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The Honorable Eleanor Holmes Norton

Lawyer and political leader Eleanor Holmes Norton was born on June 13, 1937 in Washington D.C. to Vela and Coleman Holmes. She received her B.A. degree from Antioch College, and simultaneously earned her M.A. degree in American Studies and her J.D. degree from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

After graduating from Yale, Norton worked as a law clerk for Federal District Court Judge A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. She was appointed assistant legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1965, where she represented sixty female employees of Newsweek in their gender discrimination lawsuit against the newspaper in 1970. That same year, she left the American Civil Liberties to head New York’s Human Rights Commission. An active civil rights and feminist leader, Norton served on the founding board of Women’s Rights Law Reporter, the first legal periodical focused on women, and was one of the women to sign the Black Woman’s Manifesto, arguing against the oppression of black women.

In 1977, Norton was appointed the first female chair of the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by President Jimmy Carter. She began teaching law classes at the Georgetown University Law Center in 1981, continuing to teach as a tenured professor of law even after being elected to office. Norton was first elected to the U.S. Congress in 1990 as a democratic delegate to the House of Representatives. Though Norton did not have voting power in Congress as a delegate, she did use her position to influence decisions in the House and in the Senate. Over the years, Norton has brought significant economic development to the District of Columbia throughout her service in Congress, while creating and preserving jobs in Washington, D.C. and securing the construction of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security headquarters in Washington, D.C., in addition to the development of the Southeast Federal Center.

Norton has been named one of the 100 most important American women, and one of the most powerful women in Washington, D.C. She has received more than fifty honorary degrees.

Norton has two children, Katherine Norton and John Holmes Norton.

Eleanor Holmes Norton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2018.176

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/25/2018

Last Name

Norton

Maker Category
Middle Name

Holmes

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Eleanor

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

NOR09

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/13/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Lemon Meringue Pie

Short Description

Lawyer and political leader Eleanor Holmes Norton (1937 – ) served as democratic delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives for over twenty-five years, after having served as the first female chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Favorite Color

Yellow

Bill Lester, III

Race car driver Bill Lester, III was born on February 6, 1961 in Washington D.C. to William Alexander Lester, Jr., an electrical engineering professor and researcher at IBM Corporation, and Rochelle Lester, a social worker and elementary school teacher. Lester graduated from Skyline High School in Oakland, California in 1979, and was awarded a Regents Scholarship to attend the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned his B.S. degree in electrical engineering and computer science in 1984.

Lester began his career as a project manager at Hewlett-Packard Company in Palo Alto, California. In 1985, Lester attended Sports Cars Club of America driving school; and that same year, he was named SCCA’s Rookie of the Year for Northern California, winning the SCCA Regional Road Racing Championship in 1986. He made his International Motor Sports Association debut in 1989, finishing twelfth at Sears Point International Roadway race, part of IMSA’s GTO Series. In 1998 and 1999, Lester competed in the 24 Hours of Daytona race, finishing fifth and tenth respectively. In 1999, Lester became the first African American to race in NASCAR’s Busch Series, where he represented Team Rensi Motorsports and finished in twenty-first place. In 2000, Lester raced in the No. 8 Dodge Ram in NASCAR’s Craftsman Truck Series for Bobby Hamilton Racing. In 2002, he began racing in the Craftsman Truck Series full-time in the No. 8 Dodge Ram. Lester switched to Bill Davis Racing in 2004; and in 2006, he began racing in the No. 22 Toyota Tundra. Lester became the first African American since 1986 to participate in the Nextel Cup at Atlanta Motor Speedway. He switched to Billy Ballew Motorsports for a season before leaving NASCAR racing in 2007.

The following year, Lester joined Southard Motorsports, where he drove in the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series from 2008 to 2010. Lester spent the 2009 season with Orbit Racing and the 2010 season racing for Starworks Motorsport. In 2011, Lester became the first African American driver to win any Grand-Am division. After retiring as a driver, Lester served as a member of the National Motorsports Appeals Panel as well as the NASCAR Diversity Council.

Lester and his wife, Cheryl, have two sons, William Alexander IV and Austin Richard.

Bill Lester, III was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 10, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.039

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/10/2018

Last Name

Lester

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Booksin Elementary School

Edwin Markham Middle School

Skyline High School

University of California, Berkeley

First Name

Bill

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

LES02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Brazil

Favorite Quote

It's The Little Things

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/6/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Favorite Food

Lasagna

Short Description

Race car driver Bill Lester, III (1961 - ) competed in the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series, the Nextel Cup Series, the Rolex Sports Car Series, and was the first African American to race in the NASCAR Busch Series.

Employment

Bill Lester Racing

Finish Line Investing

Hewlett-Packard

Favorite Color

Blue

Jerry Thomas, Jr.

Lawyer and gallery owner Jerry Thomas, Jr. was born on June 8, 1952 in Washington, D.C to Jerry, Sr., and Estell Thomas. He received his B.A. degree in 1974 from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut and his J.D. degree in 1977 from The George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C. He also received a certificate in International Law, Business, Trade Commerce and Negotiations in 1986 from The Hague Academy of International Law in The Hague, the Netherlands.

After graduation, Thomas went to work for the U.S. Congress as a staff aide in Washington, D.C. In the late 1980s, he served as a lawyer at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in Washington, D.C. Thomas was named director of administration for the 1990 Goodwill Games where he was responsible for control of the overall operation of the international event. Thomas was admitted to the Georgia State Bar in 1990. He also established the Law Offices of Jerry Thomas, LLC in Atlanta, Georgia and served as managing partner for over sixteen years. In 1995, he founded Jerry Thomas Arts in Atlanta, Georgia, where he served as owner, art broker, curator and consultant.

His collection includes works from; Romare Bearden, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Thornton Dial and Sam Middleton. In 2012, Thomas’ own Romare Bearden collection was featured when the Romare Bearden Foundation hired him to curate the art for Atlanta’s observance of the artist’s 100th birthday. In 2013, he set a record price for the sale of a Thornton Dial artwork to record producer Swizz Beatz. In 2015, Thomas collaborated with Alan Avery, owner of the Alan Avery Art Company in Atlanta, to showcase the work of Romare Bearden at an exhibition.

Thomas also has been a featured speaker at conferences, and in 2005, he delivered a speech at the National Black MBA Association Annual Conference on investing and collecting African American Art and has been quoted in the Los Angeles Times, BusinessWeek magazine, and the London Stock Exchange regarding the investment potential of African American art. Thomas also served as chair of the Fulton County Arts Council. In addition, Thomas served as a founding board member of the Edwin Moses Foundation, an initiative supporting science, technology, engineering, and math education.

Jerry Thomas, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 9, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.037

Sex

Male

Interview Date

03/9/2018

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Nalle Elementary School

McKinley Technology High School

Wesleyan University

George Washington University

The Hague Academy of International Law

First Name

Jerry

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

THO27

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Dominican Republic

Favorite Quote

Always Strive For Perfection But Always Remember That It's an Ideal.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/8/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Sweet Potatoes, Collard Greens

Short Description

Lawyer and gallery owner Jerry Thomas, Jr. (1952 - ) was a lawyer for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and founded the Law Offices of Jerry Thomas, LLC and Jerry Thomas Arts.

Employment

Jerry Thomas Arts

Thomas and McDonald, LLC

Goodwill Games (TBS)

Federal Communications Commission

Neighborhood Legal Services

Favorite Color

Blue

Dr. Reed V. Tuckson

Healthcare executive Reed V. Tuckson was born on February 18, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to Coleman and Evelyn Tuckson. He received his B.S. degree from Howard University in 1973, and his M.D. degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1978. From 1978 to 1981, he trained at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a specialist in internal medicine, served as an admitting doctor at Philadelphia’s Veterans Affairs hospital, launched a radio program aimed at African American listeners, and organized a support group for sickle-cell anemia patients. His interest in public health led him to a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars fellowship, where he studied health care administration and policy at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business, from 1981 to 1983.

Tuckson worked for Elmira Jeffries Nursing Home in Philadelphia as a founding medical director from 1981 to 1985. Returning to Washington, Tuckson worked for the D.C. Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Administration from 1983 to 1985. He then held the position of District of Columbia deputy commissioner of public health from 1985 to 1986; and a year later, was promoted to commissioner of public health for D.C., a position he held from 1986 to 1989. He joined the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation as senior vice president for programs before being appointed as the new president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, serving from 1991 to 1997. Tuckson left Drew University to work for the Chicago-based American Medical Association as the group vice president for professional standards from 1997 to 2000. He accepted an offer from the United Health Group in Minneapolis, Minnesota to serve as senior vice president of consumer health and medical-care advancement from 2000 to 2006 when he was then promoted to executive vice president and chief of medical affairs at United Health where he served until 2013. He then established Tuckson Health Connections, a private health and medical care consulting company.

Tuckson has held numerous appointments in the areas of health care, the federal government and academia including active memberships in the American Medical Association and the Institute of Medicine-National Academy of Sciences. He was appointed to the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health, and has served on numerous boards, including those of Neptune Technologies & Bioressources, Inc.; the National Hispanic Medical Association; the Alliance for Health Reform; the National Patient Advocate Foundation; ViTel Net, Inc.; Cell Therapeutics, Inc.; Inform Genomics, Inc.; AcademyHealth; Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities; and Minnesota Public Radio. He also served on the board of trustees of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, on the advisory board of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, and as president of the Society of Medical Administrators.

Tuckson and his wife Margie Malone Tuckson have four adult children including Kobi, Nia, Dominic and Lance.

Reed V. Tuckson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.030

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/5/2018

Last Name

Tuckson

Maker Category
Middle Name

V

Schools

Georgetown University School of Medicine

First Name

Reed

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

TUC32

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Inside of My Mind

Favorite Quote

I'm in Love With the Unity of the Divine Intelligence.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/18/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Favorite Food

Eggs, Bacon, Toast and Coffee

Short Description

Healthcare executive Dr. Reed Tuckson (1951- ) founded Tuckson Health Connections in 2013 and previously served as president of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, group vice president for professional standards of the American Medical Association, and executive vice president and medical affairs chief of UnitedHealth Group.

Employment

Tuckson Health Connections, LLC

UnitedHealth Group

American Medical Association

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

District of Columbia

Mental Retardation and Developmental Disability Administration

Favorite Color

Blue

Shellye Archambeau

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau was born on July 6, 1962 in Washington, D.C. to Mera Archambeau and Lester Archambeau II. In 1980, she graduated from Montville High School in Montville, New Jersey, and received her B.S. degree in marketing and decision science in 1984 from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Archambeau started her career with the IBM Corporation, where she served in several roles including general manager of direct marketing in the Asia Pacific Division. In 1999, Archambeau was promoted to vice president of public sector industries in the Asia Pacific Division, making her the first African American woman to take on an international executive role at IBM. In 1999, she joined Blockbuster Inc. as senior vice president of their nascent e-commerce division, Blockbuster.com. In 2000, she was named executive vice president and chief marketing officer of NorthPoint Communications. In 2001, she served as chief marketing officer and executive vice president for LoudCloud, Inc. In 2002, Archambeau became the chief executive officer of Zaplet, Inc., overseeing the company’s merger with MetricStream in 2004. In 2018, Archambeau stepped down as CEO.

Archambeau received many awards for her business leadership, including the JEM Luminary Award from the C200 organization, the NCWIT Symons Innovator Award from the National Center for Women & Information Technology, the Game Changer Award from the Digital Diversity Network and the Spirit of Excellence Award from the Silicon Valley Black Charter of Women. She serves on the board of directors for Arbitron, Inc., Verizon Communications, Inc., Nordstrom Inc., the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and the IT Senior Management Forum. Also a member of the Forum of Women Entrepreneurs and the Women's Council to the Board of Trustees for the University of Pennsylvania, she served on the Council on Foreign Relations, and has been inducted into the National Hall of Fame of the Negro Business and Professional Women's Club. In 2016, Archambeau co-authored the business book Marketing That Works: How Entrepreneurial Marketing Can Add Sustainable Value to Any Sized Company .

Shellye Archambeau was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.208

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/29/2017

Last Name

Archambeau

Maker Category
First Name

Shellye

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ARC13

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Dorothy Terrell

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Someplace I've Never Been That Has Great History

Favorite Quote

Everybody's a Package

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/6/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Palo Alto

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Chief executive officer Shellye Archambeau (1962 - ) held leadership positions at IBM Corporation, Blockbuster, Inc., NorthPoint Communications, and LoudCloud Inc. before serving as the chief executive officer of MetricStream from 2002 to 2018.

Employment

IBM

Blockbuster

Northpoint

Loudcloud

Metric Stream

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

The Honorable Susan E. Rice

Ambassador and national security advisor Susan E. Rice was born on November 17, 1964 in Washington, D.C. to Lois Dickson Rice and Emmett J. Rice. Rice graduated from the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C. in 1982, and received her B.A. degree in history from Stanford University in Stanford, California in 1986. She went on to earn her M.Phil. degree in 1988 and Ph.D. degree in 1990 in international relations, from the New College of the University of Oxford in Oxford, England, where she was a Rhodes Scholar.

From 1991 to 1993, Rice worked as a management consultant at McKinsey and Company. In 1993, she was appointed director of International Organizations and Peacekeeping on the National Security Council in President Bill Clinton’s White House, and later continued to serve on the National Security Council as special assistant to the President and senior director for African Affairs. In 1997, Rice moved to the State Department, serving as assistant secretary of State for African Affairs. From 2002 to 2008, Rice was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and became a senior foreign policy advisor for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign. Once elected, President Obama nominated Rice to the position of U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. In 2013, she was appointed national security advisor for President Obama’s second term. After leaving government in 2017, Rice became a distinguished visiting research fellow at American University’s School of International Service and a non-resident senior fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She also became a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Rice served on numerous boards, including as an independent director of the Bureau of National Affairs (now Bloomberg BNA), Common Sense Media, the Beauvoir School in Washington, D.C., and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. She also served on the board of Netflix and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, in addition to being a member of the Aspen Strategy Group, American Academy of Diplomacy, and Council on Foreign Relations.

In 2000, Rice was the co-recipient of the White House’s Sam Nelson Drew Memorial Award. In 2017, French President Francois Hollande presented Rice with the Award of Commander, the Legion of Honor of France, for her contributions to Franco-American relations.

Rice and her husband, Ian Cameron, have two children.

Susan E. Rice was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 30, 2017 and December 4, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.191

Sex

Female

Interview Date
10/30/2017 |and| 12/4/2017
Last Name

Rice

Maker Category
Schools
National Cathedral School
Stanford University
University of Oxford
First Name

Susan

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

RIC23

Favorite Season

Fall

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anguila

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

11/17/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Ambassador and national security advisor Susan Rice (1964 - ) served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs under President Bill Clinton and was appointed U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations by President Barack Obama.

Employment
White House
United Nations
Brookings Institution
U.S. Department of State
McKinsey & Company, Inc.
Favorite Color

Purple

Paula Boggs

Lawyer and musician Paula Boggs was born on May 2, 1959 in Washington D.C. to Janice Anderson Barber and Nathaniel Boggs Jr., who received Howard University’s first Ph.D. in Zoology in 1963.  In 1977, Boggs enrolled at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, on a four-year Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarship and completed the U.S. Army Infantry Airborne School program. In 1981, Boggs earned her B.A. degree in international studies from Johns Hopkins University and in 1984 earned her J.D. degree from the University of California Berkeley, School of Law.
 
Boggs served eight years in the U.S. Army as a regular officer and was honorably discharged. She was also one of the first women to receive a congressional appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy. After law school, Boggs returned to Washington D.C. where she worked as an U.S. Army officer and attorney at the Pentagon and White House Office of Legal Counsel. From 1987 to 1988 Boggs served on the Iran-Contra Legal Task Force for which she earned the Defense Meritorious Service Award and Presidential Service Badge.
 
In 1988, Boggs became an assistant U.S. attorney in the Western District of the State of Washington, where she prosecuted fraud and regulatory crimes and twice earned the U.S. Department of Justice Special Achievement Award. Working as a trial lawyer specializing in corporate civil litigation, Boggs was in 1995 named the first African American female partner of Seattle, Washington’s Preston Gates & Ellis LLP. In 1997, she became Dell Corporation’s first African American female vice president. She returned to Seattle in 2002, serving as Starbucks Corporation’s first African American Executive Vice President, when she became general counsel and board secretary, a role she held until 2012. Boggs formed the Paula Boggs Band in 2007 releasing albums in 2010, 2015 and 2017. She founded Boggs Media, LLC in 2013.
 
Boggs was honored with the Secretary of Defense Award for Excellence in 1994, the 2006 American Bar Association Spirit of Excellence Award, the 2008 Wiley A. Branton Award from the National Bar Association and the American Bar Association Notable Member Award in 2013. In 2014, Boggs earned the Song of the Year© Award for “Look Straight Ahead” and is a voting member of the Recording Academy (The Grammys©).
 
In addition to her legal and music careers, Boggs was a member of the White House Council for Community Solutions from 2010 to 2012, and the President’s Committee for the Arts and Humanities from 2013 to 2017. She served on the boards of School of Rock LLC, Seattle Art Museum, public radio station KEXP, Johns Hopkins University and served as Legal Aid for Washington (LAWFUND) board president from 2006 to 2008. She serves on the boards of Avid Technology Inc., Seattle Symphony and American Bar Association Board of Governors. Boggs was inducted into the Johns Hopkins University ROTC Hall of Fame in 2016 and received the Seattle Mayor’s 2018 Arts Award.
 
Paula Boggs was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.176

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/04/2017

Last Name

Boggs

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

BOG03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Kawaii

Favorite Quote

Winners never quit, quitters never win.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

5/2/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Lawyer Paula Boggs (1959 - )

Favorite Color

Green

George H. Lambert

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert was born on May 12, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to George H. Lambert, Sr. and Arnitha Green Allen. Lambert graduated from William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania in 1971. He went on to earn his B.A. degree in urban studies from Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia in 1975.

Upon his college graduation, Lambert worked for two years at the Richmond Community Action Program. Then, he became a community organizer for the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia. Lambert was hired as the executive director of the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League in 1980. He also co-founded the Alexandria Forum, as a space for civil rights groups to collaborate on key issues and strategic planning. In 1990, he led the branch’s transition into the fully affiliated Northern Virginia Urban League. During his tenure as the executive director, Lambert also served as a senior regional consultant to the National Urban League. Lambert left the Northern Virginia Urban League in the mid-2000s, at which time he served as a senior director for resource development for the United Way of the National Capital area and as the vice president of public affairs at Issue Dynamics, Inc. From 2011 to 2013, he served as the president and chief executive officer of the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio. Lambert was then appointed as the president and chief executive officer of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014. In this role, he created the Thursday Network, which facilitated interactions between African American youth and the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. Lambert also worked with the Washington Nationals to institute Black Heritage Day at Nationals Park; and he partnered with corporations like Potomac Electric Power Company to offer utility assistance in the African American community.

He was a member of the National Urban League’s Association of Executives; the Academy of Fellows. He was also a parishioner of Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria, Virginia.

Lambert and his wife, Bernadette Curtis-Lambert, have five children together.

George H. Lambert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 2, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.041

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/03/2017

Last Name

Lambert

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

H.

Occupation
Schools

William Penn Senior High School

Virginia Union University

Randall Junior High School

James G. Birney Elementary School

H.D. Cooke Elementary School

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

LAM04

Favorite Season

Christmas holiday season

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Greece

Favorite Quote

Have Mercy. To God Be The Glory.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/12/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet potatoes, salmon

Short Description

Nonprofit executive George H. Lambert (1951 - ) served as president and CEO of the Northern Virginia Urban League in Alexandria, Virginia and the Lorain County Urban League, in Elyria, before being appointed the president and CEO of the Greater Washington Urban League in 2014.

Employment

Greater Washington Urban League

Lorain County Urban League

United Way

IDI

National Urban League

Northern Virginia Urban League

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of George H. Lambert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert recalls how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert talks about gender discrimination in the Baptist church

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert remembers staying in Washington, D.C. after his parent's divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert describes his parent's personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert talks about his brother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert talks about moving to York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about his mother's decision to move him out of Washington, D.C. as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert describes his neighborhood and upbringing in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert recalls attending William Penn Senior High School in York, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert talks about developing his interest in African American studies

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert remembers his options after graduating from high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes his decision to attend Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls majoring in Urban Studies at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about the black political leadership of the 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert recalls reading the works of influential black writers

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers joining the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert recalls backing coed dorms at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Richmond's annexation of Henrico County, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about his job offer from the Richmond Community Action Agency

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers his graduation from Virginia Union University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about his community organizing work

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert recalls the history of the National Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert talks about neighborhood preservation in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes his role at the Northern Virginia branch of the Washington Urban League

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert remembers Mayor Marion Barry, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert talks about the Northern Virginia Urban League becoming an affiliate of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert describes African American politicians in Northern Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about Governor L. Douglas Wilder

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert recalls the articles he's published in African American newspapers

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his work with the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert remembers Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes past presidents of the National Urban League

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert talks about his work in public affairs and with the United Way of America

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert describes his experiences with the Lorain County Urban League in Elyria, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George H. Lambert talks about the Black Lives Matter movement

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George H. Lambert remembers Chief Cathy Lanier of the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George H. Lambert talks about educating young African American males on law enforcement procedures

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George H. Lambert describes the Greater Washington Urban League's partnership with the Washington Nationals

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George H. Lambert talks about the Greater Washington Urban League's collaborations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George H. Lambert describes the scholarships and philanthropy of the Greater Washington Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George H. Lambert talks about his retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George H. Lambert reflects upon the presidency of Barack Obama

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - George H. Lambert describes race relations in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - George H. Lambert describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - George H. Lambert reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - George H. Lambert talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - George H. Lambert describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$12

DATitle
George H. Lambert remembers football coach Herman Boone
George H. Lambert remembers the application process to become Greater Washington Urban League president
Transcript
So, are there any stories from this period of time? I mean, from these ten years that--?$$Well, you know, so I will share one with you. I had a great mentor when I served in Alexandria [Virginia] and for the Northern Virginia Urban League and so for the affiliate there and the person of a gentleman by the name of Ferdinand Day who is now deceased. Ferdinand Day was the, also he was the first African American to become the chair of the board for the, for the school board there [Alexandria City School Board] and so he, he was really my mentor. He, if you recall the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' and, and at some point in the movie, so Denzel Washington was the person who starred in the movie, but, but Herman Boone was the real coach. And so Herman was a good friend, good buddy. And so in the movie, you know, there was this whole discussion about the team, the football team not being able to go. I can't remember where it was, but not being able to go to someplace to play a game or whatever. And so Ferdinand Day, as the chair of the school board, said, well, you know, he would just cut some of the things out of the budget so that there would be resources and money for, for the team but it was that kind of boldness and, and leadership that Ferdinand Day really kind of brought. And so, you know, at some point the, the system really decided to acquiesce, if you will, and supported him in terms of the team but, but Herman Boone is someone that I really admired and when he did the movie, 'Remember the Titans,' when he and Denzel did the movie, I was still serving there. And so we decided that we were going to recognize Herman Boone at our annual gala, we were going to recognize him for his leadership. And so I remember having lunch with Herman one day and I said to him, "You know, it would be great if we could get Denzel Washington to come and present the award to you." And he said to me, he says, "Well George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], send him a letter." And so, so I did, you know, sent, sent Denzel Washington a letter and his people immediately got back with me, probably in a couple of weeks or so and said, "Unfortunately, Mr.," you know, "Mr. Washington is--has other commitments now and won't be able to come." So I called Herman and said, "Herman, I did what you told me to do, you know, we sent Denzel Washington a letter and asked him to come and I'm told that, you know, we're told that he's not going to be able to come." And Herman is kind of very direct when he talks with you. He said, "Okay, George, thank you, I'll take care of it." I didn't quite understand what that meant. So I'll never forget, maybe about a week or so later, my wife [Bernadette Curtis-Lambert] and I, we were coming in from church and it was Herman, he called, and so the phone was ringing as we were walking in the door and he said, and I said, hello, and so Herman said, "George, this is Herman Boone." And I knew who it was, he didn't have to tell me who, but I knew it was, "Herman Boone," and I said, "Hey, Herman, how you doing?" He said, "Well listen, I'm calling to let you know that Denzel Washington is coming." I said, "Herman, come on." I said, "Now, it's Sunday, you know, I'm coming in from church," and I said, "You shouldn't be really kind of, you know, pulling--." He says, "George, I'm telling you he's coming." I said, "Herman, you sure?" He says, "George, I'm standing in the man's kitchen right now and he wanted me to call you. He said, he wanted me to call Mr. Lambert and tell him he was coming." So, lesson learned from that. First of all, Denzel Washington, as he explained to Herman, as I understand, he never really saw my letter from him. His people got it and, you know, they knew how busy he was and so his people just kind of made a decision for him that he would just not be able to do it but Denzel Washington thought so much of Herman Boone and the work that he had done in terms of the integrating of the football team [at T.C. Williams High School, Alexandria, Virginia], he really wanted to come to present the award to Herman Boone. So, he did come at our gala to present the award to Herman Boone, so yeah.$$Okay.$$So when you ask me, you know, memorable experiences, that will be one I will never, ever forget, yeah.$$Okay, okay, that's something. So this would have been around the time the movie was out and--?$$Yeah, it was during the period that the movie was out, yeah, yeah.$$This is like in the mid-'90s [sic. 2000], I guess?$$Mid-'90s [1990s], yeah, yeah, mid-'90s [1990s] or so, yeah, yeah.$So you were there from 2011 to 2013; and you said you accomplished your objectives and kind of--$$Yeah, yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) got them back into working order.$$My coming, 'cause so, from Lorain [Lorain County Urban League, Elyria, Ohio], I did come to the Greater Washington Urban League [Washington, D.C.] but initially that was really not in the game plan because my predecessor here and a lady who I really considered a mentor, who I, you know, continue to revere as well, [HistoryMaker] Maudine Cooper, had served here as the president of the Greater Washington Urban League for a number of years and I had no idea that, you know, she was really considering retiring. And so even when she announced her retirement, yup, you know there were some folks who reached out to me and said, you know, "George [HistoryMaker George H. Lambert], Maudine is retiring, you ought to consider, you know, throwing your hat in the ring for the, for the Greater Washington Urban League." I was like, "No." You know, part of it with me was that I just, to some extent thought that everybody who thought they had arrived, so to speak, were going to be in the hunt to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League. It had nothing to do with my skillset but just kind of felt, everybody who arrived, that's where they were going to be and I just really didn't want to travel in that. And so to kind of show you how, because also kind of maintain, it was the Lord's hand in this as well. It was the last day of the cutoff time to submit your resume that I finally made a decision that I would submit my resume for the position, the last day, okay. And, and so, the last day and then, you know, six months or so later, because there was a number of rounds of interviews, or whatever that I went through, I actually went through six rounds of interviews, to then emerge and to actually become the president, you know, of the Greater Washington Urban League but initially, this wasn't my focus. I wasn't really looking, that I was even going to throw my hat in the ring. So, so I just, you know, I just kind of now step back and look at it and just know that there was, it was, you know, the intervention of the Lord's hand in it.$$Okay, well, now so, were there, were there a lot of candidates?$$Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean the, at the end of the day, some board members here shared with me, there were quite a few candidates, you know, and so, so yeah, yeah, but that, that, you know, for an affiliate of this size and for the work that this particular organization is involved in doing and for the, the notoriety that Maudine Cooper really kind of brought to the Greater Washington Urban League, that would be expected. I would have expected no less, really. That would have been a, that there would have been a number of candidates that would have had an interest in, in throwing their hat in the ring for, to become the president of the Greater Washington Urban League.

Laurie Robinson Haden

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden was born on December 14, 1972 in Washington, D.C. to Frances Privott Robinson and James Robinson. Haden graduated from Oxon Hill High School in Maryland in 1990, and enrolled at North Carolina Central University, where she was named Miss NCCU. Haden received her B.A. degree in political science in 1994, and went on to earn her J.D. degree from Indiana University School of Law in 1998. She also completed a certificate in entertainment media management at the New York University School of Continuing Education.

Haden first served as a legal intern in the labor management division of the National Football League. From 1998 to 2002, she worked as a labor and employment associate at the New York City law firms of Seyfarth Shaw LLP and Epstein, Becker, and Green P.C. Haden was hired as the assistant general counsel and director of training and development for CBS Broadcasting Inc. in 2002. She was then promoted to vice president and assistant general counsel for CBS Corporation; and was named senior vice president and assistant general counsel in 2009. In 2004, Haden became the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color (CCWC), a non-profit professional organization. In 2012, Haden launched CCWC Live Blog Talk, serving as the host and executive producer. Haden authored several legal-related publications, as well as a quarterly column on diversity in Inside Counsel magazine. She also contributed to the CBS Corporation Diversity Blog. She presented at the American Bar Association, the Inside Counsel Super Conference, the National Bar Association and the Minority Corporate Counsel Association; and served on the board of directors of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Haden has received many awards for her leadership, including the Women's Venture Fund's Highest Leaf Award, the Los Angeles Black Women Lawyer's Power of One Award, the Chicago Black Women Lawyer's Diversity Visionary Award, the New York City Bar Association Diversity Champion Award, and the New York State Bar Association Diversity Trailblazer Award. She was named to the Network Journal's 40 Under Forty List, and was one of Pink magazine's Top 15 Women in Business in 2009. Haden also received the first M. Ashley Dickerson Award, given by the National Association of Women Lawyers, and was recognized as one of the "10 Up-And-Coming African-American Lawyers to Watch" by Diversity & The Bar magazine. She was the recipient of the Indiana University School of Law Distinguished Alumni Award, the Ronald H. Brown Distinguished Leadership Award from the University of the District of Columbia, the National Bar Association's Pinnacle Award, and named the Chambers and Partners 2012 In-House Counsel Up & Coming Lawyer of the Year. Haden also serves on the board of trustees of the Indiana University School of Law. 

Haden and her husband, David Patrick Haden, have one son, David Patrick Haden II. 

Laurie Robinson Haden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.149

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2016

Last Name

Robinson Haden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Nicole

Schools

New York University School of Professional Studies

Indiana University Maurer School of Law

North Carolina Central University

Oxon Hill High School

Oxon Hill Middle School

Indian Queen Elementary School

First Name

Laurie

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ROB31

Favorite Season

December

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Jesus Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/14/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese

Short Description

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden (1972 - ) worked as the senior vice president and assistant general counsel of CBS Corporation. She was also the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color.

Employment

CBS Corporation

Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Epstein Becker & Green

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Laurie Robinson Haden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her mother's education background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her father's legal career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her community in Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early entrepreneurialism

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her favorite television programs

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her time at Oxon Hill High School in Oxon Hill, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her decision to improve her grades

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her transition to North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls winning the Miss North Carolina Central University pageant

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her political internships during college

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her mentors at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about Harvey Gantt's campaigns for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her internship at the White House

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her decision to attend the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her experiences at the Indiana University School of Law in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her mentors at the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her first post-graduate position at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her experiences of discrimination at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her time at Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her transition to the CBS Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the challenges for men of color in Corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the organizational structure of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the accomplishments of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her advice to members of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about generational differences among African American lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her promotion to senior vice president of the CBS Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the research on attrition among black female corporate lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls studying media management at New York University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls launching 'CCWC Live Blog Talk'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her board service for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about moving to her hometown of Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color
Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms
Transcript
I guess more importantly for you, you founded, in 2004, the Corporate Counsel Women of Color [New York, New York], right?$$Yes.$$All right. So tell us how you, or why you founded it and how you founded it, and what its structure is and, you know--$$Well, you know, as I, as I was mentioning about the challenges that we were talking about as law firm associates, everyone had kind of like the same story. They were the only one at their firm. They were not feeling that they were getting quality work assignments. They were struggling to get their billable hours. They needed mentorship. They needed sponsors, so when I went in house [at CBS Corporation], a small group of us, we started to connect people and connecting with people who were women of color, who worked in house at corporations so, you know, again it's the type of situation where people are isolated. You don't know where people are in great number, so we would just meet for dinners just to support one another, let people know you are not alone, and this is well before LinkedIn ever came about, but I decided at one of the dinners, hey, everyone just give me your business card, and I will create a directory, and in this directory, I'm going to, you know, put your name, where you went to law school, your practice areas and then I will print this directory, and I'll mail it to you so that you have it. So I emailed the template for it and I said, "You know, get it back to me in a week," so what happened was, the thirty people who went to the gathering, they forwarded it to their friends and their friends, and within a week, we had identified a total of fifty people, women of color who were in house at corporations, so it was great. And I said, "Well, look, let's do another run of this. Everyone, here's the current list. If there's anyone you know that we're missing, let them know. Get back to us in a week." Well, let me tell you, in a week's time, we had found over a hundred women of color at corporations and that was unheard of. We couldn't believe it. And, you know, that's how Corporate Counsel Women of Color got its start. And today we have over thirty six hundred women of color attorneys that we have identified in corporations around, around the United States and we have what we call CCWC friends and we have over six thousand friends, who are people who work at law firms; so we now are able to reach over ten thousand attorneys of color in the profession.$Can you talk about any of the cases or situations that you deal with as a corporate lawyer for CBS [CBS Corporation]?$$Yeah, I mean, I think what's great is that, you know, CBS law department is sort of like a law firm. We have lawyers from all over who work in our department, and everybody has different practice areas and different specialties, so with respect to my background, I do employment litigation, and our litigation department, we also do defamation law, copyright, trademark law, any litigation that comes up against CBS, one of the lawyers in our department will handle that matter based on their area of specialty. So, you know, it's been a great and rewarding experience, and what I really enjoy is, now I get to work with the law firms, and we get to say to the law firms, "You know, diversity is important, and we want our legal matters staffed with diverse attorneys," and then we can say, "We're going to look at your billing hours and we're going to make sure that the diverse attorneys that you said were going to work on these matters are actually working on the matters," so, you know, it's great to now be the client working with the law firms and, you know, requiring that our legal cases be staffed with diversity.$$So Verizon [Verizon Wireless Communications, Inc.] set a good example that you're--$$Yes.$$--you're following now.$$Verizon and Walmart [Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.]. You know, they have been the consistent leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion. And years ago, Walmart said, "If you do not staff our cases with diverse lawyers, we will cancel you from working on any of our matters," and that's unheard of. You know, but that was a great example for the legal profession in general.

The Honorable Garnet Coleman

State representative Garnet Coleman was born on September 8, 1961 in Washington, D.C. to Gloria Jones Coleman and Dr. John B. Coleman. Coleman was raised in Houston, Texas, where his father worked as the chief of obstetrics and gynecology at Houston’s Riverside General Hospital. He also served as the first African American appointee to the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents in 1977. Coleman graduated from Jack Yates Senior High School in 1979, and entered Howard University in Washington, D.C. but returned to Houston, where he earned his B.A. degree in political science from the University of Saint Thomas in 1990. Coleman later completed Harvard University’s Senior Executive Program for State and Local Government.

Coleman began his political career in 1988 as a delegate to the Texas State Democratic Convention. In 1990, he served as precinct chair of his local Democratic Precinct Convention, and was elected to serve as a Texas state representative in 1991. Coleman defeated longtime civic leader Reverend Jew Don Boney, Jr. in a runoff election for the seat left vacant by the passing of Larry Q. Evans. In 1991, Coleman also founded S.M.A.R.T. Kids, a youth development and tutoring program. In 1992, Coleman served as the Harris County field director for Bill Clinton’s presidential campaign, and as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. In addition to his service as a state representative, Coleman was elected chair of the Legislative Study Group in 2003. As chairman, Coleman advocated to preserve Texas’ top ten percent rule, which assisted historically underrepresented students by automatically admitting the Texas’ top performing high school students to Texas state universities. During President Barack Obama’s administration, Coleman served as a member of the president’s State Legislators for Health Reform. Coleman also served as CEO of Apartments for America, Inc., a non-profit affordable housing corporation.

Coleman served on the House Select Committee for Mental Health and the Public Health Committee as a senior ranking member, in addition to chairing the County Affairs Committee. He also served on the board of numerous charitable organizations including the South Central Young Mens’ Christian Association, the Ensemble Theater, the Third Ward Redevelopment Council, and the Houston Drug and Alcohol Abuse Council.
Coleman was honored with the 2005 Reintegration Award from Eli Lilly and Company for his support of public health programs.

Garnet Coleman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 2, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.139

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/2/2016

Last Name

Coleman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

St. Stephen's Episcopal School

University of St. Thomas

River Oaks Elementary School

St. Anne Catholic School

Bellaire High School

Strake Jesuit College Preparatory

Howard University School of Business

Texas A&M University

Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University

First Name

Garnet

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

COL26

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York City

Favorite Quote

Thinking Is Underrated.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

9/8/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Milkshake

Short Description

State representative Garnet Coleman (1961 - ) was elected to serve Houston’s historic Third Ward in the Texas House of Representatives in 1991. He went on to serve as chair of the Legislative Study Group and County Affairs Committee, and on the Public Health Committee as well as the House Select Committee for Mental Health.

Employment

The State of Texas

Clinton-Gore Presidential Campaign

J.B.'s Entertainment Center

Frederick's Riverside Wine Bar

U.S. Congressman Mickey Leland

Small and Minority Business Resources Department

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Garnet Coleman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his relation to Sally Hemings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his maternal ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the origin of his name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his maternal grandparents' careers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable talks about the historically black neighborhoods of Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his father's medical training

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his father's education advocacy

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his father's political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his parents' early relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his elementary school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history curriculum in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes the activism of the National Medical Association

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history of African Americans in Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early childhood influences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers the onset of his bipolar disorder

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the treatment of mental illness in the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his early influences

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his courses at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his mentor at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his godfather, Herbert O. Reid, Sr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman describes his social activities at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his decision to leave Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers entering the restaurant industry

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman recalls working for Congressman Mickey Leland

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers Frederick's Riverside Wine Bar in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his airport concession business

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about his early political activities

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman recalls the death of Larry Evans

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his first campaign for the Texas House of Representatives

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

12$5

DATitle
The Honorable Garnet Coleman remembers his first campaign for the Texas House of Representatives
The Honorable Garnet Coleman talks about the history of African Americans in Texas
Transcript
So Larry Evans dies all of a sudden, and he leaves this void [in the Texas House of Representatives], you know.$$(Nods head).$$So, now how did you get involved and run for the seat?$$Well, my cousin, Terry Whitfield [ph.], was working in the AG's [attorney general] office in Austin [Texas], a good friend of mine was doing work at Huston-Tillotson [Huston-Tillotson College; Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, Texas], and I had moved up to Austin and I was just joking around a little bit. I'd gone to dinner, my other cousin, Annette Bracey, came up, and we were all having dinner and I was talking about politics and they say, "Well, shoot, you ought to run." And I was like, hm? "Yeah, yeah, you like this stuff, you ought to run." So my cousin Terry, my good friend, Anthony Haley [ph.], we all sat down at the table and went through stuff and I decided to run from Austin, I was living in Austin. And, so I called my father [John B. Coleman], I called everybody else first, then I called my father because I was expecting him to say, "No, you shouldn't," and he didn't but, again, you know, that wasn't the first person I was going to call. If I was going to do this, I was going to do it. It didn't matter whether people were involved or not.$$But your dad had been a delegate of the Democratic Party, right, in '88 [1988] and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, he was--well, he was a--no, my father was a giver of money. He was never a delegate.$$Okay. So were you a delegate in '88 [1988]?$$I was a delegate.$$All right, so, all right. 'Cause I've got--this--my outline's confusing me a little bit.$$Okay, I--$$But you were a delegate in '88 [1988], all right. I thought they were talking about your--$$I went to the convention in '88 [1988 Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, Georgia]--$$Okay.$$--as a guest of the--$$Right.$$--Democratic Party chair here in Texas.$$Okay. And that's the convention where they nominated Michael Dukakis right?$$That's correct.$$And Lloyd Bentsen as vice president from Texas.$$That's right.$$Yeah.$$That's right.$$Okay, all right.$$And, so in '92 [1992]--I've been to every convention since '92 [1992 Democratic National Convention, New York, New York]--$$Okay.$$--as a delegate, not--I'm actually a member of the DNC [Democratic National Committee].$$Okay. But you were there in '88 [1988] as just an observer?$$Observer.$$Okay.$$And I used to go to the state conventions, if they were in Houston [Texas], as an observer so--$$Okay.$$Just go, I mean, you know, but it's because you like it. You don't go to stuff you don't like.$$But you had to run--this is 1991 when you run for the vacated seat. You run aga- you have to run against Reverend Jew Don Boney [J. Don Boney, Jr.].$$Yeah, Jew Don Boney.$$And (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) John Chase's [HistoryMaker John S. Chase] daughter, Saundria Chase [Saundria Chase Gray]. There were eleven people in the, in the race--$$Okay.$$--but the advantage of it is, it couldn't, couldn't go past sixty days. So thirty days to the special election and then thirty days to the runoff.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$All right (laughter).$$So it was, it was interesting. It was actually--I tell people all the time, there are two parts of being an elected official. One part, everybody has to do and that's run for office but that journey in itself is very valuable, win or lose, 'cause you actually get to know yourself better. I learned more about my grand- my daddy's daddy [William Coleman, Sr.] running for office, knocking on doors in Third Ward [Houston, Texas] than I ever knew. This one guy said, "Oh, oh, you Mr. Coleman's son--grandson." He said, "Yeah, I knew your grandmamma [Clara Hubbard Coleman] and I knew your granddaddy and your daddy," and he said, "Yeah, your grandfather looked like a white man" (laughter), and I just thought, well I didn't know that, maybe look like--you know, so it was just interesting to hear about my, particularly my grandparents from the people who lived in Third Ward at the same time they did.$The kind of history you were taught in school was probably, I'm guessing, was the Alamo and things like that? Like--$$Yeah, there was a lot of that.$$--like the John Wayne, Fess Parker type of history where there--$$A lot of, a lot of what we would call stereotypical Texas that identifies Texas and a lot of it was Central Texas that be--which, whichever people, you know, people, the lore is around Central Texas, not around the cane fields [sugarcane] and Brazoria County [Texas] or Brazos County [Texas], not around the cotton--cotton was talked about a lot but not who was picking it.$$Right.$$So, that's why, you know, we look at populations of black people, they're all along whatever that agricultural base was. That's why a bunch of black people in north Texas and Lubbock [Texas] and, you know, in the plains, well, how did they get up there? Well, they were picking the cotton (laughter), you know, so the same is cutting the cane and they still cut cane in, you know, and it's--it was very much that, if you think about it, that commodity, those commodities that slaves picked.$$Did you have a balance of that kind of discussion when you were growing up around--$$Yes. I caught myself, you know, I'm the same age as Barack Obama [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama], you know, which is a big deal to me. The idea of understanding what it was like by story to be in segregation. My father-in-law used to always talk about when he would drive, we as a family, we would drive back to Houston [Texas] and he said he had to get to a black city with a black hotel 'cause you couldn't stay in a white hotel. And, so I, you know, these are stories that I grew up with and that basically it was about change. There was a fear in not, in driving at night and also not being in a town where you could get a hotel and that fear continues with a lot of people to today but, so that told me there was something different, I mean, you know, I--and that kind of--those stories stayed with me, you know, stay with me now because, you know, you grow up knowing to make sure that you don't, you have either your hands on the wheel or don't go for your glove compartment, you know, we hear this all the time but it's true. And, you know, even though I lived in a black world, for the most part, except for some of my schools, I thought that that was kind of, you know, it wasn't different but we had our own intact community that was a good, good community, although it was--came from segregation, just like the NMA, the National Medical Association instead of the American Medical Association. There was some, I saw all this as, you know, with the split was in the country, and it was a split by race.