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Clinton Turner Davis

Theatrical director Clinton Turner Davis was born on April 9, 1949 in Washington, D.C. to Josephine Davis and Clinton Davis. Davis attended McKinley Technical High School, where he performed in plays and was president of the thespian club. He briefly attended Hanover College in Hanover, Indiana, but received his B.F.A. degree in theater from Howard University in 1972.

After being cast in Slaughterhouse Play at the Public Theatre in New York City, Davis began his career with the Negro Ensemble Company in 1972 as the production stage manager for The Great Macdaddy at St. Mark’s Playhouse. Throughout the 1970s, Davis served as the stage manager for a succession of Negro Ensemble Company productions, including Eden, Nevis Mountain Dew, Old Phantoms: A Play in Two Acts, The Sixteenth Round, Zooman and the Sign, Weep Not for Me and Home. In 1982, Davis made his directorial debut with Abercrombie Apocalypse: An American Tragedy at Westside Arts Theatre in New York City. Produced by Negro Ensemble Company and written by playwright Paul Carter Harrison, the off-Broadway drama starred Graham Brown, Timothy B. Lynch, and Barbara Montgomery. Davis would go on to direct Pearl Cleage’s first play, Puppetplay, at Theatre Four in New York City in 1982, and serve as the stage manager for Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music in 1983. Additional Negro Ensemble Company productions directed by Davis in the 1980s included Two Can Play, House of Shadows and That Serious He-Man Ball. In 1986, Davis co-founded the Non-Traditional Casting Project. He then directed his first August Wilson play, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, at Theatreworks in Palo Alto, California in 1989. At the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 1993, Davis directed Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, which was the festival’s first produced work by an African American playwright. In 2013, he directed Charles Fuller’s One Night.... Davis was an associate professor of drama at Colorado College in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Davis served as a director for the American Young Playwrights Festival in New York City. He was a guest lecturer at Yale University, Dartmouth College, Columbia University, The Ohio State University, and Howard University; and directed theatrical productions at The Juilliard School, Brandeis University, and Colorado College. Davis received a Distinguished Alumni Award from Howard University, in addition to Dallas Theatre, Bay Area, and Drama-logue Critics’ Awards. In 2015, Davis received the Lloyd Richards Directors Award from the National Black Arts Festival.

Clinton Turner Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 25, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.045

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/25/2016

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Turner

Schools

Charles E. Young Elementary School

Barnard Elementary School

Keene Elementary School

MacFarland Middle School

LaSalle-Backus Education Center

McKinley Technology High School

Hanover College

Hunter College

Howard University

First Name

Clinton

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

DAV38

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Carolina

Favorite Quote

And there you have it. -- It speaks for itself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/9/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Theatrical director Clinton Turner Davis (1950- ) began his career with Negro Ensemble Company in 1972. He has directed numerous off-Broadway productions, including works by Pearl Cleage, Paul Carter Harrison and August Wilson.

Employment

Colorado College

University of Colorado - Colorado Springs

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of California, Berkeley

Yale University

Ohio State University

Howard University

Apollo Theater

Colorado Festival of World Theatre/Market Theatre Tre

Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games

Taiyuan Puppet Theatre Artists Residency

Anna Deavere Smith Project

First National Symposium on Non-Traditional Casting

Favorite Color

Green, orange, black

The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr.

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. was born on August 21, 1944 in Washington, D.C. to Federal Judge Barrington D. Parker, Sr. and Marjorie Holloman Parker, board chair of the University of the District of Columbia. Parker graduated from McKinley Technical High School, and earned his B.A. degree in history from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in 1965. He then received his LL.B. degree from Yale Law School in 1969.

Parker began his legal career as a clerk for Judge Aubrey E. Robinson, Jr., an African American judge on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He joined the firm of Sullivan & Cromwell in New York City as an associate in 1970, where he specialized in general commercial litigation. In 1977, Parker and three other partners founded the law firm of Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann, & Delehanty, P.C. which, in 1987, merged with Morrison & Foerster, an international law firm based out of San Francisco, California. In 1994, Parker was appointed to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President Bill Clinton. His cases in the district court included Trinity United Methodist Parish v. Board of Education of Newburgh, where he upheld a church’s right to rent space within a public school, and the trial of businessman Albert J. Pirro, Jr., who was indicted for conspiracy and tax evasion. In 2001, President George W. Bush nominated Parker to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the Senate confirmed him 100-0. On the circuit court, he was involved in several prominent cases involving the rights of terrorism suspects, including Rumsfeld v. Padilla, where Parker ruled that Al Qaeda suspect Jose Padilla must be offered habeas corpus as an American citizen, and Arar v. Ashcroft, where Parker wrote a dissenting opinion stating that Maher Arar’s rights had been violated by the Bush administration’s policy of extraordinary rendition. Parker assumed senior status in 2009.

Parker served on the board of trustees for the Yale Corporation, and on the board of The Harlem School of the Arts, the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and the Central Park Conservancy.

Parker has three children: Christine, Kathleen, and Jennifer.

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.067

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/5/2016

Last Name

Parker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Middle Name

Daniels

Schools

Yale University

Yale Law School

McKinley Technology High School

Monroe School

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School

First Name

Barrington

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

PAR09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I Did The Best I Could With What I Had.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/21/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburger

Short Description

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (1944 - ) served on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Employment

Phillips Exeter Academy

NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Office of the Corporation Counsel for Washington D.C.

United States District Court for the District of Columbia

Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann and Delehanty, P.C.

Morrison and Foerster LLP

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

United State Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describe his paternal grandfather's role at the Robert H. Terrell Law School

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his community in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his family dinners and holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers visiting the Smithsonian Institution

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his schooling in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls the desegregation of public accommodations in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the integration of McKinley Technical High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his favorite academic subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his mother's community involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his transition to Yale University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his friends and mentors at Yale University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers studying history at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his paternal grandfather's legal representation of W.E.B. Du Bois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers William Sloane Coffin's civil rights activism

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the civil rights activity at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a career in law

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his internship with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his encounters with the Ku Klux Klan during the Freedom Rides

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls working as a freshman proctor at Yale University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his concerns about the draft during the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his clerkship with Judge Aubrey Eugene Robinson, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers joining Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers founding Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann and Delehanty, P.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his family, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his family, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his board service

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his work with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about the Central Park Conservancy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a judicial appointment

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers joining the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls the cases in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes the duties of a district judge

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his wife's work

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$4

DATitle
The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a career in law
The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 1
Transcript
When did you figure out that you wanted to be a lawyer?$$I--after I graduated, I took a job in the history department at Phillips Exeter [Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire] and I was trying to figure out whether to go to graduate school in the history or law school. And I liked the place. It was a great school. And I mean I--I'm not--I'm not sorry I didn't go there 'cause I just--I mean (laughter) there were these sort of ruling class white kids there and they were--(laughter) most of them were miserable. I mean, it was just like an intellectual boot camp. I mean, they just worked hard. They had fabulous teachers. It was academically very demanding. And I, I, I sort of wish--I mean, in, in the--you know, quickly kind of didn't matter, but I said, you know, if I had a couple of these teachers, if I had just a syllabus, if they taught this, just used the same books and asked the same questions at McKinley Tech [McKinley Technical High School; McKinley Technology High School, Washington, D.C.] that they were asking at Exeter, it made a big difference. And the people in the history department could not have been nicer to me. They wanted me to go back to graduate school and they--you know, they said, you know, you--, "If you--ever you want to come back and teach here--." I thought that the most interesting--the most exciting years in teaching tended to be the earlier ones and I thought that as--a career as a lawyer would get progressively even more interesting, and that assessment in retrospect was the correct one. So, instead of going to graduate school, I went to law school--went back to Yale [Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut].$Did you find yourself involved in civil rights activity at all?$$Yeah. So, they had this group there called the--I think it was called the Yale civil rights research council [Law Students Civil Rights Research Council] or something like that--I forget the name of it, and so, that was a group of people on campus who were interested in civil rights activity, so I was involved in that. But, summer of 1964, I'm back in Washington [D.C.] and I got this gosh, horrible job that my father [Barrington D. Parker, Sr.] got me working in the post office [U.S. Post Office Department; U.S. Postal Service] stuffing second class mail for Virginia. It was just horrible (laughter). So, that was the, the summer--that was the summer of the Mississippi Summer Project [Freedom Summer], so you would go back home and sit down and watch television and, you know, the, the point of that project was to get white volunteers down south to focus the media on conditions in places like Southwest Georgia and Mississippi. So, I mean, I'm sitting here looking at this and, you know, why am I here? And so I, I forget what, what happened. Our parents were away someplace and somebody told me that they were--they were organizing a second tranche of volunteers to go and they were doing training at All Souls Church [All Souls Church, Unitarian] on--in Washington, so I went down there, and then the next thing I knew, I was in this carpool. We went to the SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] office in Atlanta [Georgia] and then they kind of gave you your assignment and told you where you were going, so I ended up in, in Hattiesburg [Mississippi], and that was a--that was another sort of game changer.$$What happened there?$$Met all these absolutely extraordinary people. So, I was in South Africa before Mandela [Nelson Mandela] got out of jail, so I'm sitting around this dinner party with all these guys who are getting out of Robben Island [South Africa] and it's always been a close call in my mind about whether the most impressive group of adults I've ever met were those guys or the young SNCC guys I met in Mississippi, [HistoryMakers] James Forman, [HistoryMaker] John Lewis, Robert Moses [Robert Parris Moses], Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture]. They were all these guys who were just visionary and courageous and, you know, they made all--they made all the difference. And, and, you know, guys whose names you never heard of anymore--$$Now (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) who, you know, worked in these dangerous towns.$$Well, and so when you decided to go, did you get any resistance from your family?$$They were--no, not at all.$$No?$$Right.$$And as you're traveling--$$My mother [Marjorie Holloman Parker] told her--all her AKA [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority] friends (laughter).$$So, she was proud of you.$$Um-hm.$$As you made your way--that's fine--as you made your way down, did you encounter any dangerous moments?$$No. I think--I, I can't--I think we went to--no. I mean, Hattiesburg was relatively calm. I mean, there were things you didn't do. You know, you didn't--you know, you, you, you certainly didn't go around town with white women and so forth. But what we were doing in Hattiesburg was we were teaching at the Freedom Schools and then encouraging people to register to vote and then encouraging them to--you know, and telling them that the--you know, that there's a statewide school of desegregation suit that had been won and they could send their kids to, you know, the nice school down the road and so forth and so on.$$But, I mean, those were game changing things down there that--$$Yeah, you're--the heavy lifting was done--I don't mean heavy lift- but, there were places that were just dangerous to be in and they were up in the Delta [Mississippi Delta] and in the Piney Woods area. Hattiesburg was not a Klan [Ku Klux Klan, KKK] town. I don't--I can't explain why, but it was just--I mean, you could kind of walk around downtown in Hattiesburg and nobody would--I mean--and so forth.$$Um-hm.$$But--

Eric Deggans

Journalist Eric Deggans was born on November 6, 1965 in Washington, D.C. He was raised in Gary, Indiana and graduated from Andrean High School. In the 1980s, while attending Indiana University, Deggans worked as a professional drummer and toured with Motown recording artist The Voyage Band. He received his B.A. degree in political science and journalism from Indiana University in 1990.

Deggans first held municipal reporting positions at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania. He then served as the music critic for the Asbury Park Press newspaper in Neptune, New Jersey. In 1995, Deggans joined the Tampa Bay Times, then called the St. Petersburg Times, as its pop music critic. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as a TV critic for the Times, and, from 2004 to 2005, he sat on the paper’s editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. Deggans then returned to the Tampa Bay Times news desk, first as a media writer in 2005, then as the TV critic in 2006. In 2010, he made national headlines when he interviewed former USDA official Shirley Sherrod at the National Association of Black Journalists’ summer convention in San Diego, California. Deggans left the Tampa Bay Times in 2013 to take a job as NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans published his first book, Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, in 2012. He also contributed to the Poynter Institute’s The New Ethics of Journalism, which was published in August 2013. Deggans’ writing has appeared in The New York Times online, Salon magazine, CNN.com, The Washington Post, Village Voice, VIBE magazine, Chicago Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Sun-Times, The Seattle Times, Emmy magazine, Newsmax magazine, and Rolling Stone Online, among others. Deggans also taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, Loyola University, California State University, Indiana University, the University of Tampa, and Eckerd College, and has guest hosted CNN’s media analysis show Reliable Sources.

Deggans served as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, and sat on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists. In addition, he served on the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

Deggans was named as one of Ebony magazine's "Power 150" in 2009. In 2013, he was awarded the Florida Press Club’s first-ever Diversity Award, and the National Association of Black Journalists’ Arts & Entertainment Task Force Legacy Award. Deggans also received reporting and writing awards from the Society for Features Journalism, American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

Eric Deggans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.197

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2014

Last Name

Deggans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Charles

Occupation
Schools

Frederick Douglass Elementary School

Hebrew Academy of Northwest Indiana

Andrean High School

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Eric

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

DEG02

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

11/6/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

St. Petersburg

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist Eric Deggans (1965 - ) , NPR's first full-time TV critic, worked at the Tampa Bay Times for eighteen years as an entertainment critic and columnist. He also authored Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation.

Employment

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Pittsburgh Press

Asbury Park Press

Tampa Bay Times

NPR

Nina M. Wells

Lawyer and state government appointee Nina Mitchell Wells was born in 1950 in Washington, D.C. She attended Immaculate Conception Academy, an all-girl catholic high school, and graduated from there in 1968. Wells then enrolled in Mount St. Joseph College, now Mount St. Joseph University, in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1970, she transferred to a women’s college, Newton College of the Sacred Heart, where she received her B.A. degree in 1972. Wells went on to receive her J.D. degree from Suffolk University Law School in 1976.

After a brief stay in Los Angeles, California, Wells began her legal career as assistant corporation counsel for the City of Newark legal department. In 1990, Wells served as head of the Division of Rate Counsel in the Department of the Public Advocate while Governor Jim Florio was in office. She then served as vice president and senior attorney at the CIT Group from 1994 until 1996. In 1996, Wells was hired at Rutgers University School of Law and served as the assistant dean for the Minority Student Program. In 1998, she was named vice president of public affairs at Schering-Plough Corporation and president of their philanthropic arm, Schering-Plough Foundation. Wells was then appointed to New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine’s cabinet as the Secretary of State of New Jersey in 2006, and served in that position until 2010.

Wells has served on numerous boards including Seton Hall Preparatory School, Newark Day Center and Teach for America. In 2013, she served on the board of trustees of both the Victoria Foundation and the New Jersey Performing Arts Center Women’s Association. She received a nomination by President Barack Obama to serve on the board of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority. Wells has also been the recipient of several awards and honors such as the New Jersey Women Lawyers Association Women’s Initiative & Leaders in Law (WILL) Platinum Award and the Montclair Art Museum Honoree for Arts Education. Wells has received honorary degrees from Drew University and the College of St. Elizabeth.

Wells and her husband, criminal defense lawyer Theodore Wells, reside in Livingston, New Jersey.

Nina Wells was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 11, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.216

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/11/2014

Last Name

Wells

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Mitchell

Schools

Immaculate Conception Academy

Mount St Joseph University

Newton College of the Sacred Heart

Suffolk University Law School

First Name

Nina

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WEL04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Grand Cayman

Favorite Quote

You Only Live Once.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/9/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

State government appointee and lawyer Nina M. Wells (1950 - ) served as the Secretary of State for New Jersey from 2006 to 2010.

Employment

City of Newark Legal Department

Department of the Public Advocate

CIT Group

Rutgers Law School-Newark

Schering-Plough Corporation

Schering-Plough Foundation

Governor Jon Corzine's Cabinet (New Jersey)

Garfinkel's

U.S. Social Security Administration

New Jersey Bell Telephone Company

Bell Communications Research

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:3276,94:10756,311:16916,419:26548,482:27136,511:39776,711:43820,748:44474,755:58862,963:72140,1120:78740,1554:92898,1728:121538,2010:127810,2152:136600,2280:140685,2367:145205,2446:170900,2941:182606,3103:183380,3114:190080,3178:193852,3272:197542,3376:202298,3478:207874,3668:210990,3851:212794,3913:213450,3923:213778,3928:214270,3937:215008,3949:215746,3961:225270,4037:226732,4066:229398,4112:229742,4117:230516,4259:247105,4489:247865,4499:256420,4633$0,0:964,62:2308,89:5668,149:10288,219:12136,247:26029,428:30511,538:35574,664:35989,683:37151,705:37898,718:40222,761:40637,767:41467,778:41882,784:43957,840:57508,1041:61636,1113:65076,1180:72300,1340:77995,1366:79848,1387:92415,1640:93360,1662:120158,2316:129551,2503:133976,2535:134468,2542:135124,2553:148170,2806:154154,2943:159100,2969:161300,3006:179211,3266:180279,3285:182300,3294:198300,3492:200988,3585:205608,3682:206364,3692:213854,3779:214322,3786:227504,4070:227816,4075:243330,4330:246290,4386:248690,4474:252610,4585:252930,4590:253570,4600:253890,4605:260964,4635:266396,4719:266784,4724:276295,4884:277045,4928:281995,4989:286495,5090:287395,5105:295040,5247:295810,5260:300498,5347:304632,5437:311886,5623:312432,5631:313134,5643:318840,5657:321504,5691:323328,5728:324012,5738:325076,5769:325608,5778:326140,5787:326444,5792:327812,5830:335260,6060:336020,6071:336704,6081:356574,6376:363050,6488
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nina M. Wells' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about her paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers her relationship with her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells remembers her summer jobs in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Nina M. Wells remembers modeling for Garfinkel's in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells remembers modeling for Garfinkel's in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers visiting her parental grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells talks about her aspiration to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells describes her social life during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about her social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells remembers dating her husband

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells remembers transferring to Newton College of the Sacred Heart in Newton Centre, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Newton College of the Sacred Heart

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her decision to attend the Suffolk University Law School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells talks about the early years of her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about the differences between law schools

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers studying at Langdell Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers the first case as counsel to the City of Newark

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her reasons for moving to Newark, New Jersey, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her reasons for moving to Newark, New Jersey, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her role as counsel to the City of Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells talks about the Garden State Bar Association

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells recalls the notable African American lawyers in New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers the events of the 1970s in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her role at the New Jersey Bell Telephone Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells talks about the breakup of the Bell system

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Bell Communications Research, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her work with the New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey Governor James Florio

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes her involvement on charitable boards, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells describes her involvement on charitable boards, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about her two-year sabbatical

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes how she came to work for CIT Financial Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells recalls her assistant deanship of Rutgers Law School in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about balancing her career and her family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her position at the Schering Plough Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells remembers meeting New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about her relationship with New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells describes how she became the New Jersey secretary of state

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells remembers honoring Judge Robert L. Carter

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about the political role of the New Jersey Department of State

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences as New Jersey secretary of state, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences as New Jersey secretary of state, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about the defunding of the New Jersey Network

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about diversity and segregation in New Jersey

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey politics

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells recalls her appointment to the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells reflects upon her marriage to Theodore V. Wells, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Nina M. Wells remembers dating her husband
Nina M. Wells remembers honoring Judge Robert L. Carter
Transcript
So tell, talk about meeting Ted [Wells' husband, HistoryMaker Theodore V. Wells, Jr.].$$Yeah. Well, I, like I said, I knew a lot of the kids from Coolidge [Calvin Coolidge High School; Calvin Coolidge Senior High School, Washington, D.C.], and a young man had asked me to go on a bus trip, and the bus trip was sponsored by the coach of Calvin Coolidge, the football coach. So if the team did well every year, he would take them on a bus ride to--we were going to see the Baltimore Bullets [Washington Wizards] play in Baltimore [Maryland], basketball game. So it was like a big deal. So this young man asked me to go, and I said, sure. So I'm on the bus, and sitting in front of me was Ted--excuse me, and his girlfriend. Then afterwards, he--Ted turned around and saw me, and then he said to my date, "Let's trade numbers, phone numbers," so they traded phone numbers, so Ted called me. But at the time, he was known as Tokey. He was a jock. And I kind of knew about him, and he was like in a nice crowd, but not exactly my crowd. Like if he'd come to the parties, he wouldn't get in the front door. They would end up coming in later when somebody would open the door for them.$$(Laughter).$$So I was like, I know this guy. I seen him come in the back door. I'm like, he's not one of the invitees, invited guests, so I told him I didn't--wasn't interested. I said, "No, I know you, and I know your friends, and that's--no, no thank you." So he kept calling me, and then he had a friend call and say, "Oh, I can, I can tell you, he's really a good guy. He's really smart. He does well in school. He's really nice." I was like, "No, I don't--I'm not interested." So he kept on, kept on, kept on calling. He goes, "Why don't you even give me a chance? Like one date." I was like, I don't know. So I said, okay. So I went out on one date with him, and I was like totally impressed 'cause I thought he was more of a--I used to say, "You're, you're just a hoodlum, and your friends are hoodlums." But I just meant that they were like, you know, kind of really out there, but he was so nice, and he was so well dressed, and I thought he was going come with some hip hop clothes on, and he had on Bass weejuns [G.H. Bass and Company], and I was like, oh, my god. You look nice. So from that point on, I thought maybe he was worthy of my attention, so--and then I found out that he was really like--really interested in going to college, too, which was really important 'cause at first my father [Ignatius Mitchell, Jr.] did not like him.$$Oh, he didn't.$$No.$$What did he say?$$No. He was I don't really--I don't know. He's--Ted was pretty much raised by his mom [Phyllis Wells]. He goes, "Oh, a single parent." I'm like, "I'm [sic.] a single parent." And my father said, "No, I don't think I really like him. I don't think he's a good date." And I said, "Well, you don't know him. You have to get to meet him, meet his family and everything." So once Ted--once my father met Ted's mother, he said, "Oh, she's really lovely." And then, believe it or not, Ted's family, once we started dating, his family, his mother and sister [Toni Wells] would join us for Christmas dinner for like years, and then when we decided to get married, we just got married at, at a Christmas dinner informally, so it was so interesting how the mothers really became friends.$$Oh, the two mothers became friends (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes.$$Okay. Not the fath--$$Yeah.$$The two mothers.$$The mothers 'cause Ted's father [Theodore V. Wells, Sr.] wasn't in the picture.$$Right.$$And then--$$Right.$$--my father thought Ted's mother was quite lovely, too.$$Okay.$$But my father didn't join us for dinner. My mother [Pearline Jackson Smith], remember, was (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I see.$$--remarried, yeah.$$So you know--$$So it was interesting how we kind of merged the two families, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Because I read that you went to see movies your first date, 'Fahrenheit'--maybe 45- (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) '451.' That was--well, that was the first date, but don't forget, when I met Ted, that wasn't a date.$$Right. That--$$They switched (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) that was on the bus.$$Yes. How did you read that?$$Go on, all right.$$Where did that come from? That's true, 'Fahrenheit 451,' yeah, absolutely. Thank you for refreshing my recollection, yeah. I--we used to--I used to keep track. I'd write down every date and give it a grade (laughter). For years and years I had a record of every place we went, and then I would evaluate it. I mean, how was it? And what was he like? (Unclear), right?$So (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--talk about what, what happened.$$Yeah.$$You became the--$$Yeah. I became the secretary of state for New Jersey, and previous governors had moved certain functions out of the department for a variety of reasons, and Governor Corzine wanted to put it back in. But one of the fun things I did was, I was part of the senior staff, which really meant that you met with the governor every single day at eight o'clock in the morning, and, basically, what you would do is you sat around with like ten people, and you talked about all the priorities for the administration, what we were going to do that day, what public events there were, how we were going to execute things, and, basically, you, you were like the pulse of state government every single day, you know. Were there key issues you'd heard about that the governor needed to be aware of? If he was, you know, considering certain actions, what was your reaction? How did you feel about things, and, you know, so you were sort of eyes and ears outside of your own cabinet position, so you got a chance to really see everything that was going on in the state government, and to--and, politically, and you were--you know, had the political, you know, you have to be attuned to what was happening politically, comment accordingly, and if you saw opportunities. One of the really fun, fun, fun things I did, and I have a picture to capture it, is Ted [Wells' husband, HistoryMaker Theodore V. Wells, Jr.] said to me, "While you're there, ask the governor--we got to give Judge Robert L. Carter [HistoryMaker Robert L. Carter], we got to get him a building, a school, a school, a building, something. Nina [HistoryMaker Nina M. Wells], you're on a mission. Let's go do it." So I talked to Jon Corzine, and he says, "I'm fascinated with Judge Carter's career." I said--twenty-four [U.S.] Supreme Court arguments, won twenty-three. You know, argued Brown versus Board of Education decisions [Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954], you know, before Thurgood [Thurgood Marshall] did, and Thurgood is getting feedback, and then they go and they come, the whole nine yards. 'Simple Justice' ['Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality,' Richard Kluger], you know, right, taking the pages out of 'Simple Justice.' And Corzine said, "What a phenomenal idea. Let's see what we can do." And I talked to Cory [Cory Booker], and it's like, "Cory, give me a school." "Everything is just so school board, and it's so difficult." So I said, "We got to find a building. We got to find a building, got a find a building." The department of education [New Jersey Department of Education], we said, "That's the perfect building," in Trenton [New Jersey], right. So I have this wonderful--we had a reception for Judge Carter here. Of course, we had a wonderful--at the department of education, we had the entire department, all of these great, you know, key people in state government, and governors come out and dedicate the department of education building [Robert L. Carter Building] to Judge Robert L. Carter. I'll show you the signage that is in front of it. And that morning, we were all set for the media and everything. That morning Judge Carter's wonderful son called and said Judge Carter was too sick to even get in the car. You know, he had coronary heart disease. I mean, this was maybe five years before he passed. He was very sick. And he said, "But we're coming," he and his brother [John Carter and David Carter]. He said, "We're coming and we'll speak and everything." And we're like, "No problem." So we have this wonderful, wonderful ceremony. Everybody in the department of education was going like really crazy. What's really nice, though, is that it's been memorialized in the lobby. First of all, there's a beautiful, huge sign which I'll show you. Then this--his, his bust, a plaque, the whole history of everything he did. They said busloads come to that building, it's like on the, you know, tour. If you come down to the statehouse in Trenton, that's one of the things that's a must see. Busloads of kids get out and read about Judge Robert L. Carter, which I think--who was a New Jerseyan, right?$$Now, so (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--talk about his relationship with New Jersey and his, you know--$$Yeah. Started school in Newark [New Jersey], and his father [Robert L. Carter, Sr.] died. His mother [Annie Martin Carter] was a nurse, and she moved the family to East Orange [New Jersey], and he went to high school in East Orange. And, I mean, a lot of people from Newark and from--of course, he was a top, top, top student at Barringer High School [Barringer Academy of the Arts and Humanities] in Newark. A lot of people do not know, and in East Orange and graduated with honors, but he had a lot of challenges, though, because East Orange, at that time, was primarily Caucasian, and they didn't want him even to use the swimming pool, and he talks about how, you know, he dealt with all of the racism and everything and still graduated the tippy top of his class, and, you know, and then went Lincoln University [Lincoln University, Pennsylvania] and then on to Columbia Law School [New York, New York]. But a lot of people in Newark do not know him, so it's so nice now to have the department of education building in Trenton dedicated to him, and so it's exposed people in a way that they never would have been exposed, and then Raymond M. Brown, the son of the famous lawyer [Raymond A. Brown], although, he is also very famous, has a program called 'Due Process,' and they did a whole segment on Judge Carter right as he passed, so it's a wonderful piece, and they've replayed it over and over and over again, and I wish it could be part of something in your library.$$I, I actually saw, saw the piece (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Did you see the program?$$I saw the program.$$Yeah.$$So--$$Letting people in Newark know--$$Right.$$--in New Jersey.$$So let me--I mean, that was a wonderful thing to do. Did he, did he get to see the wall, though?$$He, he never got to see it. Although, we had pictures.$$Oh.$$Because in his later years, he couldn't travel. Don't forget Trenton for him would have been two hours in the car, but his sons--you should see the pictures, amazing. We did a whole portfolio. But then we had a reception here at the apartment, and I, I brought it out so you could see it.

Howard W. French

Journalist and professor Howard W. French was born on October 14, 1957 in Washington, D.C. to Carolyn Alverda Howard French and David Marshall French, a doctor. French received his B.A. degree from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst in 1979.

French first worked as a translator in Abidjan, Ivory Coast in the early 1980s, and taught English literature at the University of Ivory Coast until 1982. From 1982 to 1986, he worked as a freelance reporter for The Washington Post and several other publications in West Africa, including Africa News and African Business. He was then hired by The New York Times in 1986, and worked as a metropolitan reporter in New York City for three years. From 1990 to 2008, French reported for The New York Times as a bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China in Shanghai.

From 1998 to 1999, French was a visiting scholar at the University of Hawaii, and in the spring of 1999, was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center, in Honolulu. While working at The New York Times, he also served as a weekly columnist on global affairs for the International Herald Tribune from 2005 to 2008. In 2008, French left The New York Times and became an associate professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. He went on to serve as a 2011 fellow of the Open Society Foundations.

In 2004, French published A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa, which was named non-fiction book of the year by several newspapers, and won the 2005 American Library Association Black Caucus Award for Non-Fiction. He later authored China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa, published in 2014. Also a documentary photographer, French co-authored and contributed photographs to the 2012 book, Disappearing Shanghai: Images and Poems of an Intimate Way of Life. His work as a journalist has been published in The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The Nation, Rolling Stone, Transition, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Crisis, and Travel and Leisure.

French was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, and was twice a recipient of an Overseas Press Club Award. He won the Grantham Environmental Award, and received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Maryland. In addition, The New York Times awarded French its highest prize, the Publisher's Award, six times. French also served as a board member of the Columbia Journalism Review.

French lives in New York City. He and his wife, Agnes, have two sons.

Howard W. French was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.193

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/28/2014

Last Name

French

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Occupation
Schools

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Howard

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

FRE08

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

10/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist and professor Howard W. French (1957 - ) was an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He worked at The New York Times for over twenty years as a bureau chief in Central America, the Caribbean, West Africa, Japan, the Koreas, and China, and authored three books: A Continent for the Taking; Disappearing Shanghai; and China’s Second Continent.

Employment

University of Ivory Coast

The Washington Post

Africa News

African Business

The New York Times

University of Hawaii

International Herald Tribune

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Harold Haizlip

Educator Harold C. Haizlip was born in Washington, D.C. in 1935 to parents Allen Joshua Haizlip and Nellie Hill Haizlip. In 1953, he graduated as the valedictorian of Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C. Haizlip then attended Amherst College and graduated with honors with his B.A. degree in Latin, Greek and classical philology in 1957. He went on to earn his M.A. degree in classics and education and his Ed.D. degree in education policy and management from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. While earning his M.A. degree, Haizlip taught English and Latin at Wellesley High School and during summers was assistant director of the Harvard Newton Summer School. While pursuing his doctorate, he served as education director of Action for Boston Community Development, a Ford Foundation funded antipoverty program. Haizlip subsequently worked as an associate director of educational planning at Xerox Corporation’s Basic Systems, Inc. before being hired as the headmaster of the New Lincoln School in New York City.

In 1971, Haizlip was appointed as the Commissioner of Education to the U.S. Virgin Islands for St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John. He then worked for seven years as vice president of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York. From 1996 to 2000, Haizlip served as the western region director of Communities in Schools, Inc., where he supervised support for minority education and training in Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. From 2000 to 2002, he served as the executive director of the “I Have A Dream” Foundation of Los Angeles and Pasadena, California. In May of 2003, Haizlip was appointed as the executive director and corporate consultant for the After School Arts Program (ASAP) of LA’s BEST, where he worked until 2010 designing, funding and implementing arts residencies in Visual Arts, Music, Dance and Theatre Arts taught by professional artists to 50,000 low income students.

Haizlip has consulted for numerous organizations, including Earth Force, The Film Directors’ Guild of Hollywood, the Los Angeles Unified School District, The Archdiocese and diocesan schools of Los Angeles, The Western Synod of the Lutheran Church, the University of Southern California, the University of California-Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History, and the Los Angeles Museum of Science and Industry. He has served as board member of The American Museum of Natural History (NYC) and chair of the Education Outreach Committee of Southern California’s Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic; as a board member of Child Advocates for Children; chair of the Multicultural Commission of the United States Environmental Protection Agency; board member of Harvey Mudd College; advisor to The Natural Guard; and board member of The New Visions Foundation of Santa Monica, California.

Haizlip lives in Los Angeles, California with his wife, Shirlee Ann Taylor Haizlip, author of the bestselling memoir The Sweeter the Juice. In 1999, Haizlip and his wife co-authored In the Garden of Our Dreams: Memoirs of Our Marriage. They have two daughters, both Yale alumnae.

Haizlip passed away on January 31, 2018.

Harold C. Haizlip was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 30, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.238

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/30/2014

Last Name

Haizlip

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Cornelius

Occupation
Schools

George Washington Carver Elementary School

Brown Junior High School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Amherst College

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

Harold

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

HAI04

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

5/30/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Death Date

1/31/2018

Short Description

Educator Harold Haizlip (1935 - 2018) was Commissioner of Education to the U.S. Virgin Islands for St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John. He served as vice president of Manhattan Community College, CUNY, as the executive director of the “I Have A Dream” Foundation and Communities in Schools, Inc. in California, and as the executive director for the After School Arts Program (ASAP) of LA’s BEST.

Employment

LA's Best

I Have A Dream Foundation

Communities in Schools

Lyne Pitts

Television executive and journalist Lyne Johnson Pitts was born on December 12, 1954 in Washington, D.C. She attended the Emma Willard School in Troy, New York, and graduated from Stanford University with her B.A. degree in communications in 1976.

Upon graduation, Pitts was hired as an editor for the Ravenswood Post in East Palo Alto, California. From 1977 to 1978, she worked as a writer at KPIX-TV, the CBS owned station in San Francisco. Pitts went on to serve as a writer and producer at KTLA-TV from 1978 to 1980 and at CBS’s KNXT (now KCBS-TV) from 1980 until 1984. She was then hired by CBS News in 1984 as a broadcast producer for the CBS Morning News. She served as a producer for CBS News Sunday Morning and the CBS News weekend broadcasts in 1987, and then as senior producer and producer of 48 Hours from 1987 to 1996. In 1996, Pitts was named executive producer of "The Class of 2000", a four-year ongoing project of CBS News. During this period, she also served as executive producer of "Before Your Eyes," a series of critically acclaimed CBS News primetime specials. Pitts was then appointed as executive producer of the CBS Evening News weekend broadcasts in 1997, and was promoted to executive producer of CBS’s The Early Show in December 1999. In 2003, she moved from The Early Show to senior broadcast producer of CBS Evening News with Dan Rather.

Pitts left CBS News in 2004 and was hired as executive producer of NBC News’ Today, Weekend Edition in February of 2006. In 2007, Pitts was named vice president of strategic initiatives for NBC News, where she worked until 2009. Then, after briefly serving as head of U.S. operations for Nduka Obaigbena’s Arise News, she was named The Root’s interim managing editor in September of 2013. She took on the permanent role of The Root managing editor in February of 2014. Pitts also serves as chief executive officer of BLP Productions LLC and of Maltese Productions, Inc.

Her honors include several national Emmy Awards and the Silver Gavel Award from the American Bar Association. She is married to ABC News chief national correspondent Byron Pitts. Together they have six children.

Lyne Pitts was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 19, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.209

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/19/2014

Last Name

Pitts

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Emma Willard School

Stanford University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Lyne

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

PIT32

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/12/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Television executive and journalist Lyne Pitts (1954 - ) was managing editor of The Root, served as NBC News’ vice president of strategic initiatives from 2007 to 2009, and worked as a producer at CBS News for over twenty years. Her honors include several Emmy Awards.

Employment

Ravenswood Post

KPIX-TV

KTLA-TV

KCBS-TV

CBS News

NBC News

Arise News

The Root

BLP Productions LLC

Maltese Productions, Inc.

Baratunde Thurston

Comedian and writer Baratunde Rafiq Thurston was born on September 11, 1977 in Washington, D.C. Thurston graduated from the prestigious Sidwell Friends School in 1995, and received his A.B. degree in philosophy from Harvard University in 1999.

From 1999 to 2003, Thurston worked as an associate for Cambridge Strategic Management Group and the Management Network Group. He then worked as a contract senior consultant for Altman Vilandrie & Company, and as a contract producer and advisor for Untravel Media. In 2006, Thurston co-founded the black political blog Jack & Jill Politics. From 2007 to 2012, he served as digital director for the satirical news outlet, The Onion. In the summer of 2012, Thurston co-founded the comedy/technology startup, Cultivated Wit, where he serves as CEO. He also writes the monthly back page column for Fast Company, and has contributed to the Huffington Post and the Weekly Dig. In addition, he is a semi-regular panelist on the podcast This Week in Tech, and hosted the Discovery Science show Popular Science's Future Of in 2009 and 2010. He performs standup comedy in New York City and across the United States, as well as delivers keynotes at South by Southwest, Personal Democracy Forum, and the Guardian Changing Media Summit. In May 2011, Thurston spoke at the presidential palace in Tbilisi, Georgia on the role of satire in a healthy democracy, and he has advised The White House on digital strategy and public engagement. In January of 2012, Thurston joined the MIT Media Lab as a director's fellow. He has been featured on CNN, NPR, BBC, and C-SPAN, as well as in the New York Times and Boston Globe.

Thurston has authored four books: Better than Crying: Poking Fun at Politics, the Press & Pop Culture (2004); Keep Jerry Falwell Away from My Oreo Cookies (2005); Thank You Congressional Pages (For Being So Damn Sexy!) (2006); and the New York Times best-seller, How To Be Black (2012).

The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan honored Thurston “for changing the political and social landscape one laugh at a time.” He was also nominated for the Bill Hicks Award for Thought Provoking Comedy. The Root added him to its list of 100 most influential African Americans, and Fast Company listed him as one of the 100 Most Creative People In Business.

Thurston lives in New York, New York.

Baratunde Thurston was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 7, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.100

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/7/2014 |and| 8/31/2016

Last Name

Thurston

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Rafiq

Occupation
Schools

Bancroft Elementary

Sidwell Friends School

Harvard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Baratunde

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

THU02

Favorite Season

Summer Into Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Goa, India

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/11/1977

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Bacon

Short Description

Comedian and author Baratunde Thurston (1977 - ) served as director of digital for 'The Onion' and co-founded Cultivated Wit in 2012. He is the author of Better than Crying: Poking Fun at Politics, the Press & Pop Culture (2004); Keep Jerry Falwell Away from My Oreo Cookies (2005); Thank You Congressional Pages (For Being So Damn Sexy!) (2006); and the New York Times best-seller, How To Be Black (2012).

Employment

Cultivated Wit

Jack and Jill Politics

The Onion

Kingly Companion Media, LLC

Discovery Communications

Huffington Post

The Weekly Dig

Altman Vilandrie & Company

Untravel Media

The Management Network Group

Cambridge Strategic Management Group

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
0,0:778,77:3242,103:5882,162:6410,169:16618,325:21874,480:30768,612:31804,632:32100,637:36318,743:40092,824:40980,842:41424,849:45198,933:52620,1000:54020,1037:60015,1139:64760,1241:67753,1298:68118,1304:74220,1358:78750,1398:79115,1404:79699,1415:80064,1421:89189,1600:98174,1733:100690,1792:103070,1828:106850,1866:107305,1874:107630,1880:118560,2104:130180,2299:130500,2304:138926,2417:139291,2423:139583,2428:144998,2449:152629,2536:155432,2552:157652,2604:157948,2609:158392,2616:158984,2630:160908,2683:163276,2739:164238,2760:166236,2803:174314,2899:183360,3090:186240,3141:190808,3199:195410,3272:200867,3317:201175,3322:203100,3361:220200,3581$0,0:8854,149:25590,386:91803,1415:116756,1755:118384,1791:131177,2000:131572,2006:138381,2082:145551,2148:146706,2224:147938,2254:152173,2367:152943,2379:166616,2558:167526,2678:174440,2731:175170,2787:191110,2977:197590,3074:203862,3298:233127,3665:233379,3670:233820,3679:234450,3695:252201,4055:253742,4084:261230,4190:266121,4303:291800,4706:294044,4738:298220,4778
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Baratunde Thurston's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Baratunde Thurston lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his maternal grandmother and his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Baratunde Thurston describes the different complexions in his family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his mother's political activism

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his childhood personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Baratunde Thurston describes the change in his mother between his sister's childhood and his own, pt.1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Baratunde Thurston describes the change in his mother between his sister's childhood and his own, pt.2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his sister

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Baratunde Thurston talks about playing music as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Baratunde Thurston describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Baratunde Thurtson describes his childhood neighborhood in Washington, D.C.'s Columbia Heights neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Baratunde Thurtson talks about moving to Takoma Park, Maryland due to the crack epidemic in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Baratunde Thurtson talks about his grade school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Baratunde Thurtson talks about Marion Barry, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Baratunde Thurtson talks about Marion Barry, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Baratunde Thurtson remembers his favorite teachers from Bancroft Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Baratunde Thurtson talks about his childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Baratunde Thurston talks about Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Baratunde Thurston describes his experience at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his involvement in Ankobia while a student at Sidwell Friends School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his extracurricular development at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Baratunde Thurston describes writing a school paper about U.S. propaganda

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Baratunde Thurston talks about racial politics at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Baratunde Thurston talks about the self-segregation of youth

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Baratunde Thurston remembers going to Senegal as a student at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Baratunde Thurston talks about attending the Million Man March in 1995

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Baratunde Thurston talks about his favorite teachers at Sidwell Friends School

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Baratunde Thurston talks about HistoryMaker Rickey Payton, Sr.

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
Baratunde Thurston describes his experience at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.
Baratunde Thurston talks about his involvement in Ankobia while a student at Sidwell Friends School
Transcript
Yeah, okay. How does that affect your sense of self when you're a kid, when you're around people that have much more money than you?$$Well--so the idea of bein' around money and the effect on my sense of self--subconsciously, it might have had an effect on me not really inviting kids to, to my home; it was a real point of contention. My mother [Arnita Thurston] was always annoyed I'd invite people over, especially after we moved to Takoma Park [Maryland]--had this nice big house, this big yard; and I don't think of it as shame as what kept me from doing it, I think it was just like awkwardness. I just wasn't developed in that area enough to be like, "Yeah, everybody come over." Now, I actually love hostin' things; I throw dinner parties and events at bars, and I'm all over the globe hostin' things. But as a teenager, I was a little more shy in that regard. I'm fine being on stage, but bringin' people into my home just didn't quite cross my mind, so the early effect of goin' to a school like Sidwell, coming out of a school like Bancroft [Elementary School], was shock; there was definitely a cultural adjustment. You know, there was a bit of an Ebonics tone that I had to my style of speech, which I remember these two white kids, these twins, makin' fun of--there were these blond hair, blue eyed, thin dudes--twins--they were just so classically out of some kinda book, and their names were quite similar. It was like Ricky and Richard--somethin' like that; just one letter off kinda between them, and they were makin' fun of the way I spoke and we actually came to a little physical violence; I just went over and kicked one of 'em 'cause I was just tired of hearin' 'em talk, you know, all this nonsense. That wouldn't end up bein' my preferred method of conflict resolution over time but, you know, there was--it was, it was weird, that seventh grade year. My name was strange to people, and just seeing the houses--I remember visiting a friend who lived in Georgetown [Washington, D.C. neighborhood], and I never been to anybody's house in Georgetown, you know. Anybody's house I'd been in was in the neighborhood, or maybe a friend of my mother's, and this was a--like stupendous house; he had these speakers that were super-thin, I'm like--how do you have speakers like that? Big old TV, cable--we were watchin' like MTV or somethin'--some kinda cable or music video thing--this is early high school. But I don't think it affected me in the sense that it made me want all that, or feel bad about the stuff I had. I also got exposed--I had a preconceived notion about rich people problems, and that they didn't have 'em, and white people problems that they didn't have 'em, and I discovered by goin' to school with them and socializing and doing plays and, you know, just having human relationships--like everybody's got problems, and there's some kids who can't come outta the closet 'cause their parents would be ashamed. And there's some kids who can't make their own choices 'cause their parents have had their lives all mapped out for them. And I remember feelin' very lucky as well, being at that school, of the household that I came from, and that I was encouraged to try this and play that and go here and be that, and didn't have any career expectation that I'd have to take over the family business or live up to some name. That was a real eye-opening experience for me with that side. My previous experience is like the Jetsons, Benson (laughter), like I don't know who my references were, but they were through television mostly.$Okay. Now you had like two streams, and you discuss 'em in your book--$$Emm hmm.$$--'How To Be Black.' Two streams of Ankobia--$$Yeah.$$--Rites of Passage project, and Sidwell Friends [School, Washington, D.C.]. So you had these two cultural paths--divergent paths--$$Yeah.$$--with one (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--One person (laughter) straddling the line.$$Right.$$That was a part of my mother's [Arnita Thurston] genius in how she sent me Sidwell where she also enrolled me in a pan-African Rites of Passage program called Ankobia.$$And that's spelled--$$A-N-K-O-B-I-A; it is born out of a pan-African group not unlike the one she was a part of in the '60s [1960s] and '70s [1970s] that stayed together, and we created an Afrocentric school called Nation House Watoto [ph.], and had extra programming to assure their youth into adulthood. Men--boys' program, girls' program, meeting every Saturday for enrichment of the mind and the body. And so we read a ton of books that were never on the Sidwell Friends reading list or the public school reading list, we learned to drum, we learned African dance, went out to the country, and we were schooled then in a different way of being and a different level of pride, so--oh, and the way we found that program was through the principal at the Sidwell Friends School, which still blows my mind. Like, there's a black dude running the Sidwell Friends Middle School at the time, who's also an elder in this pan-African program; that's in the same person.$$Okay, what was his name?$$Bob Williams; Robert Williams--yeah. Yeah, he was, he was known to us as Baba Jawanza [ph.].$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$All right, all right.$$So this is, this is a brother livin' two lives too, you know, dealin' with boards of trustees and all these parents, and college, you know. Well, in middle school, you're not really dealing with college people too much, but then dealing with this program, you know, and the curriculum and what--what is it that you should have a young black mind know? And what experiences should it have to prepare us for the world?$$Now this is an interesting idea. Well, for years, Jewish people--$$Yep.$$--have like a Friday (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--They have Hebrew School.$$--Hebrew School--$$Yeah.$$--for the children, where they learn everything it is about being Jewish--$$Emm hmm.$$--and the history and culture and all that--$$Yeah.$$--and it's not religious study (unclear), you know, under the political position (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah.$$--of Jewish people in the world of what's important, what isn't, you know, and the stories, the folklore, or all that other--you know, the dance, arts, and so this is--I don't know if the worlds are quite as different as (laughter) the ones Ankobia would have in a (unclear).$$I think what it--you know, it was--I joke that it's the Hebrew school for blackness. I mean what it did for me in the Sidwell environment is it just gave me somethin' else; it gave me some depth, it gave me some conflict, it gave me another perspective to see the world, it gave me some weird traditions to carry. You know, there's a--sort of an initiation component to the program; we had to wear this African medallion every day, like you're not supposed to take it off--ever. And so that means I had to explain this to my classmates. "What is--why--what is this thing around your neck?" "Well, I'm a part of this program and I have to wear it." And so it forced a level of publicity around pride in self, and around your history that might have been different from what was being taught. Not that--I mean Sidwell is a very progressive school, so it's also the school where at high school I took an elective in Islam and an elective in African history, taught by a black person. That's not typical in a public school system (laughter), or of a lot of the private school systems, certainly at the time, so I feel like, you know, there's a lotta tension in goin' to a school like that, there's a lotta race issues and class issues, but I also was very fortunate that that was the version of that experience that I got because of the principal I had that led us to Ankobia, because of the nature of the Quaker traditions that were viewed in some of the processes in a place like Sidwell that might not have been in a Catholic version or in a purely money version that has no spiritual or religious grounding--yeah.$$Okay, all right. So this--$$Those are the hippie version, you know. I mean there's, there's looser versions, you know. There's--I think Georgetown Day [School] was hippy-er [ph.] than Sidwell Friends, but Saint Albans [School], which is attached to the cathedral and the church, is much more strict and narrow, in certain ways, than a Sidwell.

Derek McGinty

Broadcast journalist Derek McGinty was born on August 17, 1959 in Washington, D.C. He attended Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, and graduated in 1977. McGinty went on to receive his B.A. degree in journalism from American University in Washington, D.C. in 1981.

McGinty was hired first as a desk assistant for ABC Radio News in the Washington bureau, and then became a reporter for United Press International's Washington Metro desk. From 1984 to 1991, McGinty worked as an anchor/reporter for WHUR-FM, where he went on to co-host “The Daily Drum,” a news and interview program covering local politics. He then hosted the radio talk show called “The Derek McGinty Show” from 1991 to 1998 on WAMU in Washington, D.C. His guests included former Washington, D.C. Mayor Marion Barry, former Secretary of State James Baker, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, jazz musician Wynton Marsalis, rapper Ice-T and author Robert Ludlum, among others. McGinty also served as an anchor for News Channel 8 in Washington, D.C. in 1994. In addition, he worked as a correspondent for the PBS series "State of the Union," as a moderator for "Straight Talk with Derek McGinty" on Washington, D.C.'s WETA-TV, and as a correspondent for the CBS News program "Coast to Coast." He has also served as host of WETA's public affairs program "Here & Now," guest host of NPR's All Things Considered, and host of Discovery Channel's weekly online talk show, "Live! With Derek McGinty."

In 1998, McGinty left WAMU and was hired as a correspondent on the CBS News program “Public Eye with Bryant Gumbel.” He then served as a correspondent for “Real Sports” on HBO from 1999 to 2003, and worked as a reporter and anchor for WJLA from 1999 to 2001. From 2001 to 2003, he was co-anchor of ABC's “World News Now,” and anchor of “World News This Morning.” In 2003, McGinty joined WUSA, where he serves as the weekday anchor for WUSA 9 News at 7pm and weeknight co-anchor for WUSA 9 News at 5pm, 6pm and 11pm. He was also the host of “Eye on Washington.” McGinty has written articles that have appeared in The New York Times; The Washington Post; The New York Daily News; and Washingtonian Magazine.

In 1994, “The Derek McGinty Show” received the Gold Award for Public Affairs Programming from the Corporation of Public Broadcasting, the highest programming honor in public radio.

Derek McGinty was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 19, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.097

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/19/2014

Last Name

McGinty

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

American University

Woodrow Wilson High School

Keene Elementary School

Rabaut Junior High School

Archbishop Carroll High School

First Name

Derek

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MCG07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ski Resorts

Favorite Quote

Such is life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/17/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Derek McGinty (1959 - ) was an anchor on WUSA 9 News from 2003, and was the host of the award-winning “The Derek McGinty Show” from 1991 to 1998.

Employment

WUSA-TV 9

ABC News

ABC World News This Morning

HBO

WJLA TV

CBS News

WAMU Radio

WHUR-FM Radio

WTOP TV

ABC Radio News

Favorite Color

Red and Blue

Timing Pairs
310,0:606,5:6340,128:12440,194:12704,199:20610,313:29006,406:33998,538:34574,553:36302,602:48442,785:48797,791:49294,802:49720,809:53490,897:53840,903:54890,928:56220,1061:68780,1197:73820,1325:78160,1399:85580,1454:90838,1570:101664,1685:102231,1705:103743,1752:108872,1943:115246,2034:116606,2070:116946,2076:118374,2122:129681,2326:130391,2339:134935,2458:135219,2463:136284,2485:140757,2633:142177,2663:144165,2726:153572,2844:154978,2874:160595,2954:167114,3092:168500,3121:169886,3159:171349,3191:173351,3233:193500,3482$0,0:7870,79:10198,111:10563,117:18085,332:35960,528:36456,539:45984,714:50012,746:57823,911:58115,916:58699,925:62615,942:62915,948:64490,990:70792,1096:75528,1225:78858,1307:90136,1507:91098,1535:97980,1710:98646,1731:101162,1783:101458,1788:101754,1793:120966,2098:121746,2112:127050,2221:133572,2329:146431,2507:146857,2517:147425,2528:149981,2603:150478,2614:164892,2805:165948,2888:182406,3160:183062,3178:183554,3183:184128,3191:194735,3405:195100,3411:195830,3427:196341,3522:203906,3563:206870,3635:207326,3643:208314,3668:212114,3839:228457,4081:232048,4170:232678,4184:233119,4192:236332,4266:257101,4657:258487,4691:270176,4936:270428,4941:275790,5029
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Derek McGinty's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Derek McGinty lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Derek McGinty talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Derek McGinty talks about his mother's educational background and career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Derek McGinty talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Derek McGinty talks about his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Derek McGinty reflects upon his father's dream of being a playwright

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Derek McGinty describes the plays his father wrote

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Derek McGinty describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Derek McGinty describes his father's features and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Derek McGinty describes his mother's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Derek McGinty talks about his mother's Howard University music students that included Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Derek McGinty talks about his sister

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Derek McGinty talks about his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Derek McGinty describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Derek McGinty describes his childhood neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Derek McGinty describes the sights, smells, and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Derek McGinty recalls the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Derek McGinty talks about his experiences in elementary and middle school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Derek McGinty describes his childhood interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Derek McGinty describes his interest in fashion and style as a teenager in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Derek McGinty remembers his childhood teachers and mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Derek McGinty describes how transferring schools affected him as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Derek McGinty talks about how meeting news anchor James Vance influenced his decision to become a journalist

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Derek McGinty talks about his high school experiences and mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Derek McGinty describes how his parents' influenced his decision to attend American University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Derek McGinty describes his experiences at American University, including pledging Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Derek McGinty describes his stand on freedom of speech at American University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Derek McGinty describes his father's focus on honesty and integrity as part of a core value system

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Derek McGinty talks about being an African American student at American University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Derek McGinty talks about his internships and employment while a student at American University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Derek McGinty talks about his admiration for Bryant Gumbel and the influence of his teachers at American University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Derek McGinty talks about his internship at ABC News while a student at American University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Derek McGinty talks about being hired as a news writer

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Derek McGinty describes his hiring as a news reporter at United Press International

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Derek McGinty describes his first on-air job at WHUR

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Derek McGinty talks about how "The Derek McGinty Show" started

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Derek McGinty describes the continued segregation in radio

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Derek McGinty talks about his most memorable shows

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Derek McGinty talks about his favorite "The Derek McGinty Show" shows

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Derek McGinty talks about leaving "The Derek McGinty Show"

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Derek McGinty describes his experiences covering HBO "Real Sports" stories, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Derek McGinty describes his experiences covering HBO "Real Sports" stories, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Derek McGinty talks about co-anchoring for ABC World News Now

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Derek McGinty talks about his current position at WUSA Channel Nine News in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Derek McGinty describes his most memorable moments and stories at WUSA Channel Nine News

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Derek McGinty reflects upon the death of President Ronald Reagan and the Boston bombing as some of his biggest news stories

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Derek McGinty credits his persistence as a key to his success

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Derek McGinty reflects upon his building a career in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Derek McGinty shares his philosophy on journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Derek McGinty describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Derek McGinty reflects upon his career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Derek McGinty compares television and radio

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Derek McGinty talks about what he would have done differently in life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Derek McGinty describes his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Derek McGinty talks about his civic involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Derek McGinty talks about his loved ones and family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Derek McGinty shares insight into his experiences with difficult radio and television guests

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Derek McGinty shares how he wants to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

11$5

DATitle
Derek McGinty talks about how "The Derek McGinty Show" started
Derek McGinty talks about co-anchoring for ABC World News Now
Transcript
Then they put me anchoring "The Daily Drum" [WHUR-FM]. So I anchored "The Daily Drum" for a couple of years. Then--that was a great gig I mean a tremendous learning experience for me--I get a call from a friend of mine, a guy name Richard Paul, who had gone to school with me at AU [American University] and he says, WAMU [FM] is looking for a talk show host, you ought to apply. Here we go again. But this was a whole different thing, so I--I almost didn't send in the tape, right. I waited a week or two, you know, it's gonna be a pain to get it together, I don't know, but then I said, no, you have to do this. So I got it together, got it in there and they called me in for an interview and then they said, you have to audition. So the audition was I had to do the show for three hours, one Friday night. I said, okay. So I went and did it. It was the hardest thing I've ever done. Three hours on the air. I had never done anything like that. It was really difficult and, you know, taking phone calls for that long. I had done a little bit of that at the Daily Drum, we had a little 20 minute show, but nothing like three hours, that's a whole different creature. But I made it through, and I remember at the end of it, I thought to myself, man I don't even want this job, it's too hard, you know, and you know long story short, they called me up a few months later after lots of controversy to say that they really liked me, but they were going to hire this other guy. And I said, okay. I was just glad to really be considered, you know, I came in second, maybe this could lead to something else you know whatever. They said, we're ninety something percent sure that we're going to sign him but if we don't we'll call you back. That was like a Friday. Tuesday, he called me back. We couldn't sign him up, we had--are you still interested? I'm thinking part of me say, oh, I'm the second choice, the other part of me says, who cares, you know. So I take the job. And that job, of course, you know, lead to everything that I'd been able, to a great deal, of what I've been able to accomplished, because I was good at that job, you know. And my father had always said, you know, you're a natural conversationalist, you're a natural interviewer, you should-- this is what you should be doing. And I think he was right, I mean, I think, you know, I was able to really get people to talk and I enjoyed the heck out of it and I had a good time with it, and you know, they moved it, it was night time at the time. When I first got there, it was eight to eleven week nights and then it became--they changed it from noon to two, which was a great thing, because being on eight to eleven was tough on the social life. It became noon to two and you know sort of the sky was the limit. They syndicated it. I mean it was a great gig. It really was the best job I've ever had.$$Well what was the name of it in the beginning?$$It was called, I think it was--they made it the Derek McGinty Show when I first came on board, because it had been the Mike Cuspard Show, when I first came on board and then Mike left to go to some big job up in Boston or whatever, and then it became the Derek McGinty Show. So it was always the Derek McGinty Show, as far as I can recall.$$Okay, so this starts in 1991?$$Yes. And went to '98' (1998). And over that time, I mean, it was a great ride, it was great ride. I didn't even know how good I had it working at that station.$World News Now, overnight?$$Yes, I left ABC in 2000--March, 2001, to go to New York and do the overnight show, World News Now. Frankly, this is one of those kind of jobs where I was almost hoping it didn't come through. (laughing) Because I was thinking, man, working overnights, moving to New York, I don't know if I want to do that, you know. But it came through, I kind of had to take it, cause you know, this kind of opportunities don't come, so I took it. Moved to New York and it was as difficult and as painful as I thought it would be. But it was all worth it.$$Now, this is, you know, the overnight show, I used to watch it because I stay up late at night. I used to see it is more discussion, but it's not like the early morning discussion. What was--was there a format?$$Well, yeah, there was a format. I mean, we did the news, we had fun, you know. I mean as somebody said, we do the news like nobody's watching it, you know, which was kind of true, but we did have a couple of million people watching it, you know, we had fun with it. And we had a lot of room to have fun because you know it was at two o'clock in the morning, so we could do--and no one would ever leave that job if--'cause it was so much fun to do, the people were great. No one would ever leave if the hours were decent, you know, but you can only do that job for a couple of years before you go, oh, I gotta get out of here, you know. But it was a great--it was a fun job, you know. But moving to New York was hard. New York's a big old lonely town, as I found it to be. I'm working overnights, you know, I'm trying to figure out how to get sleep, you know. I'm living in this new apartment. I used to have a house, now I have an apartment you know I'm living in. And I don't know that many people. It was hard, it was a hard transition, you know.$$Who was your co-anchor?$$I had two. I had Alison Stewart and then I had Liz Cho. Liz Cho and I became--Alison and I were fine, I mean, you know, but Liz and I became good friends, you know, and I still call her every once and a while, she's an anchor in New York at the ABC [WABC-TV News Channel 7] station up there now. Liz was--Liz was beautiful. I mean, she was gorgeous and while we were doing it, she got to be one of the People's [People Magazine] "50 Most Beautiful People," you know. She was--that just kind of tells you. And so, I kept saying, I don't know why I didn't get in there. But as pretty as she was, that's how nice she was, you know. We just had a great time together, we were really good friends. I really liked her, you know, as a person, you know and so. "The Lizard," as I used to call her. Like I said she's still in New York anchoring at Channel Seven. I need to give her a call, see how she's doing.$$Okay. Yeah, it's interesting, a little back and forth--$$Yeah, we had a good time. That was a great job, but like I said, man, you just (simultaneous)--$$--And the news coverage was actually good.$$--But it was just the hours, you know, working overnights, that's--whew, it's tough, it's tough.$$So you were there like for how long?$$I was there for two years.$$Two years, okay.$$And then Channel Nine [WUSA-TV, Washington, D.C.] called and wanted me to do their seven o'clock news and so I said, yes, although I still had a year left on my contract at ABC. So I had to get them to let me out of the contract, which they did, which tells me they weren't that interested in keeping me. But, cause if they had really wanted me, they would have said, no. But they did, they were very nice about it, they let me out of my contract so I could come to Washington [D.C.] and do this and where I've been ever since.$$Well it seems as though the philosophy of World News Now is to bring in somebody new every couple of years anyway--$$Yes.$$--I don't know.$$I think you're right. They do cycle anchors through there because you either, you know, become a correspondent or you're kind of out of there. So, that's kind of what happens cause there's no more anchoring job that you're gonna get right at the network, you're either on--there's only two shows, the morning show and the night and the evening news and those jobs are taken, right, so if you want to be in anchor, you kind of got to leave the network, you know. And so that's what happens, you do that so for a couple of years and then you go on off and do something else. So, you're right, they do seem to do that.$$It seems that the roles seem to be cast appeal to the younger audience than the regular news.$$What, on World News Now?$$Yeah.$$I don't know about now. I haven't seen it, you know, since I left practically, but--$$Over the years you see like there are younger people sitting there (simultaneous)--$$--Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.$$--Seem to know more contemporary stuff than (simultaneous)--$$Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's a hipper--it considers itself more of a hipper show, and that might be what you're talking about. So, yeah, I would say that's true.$$--Right, right.

Brenda Wood

Broadcast journalist Brenda Blackmon Wood was born on September 8, 1955 in Washington, D.C. to Welvin Bray and Bernice Blackmon. Wood graduated from Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland in 1973. She went on to receive her B.A. degree in speech communication and mass media from Loma Linda University in Southern California in 1977.

Upon graduation in 1977, Wood was hired as a news reporter for WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama. In 1978, she left that market for a brief time to serve as a general assignment reporter at WSM-TV in Nashville, Tennessee. One year later, Wood returned to WAAY-TV as the evening news anchor. In 1980, she moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where she spent eight years as the evening weekday news anchor for WMC-TV. In 1988, Wood was hired as the evening news anchor and reporter at Atlanta, Georgia’s WAGA-TV, where she also hosted the Emmy award-winning news magazine show, Minute by Minute. She then joined WXIA-TV in Atlanta in 1997, where she anchors the 6pm and 11pm weekday newscasts, as well as her signature newscast, The Daily 11 at 7 with Brenda Wood. Wood was also co-producer and host of WXIA-TV’s Emmy award-winning prime time show, Journeys with Brenda Wood, which has received the National Association of Black Journalists’ 1998 award for Community Affairs Programming.

Throughout her career Wood has received numerous honors and awards, including eighteen Emmy awards from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) Southeast Region; six awards from the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists (AABJ); and three awards from the Georgia Association of Broadcasters (GAB). In 2013 she was named Georgia Woman of the Year by the Governor's Office of the Georgia Women's Commission, and received the Legacy Award from the Atlanta Business League. Wood has also been named Who's Who in Atlanta; awarded the NAACP's Phoenix Award for "Best News Anchor," and named "Best Local News Anchor" by Atlanta Magazine in 1998. Wood has also received an award from the Georgia Chapter of Women in Communication, the Gabriel Award of Merit from the National Association of Catholic Churches, and a journalism award from the Georgia Psychological Association, as well as several awards and honors from local civic and community organizations.

Wood is a member of the NATAS, the NABJ, the AABJ, the Atlanta Press Club, and Women in Film. She serves on the boards of Kenny Leon's True Colors Theater Company and Chayil, Inc., a nonprofit that helps domestic abuse victims. In addition, Wood serves on several local advisory boards in the Atlanta area.

Wood lives in Atlanta, Georgia and has two daughters, Kristen and Kandis.

Brenda Wood was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.072

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/21/2014

Last Name

Wood

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Blackmon

Schools

Takoma Academy

Loma Linda University

Oakwood Adventist Academy

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Brenda

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WOO11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Turks and Caicos

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/8/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni, Cheese

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Brenda Wood (1955 - ) has worked as a reporter and news anchor for Atlanta, Georgia’s WAGA-TV and WXIA-TV for over thirty-four years. She has received eighteen Emmy awards, six awards from the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists, and the NAACP's Phoenix Award for "Best News Anchor."

Employment

WAAY TV, Huntsville

WSM TV, Nashville

WMC TV, Memphis

WAGA-TV (Television Station: Atlanta,Ga.)

WXIA-TV, Atlanta

Favorite Color

Teal

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Brenda Wood's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Brenda Wood lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Brenda Wood talks about her biological mother and her adoptive mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Brenda Wood talks about her adoptive parents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Brenda Wood describes the history of musicianship in her maternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Brenda Wood describes her adoptive father's family background and talks about his career as a musician

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Brenda Wood talks about the death of her biological mother in 1960, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Brenda Wood describes her adoptive mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Brenda Wood describes growing up in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Brenda Wood talks about the death of her biological mother in 1960, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Brenda Wood explains why her adoptive father, Henry Blackmon, immigrated to the Netherlands

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Brenda Wood recalls her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Brenda Wood talks about her upbringing as a Seventh Day Adventist and attending Seventh Day Adventist schools throughout her education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Brenda Wood describes her experience at Smothers Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Brenda Wood talks about her experiences at Woodson Junior High School and the Dupont Park Church Seventh Day Adventist School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Brenda Wood remembers taking piano lessons from her mother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Brenda Wood remembers watching JC Hayward and Max Robinson on Channel 9 in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Brenda Wood talks about her mother's friendship with singer and actress Joyce Bryant

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Brenda Wood talks about her mother's relationship with singer Roberta Flack

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Brenda Wood talks about wanting to be a Broadway performer

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Brenda Wood describes her experience at Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Brenda Wood remembers the riots in Washington, D.C. in 1968 after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Brenda Wood describes the racial demographics of the student body at Takoma Academy in Takoma Park, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Brenda Wood describes how she became interested in speech and communications

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Brenda Wood talks about deciding to attend Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Brenda Wood talks briefly about the Loma Linda University Medical Center's legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Brenda Wood talks about transferring to Loma Linda University and wanting to become an investigative filmmaker

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Brenda Wood remembers being interviewed by WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Brenda Wood talks about joining WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama in 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Brenda Wood explains why she chose not to leave Huntsville, Alabama for Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Brenda Wood talks about receiving an offer to join WSMV-TV in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Brenda Wood talks about her marriage in 1978

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Brenda Wood remembers watching JC Hayward and Max Robinson on Channel 9 in Washington, D.C.
Brenda Wood remembers being interviewed by WAAY-TV in Huntsville, Alabama
Transcript
So, now, did you pay--considering what you're doing today, did you pay special attention to news people on television?$$No, not really. I do remember, I was--I remember when JC Hayward and Max Robinson arrived at Channel 9 in Washington [D.C.] and loved them, probably, I guess, because I don't know this to be a fact, but we watched Channel 9 all the time. And they were the first blacks that I saw on TV giving the news. So, my mom [Alma Montgomery Blackmon] was very, very proud of that. She loved Max Robinson, you know. They were always in--so I watched them growing up. I can't say, though, that I, you know, that was not--I didn't look--I don't know. You know, I, I admired them greatly, but I don't really recall thinking one day I want to be JC Hayward, you know what I'm saying? Don't--it wasn't that. But I did watch them all the time.$$Okay, so you were keenly aware of them, but you weren't--$$Absolutely.$$--you didn't see them as future, you know--$$No, you know, at the time, I wanted to be a Broadway singer, or you know opera singer. That's kind of where my head was 'cause that's, that'a what I was hearing all the time.$I was--by this time I was engaged. My fiance was slated to graduate in December, and then we were gonna get married. And then I was gonna start the master's fellowship there in Ohio [at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio]. He was gonna do his residency there. So between June of graduation from undergrad and December I had this free time. So I applied for a job somewhere in Huntsville [Alabama]. And I, you know, I had done a little bit of radio in college at the college radio station, and I had done some internships--$$I was gonna ask you if they had a station there?$$Yeah, they did. It was all automated, so, yeah, I didn't do very much but punch buttons. And I had done some internships in Los Angeles [California] with a couple of independent film companies. So I had a small resume. I'd sent it back home to then Huntsville. And I just, you know, sent it everywhere to radio, TV, newspapers, just, you know, I just needed something to do. And I wanted to do something in communications. And--$$Now, this is in the space between Loma Linda [University, Loma Linda, California] and Ohio State?$$Correct.$$Would have been Ohio State.$$Right, so I sent out my resume like in April. I knew I was gonna be graduating in June, so I had put together a little resume and sent it out before graduation. I got an inquiry before graduation from a couple of newspapers, little local newspapers, couple of radio stations that were interested, and a television station. And my first week back home from, after graduation, I only went to the TV station for the interview, not smart, you know. It's like, "Oh, I don't wanna work at a newspaper. And I don't wanna work at a radio station." I wanted to--and the reason why I wanted to do the TV was because they shot film. And this is 1977. So they're still shooting film. So in my little brain, I'm thinking, well, I wanna do film, and they do film. So I'll (laughter) do film. So I went, I accepted the, the invitation to come and do an interview at the television station there.$$Okay, so you saw yourself as behind the cameras kind of--$$Yeah, yeah, right, but they--and they were, I knew they were looking for a reporter. And I had taken one journalism class. So, you know, I wasn't so much interested--what drew me to the TV station wasn't that I wanted to be a reporter or let me see what reporting is like? It was, I, you know, I don't know. I knew nothing. So, you know, it was like, they shoot film, and I wanna do film. So I'll go to the television station and apply to be a reporter. And it doesn't really connect. But that's what I did. And Adrian Gibson was the news director at the time, and he interviewed me, and I said, really all the wrong things, thinking back on it. You know, I said, I don't wanna be, I'm not interested in being a reporter. You know, have you ever done any reporting? No, taken, you know, have you taken classes? Just one. Yeah, well, what do you see in your future? Well, I wanna be a filmmaker. Do you wanna be a reporter? "No, not really. And by the way, I'm leaving in six months 'cause I'm going to Ohio State to get my master's in filmmaking. And then I'll be gone. Oh, and on top of that, I don't work on Friday nights or Saturdays 'cause I'm Seventh Day Adventist." And this man hired me (laughter). I don't know why. I did a, they put me in front of the camera on the news set in the studio and asked, you know, just said, talk, you know, just talk to the camera. And I did, and I don't even know what I said.$$This is your first time talking, I mean being the talent on a television program.$$(No audible response) 'Cause, you know, we didn't have the--different from today. At, at--neither at Oakwood [College, Huntsville, Alabama] nor at Loma Linda did they have a studio set up, you know, did they have a, you know, a little news operation. They had none of that where I was, none of that. So it really was the first time I'd been in a studio, the first time I'd talked in front of a camera or any of that.$$Okay. So did they build your work around your religion and other--$$Yeah, they did. They gave me a Sunday through Thursday schedule. Fortunately, because they're in Huntsville, they knew of Oakwood's existence. They knew of the Seventh Day Adventist College. So they--and the woman that I was replacing who was also a black female, ironically, left to go to Ohio State University to work on her master's degree. Isn't that just funny how life works. So, you know, and because it was the '70's [1970s], and I filled two quotas, I was black and female, you know, I would, I was, you know, I was a twofer. So they wanted to hire--they had a slot for (laughter) a twofer. They were losing one, a black female. And so they get to hire one. So that probably was more of the motivating factor than anything else (laughter) in hiring me. I was there (laughter). I was a warm body (laughter).$$Now, well, you had the credentials which some, it was like a driver's license in some ways. You have a degree in communications.$$Yeah.$$So they can say, they can justify your hiring by pointing to these degrees.$$Right. It wasn't a degree in journalism.$$I mean in communications.$$That would have been helpful. Well, yeah, it was in communications. You said it right. You know, it was very broad, very generic, yeah.$$All right.$$But I filled the bill.$$Okay, okay, and ever--anyone ever told you that you looked like a television talent?$$No.$$Really, up to that point?$$Oh, no. No, as a matter--$$Interesting.$$--of fact, when I was in college, people would say to me, you know, "What's your major?" "Communications." "Oh, what's that?" You know, that--it's the '70s [1970s]. It was a new major. "What's that?" And my standard answer in explaining what that was, you know, "Well, you know, I wanna go into filmmaking." "Huh?" And then my retort would be, "Well, anything but news."