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Dorothy Burnham

Professor Dorothy Burnham was born on March 22, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York to Frederick Burnham and Aletha Dowridge. She attended P.S. #11 and graduated from Girls High School in Brooklyn in 1932. Burnham majored in microbiology and received her B.S. degree from Brooklyn College in New York.

In the early 1930s, she was active with the American Student Union; and, in 1941, Burnham and her husband, Louis Burnham moved to Birmingham, Alabama to the headquarters of the Southern Negro Youth Congress (SNYC). During that period, the Burnhams, along with civil rights activists Esther Jackson and James Jackson, coordinated sit-ins, freedom rides and voter registration drives. They also worked to initiate equal pay for workers, integrate the public transportation systems and public institutions. Burnham worked in the Birmingham office until it closed in 1949.

In 1949, she returned to Brooklyn and worked as a laboratory technician in New York City area hospitals. Later, Burnham joined the faculty at Hostas Community College and also taught biology, bioethics and health sciences in the adult education program at Empire State University, in the City University of New York (CUNY) system, during which time she was also active in the New York State Teachers Union.

Burnham was active in the national organization of Women for Racial and Economic Equality, as well as with the Sisters Against South African Apartheid, Genes and Gender, and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. She served as president of the Louis E. Burnham Awards Fund. 

In 2011, Burnham was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Better World Awards by the New York Friends of People's World, for her role in the fight for quality public education. Burnham was named a Brooklyn “Renaissance Woman”, and her lifetime achievements were recognized by New York State Senator Velmanette Montgomery (D-Brooklyn) during the reading of a Senate resolution. Burnham was the recipient of the Heritage Award from State University of New York Empire State College in 2012.

Burnham, the widow of Louis Burnham, has four adult children; Claudia, Margaret, Linda and Charles.

Dorothy Burnham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.209

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/15/2018

Last Name

Burnham

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR28

Favorite Season

N/A

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

N/A

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/22/1915

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

N/A

Short Description

Professor Dorothy Burnham (1915- ) worked for the Southern Negro Youth Congress in Birmingham, Alabama and taught at Hostas Community College and Empire State University.

Favorite Color

N/A

L. Duane Jackson

Architect L. Duane Jackson was born on October 13, 1949 in Brooklyn, New York to Annie Belton Jackson and Marion Robinson. He attended Andrew Jackson High School and graduated from Hampton Institute. He earned his M.C.P. degree and M.Arch. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971 and 1978 respectively. From 1993 to 1994, he was a Loeb Fellow of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

From 1978 to 1980, Jackson worked as an architectural designer at Wallace, Floyd, Ellenzweig, Moore, Inc. He then joined the architectural firm of Cambridge Seven Associates, Inc., followed by Mintz Associates Architects/Planners, Inc. in 1981. That same year, he established is own firm, which he named Lewis Jackson and Associates, Inc. In 1985, Jackson and fellow architect Fernando A. Migliassi, AIA co-founded Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. Their clients included film director Spike Lee and Peter Norton of Norton Utilities. Also, in 1985, Jackson became the president and CEO of the real estate development company Urban Investment Associates, Inc. His involvement with the Demonstration Disposition Initiative began in the 1990s, at which time he assisted in the rehabilitation of public housing structures such as the Franklin Park Housing Development, the Washington Heights Housing Development, and the Sonoma/Maple Schuyler Housing Development. In addition to his work on the construction of the Lucerne Gardens in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Jackson also acted as general manager of Parmelee Court, a mixed income housing development in Boston’s South End neighborhood. In 2007, Jackson reorganized Urban Investment Associates, Inc. and Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. into Alinea Capital Partners, LLC, focusing exclusively on real estate development, where he served as a managing member and founder. There, he oversaw the development of Grove Hall’s Mecca retail center, and the Warren/Palmer Building, a mixed-use facility in Roxbury.

Jackson served as a director on numerous non-profit and public boards, such as serving as vice chairman of the Massachusetts Port Authority and chair of the Real Estate and Strategic Initiatives Committee, where he established an historic diversity and inclusion policy to provide ownership and professional participation in the Agency’s real estate projects. In 2017, he was awarded the Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner Advocacy Award by the Vineyard Chapter of the NAACP.

Jackson and his wife, Deborah C. Jackson, live in Milton, Massachusetts. They are the proud parents of sons, Leigh Dana and Jeffrey Brian Jackson.

L. Duane Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 21, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.164

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/21/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Duane

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

L.

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

JAC45

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

There But By The Grace Of God Go I Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

10/13/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Architect L. Duane Jackson (1949- ) co-founded Migliassi/Jackson & Associates, Inc. and Urban Investment Associates, Inc., reorganizing them both into the real estate development company Alinea Capital Partners, LLC.

Favorite Color

Blue

The Honorable Ivy R. Taylor

Political leader Ivy R. Taylor was born in 1970 in Brooklyn, New York to Patricia Ann Burns Sidberry Jones and Ivory Sidberry. Taylor graduated from Martin Van Buren High School in Queens, New York City in 1988, and received her B.A. degree in American studies from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in 1992. She then earned her M.R.P. degree in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1998.

In the summer of 1997, Taylor completed an internship with the San Antonio Affordable Housing Association. Upon completing her graduate studies, Taylor served as a municipal community development coordinator for the City of San Antonio Housing and Community Development Department from 1998 to 2004, and also worked with the Neighborhood Action Department. In 2004, she joined Merced Housing Texas, an affordable housing agency, and served on the San Antonio City Planning Commission from 2006 to 2008. Taylor was elected as a city council representative for District 2 in 2009, and was re-elected again in 2011 and 2013. When Julian Castro resigned as Mayor of San Antonio to become the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 2014, the San Antonio City Council appointed Taylor as the interim mayor for one year. Upon taking office as mayor in 2014, Taylor worked on the resolving a long-running dispute with the police union, adopting a comprehensive plan for the city and implementing neighborhood revitalization initiatives on San Antonio’s East Side. Upon winning a run-off election, Taylor was elected Mayor of San Antonio, serving a two-year term from 2015 to 2017. In 2018, Taylor joined J.L. Powers & Associates as a consultant and began a doctoral program in Higher Education Management at the University of Pennsylvania.

An active member of The Links, Incorporated, Jack and Jill and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Taylor is also currently a member of the Board of Trustees at Huston Tillotson University, an HBCU in Austin, Texas. She received the San Antonio Business Journal's "Forty under Forty" Rising Star Award in 2004.

Taylor and her husband, Rodney, have one daughter, Morgan.

Ivy R. Taylor was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 4, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.113

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/4/2018

Last Name

Taylor

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Ivy

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

TAY19

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans, Louisiana

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/17/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Favorite Food

No, There's too many to love

Short Description

Political leader Ivy R. Taylor (1970 - ) served as on the San Antonio City Council from 2009 to 2014, and then served as Mayor of San Antonio, Texas from 2014 to 2017.

Favorite Color

None

Andrew P. Jackson

Librarian Andrew P. Jackson was born on January 28, 1947 in Brooklyn, New York to Bessie Lindsey Jackson and Walter Luther Jackson, Sr. Jackson graduated from Forest Hills High School in the East Elmhurst neighborhood of Queens, New York, and joined the U.S. Air Force in 1964. After receiving the bronze star for his service with the 4th Air Commando Squadron in Vietnam, Jackson was honorably discharged in 1968. He then completed several semesters at Bernard M. Baruch College in Manhattan, before working for the New York City Human Resources Administration and the Agency for Child Development. Jackson went on to complete his B.S. degree in business administration at York College (CUNY) in 1990, and his M.L.S. degree from Queens College in 1996. He also earned his public librarian’s professional certificate from the University of the State of New York Education Department in 1996.

In 1976, Jackson moved to California, where he worked as a car salesman. He later returned to Queens, where he was hired at the Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center. In 1980, he was promoted to executive director of the center. Under his leadership, the Langston Hughes Library established a partnership with the Queens Public Library in 1986. In 2001, Jackson became an adjunct professor at his alma mater, York College (CUNY). He was appointed vice president of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA) in 2002, serving as president of the Black Caucus from 2004 to 2006. Jackson also worked as a training, operations, and development consultant for the Roosevelt Public Library System; and in 2007, he became an adjunct professor at Queens College. Jackson authored the book Queens Notes: Facts About the Forgotten Borough of Queens, New York, and co-edited The Black Librarian in America: Issues and Challenges of the 21st Century. In 2016, Jackson retired from his position as executive director at the Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center.

Jackson received numerous awards and accolades, including the Governor’s Award for African Americans of Distinction in 1994, the Literacy Advocacy Award from the Black Caucus of the American Library Association in 1999 and a Professional Achievement Award from the BCALA in 2007. From 1997 to 2010, Jackson served on the executive board of the BCALA as well as on the board of directors for Queens Public Television and the Renaissance Charter School in Jackson Heights.

Andrew P. Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 26, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.080

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/26/2018

Last Name

Jackson

Maker Category
Middle Name

P.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Andrew

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

JAC43

Favorite Season

Spring-Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ghana, West Africa

Favorite Quote

If You Want To Be The Best For Yourself, Do It For Those Who Are Denied The Opportunity To Be The Best.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/28/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Librarian Andrew P. Jackson (1947 - ) was the executive director of the Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center from 1980 to 2016. He also served as president of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association from 2004 to 2006.

Favorite Color

Blue

Constance W. Rice

Nonprofit executive and academic administrator Constance W. Rice was born in Brooklyn, New York. She attended P.S. 144 and Erasmus Hall High School in New York City and enrolled at Howard University. She transferred to Queens College, and received her B.S. degree in sociology and anthropology in 1966. Rice received her M.A. degree in public administration and her Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Washington.

In 1966, Rice began working under Whitney Young at the National Urban League. The following year, she moved to Seattle, Washington and began working at the Washington Employment Security Department as a youth counselor. She later accepted an editorial position at The Trumpet, a newsletter focused on housing and social services and operated by the Central Area Motivation Program. In 1984, Rice founded CWR, Inc., a public relations firm. She also served as assistant executive director of the Washington Education Association and later led the Center for Urban Studies at Western Washington State University. In 1992, Rice became vice chancellor of the Institutional Advancement for Seattle Community College District. She then became interim president of North Seattle Community College in 1995, before she returned to the Seattle Community College District as senior vice chancellor in 1997. Rice also helped establish the National Coalition of 101 Black Women, which focused on networking and employment opportunities. During her husband’s tenure as mayor of Seattle, Rice created the Health and Nutrition Project at Washington State University.

Rice was appointed as a trustee of Evergreen State College in 1989. In 1999, she became president and founder of Strategic Education Centers, to support the educational evolution of children in Africa and the United States, which also helped establish two after-school centers in Swaziland. She continued this work as the founder and executive director of the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation USA, which established two schools in Swaziland. In 2013, she was appointed by Washington Governor Jay Islee to the University of Washington’s Board of Regents, and the following year, she became a senior executive fellow for Casey Family Programs.

Rice has held leadership positions on numerous boards, including the Seattle Community College District, Seattle Art Museum Executive Board Community and Education Engagement Committee. Rice was the chair of Women and Ethnic Studies at Shoreline Community College and served as a gubernatorial appointee to the Washington Student Achievement Council and as vice chair. Rice served on the University of Washington Visiting Committee for the Evans School of Public Policy & Governance.  She was the national western area vice director of The Links, Incorporated, and served on the Board of Directors Downtown Rotary, the Rainier Club, The Seattle Foundation, and Swedish Hospital.

In 2018, Rice received the Women of Influence Lifetime Achievement Award from the Puget Sound Business Journal.

Rice and her husband Norman B. Rice, have one child, Mian Rice.

Constance W. Rice was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 8, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.181

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/08/2017

Last Name

Rice

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Organizations
Schools

P.S. 178 St. Clair McKelway

P.S. 144

Harvard Business School

University of Washington

Queens College, City University of New York

Erasmus Hall High School

First Name

Constance

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

RIC22

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Nevis

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

6/23/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

SEattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab Pasta

Short Description

Nonprofit executive and academic administrator Constance W. Rice (1944 -  ) was senior vice chancellor of the Institutional Advancement for Seattle Community College District and founded the Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation USA.

Employment

National Urban League

Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle

Casey Family Program

University of Washington

Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation USA

CWR, Inc.

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Constance W. Rice's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Constance W. Rice lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Constance W. Rice describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Constance W. Rice describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Constance W. Rice describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Constance W. Rice describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Constance W. Rice describes her experiences at P.S. 144 in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Constance W. Rice remembers her social life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Constance W. Rice talks about the Concord Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Constance W. Rice remembers J.H.S. 178, St. Clair McKelway School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Constance W. Rice remembers attending Broadway plays

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Constance W. Rice remembers Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Constance W. Rice talks about her involvement with SNCC

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Constance W. Rice describes her experiences at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Constance W. Rice talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Constance W. Rice describes her experience at Queens College in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Constance W. Rice remembers joining the staff of the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Constance W. Rice describes her experiences at the National Urban League

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Constance W. Rice recalls moving to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Constance W. Rice recalls how she came to join the Central Area Motivation Program

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Constance W. Rice remembers the activist community in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Constance W. Rice remembers meeting Norman Rice

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Constance W. Rice talks about the influential figures in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Constance W. Rice talks about her grassroots activism in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Constance W. Rice describes the racial demographics of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Constance W. Rice talks about the economy of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Constance W. Rice describes her role in her husband's political career

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Constance W. Rice remembers founding CWR, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Constance W. Rice talks about her work at CWR, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Constance W. Rice describes the establishment of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Constance W. Rice remembers receiving her Ph.D. degree from the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Constance W. Rice recalls her husband's election as mayor of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Constance W. Rice reflects upon her husband's mayoralty of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Constance W. Rice remembers Maxine B. Mimms

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Constance W. Rice remembers organizing the Health and Nutrition Project in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Constance W. Rice talks about her work in South Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Constance W. Rice talks about her work in Swaziland

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Constance W. Rice talks about her work at CWR, Inc.
Constance W. Rice describes the establishment of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women
Transcript
Now you were the director for Western Washington University Center For Urban Studies in Seattle [sic.], right?$$Right.$$Is this during the '80s [1980s]?$$Yeah, well it had to be yes, yes it was.$$Okay.$$You're mentioning my short term stint as really part of the consultancy effort, so--$$Oh with your group CW--?$$Right, CWR, Incorporated [CWR, Inc.] and so most of it was in education. Later on I branched out to more public affairs work as well. But the, yes I did that.$$So basically you were sort of like--$$And this--$$--public relations at CWR, which is [HistoryMaker] Constance W. Rice (laughter)?$$That's it, that's it.$$All right, all right.$$And then it was public affairs because I was doing, and the public affairs side of it was doing the policy.$$Okay.$$So in each one of these positions it was policy related. For as an example, the Center for Urban Studies that was Fairhaven [Washington] at, out of Western Washington State University [Western Washington University] and it was an idea that college without walls of bringing and also as I said it's in Bellingham [Washington], right, I don't know if I mentioned Bellingham is close to the Canadian border and so they were very interested in doing more in urban areas the reason was that they wanted to have more black exposure for the black students to them, and vice versa. So they had also gotten rid of--this story of my life--got rid of their former director; asked me to come and fill in for them and to help build out a program in education, liberal arts education that would be attractive to black students who had stepped out of college and worked for a period of time and wanted to come back and we would be able to use their work activity as experiential toward credits, so they could get their B.A. degree et cetera. So the average age of a student would be about twenty-eight, twenty-nine getting their undergraduate degree. So that was the, the concept that they asked me to build out.$Okay, all right, all right. Now in--oh, I should ask you about this first I guess. Now you helped establish 101 Black Women, right?$$Yes, there was a national group called the 100 Black Women [National Coalition of 100 Black Women] and a group of us got together and said, "We don't like that idea because it, it was, it sounded too exclusive, too elitist." So we said, "Let's do 101." So that no one would ever know when we got the one, right. And so we were lucky at the time there was a forward thinking manager at Nordstrom downtown, we're the headquarters for Nordstrom, as you probably know, who I approached and I said, "Can we use your meeting room?" Because allegedly this meeting room at the store was for the community to come and use. And he said, yes. And it was an auditorium and it seated maybe two hundred people and so we started meeting there and what it became was a welcome wagon for African American women that came to Seattle [Washington] as well as women who lived in Seattle. So it was a nice you know, meeting of the old with the new to make the transition a lot easier and we would have speakers come from you know, like either finance or social or library, et cetera just to have that back and forth and then after which we would have soft drinks.$$Okay.$$So that's what it was.$$Was there a comparable organization for, for black men that (unclear)?$$No, no, no it was not.$$Okay, all right.$$There was one for the 100 Black Men [100 Black Men of America, Inc.] comparable to the 100 Black Women that was national but this was local. This was 101 and as I said we wanted to knock down the barriers. If a person would come to town and they were a part time sales clerk and another person was the chief financial officer they both had a chance to meet each other. So that was the concept (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I see what you're saying now.$$--right, as a concept.$$It was more than just for (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Whereas for the 100 Black Women, you know, someone like me you know, title, background, et cetera you know, we were there. And there's nothing wrong with that, it was just I, we wanted more of a democracy of participation of folks from you know, government to private sector to even, a few were unemployed. They had been employed and it was also an opportunity for them to get a job through their networking, so it was, it's very hard in certain areas of the county, and this was one of those areas where you don't have the concentration of black individuals like you have elsewhere for us to get together as females, so that was, that was the concept.

Lenny Wilkens

Basketball coach and player Lenny Wilkens was born on October 28, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from Boys High School in Brooklyn and received his B.A. degree from Providence College in 1960, where he was a two-time All-American on the men’s basketball team.

Wilkens was chosen by the St. Louis Hawks in the 1960 National Basketball Association (NBA) draft. He spent eight years with the Hawks organization and between 1960 and 1970, he was voted to nine all-star teams and finished second to Wilt Chamberlain for the NBA’s MVP Award in 1968. That same year, Wilkens was traded to the Seattle SuperSonics becoming a player-coach. He led the Sonics to their first winning season in 1971 and 1972. He ranked among the all-time leaders in assists, free throws, and was named MVP in the 1971 All-Star game. Wilkens left coaching to play with the Cleveland Cavaliers in 1972, and later became player-coach of the Portland Trail Blazers. In 1975, he retired from playing after fifteen seasons and remained as coach of the TrailBlazers for an additional season.

Wilkens returned to Seattle as head coach midway through the 1977 and 1978 season. He coached the Sonics to the NBA Finals that year. In his eight seasons with the Sonics, the team won its only NBA Championship in 1979, and compiled a record of 357-277 for a winning percentage 56.3. He served as the Sonic general manager for one season before accepting the head coach position for the Cleveland Cavaliers, where he coached for seven seasons. He later joined the Atlanta Hawks, coaching the team to the Central Division Championship and was named NBA Coach of the Year in 1994. Wilkens remained with the Atlanta Hawks organization until 2000, and left to coach the Toronto Raptors from 2000 to 2003, and the New York Knicks from 2004 to 2005. The following year, Wilkens was hired as vice chairman of the Seattle SuperSonics ownership group, and later became president of basketball operations. Wilkens retired from the organization in 2007.

Wilkens was the only person named one of the fifty greatest players and one of the top ten coaches in league history, and was inducted into the Naismith Hall of Fame as a player and a coach. 

Wilkens and his wife, Marilyn have three children, Leesha, Randy and Jamee.

Lenny Wilkens was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.177

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/05/2017

Last Name

Wilkens

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Organizations
First Name

Lenny

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

WIL80

Favorite Season

Fall Into Winter

Sponsor

Laura and George Bilicic

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Be Consistent In What You Do And What You Say.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

10/28/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

My Wife's Fried Chicken

Short Description

Basketball coach and player (1937 - ) played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for fifteen years and transitioned to coaching where he won an NBA Championship and was inducted into the NBA Hall of Fame as a coach

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Barbara Alleyne

Investment banker Barbara Alleyne was born on October 9, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York to Elaine Harrell Alleyne and Irving Seymour Alleyne. Her family later moved to Long Island, New York and she graduated from Roosevelt Junior and Senior High School in Roosevelt, New York in 1965, and received her B.A. degree in economics from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1970, where she participated in three finance co-ops including one with First National City Bank. She then received her M.B.A. degree from the Columbia Business School in New York, New York in 1979, where she received a scholarship from the Coalition of Concerned Black Executives.

Alleyne worked for Model Cities in the New York City Office for the Aging, where she remained for three years. In 1976, Alleyne secured a position with the New York State Office for the Aging. Following her graduation from Columbia Business School in 1979, Alleyne was hired at Salomon Brothers where she oversaw a team marketing money market securities and was mentored by Milton Irving. In 1989, she joined Chase Manhattan Bank where she worked for five years and sold their first corporate bond, until she returned to Salomon Brothers which later became part of Citigroup in 1998. Alleyne served as the first African American female managing director in global fixed income at Citigroup, where she remained until 2001.

Alleyne then joined the Northeastern University board of directors, where she founded the Black Alumni Association Scholarship, and the scholarship’s annual fundraiser in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. In 2007, Alleyne was elected to the Northeastern University Corporation’s Board of Trustees, and from 2008 to 2009, served on its Students Affairs and Alumni Relations Committee. Alleyne also served as vice chair of the board of directors for the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, and as treasurer of the Martha’s Vineyard Branch of the NAACP. She was also active in the Adult and Community Education of Martha’s Vineyard organization and The Cottagers, Inc., the island’s philanthropic organization. In 2017, Alleyne’s gift to Northeastern University created an associate professorship in the department of African American Studies.

Barbara Alleyne was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 20, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.150

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/20/2017

Last Name

Alleyne

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

ALL07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Looking for one - used to be Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Somebody's got to do it.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

10/9/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Martha's Vineyard

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice cream

Short Description

Investment banker Barbara Alleyne (1948 - ) was the managing director in global fixed income at Citigroup until 2001, and founded the Black Alumni Association Scholarship at Northeastern University.

Favorite Color

Many Colors

David Grain

Investment executive David Grain was born on May 31, 1962 in Brooklyn, New York to Dora Grain and Walter Grain. Grain attended Vineyard Regional High School in Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts and graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in Worchester, Massachusetts in 1984 and earned his M.B.A. degree from Dartmouth College, Tuck School of Business in Hanover, New Hampshire in 1989.

Grain began his professional career in 1989 at Drexel Burnham Lambert, and, after a year at Drexel Burnham Lambert, he accepted a position with Morgan Stanley, where he was promoted to principal after only two years with the company. Grain’s work focused on telecommunications, media, and technology companies. In 2000, he joined AT&T Broadband Corporation as the senior vice president for the New England region. Only two years later, Grain became a director at Newcastle Investment Corporation, as well as president at Pinnacle Holdings, Inc. During his presidency at Pinnacle Holdings, Grain led the company out of bankruptcy and grew the company’s portfolio from approximately 2,000 communication sites to over 11,000. After Crown Caste International acquired Pinnacle Holdings in 2006, Grain left the company and founded Grain Communications Group, Inc. The following year, he founded Grain Management, LLC, which invested in the wireless communications sector.

Grain was named by the Boston Business Journal as one of Boston’s “Top 40 leaders under 40” and was awarded the Ten Outstanding Young Leaders Award by the Boston Jaycees. His company, Grain Management, LLC, was also named as Black Enterprise’s Financial Services Company of the Year in 2005.

In addition to his own businesses, Grain has served in leadership roles for many other organizations as well. In 2009, he was appointed to the Florida State Board of Administration’s Investment Advisory Council and, two years later, was appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Infrastructure Advisory Council of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Grain was also selected by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to participate in the U.S. Joint Civilian Orientation Conference. He served on the board of trustees for Emerson College and the College of the Holy Cross. Grain was the founder of the Grain Fellows Program, which provides students from low-income families with funding for SAT preparation classes, college application fees, and financial aid negotiation.

Grain and his wife, Lisa Butler Grain, have two children, Chelsea Grain and David Grain, Jr.

David Grain was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 17, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.132

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/17/2017

Last Name

Grain

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

GRA18

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Dorothy Terrell

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

The harder I work the luckier I get.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

5/31/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Sarasota

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Organic chicken

Short Description

Investment executive David Grain (1962 - ) founded Grain Communications Group, Inc. and Grain Management, Inc.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Green

Franklin A. Thomas

Foundation executive and lawyer Franklin A. Thomas was born on May 24, 1934 in Brooklyn, New York to James and Viola Thomas. He graduated from Franklin K. Lane High School in 1952, and attended Columbia University, where he played basketball, became the first African American to captain an Ivy League basketball team, and was named the league’s most valuable player in 1955 and 1956. Thomas earned his B.A. degree from Columbia University in 1956 and went on to earn his L.L.B. degree from Columbia Law School in 1963.

After earning his B.A. degree, Thomas joined the U.S. Air Force as a strategic air command navigator, where he served as captain from 1956 to 1960. In 1964, he was admitted to the New York State Bar and began his legal career as an attorney at the Federal Housing and Home Finance Agency’s New York office. During the same year, Thomas served as Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. From 1965 to 1967, he served as deputy police commissioner in charge of legal matters for the New York City Police Department, where he established the Civilian Complaint Review Board. From 1967 to 1977, Thomas served as president and chief executive officer for the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, and was credited with raising approximately $63 million in public and private funds, and serving in the forefront of community redevelopment efforts. In 1977, Thomas resumed his private legal practice, until 1979, when he was selected to serve as the first African American president of the Ford Foundation, where he served until 1996.

Thomas served as the chairman of the Rockefeller Foundation-funded Study Commission on U.S. Policy Toward South Africa from 1979 to 1981, and produced the comprehensive, groundbreaking report on apartheid, Time Running Out. He went on to serve as a member of the U.S. Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on South Africa from 1985 to 1987.

Thomas served as chairman of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on South Africa, the Study Commission on United States Policy Toward Southern Africa, and the September 11th Fund. He has also served on the board of directors for the Aluminum Company of America, Avaya, CBS Inc., Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Citicorp/Citibank, and Lucent Technologies. In 2005, Thomas founded the TFF Study Group, a nonprofit organization dedicated to development in South Africa in 2005.

Thomas is the recipient of numerous awards, including: The Lyndon Baines Johnson Award for “Contributions to the Betterment of Urban Life,” the John Jay and Alexander Hamilton Awards from Columbia College, and Columbia Law School’s James Kent Medal for distinguished professional achievement. He is also the recipient of Columbia University’s Medal of Excellence. He has been granted honorary degrees from Bank Street College, Columbia University, Fordham University, New School University, Pace University, Pratt University and Yale University. In 2003, Thomas was named one of four “kingmakers” in corporate America by Fortune magazine.

Franklin A. Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 28, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.088

Sex

Male

Interview Date

04/26/2017 |and| 06/28/2017

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Schools

Franklin K. Lane High School

Columbia University

J.H.S. 33 Mark Hopkins Junior High School

P.S. 44 Marcus Garvey Elementary School

Columbia Law School

First Name

Franklin

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

THO26

Favorite Season

Fall, Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

How Are You?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/27/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken And Rice

Short Description

Foundation executive and lawyer Franklin A. Thomas (1934 - ) was the first African American president of the Ford Foundation, after serving as the president and CEO of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation.

Employment

Ford Foundation

Faucus and Baron

U.S. Air Force

Housing and Home Finance Agency

U.S. Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York

New York City Police Department

Civilian Complain Review Board

Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Slating of Franklin A. Thomas' interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his parents' migration to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the drum and bugle corps at the Concord Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the gang activity in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his interactions with gangs in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his mother's influence

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls an altercation between his mother and her boarders

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his maternal uncle

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls lessons from his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his experiences at J.H.S. 33 in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his high school basketball career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his summer position at an architectural firm

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his experiences at Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his coursework at Columbia University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his challenges at Columbia University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon his time at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his NAACP activities at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his experiences on the basketball team at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his perception of racism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his service in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his role in the Strategic Air Command

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his basketball records at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his mother's emphasis on self-determination

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his older sisters

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his mother's emphasis on education

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his travels with the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls how he became a navigator in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his decision to attend Columbia Law School in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his experiences at Columbia Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls being hired at the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers prosecuting a domestic terrorism case, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers prosecuting a domestic terrorism case, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas describes how he became deputy police commissioner of New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers New York City Mayor John Lindsay

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the Civilian Complaint Review Board of the New York City Police Department, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the Civilian Complaint Review Board of the New York City Police Department, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls the corruption in the New York City Police Department

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his relationship with the Harlem Clubhouse

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Earl G. Graves, Sr.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the creation of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls becoming president of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls becoming president of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the leaders of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the Community Home Improvement Program

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls the problems in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his challenges at the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the gentrification of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his legacy at the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the financial success of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon his time at the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his relationship with Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his relationship with Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers meeting John Hay Whitney

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation's cable television venture

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his wife, Kate Roosevelt Whitney

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his board memberships

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls how he became the president of the Ford Foundation

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his corporate board memberships

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon his experience as an African American in Corporate America

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his tenure on the board of Citibank, N.A.

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his invitation to the board of Citibank, N.A.

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his transition to the Ford Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his transition to the Ford Foundation, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his tenure at the Ford Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his tenure at the Ford Foundation, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his successor at the Ford Foundation

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his changes to the Ford Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his changes to the Ford Foundation, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas lists his charitable board memberships

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Slating of Franklin A. Thomas' interview, session 2

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his basketball teammate, Albert Vann

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his decision to attend Columbia University

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the importance of education

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the student protests at Columbia University

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls the student protests on South Africa

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the black community at Columbia University

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his mother's lessons about racial discrimination

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Robert M. Morgenthau

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the conspiracy to bomb the Statue of Liberty

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about mandatory minimum sentences

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his decision to leave the U.S. attorney's office

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Police Commissioner Howard R. Leary

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about Robert F. Kennedy's commitment to the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his early involvement with the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the rising property values in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls the early leaders of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his start at the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the Bedford-Stuyvesant Development and Services Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers dissolving the Bedford-Stuyvesant Development and Services Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers John Doar

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the staff of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his role on the Knapp Commission

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the Knapp Commission

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the history of Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his early interactions with the Ford Foundation

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the Ford Foundation funding of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls how he met J. Irwin Miller and Henry Schacht

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation's architectural investments

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon the success of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Tape: 14 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his family

Tape: 14 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers the development of Continental Cablevision, Inc.

Tape: 14 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his relationship with the Whitney family

Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about John Hay Whitney's philanthropy

Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers meeting Kate Roosevelt Whitney

Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers interviewing for the presidency of the Ford Foundation

Tape: 15 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the Ford Foundation's financial problems

Tape: 15 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his relationship with President James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr.

Tape: 15 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers McGeorge Bundy

Tape: 15 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the leadership of the Ford Foundation, pt. 1

Tape: 15 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the leadership of the Ford Foundations, pt. 2

Tape: 16 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his assessment of the Ford Foundation's operations

Tape: 16 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his changes to the Ford Foundation

Tape: 16 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his interview with The New York Times

Tape: 16 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the Ford Foundation's philanthropic work

Tape: 16 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his assessment of the Ford Foundation's funding efforts

Tape: 16 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his development of the Ford Foundation

Tape: 16 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his relationship with Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 16 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon the experiences that led him to the Ford Foundation

Tape: 16 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Mary Griggs Jordan

Tape: 17 Story: 1 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the 'Time Running Out' report, pt. 1

Tape: 17 Story: 2 - Franklin A. Thomas describes the 'Time Running Out' report, pt. 2

Tape: 17 Story: 3 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 17 Story: 4 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk's visit to the United States, pt. 1

Tape: 17 Story: 5 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk's visit to the United States, pt. 2

Tape: 17 Story: 6 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls meeting with F. W. de Klerk upon Nelson Mandela's release

Tape: 17 Story: 7 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Nelson Mandela's release from prison

Tape: 17 Story: 8 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his involvement with South Africa's government, pt. 1

Tape: 17 Story: 9 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his involvement with South Africa's government, pt. 2

Tape: 17 Story: 10 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his mentorship of South African lawyers

Tape: 17 Story: 11 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his relationship with Nelson Mandela

Tape: 17 Story: 12 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the Constitutional Court of South Africa

Tape: 17 Story: 13 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers Albie Sachs and Arthur Chaskalson

Tape: 17 Story: 14 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about Nelson Mandela's wives

Tape: 17 Story: 15 - Franklin A. Thomas remembers his advice to Nelson Mandela

Tape: 17 Story: 16 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the life of Nelson Mandela

Tape: 17 Story: 17 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about the African National Congress

Tape: 17 Story: 18 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon the international reputation of the United States

Tape: 17 Story: 19 - Franklin A. Thomas recalls his chairmanship of the September 11th Fund

Tape: 17 Story: 20 - Franklin A. Thomas talks about his marriage to Kate Roosevelt Whitney

Tape: 17 Story: 21 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his wife, Kate Roosevelt Whitney

Tape: 17 Story: 22 - Franklin A. Thomas reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 17 Story: 23 - Franklin A. Thomas describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 17 Story: 24 - Franklin A. Thomas describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

12$16

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Franklin A. Thomas describes his early involvement with the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation
Franklin A. Thomas talks about his changes to the Ford Foundation
Transcript
And it's during that period that I get a call from the senator's office, and Earl Graves [HistoryMaker Earl G. Graves, Sr.], who's then working for the senator, must have mentioned my name to him; he had no other--I don't know what other sources there were, but certainly I suspect Earl was among them. And I get a call and they--I go and meet with the, the senator, and he explains what his vision is and what he's assembled up to that point, and that he's trying to work with these different groups in Bedford-Stuyvesant [Brooklyn, New York] and they need someone who can handle all of that and be, at the same time, accessible to the business group. And, for some reason, it kind of strikes me as something that--unplanned on my part, but maybe I ought to try and be helpful. So, I--I think I told you this story--I go to the meeting with the local people, and Elsie Richardson among them, and others who later become great friends, but at that point--I mean the beginning is, "What makes you think you're qualified to do what needs to be done here?" I mean that's the opening wedge for this meeting (laughter). And so we have a lengthy conversation, and I go back to Kennedy [Robert F. Kennedy] and his assembled group and say, "You know, I think it's an interesting idea. I don't think I'm the person that the community would seek to oversee this. And I say that be- not as any knock on me, but because, in my opinion, they have someone in mind who they would like to be in that position--someone they know and have worked with in the past, and who has some credentials," et cetera. So that's my impression from my meeting that I relate to the senator, and he says, "You know I, I know but that--we, we know of that person, and we've done a check there, and it's a well intentioned idea, but he's not the person that can lead this, so would you please not withdraw yourself from this while we search to see if we can find a person of--that's acceptable to both parties?" So, I say, "Okay." I'm as interested in seeing something done well as anyone. So I agree to spend some time with the local folk as they go through looking at what had been done in a, a couple of other cities--where Ed Logue [Edward J. Logue] had worked, and people whom Kennedy had brought into Bedford-Stuyvesant [Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, New York, New York], and I.M. Pei had brought in, and others had been brought in.$$I.M. Pei, who is the architect, right?$$He's the architect, yeah.$$Um-hm.$$And so--anyway, a few months go by; I--I've got my own job I'm working on, but I spend time with them, and they finally double back and say, "Well, you're not our first choice but unless you're willing to do this, it's probably not gonna happen." And the Kennedy people are saying basically the same thing, and that the person the local group seemed more interested in is not someone that the business group thinks can do the job, so I said, "Okay," I would do it for two years to get it started, and so I did. And I spent the next ten years there, and I'm happy to say it's having its fiftieth anniversary upcoming, and some of the same people are happily still there. Most have passed on, but there's another generation there, and yeah, we're all pretty proud of what's happened--yeah. And Al Vann [Albert Vann] still lives there, Gil Scott [Gilbert L. Scott] still lives there; a number of the people that, you know, I grew up with are there and involved with what's going on.$So I held meetings with the staff [of the Ford Foundation, New York, New York] in all the different areas and laid out where we were, where we had been, what had happened in the ensuing ten or twelve years, what trajectory we were on, and what that could mean going forward. So either we're going to fix things while we still have the ability to do that, with the hope that we can reposition it so it can be around in perpetuity. And that means that some who think they have a lifetime arrangement are gonna be disappointed because we're going to trim the staff and, (makes noise). So, anyway, we did all that.$$You did a lot of trimming of staff.$$Yeah.$$This was--it was, I think, what--a quarter of the staff?$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Like over a hundred--it was over a hundred and something positions.$$Yeah, yeah, yeah, it was a lot, it was a lot. And everybody got--I mean they're all disappointed obviously, but everybody got treated as well as you could expect to be treated; you're given three or four years of coverage, but it's the end. So I go to The New York Times, at their invitation--$$After some of this has happened.$$After some of this has happened.$$And this is--this is the--but it took--so it--you're saying within the year of stu- after that year of study this is when you make the decision now?$$Yeah.$$How long does it take to get board alignment? That's a--$$I'd say about three years--to get it all sorted, and then I, I double back to The New York Times, at their invitation, and they, they start by saying to me--I've--never forget (laughter) the conversation. "You know it's, it's been a while since we last spoke." He said, "Oh, I would like to know what's, what's happened, you know, since then," and all that. And so we're--I give them a, a, a rundown, a generalized rundown of what we've done and where we then were financially, and how I saw the future and, you know, their, their response was, "You know, well, you know, it's obvious that place needed to be restructured, (mumbling)." And so I say back to them, "You mean now that I've survived you, what I did was obvious, is that it?" "No, I didn't mean that." "Oh, you guys are just so full of shit, you know--stop it!" You know. But I, I knew the, the then head of the newspaper from my Columbia [Columbia University, New York, New York] days; we'd both been trustees at Columbia, and so I was pretty relaxed with, with--I wasn't angry at all; I'm just saying (laughter), you know, "Now that I've survived you, you tell me what I did was obvious."$$Well, because they had--I remember reading the one article where they were, you know, talking about you being sequestered behind--$$Yeah, yeah.$$--and then--well, I--you let go like some key people at the beginning, but you had to get your team in place, too (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) That's right, that's right. Well, they were--$$And Harold Howe [Harold Howe II] was one of--but--$$They were all angry when they left.

The Honorable David A. Paterson

Political leader David A. Paterson was born on May 20, 1954, in Brooklyn, New York to Basil Paterson and Portia Paterson. An infection left Paterson legally blind shortly after his birth, so his family moved to Hempstead, New York so that Paterson could attend school without being required to be in special education classes. Paterson went on to earn his B.A. degree in history from Columbia University in New York in 1977. In 1983, Paterson earned his J.D. degree from Hofstra Law School in Hempstead.

After graduating, Paterson worked for the Queens District Attorney’s Office. In 1985, Paterson joined the campaign staff for David Dinkins’ third campaign for Borough President of Manhattan. That same year, Paterson was elected to the New York State Senate as the youngest state senator in Albany, serving on the State Senate until 2006. In 2002, Paterson was elected as the first African American New York State Senate Minority leader. In 2006, Paterson stepped down from the Senate to run as the first African American lieutenant governor of New York, which he won by a landslide with candidate Eliot Spitzer. In 2008, Spitzer resigned from the position of governor amid a scandal, making Paterson the first African American and legally blind governor of New York in 2008. As governor, Paterson reduced New York’s budget deficit by $40 billion and increased the welfare allowance for needy individuals for the first time in 20 years. Paterson also introduced legislation that would later end discrimination against same-sex couples in New York. After leaving office, Paterson hosted a radio show for New York station WOR from 2011 to 2012. He also taught government as an adjunct professor at New York University. In 2016, Paterson joined Stifel, Nichoulas & Company as a director of investment.

In 2007, Paterson received the John Jay Award, which is reserved for distinguished alumni, from Columbia University. In 2014, he served as the chairman of the New York Democratic Party, as well as on the board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Paterson also chaired the board of the Achilles Track Club.

Paterson has two children; a stepdaughter, Ashley, and a son, Alex.

David A. Paterson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 15, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.055

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/15/2017 |and| 04/11/2017

Last Name

Paterson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

A.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

PAT10

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Peacefulness - state of being, not a geophysical place.

Favorite Quote

By the time he learned to say hello, it was time to say goodbye. (And 2 others on recording.)

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/20/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Political leader David A. Paterson (1954- ) was the first non-white New York State Senate minority leader, as well as the first African American lieutenant governor of New York, and both the first African American and legally blind governor of New York.

Favorite Color

Orange or pink