hattie Carwell describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes her father's background and military service

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell talks about her parents and siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell talks about her uncle Patrick Tunstall and her adoptive grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell describes the sights, smells, and sounds of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hattie Carwell describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hattie Carwell talks about Shiloh Baptist Church

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes her mischievous nature as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell describes her aunt and uncle as parents

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell describes her experience at John Manuel Gandy High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about civil rights and the Richmond Improvement Association

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about her interest in news and current events

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hattie Carwell talks about her high school interests and opportunities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hattie Carwell discusses her high school experiences with science

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes her selection of Bennett College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell describes her experience at Bennett College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell describes her interest in California

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell discusses her work in the field of radiation science

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about the Atomic Energy Commission and exposure to radiation

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about human radiation experiments

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes the effects of exposure to radiation

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell describe measures people take to shield themselves from radiation

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell talks about her internship at Brookhaven National Laboratory

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell describes her thesis

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell describes working at Thomas Jefferson University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about her return to Brookhaven National Laboratory

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes her work with the Atomic Energy Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell talks about her transfer to California

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell talks about her experience at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell describes her work in Vienna, Austria

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about her travels while working for the International Atomic Energy Agency

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell talks about her work as a group leader for the International Atomic Energy Agency

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell talks about her second year at the International Atomic Energy Agency

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell describes her return to the United States

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell describes her work in Rocky Flats, Colorado (part 1)

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell describes her work in Rocky Flats, Colorado (part 2)

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about her work with the High Energy and Nuclear Programs

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell talks about her appointment at Lawrence-Berkeley

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell reflects on her time at the Department of Energy

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell talks about her book, 'Blacks in Science'

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell talks about Dr. Warren Henry (part 1)

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about Dr. Warren Henry (part 2)

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell talks about Ernest Just

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Hattie Carwell talks about Glenn Seaborg

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Hattie Carwell discusses the Development Fund for Black Students in Science and Technology

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Hattie Carwell talks about the Museum for African American Technology Science Village

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Hattie Carwell describes exhibits in the Museum for African American Technology Science Village

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Hattie Carwell talks about her publication exploring green technology

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Hattie Carwell shares her hopes and concerns for the African American communiry

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Hattie Carwell talks about her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Hattie Carwell talks about her personal life

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Hattie Carwell tells how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Hattie Carwell describes her photos

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$9

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
Hattie Carwell talks about her travels while working for the International Atomic Energy Agency
Hattie Carwell describes exhibits in the Museum for African American Technology Science Village
Transcript
Now, did you ever go to Russia or--$$Went, I went to Russia as a tourist. And the Russians we interacted with, Russians disappeared on the job that I had because the majority of us believed the Russians were spies. And they were just doing our job to see the different nuclear facilities. And they thought the Japanese were out to steal industrial secrets. And me, you know, I was harmless. It was only one of me, you know, I was the only black woman and for a while, the only woman. And so, you know, what harm could I do? I was a novelty. And so I was representing the United States. I had a Laissez-passer from the UN [United Nations]. Don't touch her. Don't mess with her. Even if she's in trouble, don't mess with her. And it was, you know, if you messed with me, it's an international incident. So I got lost, you know, trying to go places and I never worried about being lost until I was supposed to be where I wasn't, you know, getting directions in a foreign language that you don't completely understand. It's bad enough getting directions in a language that you do understand. People, you know, so concerned that you might get lost, they're going in the opposite direction, and they turn around, follow me, taking you to make sure you get to the point, going to little towns in Italy. The Italians will talk to you, I don't care what language you speak. And once again, I'm going to these tiny little towns, 'cause, you know, and small-town people will get in your business. And they would wonder why is she coming here once a month, staying three days and then going back? What is she doing? And this Thai--guy from Thailand and I used to go to this town an hour from Amsterdam, Almelo, next door to Hengelo. Hengelo, they have beer. And we stayed in this bread and breakfast place. And so (laughter) Mr. Gemung (ph.) Hung (ph.) said, I'll bet you they wanna know why the two of them come here (laughter), why the hell they come here to this little town (laughter), 'cause you know, they didn't know what we were doing. We would go to the university or out to a power plant. I went to, we--it was a new enrichment plant, uranium enrichment plant, experimental, that we would go to. And, you know, I, since I was a novelty, you know, there's dead time. You're counting samples and machine, and you're just sitting there waiting. So there's a lot of just small talk. And, you know, this was interesting. The plant was in the Netherlands, and the Germans ran the plant. And I forget his name, but the director of the plan would come, and at lunchtime, he'd, you know, just hang out a little bit. And he had a habit, when you asked him a question he would say, "in princeive" (ph.), you know, in principle. And when he would say that, I would always get this big smile on my face. And he didn't know why I would always smile. So he said, what's, what's, you know, what's the problem? I said, well, you know, I'm smiling because most times when people say something "in principle", whatever they're saying is not really true, that it's close to being true, but it's not really true or you really don't know if it's true. And for the nature of our work, if he's telling us, well, it's kinda like this, but it's not, and so I would just smile. And he, it was such an ingrained habit, he couldn't break it. So every time he'd ready to say something, he'd find himself, saying "in princeive". And then he would look at me and laugh.$$Okay--$$So--$Okay, so, well, tell us, what are the exhibits in the museum, and--$$Well, first of all, I have to tell you right now, we do not have a physical location. We are in search of purchasing a building. And I wish the market had changed when we had money, but the money we had at that time was not sufficient to purchase. But now that the market is down, we're desperately in pursuit. So most all of our activities are at events or in someone else's venue. Right now, we participate in U.S. Science and Engineering Festival in D.C. [Washington, D.C.]. There were 150,000 people that came to that. And you were saying people that, not shop, but it's nice to know, kind of thing. I got a photo of the African American who got the very first patent of, you know, not a drawing, but a photo of him and was able to include that in the, in the exhibit. And since we're just more like a picture show, you gotta keep people's interests. So we do it like a game, and we'll ask, "Can you tell me who did so and so?" It's an open-book test 'cause all the answers are right there. And more than likely people don't know. They don't have a clue. But to engage them, we will blow bubbles in the directions, so they start looking. One, they read more, and they end up reading everything as opposed to something that kind of looks interesting. So, we do that. We do Juneteenth, things like that. But when we have our facility, we have groups of kids come in. My thing is solar. I don't know if you noticed my solar cells on my roof.$$I did, I did, on the roof, right, right.$$I've had my solar cells ten years, and I wanted solar cells when I didn't have a roof. And energy and the variety of what DOE [Department of Energy] research is, is what kept me there that long. And when we go to South Africa in two weeks, I'm gonna do a solar paper there.