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Dr. Reed V. Tuckson

Healthcare executive Reed V. Tuckson was born on February 18, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to Coleman and Evelyn Tuckson. He received his B.S. degree from Howard University in 1973, and his M.D. degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1978. From 1978 to 1981, he trained at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a specialist in internal medicine, served as an admitting doctor at Philadelphia’s Veterans Affairs hospital, launched a radio program aimed at African American listeners, and organized a support group for sickle-cell anemia patients. His interest in public health led him to a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars fellowship, where he studied health care administration and policy at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business, from 1981 to 1983.

Tuckson worked for Elmira Jeffries Nursing Home in Philadelphia as a founding medical director from 1981 to 1985. Returning to Washington, Tuckson worked for the D.C. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Administration from 1983 to 1985. He then held the position of District of Columbia deputy commissioner of public health from 1985 to 1986; and a year later, was promoted to commissioner of public health for D.C., a position he held from 1986 to 1989. He joined the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation as senior vice president for programs before being appointed as the new president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, serving from 1991 to 1997. Tuckson left Drew University to work for the Chicago-based American Medical Association as the group vice president for professional standards from 1997 to 2000. He accepted an offer from the United Health Group in Minneapolis, Minnesota to serve as senior vice president of consumer health and medical-care advancement from 2000 to 2006 when he was then promoted to executive vice president and chief of medical affairs at United Health where he served until 2013. He then established Tuckson Health Connections, a private health and medical care consulting company.

Tuckson has held numerous appointments in the areas of health care, the federal government and academia including active memberships in the American Medical Association and the Institute of Medicine-National Academy of Sciences. He was appointed to the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health, and has served on numerous boards, including those of Neptune Technologies & Bioressources, Inc.; the National Hispanic Medical Association; the Alliance for Health Reform; the National Patient Advocate Foundation; ViTel Net, Inc.; Cell Therapeutics, Inc.; Inform Genomics, Inc.; AcademyHealth; Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities; and Minnesota Public Radio. He also served on the board of trustees of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, on the advisory board of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, and as president of the Society of Medical Administrators.

Tuckson and his wife Margie Malone Tuckson have four adult children including Kobi, Nia, Dominic and Lance.

Reed V. Tuckson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.030

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/5/2018

Last Name

Tuckson

Maker Category
Middle Name

V.

Schools

Georgetown University School of Medicine

Howard University

First Name

Reed

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

TUC32

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Inside of My Mind

Favorite Quote

I'm in Love With the Unity of the Divine Intelligence.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/18/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Eggs, Bacon, Toast and Coffee

Short Description

Healthcare executive Dr. Reed Tuckson (1951- ) founded Tuckson Health Connections in 2013 and previously served as president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, group vice president for professional standards of the American Medical Association, and executive vice president and medical affairs chief of UnitedHealth Group.

Employment

Tuckson Health Connections, LLC

UnitedHealth Group

American Medical Association

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

District of Columbia

Mental Retardation and Developmental Disability Administration

Favorite Color

Blue

Shellye Archambeau

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau was born on July 6, 1962 in Washington, D.C. to Mera Archambeau and Lester Archambeau II. In 1980, she graduated from Montville High School in Montville, New Jersey, and received her B.S. degree in marketing and decision science in 1984 from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Archambeau started her career with the IBM Corporation, where she served in several roles including general manager of direct marketing in the Asia Pacific Division. In 1999, Archambeau was promoted to vice president of public sector industries in the Asia Pacific Division, making her the first African American woman to take on an international executive role at IBM. In 1999, she joined Blockbuster Inc. as senior vice president of their nascent e-commerce division, Blockbuster.com. In 2000, she was named executive vice president and chief marketing officer of NorthPoint Communications. In 2001, she served as chief marketing officer and executive vice president for LoudCloud, Inc. In 2002, Archambeau became the chief executive officer of Zaplet, Inc., overseeing the company’s merger with MetricStream in 2004. In 2018, Archambeau stepped down as CEO.

Archambeau received many awards for her business leadership, including the JEM Luminary Award from the C200 organization, the NCWIT Symons Innovator Award from the National Center for Women & Information Technology, the Game Changer Award from the Digital Diversity Network and the Spirit of Excellence Award from the Silicon Valley Black Charter of Women. She serves on the board of directors for Arbitron, Inc., Verizon Communications, Inc., Nordstrom Inc., the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and the IT Senior Management Forum. Also a member of the Forum of Women Entrepreneurs and the Women's Council to the Board of Trustees for the University of Pennsylvania, she served on the Council on Foreign Relations, and has been inducted into the National Hall of Fame of the Negro Business and Professional Women's Club. In 2016, Archambeau co-authored the business book Marketing That Works: How Entrepreneurial Marketing Can Add Sustainable Value to Any Sized Company .

Shellye Archambeau was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.208

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/29/2017

Last Name

Archambeau

Maker Category
First Name

Shellye

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ARC13

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Dorothy Terrell

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Someplace I've Never Been That Has Great History

Favorite Quote

Everybody's a Package

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/6/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Palo Alto

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau (1962 - ) held leadership positions at IBM Corporation, Blockbuster, Inc., NorthPoint Communications, and LoudCloud Inc. before serving as the chief executive officer of MetricStream from 2002 to 2018.

Employment

IBM

Blockbuster

Northpoint

Loudcloud

Metric Stream

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

The Honorable Susan E. Rice

Ambassador and national security advisor Susan E. Rice was born on November 17, 1964 in Washington, D.C. to Lois Dickson Rice and Emmett J. Rice. Rice graduated from the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C. in 1982, and received her B.A. degree in history from Stanford University in Stanford, California in 1986. She went on to earn her M.Phil. degree in 1988 and Ph.D. degree in 1990 in international relations, from the New College of the University of Oxford in Oxford, England, where she was a Rhodes Scholar.

From 1991 to 1993, Rice worked as a management consultant at McKinsey and Company. In 1993, she was appointed director of International Organizations and Peacekeeping on the National Security Council in President Bill Clinton’s White House, and later continued to serve on the National Security Council as special assistant to the President and senior director for African Affairs. In 1997, Rice moved to the State Department, serving as assistant secretary of State for African Affairs. From 2002 to 2008, Rice was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and became a senior foreign policy advisor for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. Once elected, President Obama nominated Rice to the position of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. In 2013, she was appointed national security advisor for President Obama’s second term. After leaving government in 2017, Rice became a distinguished visiting research fellow at American University’s School of International Service and a non-resident senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She also became a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Rice served on numerous boards, including as an independent director of the Bureau of National Affairs (now Bloomberg BNA), Common Sense Media, the Beauvoir School in Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. She also served on the board of Netflix and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in addition to being a member of the Aspen Strategy Group, American Academy of Diplomacy, and Council on Foreign Relations.

In 2000, Rice was the co-recipient of the White House’s Sam Nelson Drew Memorial Award. In 2017, French President Francois Hollande presented Rice with the Award of Commander, the Legion of Honor of France, for her contributions to Franco-American relations.

Rice and her husband, Ian Cameron, have two children.

Susan E. Rice was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 30, 2017 and December 4, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.191

Sex

Female

Interview Date
10/30/2017 |and| 12/4/2017
Last Name

Rice

Maker Category
Schools
National Cathedral School
Stanford University
University of Oxford
First Name

Susan

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

RIC23

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anguila

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/17/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Ambassador and national security advisor Susan Rice (1964 - ) served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs under President Bill Clinton and was appointed U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations by President Barack Obama.

Employment
White House
United Nations
Brookings Institution
U.S. Department of State
McKinsey & Company, Inc.
Favorite Color

Purple

Paula Boggs

Lawyer and musician Paula Boggs was born on May 2, 1959 in Washington D.C. to Janice Anderson Barber and Nathaniel Boggs Jr., who received Howard University’s first Ph.D. in Zoology in 1963.  In 1977, Boggs enrolled at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, on a four-year Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarship and completed the U.S. Army Infantry Airborne School program. In 1981, Boggs earned her B.A. degree in international studies from Johns Hopkins University and in 1984 earned her J.D. degree from the University of California Berkeley, School of Law.
 
Boggs served eight years in the U.S. Army as a regular officer and was honorably discharged. She was also one of the first women to receive a congressional appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy. After law school, Boggs returned to Washington D.C. where she worked as an U.S. Army officer and attorney at the Pentagon and White House Office of Legal Counsel. From 1987 to 1988 Boggs served on the Iran-Contra Legal Task Force for which she earned the Defense Meritorious Service Award and Presidential Service Badge.
 
In 1988, Boggs became an assistant U.S. attorney in the Western District of the State of Washington, where she prosecuted fraud and regulatory crimes and twice earned the U.S. Department of Justice Special Achievement Award. Working as a trial lawyer specializing in corporate civil litigation, Boggs was in 1995 named the first African American female partner of Seattle, Washington’s Preston Gates & Ellis LLP. In 1997, she became Dell Corporation’s first African American female vice president. She returned to Seattle in 2002, serving as Starbucks Corporation’s first African American Executive Vice President, when she became general counsel and board secretary, a role she held until 2012. Boggs formed the Paula Boggs Band in 2007 releasing albums in 2010, 2015 and 2017. She founded Boggs Media, LLC in 2013.
 
Boggs was honored with the Secretary of Defense Award for Excellence in 1994, the 2006 American Bar Association Spirit of Excellence Award, the 2008 Wiley A. Branton Award from the National Bar Association and the American Bar Association Notable Member Award in 2013. In 2014, Boggs earned the Song of the Year© Award for “Look Straight Ahead” and is a voting member of the Recording Academy (The Grammys©).
 
In addition to her legal and music careers, Boggs was a member of the White House Council for Community Solutions from 2010 to 2012, and the President’s Committee for the Arts and Humanities from 2013 to 2017. She served on the boards of School of Rock LLC, Seattle Art Museum, public radio station KEXP, Johns Hopkins University and served as Legal Aid for Washington (LAWFUND) board president from 2006 to 2008. She serves on the boards of Avid Technology Inc., Seattle Symphony and American Bar Association Board of Governors. Boggs was inducted into the Johns Hopkins University ROTC Hall of Fame in 2016 and received the Seattle Mayor’s 2018 Arts Award.
 
Paula Boggs was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.176

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/04/2017

Last Name

Boggs

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

BOG03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Kawaii

Favorite Quote

Winners never quit, quitters never win.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

5/2/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

USA

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Lawyer Paula Boggs (1959 - )

Favorite Color

Green

George H. Lambert

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert was born on May 12, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to George H. Lambert, Sr. and Arnitha Green Allen. Lambert graduated from William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania in 1971. He went on to earn his B.A. degree in urban studies from Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia in 1975.

Upon his college graduation, Lambert worked for two years at the Richmond Community Action Program. Then, he became a community organizer for the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia. Lambert was hired as the executive director of the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in 1980. He also co-founded the Alexandria Forum, as a space for civil rights groups to collaborate on key issues and strategic planning. In 1990, he led the branch’s transition into the fully affiliated Northern Virginia Urban League. During his tenure as the executive director, Lambert also served as a senior regional consultant to the National Urban League. Lambert left the Northern Virginia Urban League in the mid-2000s, at which time he served as a senior director for resource development for the United Way of the National Capital area and as the vice president of public affairs at Issue Dynamics, Inc. From 2011 to 2013, he served as the president and chief executive officer of the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio. Lambert was then appointed as the president and chief executive officer of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014. In this role, he created the Thursday Network, which facilitated interactions between African American youth and the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. Lambert also worked with the Washington Nationals to institute Black Heritage Day at Nationals Park; and he partnered with corporations like Potomac Electric Power Company to offer utility assistance in the African American community.

He was a member of the National Urban League’s Association of Executives; the Academy of Fellows. He was also a parishioner of Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia.

Lambert and his wife, Bernadette Curtis-Lambert, have five children together.

George H. Lambert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 2, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/03/2017

Last Name

Lambert

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

H.

Occupation
Schools

William Penn Senior High School

Virginia Union University

Randall Junior High School

James G. Birney Elementary School

H.D. Cooke Elementary School

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

LAM04

Favorite Season

Christmas holiday season

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Greece

Favorite Quote

Have Mercy. To God Be The Glory.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/12/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Sweet potatoes, salmon

Short Description

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert (1951 - ) served as president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia and the Lorain County Urban League, in Elyria, before being appointed the president and CEO of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014.

Employment

Greater Washington Urban League

Lorain County Urban League

United Way

IDI

National Urban League

Northern Virginia Urban League

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of George H. Lambert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert talks about gender discrimination in the Baptist church

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert remembers staying in Washington, D.C. after his parent's divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert describes his parent's personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert talks about his brother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert talks about moving to York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about his mother's decision to move him out of Washington, D.C. as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert describes his neighborhood and upbringing in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert recalls attending William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert talks about developing his interest in African American studies

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert remembers his options after graduating from high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes his decision to attend Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls majoring in Urban Studies at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about the black political leadership of the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert recalls reading the works of influential black writers

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers joining the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert recalls backing coed dorms at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Richmond's annexation of Henrico County, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about his job offer from the Richmond Community Action Agency

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers his graduation from Virginia Union University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about his community organizing work

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls the history of the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about neighborhood preservation in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes his role at the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert talks about the Northern Virginia Urban League becoming an affiliate of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes African American politicians in Northern Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about Governor L. Douglas Wilder

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert recalls the articles he's published in African American newspapers

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his work with the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert remembers Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes past presidents of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert talks about his work in public affairs and with the United Way of America

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert describes his experiences with the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about the Black Lives Matter movement

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Chief Cathy Lanier of the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about educating young African American males on law enforcement procedures

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes the Greater Washington Urban League's partnership with the Washington Nationals

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about the Greater Washington Urban League's collaborations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes the scholarships and philanthropy of the Greater Washington Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert reflects upon the presidency of Barack Obama

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes race relations in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - George H. Lambert describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$12

DATitle
George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone
George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president
Transcript
So, are there any stories from this period of time? I mean, from these ten years that--?$$Well, you know, so I will share one with you. I had a great mentor when I served in Alexandria [Virginia] and for the Northern Virginia Urban League and so for the affiliate there and the person of a gentleman by the name of Ferdinand Day who is now deceased. Ferdinand Day was the, also he was the first African American to become the chair of the board for the, for the school board there [Alexandria City School Board] and so he, he was really my mentor. He, if you recall the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' and, and at some point in the movie, so Denzel Washington was the person who starred in the movie, but, but Herman Boone was the real coach. And so Herman was a good friend, good buddy. And so in the movie, you know, there was this whole discussion about the team, the football team not being able to go. I can't remember where it was, but not being able to go to someplace to play a game or whatever. And so Ferdinand Day, as the chair of the school board, said, well, you know, he would just cut some of the things out of the budget so that there would be resources and money for, for the team but it was that kind of boldness and, and leadership that Ferdinand Day really kind of brought. And so, you know, at some point the, the system really decided to acquiesce, if you will, and supported him in terms of the team but, but Herman Boone is someone that I really admired and when he did the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' when he and Denzel did the movie, I was still serving there. And so we decided that we were going to recognize Herman Boone at our annual gala, we were going to recognize him for his leadership. And so I remember having lunch with Herman one day and I said to him, "You know, it would be great if we could get Denzel Washington to come and present the award to you." And he said to me, he says, "Well George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], send him a letter." And so, so I did, you know, sent, sent Denzel Washington a letter and his people immediately got back with me, probably in a couple of weeks or so and said, "Unfortunately, Mr.," you know, "Mr. Washington is--has other commitments now and won't be able to come." So I called Herman and said, "Herman, I did what you told me to do, you know, we sent Denzel Washington a letter and asked him to come and I'm told that, you know, we're told that he's not going to be able to come." And Herman is kind of very direct when he talks with you. He said, "Okay, George, thank you, I'll take care of it." I didn't quite understand what that meant. So I'll never forget, maybe about a week or so later, my wife [Bernadette Curtis-Lambert] and I, we were coming in from church and it was Herman, he called, and so the phone was ringing as we were walking in the door and he said, and I said, hello, and so Herman said, "George, this is Herman Boone." And I knew who it was, he didn't have to tell me who, but I knew it was, "Herman Boone," and I said, "Hey, Herman, how you doing?" He said, "Well listen, I'm calling to let you know that Denzel Washington is coming." I said, "Herman, come on." I said, "Now, it's Sunday, you know, I'm coming in from church," and I said, "You shouldn't be really kind of, you know, pulling--." He says, "George, I'm telling you he's coming." I said, "Herman, you sure?" He says, "George, I'm standing in the man's kitchen right now and he wanted me to call you. He said, he wanted me to call Mr. Lambert and tell him he was coming." So, lesson learned from that. First of all, Denzel Washington, as he explained to Herman, as I understand, he never really saw my letter from him. His people got it and, you know, they knew how busy he was and so his people just kind of made a decision for him that he would just not be able to do it but Denzel Washington thought so much of Herman Boone and the work that he had done in terms of the integrating of the football team [at T.C. Williams High School, Alexandria, Virginia], he really wanted to come to present the award to Herman Boone. So, he did come at our gala to present the award to Herman Boone, so yeah.$$Okay.$$So when you ask me, you know, memorable experiences, that will be one I will never, ever forget, yeah.$$Okay, okay, that's something. So this would have been around the time the movie was out and--?$$Yeah, it was during the period that the movie was out, yeah, yeah.$$This is like in the mid-'90s [sic. 2000], I guess?$$Mid-'90s [1990s], yeah, yeah, mid-'90s [1990s] or so, yeah, yeah.$So you were there from 2011 to 2013; and you said you accomplished your objectives and kind of--$$Yeah, yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) got them back into working order.$$My coming, 'cause so, from Lorain [Lorain County Urban League, Elyria, Ohio], I did come to the Greater Washington Urban League [Washington, D.C.] but initially that was really not in the game plan because my predecessor here and a lady who I really considered a mentor, who I, you know, continue to revere as well, [HistoryMaker] Maudine Cooper, had served here as the president of the Greater Washington Urban League for a number of years and I had no idea that, you know, she was really considering retiring. And so even when she announced her retirement, yup, you know there were some folks who reached out to me and said, you know, "George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], Maudine is retiring, you ought to consider, you know, throwing your hat in the ring for the, for the Greater Washington Urban League." I was like, "No." You know, part of it with me was that I just, to some extent thought that everybody who thought they had arrived, so to speak, were going to be in the hunt to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League. It had nothing to do with my skillset but just kind of felt, everybody who arrived, that's where they were going to be and I just really didn't want to travel in that. And so to kind of show you how, because also kind of maintain, it was the Lord's hand in this as well. It was the last day of the cutoff time to submit your resume that I finally made a decision that I would submit my resume for the position, the last day, okay. And, and so, the last day and then, you know, six months or so later, because there was a number of rounds of interviews, or whatever that I went through, I actually went through six rounds of interviews, to then emerge and to actually become the president, you know, of the Greater Washington Urban League but initially, this wasn't my focus. I wasn't really looking, that I was even going to throw my hat in the ring. So, so I just, you know, I just kind of now step back and look at it and just know that there was, it was, you know, the intervention of the Lord's hand in it.$$Okay, well, now so, were there, were there a lot of candidates?$$Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean the, at the end of the day, some board members here shared with me, there were quite a few candidates, you know, and so, so yeah, yeah, but that, that, you know, for an affiliate of this size and for the work that this particular organization is involved in doing and for the, the notoriety that Maudine Cooper really kind of brought to the Greater Washington Urban League, that would be expected. I would have expected no less, really. That would have been a, that there would have been a number of candidates that would have had an interest in, in throwing their hat in the ring for, to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League.

Laurie Robinson Haden

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden was born on December 14, 1972 in Washington, D.C. to Frances Privott Robinson and James Robinson. Haden graduated from Oxon Hill High School in Maryland in 1990, and enrolled at North Carolina Central University, where she was named Miss NCCU. Haden received her B.A. degree in political science in 1994, and went on to earn her J.D. degree from Indiana University School of Law in 1998. She also completed a certificate in entertainment media management at the New York University School of Continuing Education.

Haden first served as a legal intern in the labor management division of the National Football League. From 1998 to 2002, she worked as a labor and employment associate at the New York City law firms of Seyfarth Shaw LLP and Epstein, Becker, and Green P.C. Haden was hired as the assistant general counsel and director of training and development for CBS Broadcasting Inc. in 2002. She was then promoted to vice president and assistant general counsel for CBS Corporation; and was named senior vice president and assistant general counsel in 2009. In 2004, Haden became the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color (CCWC), a non-profit professional organization. In 2012, Haden launched CCWC Live Blog Talk, serving as the host and executive producer. Haden authored several legal-related publications, as well as a quarterly column on diversity in Inside Counsel magazine. She also contributed to the CBS Corporation Diversity Blog. She presented at the American Bar Association, the Inside Counsel Super Conference, the National Bar Association and the Minority Corporate Counsel Association; and served on the board of directors of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Haden has received many awards for her leadership, including the Women's Venture Fund's Highest Leaf Award, the Los Angeles Black Women Lawyer's Power of One Award, the Chicago Black Women Lawyer's Diversity Visionary Award, the New York City Bar Association Diversity Champion Award, and the New York State Bar Association Diversity Trailblazer Award. She was named to the Network Journal's 40 Under Forty List, and was one of Pink magazine's Top 15 Women in Business in 2009. Haden also received the first M. Ashley Dickerson Award, given by the National Association of Women Lawyers, and was recognized as one of the "10 Up-And-Coming African-American Lawyers to Watch" by Diversity & The Bar magazine. She was the recipient of the Indiana University School of Law Distinguished Alumni Award, the Ronald H. Brown Distinguished Leadership Award from the University of the District of Columbia, the National Bar Association's Pinnacle Award, and named the Chambers and Partners 2012 In-House Counsel Up & Coming Lawyer of the Year. Haden also serves on the board of trustees of the Indiana University School of Law. 

Haden and her husband, David Patrick Haden, have one son, David Patrick Haden II. 

Laurie Robinson Haden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.149

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2016

Last Name

Robinson Haden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Nicole

Schools

New York University School of Professional Studies

Indiana University Maurer School of Law

North Carolina Central University

Oxon Hill High School

Oxon Hill Middle School

Indian Queen Elementary School

First Name

Laurie

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ROB31

Favorite Season

December

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Jesus Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/14/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chinese

Short Description

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden (1972 - ) worked as the senior vice president and assistant general counsel of CBS Corporation. She was also the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color.

Employment

CBS Corporation

Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Epstein Becker & Green

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:5454,60:6060,70:6795,78:7530,87:17864,281:18684,292:19340,302:20160,313:22218,321:22574,326:23197,334:24532,347:24888,352:27000,364:28377,394:28701,399:30170,407:30446,412:30929,421:31895,446:32171,451:33137,468:33413,473:33689,478:33965,483:34448,491:34931,499:35207,504:35966,518:36242,523:36518,528:37553,546:37898,552:38450,561:38795,569:39071,574:39485,581:43280,606:46115,634:48385,664:48760,670:49585,686:53355,716:54105,727:54405,732:55080,743:55380,748:55905,757:61745,837:62420,847:62795,853:64370,879:64745,885:65045,890:65420,896:66245,910:66620,916:67670,936:69170,966:69920,978:70895,991:71345,998:72320,1015:77098,1034:77362,1039:78946,1065:79672,1078:83214,1114:83822,1123:84354,1141:84962,1150:85570,1162:85874,1167:86406,1176:87470,1194:87774,1199:89978,1259:90662,1271:92106,1293:92714,1303:93094,1310:93702,1321:94006,1326:95754,1364:96286,1373:103353,1446:104521,1472:104813,1477:108270,1513:109080,1525:110700,1557:111150,1563:112050,1575:112500,1581:114210,1616:115830,1638:116280,1644:123495,1726:125070,1769:128445,1839:128745,1844:129120,1850:130320,1879:133620,1951:135720,1981:140307,1990:141492,2007:142045,2016:147733,2133:148286,2142:148602,2147:148918,2152:150182,2171:150735,2180:151209,2186:151920,2196:152394,2204:152710,2209:153737,2223:155317,2244:156028,2255:156581,2262:161638,2299:162550,2314:163462,2328:165134,2354:165590,2365:167414,2398:167870,2406:168250,2412:168782,2421:169390,2430:171290,2456:174080,2467$0,0:618,8:922,13:2974,50:3506,59:3810,64:6394,157:13178,224:14126,237:14679,246:15232,255:15943,267:16970,283:18471,307:19498,326:21473,357:22342,371:28638,419:29368,430:30244,445:34850,480:36170,499:37050,510:37402,515:40482,563:41362,574:41714,579:43034,598:49323,669:50016,679:51017,695:51402,702:51864,709:53327,732:53635,737:56946,804:57793,817:58948,835:59487,844:59872,850:66417,984:74062,1039:74530,1047:74920,1053:76168,1074:78898,1138:79366,1145:79912,1153:80458,1166:83652,1181:83948,1187:84614,1197:85132,1206:85502,1212:86020,1221:86538,1229:88610,1303:88906,1308:89424,1316:89720,1321:92754,1423:93050,1428:93420,1437:94160,1448:95122,1463:95714,1472:97490,1502:104240,1552:104690,1558:105050,1563:105680,1571:107300,1588:108830,1604:110720,1640:115098,1674:115610,1685:115930,1691:116762,1707:117082,1713:117850,1727:119240,1735
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Laurie Robinson Haden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her mother's education background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her father's legal career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her community in Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early entrepreneurialism

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her favorite television programs

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her time at Oxon Hill High School in Oxon Hill, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her decision to improve her grades

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her transition to North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls winning the Miss North Carolina Central University pageant

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her political internships during college

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her mentors at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about Harvey Gantt's campaigns for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her internship at the White House

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her decision to attend the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her experiences at the Indiana University School of Law in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her mentors at the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her first post-graduate position at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her experiences of discrimination at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her time at Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her transition to the CBS Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the challenges for men of color in Corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the organizational structure of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the accomplishments of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her advice to members of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about generational differences among African American lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her promotion to senior vice president of the CBS Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the research on attrition among black female corporate lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls studying media management at New York University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls launching 'CCWC Live Blog Talk'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her board service for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about moving to her hometown of Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color
Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms
Transcript
I guess more importantly for you, you founded, in 2004, the Corporate Counsel Women of Color [New York, New York], right?$$Yes.$$All right. So tell us how you, or why you founded it and how you founded it, and what its structure is and, you know--$$Well, you know, as I, as I was mentioning about the challenges that we were talking about as law firm associates, everyone had kind of like the same story. They were the only one at their firm. They were not feeling that they were getting quality work assignments. They were struggling to get their billable hours. They needed mentorship. They needed sponsors, so when I went in house [at CBS Corporation], a small group of us, we started to connect people and connecting with people who were women of color, who worked in house at corporations so, you know, again it's the type of situation where people are isolated. You don't know where people are in great number, so we would just meet for dinners just to support one another, let people know you are not alone, and this is well before LinkedIn ever came about, but I decided at one of the dinners, hey, everyone just give me your business card, and I will create a directory, and in this directory, I'm going to, you know, put your name, where you went to law school, your practice areas and then I will print this directory, and I'll mail it to you so that you have it. So I emailed the template for it and I said, "You know, get it back to me in a week," so what happened was, the thirty people who went to the gathering, they forwarded it to their friends and their friends, and within a week, we had identified a total of fifty people, women of color who were in house at corporations, so it was great. And I said, "Well, look, let's do another run of this. Everyone, here's the current list. If there's anyone you know that we're missing, let them know. Get back to us in a week." Well, let me tell you, in a week's time, we had found over a hundred women of color at corporations and that was unheard of. We couldn't believe it. And, you know, that's how Corporate Counsel Women of Color got its start. And today we have over thirty six hundred women of color attorneys that we have identified in corporations around, around the United States and we have what we call CCWC friends and we have over six thousand friends, who are people who work at law firms; so we now are able to reach over ten thousand attorneys of color in the profession.$Can you talk about any of the cases or situations that you deal with as a corporate lawyer for CBS [CBS Corporation]?$$Yeah, I mean, I think what's great is that, you know, CBS law department is sort of like a law firm. We have lawyers from all over who work in our department, and everybody has different practice areas and different specialties, so with respect to my background, I do employment litigation, and our litigation department, we also do defamation law, copyright, trademark law, any litigation that comes up against CBS, one of the lawyers in our department will handle that matter based on their area of specialty. So, you know, it's been a great and rewarding experience, and what I really enjoy is, now I get to work with the law firms, and we get to say to the law firms, "You know, diversity is important, and we want our legal matters staffed with diverse attorneys," and then we can say, "We're going to look at your billing hours and we're going to make sure that the diverse attorneys that you said were going to work on these matters are actually working on the matters," so, you know, it's great to now be the client working with the law firms and, you know, requiring that our legal cases be staffed with diversity.$$So Verizon [Verizon Wireless Communications, Inc.] set a good example that you're--$$Yes.$$--you're following now.$$Verizon and Walmart [Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.]. You know, they have been the consistent leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion. And years ago, Walmart said, "If you do not staff our cases with diverse lawyers, we will cancel you from working on any of our matters," and that's unheard of. You know, but that was a great example for the legal profession in general.

The Honorable Garnet Coleman

State representative Garnet Coleman was born on September 8, 1961 in Washington, D.C. to Gloria Jones Coleman and Dr. John B. Coleman. Coleman was raised in Houston, Texas, where his father worked as the chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Houston’s Riverside General Hospital. He also served as the first African American appointee to the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents in 1977. Coleman graduated from Jack Yates Senior High School in 1979, and entered Howard University in Washington, D.C. but returned to Houston, where he earned his B.A. degree in political science from the University of Saint Thomas in 1990. Coleman later completed Harvard University’s Senior Executive Program for State and Local Government.

Coleman began his political career in 1988 as a delegate to the Texas State Democratic Convention. In 1990, he served as precinct chair of his local Democratic Precinct Convention, and was elected to serve as a Texas state representative in 1991. Coleman defeated longtime civic leader Reverend Jew Don Boney, Jr. in a runoff election for the seat left vacant by the passing of Larry Q. Evans. In 1991, Coleman also founded S.M.A.R.T. Kids, a youth development and tutoring program. In 1992, Coleman served as the Harris County field director for Bill Clinton’s presidential campaign, and as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. In addition to his service as a state representative, Coleman was elected chair of the Legislative Study Group in 2003. As chairman, Coleman advocated to preserve Texas’ top ten percent rule, which assisted historically underrepresented students by automatically admitting the Texas’ top performing high school students to Texas state universities. During President Barack Obama’s administration, Coleman served as a member of the president’s State Legislators for Health Reform. Coleman also served as CEO of Apartments for America, Inc., a non-profit affordable housing corporation.

Coleman served on the House Select Committee for Mental Health and the Public Health Committee as a senior ranking member, in addition to chairing the County Affairs Committee. He also served on the board of numerous charitable organizations including the South Central Young Mens’ Christian Association, the Ensemble Theater, the Third Ward Redevelopment Council, and the Houston Drug and Alcohol Abuse Council.
Coleman was honored with the 2005 Reintegration Award from Eli Lilly and Company for his support of public health programs.

Garnet Coleman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 2, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.139

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/2/2016

Last Name

Coleman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

St. Stephen's Episcopal School

University of St. Thomas

River Oaks Elementary School

St. Anne Catholic School

Bellaire High School

Strake Jesuit College Preparatory

Howard University School of Business

Texas A&M University

Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University

Howard University

First Name

Garnet

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

COL26

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York City

Favorite Quote

Thinking Is Underrated.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

9/8/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Milkshake

Short Description

State representative Garnet Coleman (1961 - ) was elected to serve Houston’s historic Third Ward in the Texas House of Representatives in 1991. He went on to serve as chair of the Legislative Study Group and County Affairs Committee, and on the Public Health Committee as well as the House Select Committee for Mental Health.

Employment

The State of Texas

Clinton-Gore Presidential Campaign

J.B.'s Entertainment Center

Frederick's Riverside Wine Bar

U.S. Congressman Mickey Leland

Small and Minority Business Resources Department

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:16150,318:16600,324:24855,481:26655,523:28080,547:46448,857:48272,891:55334,980:60828,1104:61648,1120:62058,1126:76802,1413:78721,1435:82812,1450:85878,1523:90477,1651:100040,1953:100551,1961:139200,2697:143433,2809:150259,2918:154907,3010:156484,3076:156982,3083:170922,3241:171302,3250:171834,3258:172822,3273:173126,3279:187621,3524:188351,3536:188935,3545:189592,3573:201310,3769:208146,3875:208410,3918:210192,3969:211578,3991:216860,4048$0,0:1032,29:6020,162:6364,167:10148,255:15389,275:20701,369:21033,375:22361,395:24353,421:25100,432:25432,437:27092,469:28503,494:29250,514:31574,551:41438,637:43218,652:43663,658:44909,678:51167,750:54955,801:59120,920:60225,954:64220,1023:64645,1029:65240,1039:65580,1044:66345,1055:66770,1061:71251,1073:71815,1078:80586,1220:87294,1326:87726,1334:89310,1360:93932,1440:98890,1553:105409,1642:106217,1652:106924,1660:107429,1667:108035,1675:110100,1684:111299,1689:113152,1706:115440,1712:118636,1749:119482,1760:120234,1770:127190,1908:132204,1941:135246,1974:136065,1982:136767,1989:139224,2025:140394,2038:145492,2067:145888,2072:146284,2077:155590,2265:162136,2308:162528,2319:164851,2330:165348,2338:165632,2343:167407,2381:169892,2449:170531,2460:171738,2482:172022,2487:173655,2523:175785,2567:180258,2598:182298,2637:186580,2705
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Garnet Coleman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his relation to Sally Hemings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his maternal ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the origin of his name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his maternal grandparents' careers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable talks about the historically black neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his father's medical training

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his father's education advocacy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his elementary school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history curriculum in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the activism of the National Medical Association

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history of African Americans in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early childhood influences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers the onset of his bipolar disorder

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the treatment of mental illness in the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his early influences

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his courses at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his mentor at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his godfather, Herbert O. Reid, Sr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his social activities at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his decision to leave Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers entering the restaurant industry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman recalls working for Congressman Mickey Leland

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers Frederick's Riverside Wine Bar in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his airport concession business

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early political activities

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman recalls the death of Larry Evans

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his first campaign for the Texas House of Representatives

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

12$5

DATitle
The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his first campaign for the Texas House of Representatives
The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history of African Americans in Texas
Transcript
So Larry Evans dies all of a sudden, and he leaves this void [in the Texas House of Representatives], you know.$$(Nods head).$$So, now how did you get involved and run for the seat?$$Well, my cousin, Terry Whitfield [ph.], was working in the AG's [attorney general] office in Austin [Texas], a good friend of mine was doing work at Huston-Tillotson [Huston-Tillotson College; Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, Texas], and I had moved up to Austin and I was just joking around a little bit. I'd gone to dinner, my other cousin, Annette Bracey, came up, and we were all having dinner and I was talking about politics and they say, "Well, shoot, you ought to run." And I was like, hm? "Yeah, yeah, you like this stuff, you ought to run." So my cousin Terry, my good friend, Anthony Haley [ph.], we all sat down at the table and went through stuff and I decided to run from Austin, I was living in Austin. And, so I called my father [John B. Coleman], I called everybody else first, then I called my father because I was expecting him to say, "No, you shouldn't," and he didn't but, again, you know, that wasn't the first person I was going to call. If I was going to do this, I was going to do it. It didn't matter whether people were involved or not.$$But your dad had been a delegate of the Democratic Party, right, in '88 [1988] and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, he was--well, he was a--no, my father was a giver of money. He was never a delegate.$$Okay. So were you a delegate in '88 [1988]?$$I was a delegate.$$All right, so, all right. 'Cause I've got--this--my outline's confusing me a little bit.$$Okay, I--$$But you were a delegate in '88 [1988], all right. I thought they were talking about your--$$I went to the convention in '88 [1988 Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, Georgia]--$$Okay.$$--as a guest of the--$$Right.$$--Democratic Party chair here in Texas.$$Okay. And that's the convention where they nominated Michael Dukakis right?$$That's correct.$$And Lloyd Bentsen as vice president from Texas.$$That's right.$$Yeah.$$That's right.$$Okay, all right.$$And, so in '92 [1992]--I've been to every convention since '92 [1992 Democratic National Convention, New York, New York]--$$Okay.$$--as a delegate, not--I'm actually a member of the DNC [Democratic National Committee].$$Okay. But you were there in '88 [1988] as just an observer?$$Observer.$$Okay.$$And I used to go to the state conventions, if they were in Houston [Texas], as an observer so--$$Okay.$$Just go, I mean, you know, but it's because you like it. You don't go to stuff you don't like.$$But you had to run--this is 1991 when you run for the vacated seat. You run aga- you have to run against Reverend Jew Don Boney [J. Don Boney, Jr.].$$Yeah, Jew Don Boney.$$And (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) John Chase's [HistoryMaker John S. Chase] daughter, Saundria Chase [Saundria Chase Gray]. There were eleven people in the, in the race--$$Okay.$$--but the advantage of it is, it couldn't, couldn't go past sixty days. So thirty days to the special election and then thirty days to the runoff.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$All right (laughter).$$So it was, it was interesting. It was actually--I tell people all the time, there are two parts of being an elected official. One part, everybody has to do and that's run for office but that journey in itself is very valuable, win or lose, 'cause you actually get to know yourself better. I learned more about my grand- my daddy's daddy [William Coleman, Sr.] running for office, knocking on doors in Third Ward [Houston, Texas] than I ever knew. This one guy said, "Oh, oh, you Mr. Coleman's son--grandson." He said, "Yeah, I knew your grandmamma [Clara Hubbard Coleman] and I knew your granddaddy and your daddy," and he said, "Yeah, your grandfather looked like a white man" (laughter), and I just thought, well I didn't know that, maybe look like--you know, so it was just interesting to hear about my, particularly my grandparents from the people who lived in Third Ward at the same time they did.$The kind of history you were taught in school was probably, I'm guessing, was the Alamo and things like that? Like--$$Yeah, there was a lot of that.$$--like the John Wayne, Fess Parker type of history where there--$$A lot of, a lot of what we would call stereotypical Texas that identifies Texas and a lot of it was Central Texas that be--which, whichever people, you know, people, the lore is around Central Texas, not around the cane fields [sugarcane] and Brazoria County [Texas] or Brazos County [Texas], not around the cotton--cotton was talked about a lot but not who was picking it.$$Right.$$So, that's why, you know, we look at populations of black people, they're all along whatever that agricultural base was. That's why a bunch of black people in north Texas and Lubbock [Texas] and, you know, in the plains, well, how did they get up there? Well, they were picking the cotton (laughter), you know, so the same is cutting the cane and they still cut cane in, you know, and it's--it was very much that, if you think about it, that commodity, those commodities that slaves picked.$$Did you have a balance of that kind of discussion when you were growing up around--$$Yes. I caught myself, you know, I'm the same age as Barack Obama [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama], you know, which is a big deal to me. The idea of understanding what it was like by story to be in segregation. My father-in-law used to always talk about when he would drive, we as a family, we would drive back to Houston [Texas] and he said he had to get to a black city with a black hotel 'cause you couldn't stay in a white hotel. And, so I, you know, these are stories that I grew up with and that basically it was about change. There was a fear in not, in driving at night and also not being in a town where you could get a hotel and that fear continues with a lot of people to today but, so that told me there was something different, I mean, you know, I--and that kind of--those stories stayed with me, you know, stay with me now because, you know, you grow up knowing to make sure that you don't, you have either your hands on the wheel or don't go for your glove compartment, you know, we hear this all the time but it's true. And, you know, even though I lived in a black world, for the most part, except for some of my schools, I thought that that was kind of, you know, it wasn't different but we had our own intact community that was a good, good community, although it was--came from segregation, just like the NMA, the National Medical Association instead of the American Medical Association. There was some, I saw all this as, you know, with the split was in the country, and it was a split by race.

Clinton Turner Davis

Theatrical director Clinton Turner Davis was born on April 9, 1949 in Washington, D.C. to Josephine Davis and Clinton Davis. Davis attended McKinley Technical High School, where he performed in plays and was president of the thespian club. He briefly attended Hanover College in Hanover, Indiana, but received his B.F.A. degree in theater from Howard University in 1972.

After being cast in Slaughterhouse Play at the Public Theatre in New York City, Davis began his career with the Negro Ensemble Company in 1972 as the production stage manager for The Great Macdaddy at St. Mark’s Playhouse. Throughout the 1970s, Davis served as the stage manager for a succession of Negro Ensemble Company productions, including Eden, Nevis Mountain Dew, Old Phantoms: A Play in Two Acts, The Sixteenth Round, Zooman and the Sign, Weep Not for Me and Home. In 1982, Davis made his directorial debut with Abercrombie Apocalypse: An American Tragedy at Westside Arts Theatre in New York City. Produced by Negro Ensemble Company and written by playwright Paul Carter Harrison, the off-Broadway drama starred Graham Brown, Timothy B. Lynch, and Barbara Montgomery. Davis would go on to direct Pearl Cleage’s first play, Puppetplay, at Theatre Four in New York City in 1982, and serve as the stage manager for Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music in 1983. Additional Negro Ensemble Company productions directed by Davis in the 1980s included Two Can Play, House of Shadows and That Serious He-Man Ball. In 1986, Davis co-founded the Non-Traditional Casting Project. He then directed his first August Wilson play, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, at Theatreworks in Palo Alto, California in 1989. At the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 1993, Davis directed Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, which was the festival’s first produced work by an African American playwright. In 2013, he directed Charles Fuller’s One Night.... Davis was an associate professor of drama at Colorado College in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Davis served as a director for the American Young Playwrights Festival in New York City. He was a guest lecturer at Yale University, Dartmouth College, Columbia University, The Ohio State University, and Howard University; and directed theatrical productions at The Juilliard School, Brandeis University, and Colorado College. Davis received a Distinguished Alumni Award from Howard University, in addition to Dallas Theatre, Bay Area, and Drama-logue Critics’ Awards. In 2015, Davis received the Lloyd Richards Directors Award from the National Black Arts Festival.

Clinton Turner Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 25, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.045

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/25/2016

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Turner

Schools

Charles E. Young Elementary School

Barnard Elementary School

Keene Elementary School

MacFarland Middle School

LaSalle-Backus Education Center

McKinley Technology High School

Hanover College

Hunter College

Howard University

First Name

Clinton

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

DAV38

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Carolina

Favorite Quote

And there you have it. -- It speaks for itself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/9/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Theatrical director Clinton Turner Davis (1950- ) began his career with Negro Ensemble Company in 1972. He has directed numerous off-Broadway productions, including works by Pearl Cleage, Paul Carter Harrison and August Wilson.

Employment

Colorado College

University of Colorado - Colorado Springs

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of California, Berkeley

Yale University

Ohio State University

Howard University

Apollo Theater

Colorado Festival of World Theatre/Market Theatre Tre

Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games

Taiyuan Puppet Theatre Artists Residency

Anna Deavere Smith Project

First National Symposium on Non-Traditional Casting

Favorite Color

Green, orange, black

The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr.

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. was born on August 21, 1944 in Washington, D.C. to Federal Judge Barrington D. Parker, Sr. and Marjorie Holloman Parker, board chair of the University of the District of Columbia. Parker graduated from McKinley Technical High School, and earned his B.A. degree in history from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in 1965. He then received his LL.B. degree from Yale Law School in 1969.

Parker began his legal career as a clerk for Judge Aubrey E. Robinson, Jr., an African American judge on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. He joined the firm of Sullivan & Cromwell in New York City as an associate in 1970, where he specialized in general commercial litigation. In 1977, Parker and three other partners founded the law firm of Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann, & Delehanty, P.C. which, in 1987, merged with Morrison & Foerster, an international law firm based out of San Francisco, California. In 1994, Parker was appointed to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President Bill Clinton. His cases in the district court included Trinity United Methodist Parish v. Board of Education of Newburgh, where he upheld a church’s right to rent space within a public school, and the trial of businessman Albert J. Pirro, Jr., who was indicted for conspiracy and tax evasion. In 2001, President George W. Bush nominated Parker to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and the Senate confirmed him 100-0. On the circuit court, he was involved in several prominent cases involving the rights of terrorism suspects, including Rumsfeld v. Padilla, where Parker ruled that Al Qaeda suspect Jose Padilla must be offered habeas corpus as an American citizen, and Arar v. Ashcroft, where Parker wrote a dissenting opinion stating that Maher Arar’s rights had been violated by the Bush administration’s policy of extraordinary rendition. Parker assumed senior status in 2009.

Parker served on the board of trustees for the Yale Corporation, and on the board of The Harlem School of the Arts, the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, and the Central Park Conservancy.

Parker has three children: Christine, Kathleen, and Jennifer.

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.067

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/5/2016

Last Name

Parker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Middle Name

Daniels

Schools

Yale University

Yale Law School

McKinley Technology High School

Monroe School

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School

First Name

Barrington

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

PAR09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I Did The Best I Could With What I Had.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/21/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Hamburger

Short Description

Judge Barrington D. Parker, Jr. (1944 - ) served on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Employment

Phillips Exeter Academy

NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Office of the Corporation Counsel for Washington D.C.

United States District Court for the District of Columbia

Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann and Delehanty, P.C.

Morrison and Foerster LLP

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

United State Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describe his paternal grandfather's role at the Robert H. Terrell Law School

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his community in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his family dinners and holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers visiting the Smithsonian Institution

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his schooling in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls the desegregation of public accommodations in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the integration of McKinley Technical High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his favorite academic subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his mother's community involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his transition to Yale University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his friends and mentors at Yale University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers studying history at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers his paternal grandfather's legal representation of W.E.B. Du Bois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers William Sloane Coffin's civil rights activism

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the civil rights activity at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a career in law

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his internship with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his encounters with the Ku Klux Klan during the Freedom Rides

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls working as a freshman proctor at Yale University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his concerns about the draft during the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his clerkship with Judge Aubrey Eugene Robinson, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers joining Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers founding Parker, Auspitz, Neesemann and Delehanty, P.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his family, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his family, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his board service

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about his work with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. talks about the Central Park Conservancy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a judicial appointment

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers joining the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls the cases in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes the duties of a district judge

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. describes his wife's work

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$4

DATitle
The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. recalls his decision to pursue a career in law
The Honorable Barrington D. Parker, Jr. remembers the Freedom Rides, pt. 1
Transcript
When did you figure out that you wanted to be a lawyer?$$I--after I graduated, I took a job in the history department at Phillips Exeter [Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire] and I was trying to figure out whether to go to graduate school in the history or law school. And I liked the place. It was a great school. And I mean I--I'm not--I'm not sorry I didn't go there 'cause I just--I mean (laughter) there were these sort of ruling class white kids there and they were--(laughter) most of them were miserable. I mean, it was just like an intellectual boot camp. I mean, they just worked hard. They had fabulous teachers. It was academically very demanding. And I, I, I sort of wish--I mean, in, in the--you know, quickly kind of didn't matter, but I said, you know, if I had a couple of these teachers, if I had just a syllabus, if they taught this, just used the same books and asked the same questions at McKinley Tech [McKinley Technical High School; McKinley Technology High School, Washington, D.C.] that they were asking at Exeter, it made a big difference. And the people in the history department could not have been nicer to me. They wanted me to go back to graduate school and they--you know, they said, you know, you--, "If you--ever you want to come back and teach here--." I thought that the most interesting--the most exciting years in teaching tended to be the earlier ones and I thought that as--a career as a lawyer would get progressively even more interesting, and that assessment in retrospect was the correct one. So, instead of going to graduate school, I went to law school--went back to Yale [Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut].$Did you find yourself involved in civil rights activity at all?$$Yeah. So, they had this group there called the--I think it was called the Yale civil rights research council [Law Students Civil Rights Research Council] or something like that--I forget the name of it, and so, that was a group of people on campus who were interested in civil rights activity, so I was involved in that. But, summer of 1964, I'm back in Washington [D.C.] and I got this gosh, horrible job that my father [Barrington D. Parker, Sr.] got me working in the post office [U.S. Post Office Department; U.S. Postal Service] stuffing second class mail for Virginia. It was just horrible (laughter). So, that was the, the summer--that was the summer of the Mississippi Summer Project [Freedom Summer], so you would go back home and sit down and watch television and, you know, the, the point of that project was to get white volunteers down south to focus the media on conditions in places like Southwest Georgia and Mississippi. So, I mean, I'm sitting here looking at this and, you know, why am I here? And so I, I forget what, what happened. Our parents were away someplace and somebody told me that they were--they were organizing a second tranche of volunteers to go and they were doing training at All Souls Church [All Souls Church, Unitarian] on--in Washington, so I went down there, and then the next thing I knew, I was in this carpool. We went to the SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] office in Atlanta [Georgia] and then they kind of gave you your assignment and told you where you were going, so I ended up in, in Hattiesburg [Mississippi], and that was a--that was another sort of game changer.$$What happened there?$$Met all these absolutely extraordinary people. So, I was in South Africa before Mandela [Nelson Mandela] got out of jail, so I'm sitting around this dinner party with all these guys who are getting out of Robben Island [South Africa] and it's always been a close call in my mind about whether the most impressive group of adults I've ever met were those guys or the young SNCC guys I met in Mississippi, [HistoryMakers] James Forman, [HistoryMaker] John Lewis, Robert Moses [Robert Parris Moses], Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture]. They were all these guys who were just visionary and courageous and, you know, they made all--they made all the difference. And, and, you know, guys whose names you never heard of anymore--$$Now (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) who, you know, worked in these dangerous towns.$$Well, and so when you decided to go, did you get any resistance from your family?$$They were--no, not at all.$$No?$$Right.$$And as you're traveling--$$My mother [Marjorie Holloman Parker] told her--all her AKA [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority] friends (laughter).$$So, she was proud of you.$$Um-hm.$$As you made your way--that's fine--as you made your way down, did you encounter any dangerous moments?$$No. I think--I, I can't--I think we went to--no. I mean, Hattiesburg was relatively calm. I mean, there were things you didn't do. You know, you didn't--you know, you, you, you certainly didn't go around town with white women and so forth. But what we were doing in Hattiesburg was we were teaching at the Freedom Schools and then encouraging people to register to vote and then encouraging them to--you know, and telling them that the--you know, that there's a statewide school of desegregation suit that had been won and they could send their kids to, you know, the nice school down the road and so forth and so on.$$But, I mean, those were game changing things down there that--$$Yeah, you're--the heavy lifting was done--I don't mean heavy lift- but, there were places that were just dangerous to be in and they were up in the Delta [Mississippi Delta] and in the Piney Woods area. Hattiesburg was not a Klan [Ku Klux Klan, KKK] town. I don't--I can't explain why, but it was just--I mean, you could kind of walk around downtown in Hattiesburg and nobody would--I mean--and so forth.$$Um-hm.$$But--

Eric Deggans

Journalist Eric Deggans was born on November 6, 1965 in Washington, D.C. He was raised in Gary, Indiana and graduated from Andrean High School. In the 1980s, while attending Indiana University, Deggans worked as a professional drummer and toured with Motown recording artist The Voyage Band. He received his B.A. degree in political science and journalism from Indiana University in 1990.

Deggans first held municipal reporting positions at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Press newspapers in Pennsylvania. He then served as the music critic for the Asbury Park Press newspaper in Neptune, New Jersey. In 1995, Deggans joined the Tampa Bay Times, then called the St. Petersburg Times, as its pop music critic. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as a TV critic for the Times, and, from 2004 to 2005, he sat on the paper’s editorial board and wrote bylined opinion columns. Deggans then returned to the Tampa Bay Times news desk, first as a media writer in 2005, then as the TV critic in 2006. In 2010, he made national headlines when he interviewed former USDA official Shirley Sherrod at the National Association of Black Journalists’ summer convention in San Diego, California. Deggans left the Tampa Bay Times in 2013 to take a job as NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans published his first book, Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, in 2012. He also contributed to the Poynter Institute’s The New Ethics of Journalism, which was published in August 2013. Deggans’ writing has appeared in The New York Times online, Salon magazine, CNN.com, The Washington Post, Village Voice, VIBE magazine, Chicago Tribune, Detroit Free Press, Chicago Sun-Times, The Seattle Times, Emmy magazine, Newsmax magazine, and Rolling Stone Online, among others. Deggans also taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, Loyola University, California State University, Indiana University, the University of Tampa, and Eckerd College, and has guest hosted CNN’s media analysis show Reliable Sources.

Deggans served as chair of the Media Monitoring Committee for the National Association of Black Journalists, and sat on the board of directors for the national Television Critics Association and the Mid-Florida Society of Professional Journalists. In addition, he served on the board of educators, journalists and media experts who select the George Foster Peabody Awards for excellence in electronic media.

Deggans was named as one of Ebony magazine's "Power 150" in 2009. In 2013, he was awarded the Florida Press Club’s first-ever Diversity Award, and the National Association of Black Journalists’ Arts & Entertainment Task Force Legacy Award. Deggans also received reporting and writing awards from the Society for Features Journalism, American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, the Society of Professional Journalists, and the Florida Society of News Editors.

Eric Deggans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.197

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2014

Last Name

Deggans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Charles

Occupation
Schools

Frederick Douglass Elementary School

Hebrew Academy of Northwest Indiana

Andrean High School

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Eric

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

DEG02

State

District of Columbia

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

11/6/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

St. Petersburg

Country

USA

Short Description

Journalist Eric Deggans (1965 - ) , NPR's first full-time TV critic, worked at the Tampa Bay Times for eighteen years as an entertainment critic and columnist. He also authored Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation.

Employment

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Pittsburgh Press

Asbury Park Press

Tampa Bay Times

NPR