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Jack Arnett Kirkland

Multicultural education expert Jack Arnett Kirkland was born on October 28, 1931, in the coal mining town of Blythedale, Pennsylvania, to Anna Mae Kirkland and Aaron Kirkland. Kirkland attended Syracuse University, where he was a member of the Phi Delta Kappa Honor Society, and received his B.A. degree in international relations in 1959. Two years later, Kirkland received his M.S. degree in social services from Syracuse University.

In 1964, Kirkland became chair of St. Louis University’s Social Group Work Program, a position he would serve in for six years. During this time, Kirkland directed the Peace Corps training in Latin America for community development from 1964 until 1967. In 1970, Kirkland became an associate professor at Washington University at St. Louis’ George Warren Brown School of Social Work. Kirkland taught classes in the rehabilitation of depressed communities and, while on sabbatical, served as the Jeff-Vander-Lou Development Corporation’s director of economic development, working on the development of the depressed Jeff-Vander-Lou section of St. Louis.

Kirkland co-founded the Black Studies Department (now African American Studies) at Washington University in 1974, becoming chair of the department that same year. He left in 1976, becoming Missouri’s director of transportation as a member of the governor’s cabinet, where he would remain for two years. Shortly thereafter, Kirkland was invited to the White House by President Jimmy Carter and also made a trip to visit with Vice President Mondale at the Blair House.

Returning from public service in 1980, Kirkland chaired the Economic Development Concentration at Washington University’s School of Social Work, and would work within this department for the rest of the decade. In 1988, Kirkland received a Most Outstanding Teacher Award for the college’s School of Social Work, and in 1990, was featured in the St. Louis Sun’s Great Teachers Series. Kirkland joined the National Association of Child Care Workers’ meeting in Capetown, South Africa, in 1995, meeting with Desmond Tutu and speaking publicly in both Port Elizabeth and Mmabatho, South Africa.

Kirkland continues to consult on issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural sensitivity for a variety of school districts nationwide, as well as for corporations throughout the Midwest. Kirkland has also testified as an expert witness for five Congressional Committees and has acted as advisor for the Native Americans of the Southwest Division of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Kirkland is married to Iris McWherter Kirkland, and they have three children, Jack, Jr., Adrianne, and Kelly.

Jack Kirkland was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 15, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.288

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/15/2007 |and| 12/6/2007

Last Name

Kirkland

Maker Category
Middle Name

Arnett

Organizations
Schools

Syracuse University

Mckeesport Area Tech Ctr

First Name

Jack

Birth City, State, Country

Blythedale

HM ID

KIR03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Scandinavia

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Missouri

Birth Date

10/28/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

St. Louis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Corn

Short Description

Academic administrator and social work professor Jack Arnett Kirkland (1931 - ) founded the Economic Development Concentration at Washington University’s School of Social Work after serving in public service as the State of Missouri’s Director of Transportation. Kirkland consulted on issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural sensitivity for a variety of school districts, corporations, and government agencies nationwide.

Employment

Saint Louis University

Plymouth House

Peace Corps

Huntington Family Centers

Washington University (St. Louis, Missouri)

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jack Arnett Kirkland's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his neighborhood in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers the flooding of the Youghiogheny River

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls his route to P.S. 11 in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers his childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers the popularity of golf in his community

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the legacy of Julius Richardson

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the community of Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers his pastimes in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers his relationship with his father

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls annual flooding in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the influence of labor unions

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls the political corruption in Blythedale, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls his early activities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers joining the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his experiences in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his experiences in the U.S. Air Force, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls his time in Liverpool, England

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his undergraduate studies at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls working at Huntington Family Centers in Syracuse, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls teaching at St. Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers training Peace Corps volunteers

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers the welfare rights movement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers the student protests of the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers training volunteers for the Peace Corps

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the Model Cities program, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the Model Cities program, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the Model Cities program, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the importance of land ownership

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the economic challenges facing the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland shares his predictions for future cities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls the demolition of the Pruitt-Igoe public housing project in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the displacement of low-income communities

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the importance of community

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the importance of black history education

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about African American studies

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Jack Arnett Kirkland's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers his introduction to African American studies

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls the demand for black history education

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the perpetuation of negative stereotypes

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland remembers researching black history

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about the popular depictions of Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the conventional history curriculum

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about Black History Month

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls developing a black studies curriculum

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the start of the black studies program at Washington University in St. Louis

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls mentoring black students at Washington University in St. Louis

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the shortcomings of social science research

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls his introduction to state politics

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls serving as Missouri's transportation director

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his achievements as the director of transportation

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls his return to Washington University in St. Louis

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about community wealth

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the Neighborhood Council in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jack Arnett Kirkland lists his teaching awards

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes the history of public housing

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jack Arnett Kirkland talks about urban transportation

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his plans for the future

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Jack Arnett Kirkland reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Jack Arnett Kirkland reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his family

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Jack Arnett Kirkland describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Jack Arnett Kirkland narrates his photographs

DASession

2$2

DATape

6$7

DAStory

9$6

DATitle
Jack Arnett Kirkland recalls developing a black studies curriculum
Jack Arnett Kirkland describes his achievements as the director of transportation
Transcript
Part of what I was trying to figure out also was how, I mean you and Dr. Williams [Robert L. Williams] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Williams right.$$--had the task of putting together a curriculum. And I guess I'm trying to ask that based on what knowledge that you all had to--from jump street. What did you know and what did he know that could inform a curriculum and where did you learn it from?$$Okay. Well Williams was a psychologist okay and I, a social worker. And obviously we, we learned a lot of this coincidentally and accidentally. We learned it in the struggles and the movements. We learned it in the racism that we were exposed to, the mythologies that I was saying we were exposed to. So African Americans learned a lot backwards. We know that for instance I was saying here you have a situation where people are sailors and they're coming across the waters and I've given you some explorers who were doing that though and if you were a kid in school you can't imagine a black or an African being navigator. You couldn't imagine Christopher Columbus having a navigator, a black navigator for his ship but the reality is that if you go back to the Carthaginians you actually will see the people who sail the world. If you go back into history you'll, you'll see here's a, a people who know the stars who can sail by the stars and so forth and so on. So there's enough--there are enough pieces around to put together to know that indeed the, the first sailors were Africans. Well if they're the first sailors it would stand to reason that they would be sailing with other people. You also realize that slavery is something that, that was not a fact of life in the, in the sense that that it--that we came to understand it. And so without the presence of that slavery and with the, with the knowledge that you get, you get the most with, with the best of of resources, we're talking about Europeans who use Africans, employ them, treated them as equals and and that they were involved in the process of of exploration. So you know that it doesn't take a lot to go back and put that together. It doesn't take a lot to go back and put together how foolish the notion is that's presented to you that, that someone is sailing to see if the world is round when all you have to do is, is recognize that you're talking about Africans not only who had clocked the the eclipses and had seen many of them and nothing ever went across that was square you know all of those, those objects that passed through one another are round. So Africans knew that. Africans knew that it took three minutes for the sunshine to get to the earth. You know Africans had the greatest math ability in the world. The--you know if, if you just look at the pyramids, you'll--what they, what they did in, in erecting the pyramid, is something that you cannot do today with the best machinery and the, and the most ablest of scientists. You can't come up with the same kinds of perfections in terms of how those pyramids were, were erected.$What were your duties at the, as director of transportation and why did you resign?$$Well, I, I, I went there from the university [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri]. I went there, I was a tenured professor when I went there. I didn't really go to be there for an extended period of time. I, I, I actually went there to as a favor for the senator [J.B. "Jet" Banks] and, and to just give the the visual image that you could be black and qualified and have a position like that and, and, and could function in it. And so that was the purpose and then I came back to this university where I've been, where I'd gone on leave of absence.$$Now were you able to accomplish anything as transportation secretary?$$Yeah, I think that you know first it was the fact that I was able to hire a staff around me that was African American, which is almost was unheard of. But what I, I learned there was how to look at a system, a governmental, governmental system in a, in a broad perspective and see how it functioned to get a sense of of how government can enhance or impede individuals, especially African Americans. So I, I, I think what I gained mostly was a, a understanding of, of organizations and power and and I guess also what I learned more than anything was that it's possible to to be the head of state and still not have the authority to do things unless whoever put you in that position permits you to do it. That was a real awakening for me and then I transposed that to the, to the fact that you can be president of a country and it's, it's whoever put you there is the one who can make decisions and you're not necessarily in a position where because you're there you can make decisions independently. So I, I, I knew that the people who were the the fund gatherers, the people who had caused the turnout of votes and hosts of other kinds of other things that they can make decisions that perhaps may be counter to what the elected person might want to make, but they are the ones who carry the day. That was--that, that shook me from my sixth grade civics concept. I, I thought that whoever was elected could with integrity vote or or command however something should go but that was not true.$$Now do you have an example of that work ethic I mean, how it worked?$$Yeah, yeah I can recall that there is a, a community that in St. Louis [Missouri] which is I don't wanna call these names but there was a community that had a, a church with a great deal of influence and money and they--we were on a plane and a call came through and, and you know this group actually helped a decision to be made about what kind of facilities should go into an area to turn it around. And the facility was an anchor and it was because the people had the money and the clout that was not necessarily the intention of, of what the governor wanted to do. I mean I'm sitting in, in board meetings and council meetings and cabinet meetings and all of those kinds of things and I see decisions being made and I, and I can--I know that those are decisions counter to what the governor wants to take but I can see the influence behind them. So those are some of the kinds of things that, that can happen and have happened.

Bernice Hutcherson

Social worker and educator, Bernice Hutcherson, was born on April 4, 1925, in Newton, Kansas, to Henrietta and Albert Ray, Sr. Hutcherson was educated in public schools, and eventually received her B.A. degree from Langston University in 1950; she was further trained at the Chicago Teacher's College and received an M.S.W. from the University of Kansas in 1969.

Throughout her nearly five-decade-long career, Hutcherson worked as an educator, beginning as a remedial reading teacher in the Chicago Public Schools system, and later as a social worker in her native Kansas. Hutcherson spent nearly twenty years with Kansas Social and Rehabilitation Services in various supervisory and training positions before taking a position as a professor of Social Work at Wichita State University in 1970. Hutcherson served on numerous university committees, including a three-year-long term as gerontology faculty chair before her retirement in 1996.

Retirement did not impede Hutcherson's commitment to the social service field; an active lecturer, she was regularly asked to run workshops and participate in academic forums. Hutcherson's numerous professional affiliations and memberships represented years of commitment to service and leadership; she remained active in the National Association of Social Workers, and the Kansas Conference on Social Welfare, and was the founding president of the Kansas Multicultural Association of Substance Abuse.

Hutcherson continued to be involved in the field of social work by volunteering through committee and board structures dedicated to substance abuse research and program development. The recipient of numerous community, professional, and academic accolades, the Wichita city council named an elder housing facility, the Bernice Hutcherson Complex, in Hutcherson's honor in 1980. In addition to her professional activities, Hutcherson and her late husband of forty years, Hubert Hutcherson, raised two daughters.

Accession Number

A2002.170

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/28/2002

Last Name

Hutcherson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Organizations
First Name

Bernice

Birth City, State, Country

Newton

HM ID

HUT01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Kansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Freeport, Bahamas

Favorite Quote

I'm never alone.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Birth Date

4/4/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Tomah

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Breakfast Foods

Death Date

5/3/2012

Short Description

Civic activist, social work professor, and social worker Bernice Hutcherson (1925 - 2012 ) is a former social worker with Kansas Social and Rehabilitation Services, where she served in various supervisory roles before becoming a professor of social work at Wichita State University in 1970. There, she served on numerous university committees and completed a three-year term as gerontology faculty chair before retiring in 1996.

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Kansas Social and Rehabilitation Services

Wichita State University

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bernice Hutcherson interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bernice Hutcherson describes the location of The Kansas African American Museum, Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bernice Hutcherson's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bernice Hutcherson details her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bernice Hutcherson describes her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bernice Hutcherson recounts her parents' courtship and marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bernice Hutcherson remembers her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bernice Hutcherson describes her relationship with her brothers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bernice Hutcherson remembers her father

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bernice Hutcherson recalls growing up in her Newton, Kansas community

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bernice Hutcherson recalls a fight from her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bernice Hutcherson describes her lifelong love of reading

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bernice Hutcherson describes memorable teachers from elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bernice Hutcherson describes her pursuits upon college graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bernice Hutcherson explains her decision to attend Langston University, Langston, Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bernice Hutcherson describes the courtship of she and her future husband

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bernice Hutcherson describes a memorable college professor

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bernice Hutcherson recalls her college experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bernice Hutcherson discusses her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bernice Hutcherson discusses her pursuits following her college graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bernice Hutcherson recalls her efforts to reform social work practices

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bernice Hutcherson details her experience as a community organizer

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bernice Hutcherson details the efforts of Wichita, Kansas community organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bernice Hutcherson shares motivational ideas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bernice Hutcherson details her efforts to stem drug and alcohol abuse

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bernice Hutcherson shares reflections on prejudice

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bernice Hutcherson reflects on her life's course

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bernice Hutcherson hopes for unity in the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bernice Hutcherson considers her legacy

DASession

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DATitle
Bernice Hutcherson describes her mother's background
Bernice Hutcherson recalls growing up in her Newton, Kansas community
Transcript
What about your mother's side of the family? Where did they come from, and did they have any stories about slavery or, or reconstruction or migration?$$They came out of Kentucky. On my father's side were the house slaves. And on my mother's side were the field slaves. And my grandmother left Kentucky and went somewhere and got near the Mississippi River, and she and two mules somehow made it across the Mississippi River because she was trying to get away from the master who was molesting, of course, all the young girls her age. That grandmother was twelve years old when slavery ended. So, she had been born, well, both sets were born in slavery. And she had actually somehow--.$$So she was born about 1850, I guess, 1851, 1850--.$$Fifty, forty--forty-nine, forty-eight [1848]. And was about the time I was getting good and grown, why, she was almost a hundred years old. She came out of there and landed, landed someplace on the other side of the Mississippi and then came back from Kentucky--.$$(Simultaneously) Now this is from Kentucky.$$Yeah, from Kentucky. Now I, I don't know where her travails took her with this, these two mules, but she was determined that she was not going back. And so for some reason she ended up swimming the Mississippi River--her and these two mules that we heard about. And then she finally landed--when she finally landed in Georgia, I believe, is where she met--came back to Georgia is where she met my grandpa. And they then got together and started traveling toward California where all the gold was supposed to be. And they ended up in Oklahoma, between Oklahoma and Kansas. Since he was kind of a farmer, kind of a--and he would farm here and then he would move, and then he would farm someplace else. What did they call them? Share-, sharecroppers, sharecropper.$$Okay.$$And he'd stay there a season and if it didn't come out right there, why, he would move again. And so between Kansas and Oklahoma is where they were. I'm also told that she didn't get to know her mother very, very well because the mother and her sister was sold off before she ever left there. And she doesn't know where they landed. And she was more left on her own by the time she was twelve and had heard that the slaves had been emancipated. But she does know that her mother spoke highly of education, and she's the one who pushed the education for everybody. Everybody had to get as much education as they possibly could because that's what was gonna make it a better place for all of the Negroes that were needing to know how to read and write 'cause they didn't know how to read and write. And she always said if you don't, if you can't read and write, why, you don't know what's going in the world around you. So, she constantly pushed education. She had ten children and, what, eight of them, I guess, got the eighth grade education, which was like our high school now, I guess. And she instilled it in them that their children should get as much, much education as they could. So most of us have. We still push it in our family.$Can you tell me about some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up in Newton [Kansas]? What was it, you know, what was your neighborhood like and--?$$Oh, yeah, my neighborhood was fun, really. I didn't realize then how unique we were that in our neighborhood we had blacks, we had Mexicans, we had whites, we had middle class, we had very poor, and we had lived and worked and all of us kids there played together. We pretty much run in and out of each other's houses like kids do except one. I'll never forget it. Her name was Mrs. Speen (ph.), and she lived on the corner. She was a little white lady who seemed to have no children, no family, and she was, she would yell at us so much until especially the boys would deliberately do things to make her mad. So simple things like--she didn't want you step on her grass, okay. And when they would walk by her house they would just take their toe and put it over on her grass. So she would come to the door and begin to hol--"Ray row row row," and they would laugh and run. But everybody else--we got along very well. We--now my father [Albert Ray] had a job as I think back to the Depression time, the Great Depression that you read about--.$$Sure, in the 1920's--that was the year of the war.$$Yes, that was a tough time. And lots of people didn't have jobs. They just had to do whatever they could do to live. And my father had a job and so I can remember it on, especially on Sundays, we would have all kinds of people at our house from our neighborhood because the people--whoever had something, they would bring it to our house and go in there and with my mother they would all be cooking 'cause we had some meat. We had goats on the yard, we had chickens on the yard, we had a--we called it a bill I think then--they call it a tab or something now. But we had a bill down at the main grocery store where we could go and buy some pork or buy some beef every once in a while. So since we had the meat, why, the neighbors could come to bring whatever they had. And we always had us a scrumptious dinner on Sundays. But we usually had somebody else there, too--some other family or two families or three families--just whoever decided to come. So I got used to all kinds of people and being able to relate to all kinds of people and understanding that we--people are people. Human beings are pretty much the same. And I think that has served me well as I have moved to adult career of social work. I don't meet any strangers. In fact, right now I've always traveled alone a lot. Right now, if I'm needing to go into a restaurant and I'm alone and somebody else seems to be alone, I'm gonna just ask them if they would like to eat with me. I'd say, you know, are you alone, no, you eat alone? They say, yes. I, I'll say, well, would you like to meet, sit down and eat with me and then we can go our separate ways? And sometimes they'll say, no. Other times they'll say, yeah, you know. And it doesn't bother me when--whichever they do is fine.

Jewelle Taylor Gibbs

Jewelle Taylor Gibbs is a noted author, clinical psychologist, college professor and member of the Santa Clara County Democratic Central Committee in California. She was born on November 4, 1933, to Margaret Morris and the Reverend Julian A. Taylor.

Gibbs grew up in Connecticut and in 1951 graduated from Ansonia High School. Gibbs attended Radcliffe College, graduating cum laude in 1955. She went on to study at the Harvard-Radcliffe Program in Business Administration, earning a certificate with distinction in 1959. Gibbs went to work at the Pillsbury Company that same year and stayed there until 1961.

In 1970, Gibbs graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with an M.S.W. From 1970 to 1975, she worked as a clinical social worker at Stanford University. Gibbs then continued her pursuit of education, receiving an M.A. in 1977 and a Ph.D. in psychology in 1980 from Berkeley. Gibbs began her teaching career in 1979 as a professor at the School of Social Welfare and also at Berkeley. Gibbs became the first African American professor appointed to an endowed chair in the University of California system as the Zellerbach Family Fund Professor of Social Policy, Community Change and Practice at Berkeley.

Gibbs is a regular commentator on issues relating to youth violence, adolescence, urban education, affirmative action, police misconduct and racial profiling – particularly as they affect the African American community. Gibbs is the author of numerous books on high-profile issues, including Preserving Privilege: California Politics, Propositions, and People of Color; Children of Color: Psychological Interventions with Culturally Diverse Youth; and Race and Justice: Rodney King and O.J. Simpson in a House Divided. She also edited Young, Black and Male in America: An Endangered Species. She is a sought-after speaker across the country and has delivered lectures in Canada, England, Japan, Hawaii and South Africa. Gibbs is married to James Lowell Gibbs, Jr.

Accession Number

A2002.047

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/25/2002

Last Name

Gibbs

Maker Category
Middle Name

Taylor

Organizations
Schools

Ansonia High School

University of California, Berkeley

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Weekends

First Name

Jewelle

Birth City, State, Country

Stratford

HM ID

GIB01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Connecticut

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spain

Favorite Quote

Can You Believe It?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

11/4/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Oakland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Banana Split

Short Description

Social work professor Jewelle Taylor Gibbs (1933 - ) was a noted author, clinical psychologist, college professor and member of the Santa Clara County Democratic Central Committee in California. Gibbs was also the first African American professor appointed to an endowed chair in the University of California system when she became the Zellerbach Family Fund Professor of Social Policy, Community Change and Practice at Berkeley.

Employment

Pillsbury Company

Stanford University

School of Social Welfare

University of California, Berkeley

Favorite Color

Red

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jewelle Taylor Gibbs'interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her father's career as a minister in the Baptist Church

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about her father's political activism

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about her paternal uncles

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recounts her mother's life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs contrasts her mother's life to the lives of her aunts and uncles

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs shares her earliest memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes the black community in Stratford, Connecticut during her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about growing up with a minister as a father

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes Stratford, Connecticut in the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about the search for her mother's sister, Grace

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes meeting her Aunt Grace and cousins for the first time

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her current relationship with her cousins

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recalls the sights, smells, and sounds of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recalls the sights and sounds of church

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes the Baptist Church she attended as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her parent's messages about race

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs reflects upon the value placed on lighter skin color

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her childhood personality

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes the responsibilities of being the oldest child in her family

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs lists her schools from elementary school through her graduate degree

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses the racial composition of Ansonia High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recalls prejudice in junior high school and breaking barriers

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about her decision to attend Radcliffe College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes the racial composition of Radcliffe College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes the class culture of Radcliffe College in the early 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recalls fighting against segregation at Radcliffe College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recounts taking the junior management intern program exam

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about spending eighteen months in Liberia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs explains her decision to earn a certificate from the Harvard-Radcliffe Program in Business Administration

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses confronting racial prejudice on the job market in the 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about working in marketing at the Pillsbury Company

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes Civil Rights and politics in Minneapolis in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recalls returning to Liberia in 1965 and then moving to Palo Alto, California

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs recounts earning her Masters of Social Work at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her work as a therapist at Stanford's Student Mental Health Center

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about earning her Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley and being hired as a tenured track professor

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about student unrest at the University of California at Berkeley in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her research interest in how inner city black students navigated culture shock at elite colleges

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her research on racial patterns of delinquency

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs advises black youth

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her first book

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs explains the contributions of her first book

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs contrasts social problems during her childhood to contemporary issues

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her book "Children of Color"

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses the significance of "Children of Color"

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses raising minority youth to be bicultural

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes connecting her research on Rodney King and O.J. Simpson

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her research on the O.J. Simpson trial for her book

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs reflects upon the reception of her book about O.J. Simpson

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses why she wrote her book "Preserving Privilege"

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her research for "Preserving Privilege"

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs shares her hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs talks about her family's legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her photographs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jewelle Taylor Gibbs narrates her photographs

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Jewelle Taylor Gibbs describes her research on the O.J. Simpson trial for her book
Jewelle Taylor Gibbs discusses her research for "Preserving Privilege"
Transcript
And at that time, it was hard to know what was going to happen at the trial. It was hard to know whether he was innocent or guilty. It was hard to know any of those things. But my editor sort of, at that point, in a way coerced me into bringing that story into the book and contrasting. So I then had to spend the next whole year looking at the trial daily. No matter where I was, I would have to have the summary at night, clipping articles out of the paper every day. And it's a hard way to write a book, 'cause you're doing only contemporary research. There's nothing behind the research in the libraries except there had been some books about his life, biographies. So I had to do really current research every single day for a year, look at TV every single day; discuss it, of course, everybody had an opinion. I'd gathered opinions. And then I decided it would be fun to do some interviews. And I did some interviews. Because I'd done interviews earlier on Rodney King, I did some interviews up here and by phone in L.A. [Los Angeles, California] about O.J. Simpson asking people some of the same questions I had asked them about Rodney King, but always relating it--always coming back to the criminal justice system and the black male in the criminal justice system, which was my focus of the book. In any case, when I finished the book, what I did, again, was to try to create a framework, to look at these two men in the criminal justice system; one who had been beaten by the cops, had no, you know, really, status in society to speak of; and the other one who had been a celebrity and been wealthy, and how he was treated in the courts. And that was the focus of the book--and trying to create some general interpretations that would help people to view these cases as not that dissimilar and to view what happens to black men whether they are innocent or guilty in the criminal justice system. And that was the point of the book.$So I got a very good graduate student, a young woman names Teiahsha Bankhead, who was working with me, and she was interested in community activism and politics and African-American issues of empowerment. So she was a good person. She had worked with me on the book about Rodney King. And so I asked her would she like to work with me on this. So we did interviews, we did a lot of research in the Secretary of State's office in Sacramento, finding out who actually funded these initiatives, and guess what? We found the initiatives were heavily funded by groups outside the state of California, who were conservative groups; groups which were related to the most conservative think tanks in America; millionaires who were conservative donors to the Republican Party. So it was clear that there was some kind of agenda here, and it wasn't just coming from California. We also found that in the polls, most Californians said they were against these things, but then they would go and vote for them. And so it was partly the way they were framed. In any case, it was clear that the initial impact of all of these propositions--the first three--were impacting very negatively on blacks and Latinos and, to some extent, Asians. And while we were in the process of doing the research, along comes Proposition 227, which is the anti-bilingual education proposition, which, of course, impacts very heavily on Latino children who form about 40 percent of our school system in California. And they were basically dismantling affirm--I mean, bilingual education and eviscerating the programs--trying to create a system where the kids had one year of bilingual education--Immersion they called it--and then afterwards, it was sink or swim. And we knew many of the kids would sink after only one year of Spanish instruction--mainly Spanish. So we put it all together, and I think we were able to document, in the book, number one, who funded these propositions; number two, that they were marketed in such a way, the publicity about the populations--about the propositions--they were marketed in such a way that they scapegoated minorities--the blacks, Latinos, and Asians; particularly, the immigrants; and that they were marketed in such a way to raise a lot of fear among the white population as to, these people were taking over the state. And so when you put them all together, you saw this pattern. And that is what the book is about. And then the book proposes alternative policies that are humane, that are bicultural, that are meant to empower minority groups; not to take away their rights. And so we have--in our final chapter we have a number of recommendations that are based on public policy experts who have recommended other kinds of policies for immigration, for bilingual education, for Affirmative Action, and for, you know, the criminal law on behavior. So our book really does try to draw from a number of experts.