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Reginald Van Lee

Management consultant Reginald Van Lee was born on May 8, 1958 in Houston, Texas to Tommie Lee and Eva Elnora Jefferson Lee. Van Lee received his B.S. degree in engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1979; and, in 1980, he earned his M.S. degree in civil engineering from MIT. Upon graduation, Van Lee was hired by Exxon Production Research Company as a research engineer. In 1982, he entered the M.B.A. program at Harvard Business School, and he interned at Booz Allen Hamilton during the summer of 1983. In 1984, after graduating with his M.B.A. degree in business administration, Van Lee was hired at Booz Allen Hamilton.

In 1993, Van Lee was promoted to partner at the Booz Allen Hamilton; and in 2003, he was promoted to senior partner. Van Lee leads Booz Allen Hamilton’s health and not-for-profit businesses, where he has helped numerous private and public health organizations and not-for-profit organizations, such as Habitat for Humanity and the American Cancer Society. As an industry expert on strategy implementation, Van Lee has contributed a number of articles on the topic. His articles have appeared in The Journal of Business Strategy and Business Horizons. Van Lee also co-authored the book, Megacommunities: How Leaders of Government, Business, and Non-Profits Can Tackle Today’s Global Challenges Together. He has appeared on ABC-TV’s “World News This Morning” and CNBC, and co-led the Urban Enterprise Initiative with the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation, where he focused on driving enhanced competitiveness for small businesses in Harlem. Van Lee is also a founding member of the Clinton Global Initiative.

Van Lee’s many recognitions include the 2008 Black Engineer of the Year Award and New York University’s C. Walter Nichols Award for community service. He was also chosen as one of the 2009 Washington Minority Business Leaders by the Washington Business Journal. Van Lee served as chairman emeritus of the board of the Evidence Dance Company, trustee of the Studio Museum in Harlem, and chairman of the Washington Performing Arts Society. In 2008, he was appointed by President Barack Obama to the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

Reginald Van Lee was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 14, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.149

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/14/2012

Last Name

Van Lee

Maker Category
Schools
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard Business School
James R. Reynolds Elementary School
Crispus Attucks Middle
Carter G. Woodson K-8 School
Evan E. Worthing Senior High School
First Name

Reggie

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

VAN06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

The Two Most Important Days In Your Life Are The Day You Were Born And The Day You Understand Why.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/8/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Management consultant Reginald Van Lee (1958 - ) is an executive vice president at Booz Allen Hamilton.

Employment
Exxon Mobil
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641758">Tape: 1 Slating of Reginald Van Lee's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641759">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641760">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641761">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his mother's childhood in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641762">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641763">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641764">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641765">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee lists his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641766">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641767">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641768">Tape: 1 Reginald Van Lee remembers James R. Reynolds Elementary School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641769">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee describes his childhood activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641770">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee remembers his mother's parenting style</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641771">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee recalls his junior high school experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641772">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee talks about his family's influence</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641773">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee remembers the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641774">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee describes his early academic success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641775">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee talks about his extracurricular activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641776">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee remembers Evan E. Worthing High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641777">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee remembers developing an interest in engineering</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641778">Tape: 2 Reginald Van Lee remembers entering the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641779">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee describes his experiences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641780">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee describes the racial makeup of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641781">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee remembers his influential professors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641782">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee describes the racial tensions in Boston, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641783">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee remembers the black community at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641784">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee recalls his mentors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641785">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee recalls earning a master's degree from at Massachusetts Institute of Technology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641786">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee recalls the start of his career at the Exxon Mobil Corporation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641787">Tape: 3 Reginald Van Lee recalls his decision to attend the Harvard Business School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641788">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee remembers enrolling at the Harvard Business School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641789">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee describes the black student community at Harvard Business School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641790">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee remembers his coursework at the Harvard Business School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641791">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee recalls his start at Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641792">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee talks about his mother's role in his success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641793">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee describes his early career at Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641794">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee remembers his projects at Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641795">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee describes the highlights of his career at Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641796">Tape: 4 Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641797">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641798">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes the formation of the Urban Enterprise Initiative</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641799">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee talks about his awards and recognitions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641800">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee remembers coauthoring 'Megacommunities'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641801">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes his involvement in the arts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641802">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee talks about his career plans</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641803">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641804">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641805">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641806">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes how he met his husband, Corey McCathern</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641807">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee describes his wedding</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641808">Tape: 5 Reginald Van Lee talks about his racial and sexual identity</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641809">Tape: 6 Reginald Van Lee describes his parents' views on his sexuality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641810">Tape: 6 Reginald Van Lee describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/641811">Tape: 6 Reginald Van Lee narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Reginald Van Lee remembers developing an interest in engineering
Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 2
Transcript
In high school had you figured that you were going to become an engineer, in high school?$$When I was in the eighth grade, I was watching 'Star Trek,' well actually when I was in kindergarten I told my mother I wanted to be an artist and she said, "Well artists starve so you need to be something else like an architect." So from kindergarten to eighth grade I was going to be an architect. Then in eighth grade my mother said, "Well the latest thing is engineering so you should be an engineer. You can be an architectural engineer but you need to be an engineer." I was very obedient, my mother said do it, made sense to me. So I'm watching 'Star Trek' and this guy comes on the USS Enterprise who had gone to MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts], Ph.D. MIT, master's [degree] MIT all this stuff and they were, Captain Kirk [James T. Kirk] and Mr. Spock were like bowing to this guy like he was a deity and to me Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock were deities. So if they are bowing to this guy he must be something. So I asked my mother, "What is MIT?" Actually to my surprise she said, "It's a school of engineering in Massachusetts." And I said, "Well I want to go to MIT," and she says, "You're going to MIT," just like that. So she called the school and they sent the bulletins. When the recruiters came from MIT they didn't come to my little black high school, they came to I think Rice University [Houston, Texas] or something. My parents [Eva Jefferson Lee and Tommie Lee] put me in the car and we went over to meet the recruiters and I did the interviewing and everything filled out the forms and wrote the essays and then I went to MIT. So that's what got me--my mother got me interested in engineering and at that time, once I really did my research, I discovered that MIT was the best engineering school in the world, highest rated. So that's where I went to school.$$So counseling played virtually no role in this, I guess?$$No as a matter of fact not Mrs. Freddie Gaines [ph.], my senior counselor who is very encouraging, but one of the other counselors basically told me that I should go to University of Houston [Houston, Texas] or Texas Southern [Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas] or maybe University of Texas [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas] because while I was smart for Worthing High School [Evan E. Worthing High School, Houston, Texas], you know, I probably wouldn't be smart enough to compete with those other kids and she didn't want me to go and be disappointed, she didn't want me to feel failure. So she felt she was protecting me. As you can imagine once I got my MIT degree I went back and showed her the degree and said, "Thank you for the encouragement because I decided that I had to go to MIT and graduate after you were so discouraging to me."$$Now this is a white counselor?$$No this is a black counselor, black counselor, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Black counselor, okay, interesting so was Worthing High School mostly black since it was closer to the neighborhood?$$Yeah, yep, at the time I graduated because we'd gone through the majority/minority zoning sort of thing, we had probably twenty white students and maybe twenty or thirty Hispanic students, but it was more than predominantly black.$$Okay. So you graduated in what nineteen seventy- (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Seventy-five. [1975].$$Seventy-five [1975].$Yeah we were talking about the small business initiative [Harlem Small Business Initiative; Urban Enterprise Initiative] in Harlem [New York, New York], and--$$And, so the small businesses came to the president [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] and said, "We need your help so that we can continue to be competitive and live and grow in Harlem." So the president went to a number of consulting firms to ask them if they would do this pro bono and we wanted to do this partnership as a collaborative approach. So we had the Clinton Foundation [New York, New York], we had the Harlem Small Business Alliance [sic. Harlem Business Alliance, New York, New York], we had Congressman Charlie Rangel's [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel] office, we had Columbia University [New York, New York], we had New York University [New York, New York], we had the National Black MBAs [National Black MBA Association], we had Booz Allen Hamilton [Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.] all working together with these small businesses to add different resources as we could deliver to them. We did the technical assistance and the consulting thing. We had attorneys to give them legal help on their leases, on their rent. We had the M.B.A.s to give us some leverage of students doing analysis, et cetera. And what we did was to create a program that actually changed the lives of many small businesses in Harlem. Several hundred have gone through the program now since 2001. We started with ten pilot businesses and it's interesting because when we first started looking at who would be good candidates for this program we said well we want the program to run for almost two years so we have enough time to really help them and test the results and see the progress we've made. So let's make sure that the businesses either own their building or they have at least a two year lease. We discovered that some 80 percent of the businesses of Harlem at that time operated on a month to month lease. So at any point a landlord could say, "I can get more for this, you've got thirty days, you've got to get out," right. And they were okay with that in the lean years because they didn't want to sign a long term lease and go out of business in a couple of months and still be stuck with having to pay the lease. So it was a good deal for them and it was a good deal for the landlords at the time. But long story made short, we worked with the businesses to bring just modern management 101 techniques to them, inventory management, receptionists for people, marketing plans, business plans, analysis of their consumer base through surveys, just very simple things; and we turned some businesses around.

The Honorable Sylvester Turner

State representative and lawyer Sylvester Turner was born on September 27, 1954 in Acres Homes, Texas. His mother was a maid at the Rice Hotel and his father, a commercial painter. Turner was raised with eight brothers and sisters. In 1973, he graduated as the valedictorian of Klein High School. Four years later, Turner received his B.A. degree in political science from the University of Houston, after which he attended Harvard Law School, where he received his J.D. degree in 1980.

Turner was hired at the Houston-based law firm Fulbright & Jaworski. After three years, Turner left and formed his own law firm with partner Barry M. Barnes. Barnes & Turner specialize in corporate and commercial law. In 1984, Turner ran for a Harris County Commissioner seat, but he lost to El Franco Lee. In 1988, he won the seat in the Texas House of Representatives for District 139, a mostly minority district. Turner also taught at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University, the South Texas College of Law, and at the University of Houston Law School’s continuing legal education program. He also ran for the mayor of Houston twice, once in 1991 where he lost in a hotly contested race, and again in 2003, where he lost to Bill White. In 2003, Turner became the Speaker Pro Tempore in the Texas House of Representatives, a post he held until 2009. His major legislative accomplishment, HB 109, expanded access to the children’s health insurance program and was passed in 2007.

Turner sits on the State Affairs committee and is the Vice Chair of the Appropriations Committee. He is also on the Subcommittee on the Current Fiscal Condition. He is a member of Brookhollow Baptist Church and has one daughter, Ashley Paige Turner.

Sylvester Turner was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 15, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.156

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/15/2012

Last Name

Turner

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

Harvard Law School

University of Houston

Klein Forest High School

Garden City Elementary and Junior High School

Klein Intermediate School

First Name

Sylvester

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

TUR07

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ That Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/27/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Spaghetti, Ox Tails

Short Description

Mayor, state representative, and lawyer The Honorable Sylvester Turner (1954 - ) represented district 139 in the Texas House of Representatives from 1988 to 2016, when he became the mayor of Houston, Texas. He also founded the law firm of Barnes and Turner LLP.

Employment

Texas House of Representatives

Barnes & Turner

University of Houston

South Texas College of Law

Texas Southern University

Fulbright & Jaworski

City of Houston, Texas

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:380,8:1604,36:7724,163:8156,170:10316,223:18750,252:22422,313:26358,341:27285,351:50377,577:57466,610:77669,792:78024,798:78734,811:79799,830:80083,835:92624,969:94016,988:106892,1136:140006,1522:141014,1533:144934,1619:167844,1904:173690,1994:180690,2087:181880,2120:191646,2255:208620,2463:208990,2469:213334,2656:219318,2808:259770,3011:266990,3079:281530,3243:285824,3263:286164,3269:292840,3443:299198,3492:302405,3528:304170,3536:304548,3549:304764,3554:305142,3563:308916,3627:313108,3672:313888,3683:317554,3751:325020,3807:325460,3812:366638,4401:367070,4416:370785,4464:371050,4470:371262,4475:372240,4499$0,0:27348,354:28086,361:28988,373:33062,403:35174,434:39650,465:53194,619:54118,632:54454,637:72446,774:91845,962:94811,990:97624,1076:123530,1376:123850,1381:129690,1507:141350,1624:142946,1649:165488,1935:186730,2255:204944,2400:212130,2475:212410,2481:212802,2490:233200,2640
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633057">Tape: 1 Slating of The Honorable Sylvester Turner's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633058">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633059">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633060">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633061">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers working with his dad</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633062">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633063">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his roots in Chappell Hill, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633064">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner lists his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633065">Tape: 1 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers the Acres Homes community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633066">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his experiences of school integration in Houston, Texas, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633067">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his experiences of school integration in Houston, Texas, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633068">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about African American political representation in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633069">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes the African American community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633070">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633071">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers the Bethel Baptist Church in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633072">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his influential teachers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633073">Tape: 2 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers being bused to an all-white school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633074">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his experiences of school integration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633075">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his early ambitions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633076">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes the demographics of Klein High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633077">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his influences at the Bethel Baptist Church in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633078">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633079">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his valedictorian speech</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633080">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his father's death</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633081">Tape: 3 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his decision to attend the University of Houston in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633082">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his early aspiration to become a lawyer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633083">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his decision to attend the Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633084">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his friendships with Leroy Hassell</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633085">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his social life at Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633086">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers Derrick A. Bell, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633087">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about the faculty of the Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633088">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his club football team at Harvard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633089">Tape: 4 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls hearing a female preacher for the first time</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633090">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his internship at Fulbright and Jaworski LLP in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633091">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes a memorable legal case</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633092">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers founding Barnes and Turner LLP</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633093">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers losing his first political campaign</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633094">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his campaign for the Texas House of Representatives</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633095">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls his election to the Texas House of Representatives</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633096">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his interest in healthcare reform</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633097">Tape: 5 The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls arguing a civil suit against the Phillips Petroleum Company</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633098">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his first campaign for the mayoralty of Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633099">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about the aftermath of the 1991 mayoral election in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633100">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers Lee P. Brown</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633101">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about politics in Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633102">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about political redistricting in Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633103">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his legislative achievements</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633104">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers his second campaign for the mayoralty of Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633105">Tape: 6 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers the passage of Texas House Bill 109</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633106">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner remembers meeting President Barack Obama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633107">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633108">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his work in the Acres Homes section of Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633109">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633110">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633111">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/633112">Tape: 7 The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

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The Honorable Sylvester Turner describes a memorable legal case
The Honorable Sylvester Turner recalls arguing a civil suit against the Phillips Petroleum Company
Transcript
Now, is there a memorable case from that period of time that you can tell us about?$$I guess it's, it's one in particular. The plaintiff was a guy by the name of Willie Harris [ph.]. I guess it is memorable since I still remember it, and that's been years ago. But, anyway, Willie was an entrepreneur, African American, and he was in his company's truck, and he was coming over the Ship, Ship Channel Bridge [Sam Houston Tollway Ship Channel Bridge, Houston, Texas]. And this 18-wheeler hit him, and he was seriously injured, and he sued the 18-wheeler. I represented the company. And, and I made him an offer through his attorney, and he did not, he did not accept the offer to settle. It end up--it went to trial. I made him another offer, and his attorney did not accept it. And, quite frankly, you know, I had, I had much more to give, okay. And, but, and so, we went to trial. During the trial, I made him another offer, attorney didn't accept it. And then, the attorney came to me during the trial, and asked me, was the offer still on the table? And I said, "Well, if you accept it now." Now, mind you, I had a lot more to give. And in many ways, I said to myself, the attorney is crazy as hell (unclear) to be accepting--I mean, I represent my client, so if, you know, and so, I say, "Yeah, if you, if you accept it now, it's on the table." This is during the course of trial. And he went over and talked to Willie, and I could, and I could kind of hear and see the exchange, where Willie was not liking the offer. And his attorney kept talking to him, kept talking to him, kept talking. And Willie finally relented and said, "Okay." And the attorney came to me and said, "We'll accept." And in my mind, I was saying, "You're crazy as hell but, okay, no problem." So, when he stood before the judge to announce that the case had settled, and the judge said, "All parties in agreement?" I said, you know, "It's the best terms for the defendant, judge, yes, I'm in agreement." Asked the other attorney, the attorney said, "Yes." And the judge asked Willie Harris. "Mr. Harris, are you in agreement with the settlement?" And he kind of said, "Oh, well," and said, "You should, well, you don't have to--are you in agreement with it?" And attorney, his attorney looked at him, and he finally said, "Yeah, yeah." And she said, "Okay, all parties in agreement. This case is dismissed." It's over. So, I was packing up, and Willie comes over to me. And he said, "Mr.," he said, "Mr. Turner [HistoryMaker Sylvester Turner], you know, I'm hurt, you know, I'm hurt, and this does not cover me for my injuries," and stuff like that. And I said, I said, "Mr. Harris, I'm not your attorney. I represent, I represent my client, and I did my job." And he said, "But, brother, you know, I'm--," he said, "Brother, you know, I'm hurt." I said, "Mr. Harris, I'm not your attorney. I represent my client. I did my job." And, and my client and I got up, and we walked out. That one, that one stands out because it's one of those deals that, yeah, you know, he had a poor lawyer. Had a poor lawyer, but it's not a case where I can be the lawyer for my client, and be the lawyer for his client as well. Okay. Now, subsequently, a few years later, I'm no longer at Fulbright [Fulbright and Jaworski LLP], and now I'm in my own shop [Barnes and Turner LLP; Barry Barnes and Associates PLLC, Houston, Texas]. Willie comes to me, and became my client, you know, but that one stands out. And, and, and because it's nothing like having a good lawyer. It's nothing like having somebody that's going to advocate for you, and fight for you, and get everything that's on the--that's potentially is on the table for you. Nothing like having a good lawyer. And in his case, his lawyer fell short, and he paid the price.$$I heard such cases before when cold--cold aspects of law sometimes, you know, the people don't know. They--$$You know--$$--don't give, give a thing (unclear).$$Right, but you can't be, you know, the way the system is designed, you know, I can't be the lawyer for my client, and be the lawyer for you at the same time. And my job is, as a lawyer is to represent my client, and represent my client zealously, and do the best I can, so but it points out the importance of having quality representation, and not only quality representation, you've got to have people who are willing to advocate for you.$$Okay.$$And if you don't have that, you'll fall short.$Now, in 1989, you sued Phillips Petroleum [Phillips Petroleum Company; Phillips 66]. That's when the big Phillips plant explosion--$$Um-hm.$$--okay, that's the Phillips plant explosion case. Tell us about that.$$(Cough) I represented Janet Little. She was an employee at Phillips Petroleum. Interesting story on how we met--I was speaking at a, at a church association banquet in--I want to say, in Sealy, Texas. And she and her parents were in the audience. Later, goes the Phillips Petroleum explos- explosion. And her mom calls me here at the firm and says--she introduced herself, Ms. Foy, and she says, "My daughter has been seriously burnt. And there are a lot of lawyers that are around here at (unclear). But she asked me to call you because she wanted, she wanted the lawyer that spoke at the banquet, and that was you." And then, we--I met with them and signed on, and represented her, and I had a very favorable outcome. She's been a client with this firm ever since. From the proceeds, her father [Charles H. Foy] was a pastor in Dickinson, Texas. And from part of the proceeds, she, she built, she constructed a new church in Dickinson [Mount Carmel Missionary Baptist Church] and paid for it herself, which is one of the, one of the largest churches now in Dickinson, Texas. You know, it was, it was, it just started the ball, the ball just--things just started changing in the, in the life of the firm.$$So, the plant was caused by some negligence of Phillips?$$Yeah, they were, they were negligent and then caused the explosion. And I represent Anna Brooks [ph.] and her, and a couple of other people. Ironically, the people that were defending, the lawyers that were defending Phillips came from Fulbright and Jaworski [Fulbright and Jaworski LLP]. And one of, and one of my mentors, Blake Tartt, was the lead attorney.$$That's, that's interesting.$$Yeah. And we were in, we were in a conference room which it was a settlement meeting. And we were talking and, you know, and Blake says, "Sylvester [HistoryMaker Sylvester Turner], are we going to get this case settled?" And I said, "I hope so, Mr. Tartt." He would call me Sylvester and I called him Mr. Tartt 'cause I'd looked up to him. And then, he asked me, how much was I asking for. And I, I wrote him a note on a sheet, on a sheet of paper, and I forwarded it to him. And he crossed it out, and sent a note back and, and I told him, I said, "If I accepted this, you would, you would lose all respect for me, and I would not be the, the student that you had taught well." So, I crossed it out, and sent him another note. And he said, "Done."

Roland Martin

Journalist, Columnist, and Commentator Roland Sebastian Martin was born November 11, 1968 in Houston, Texas’ Third Ward, the center of Houston's African American community. Roland’s mother and father where his role-models growing up and his father was an avid newspaper reader and fan of television news. When Roland was 14, he found his passion for communications as he was part of the magnet program in communications at Jack Yates High School. In 1987, Roland attended Texas A&M University on academic scholarship, were he studied journalism and worked for the Bryan-College Station Eagle and for KBTX (Channel 3). As a junior in college Martin pledged Pi Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., and attended the National Association of Black Journalist convention.

In 1991 Roland graduated Texas A&M with a B.A. in Journalism and began working at the Austin American-Statesman. Roland eventually left Austin American-Statesman and became a city hall reporter for Forth Worth Star-Telegram. In 1995 he became a morning driver reporter with KRLD radio as sports reporter. During his time at KRLD he won top sports reporting award from the National Association of Black Journalists; and honors from the Houston Press Club. Roland became news editor and morning anchor of KKDA 730 AM radio, as well as editor at Dallas Weekly. In 2000, Roland was working as a freelance producer covering the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles and suffered a ruptured appendix; his medical bills led him to file bankruptcy.

In 2001, Roland became the first editor of blackamericaweb.com founded by Tom Joyner and married Rev. Jacquie Hood Martin. He returned to radio as a news correspondent for the American Urban Radio Network and as a sports commentator on Washington, D.C., radio station WOL's "Fifth Quarter Program.” He also launched the ROMAR Media Group in Dallas, and became news editor for the new Savoy magazine. In 2007 Roland made his first appearance on CNN (later joins as contributor) and Fox television’s conservative-oriented O’Reilly Factor and wrote a column that was picked up by the nationally distributed Creators Syndicate and ran in the Detroit News, Denver Post, and Indianapolis Star. In 2004 Roland was hired as a consultant by the Chicago Defender and served as a radio talk show host for WVON-AM in Chicago. Roland has published three books and is named top 50 pundits by the Daily Telegraph in the United Kingdom. In 2008 he earned his masters degree in Christian Communications from Louisiana Baptist University. He is two time winner of the NAACP Image Award for Best Interview for “In Conversation: The Michelle Obama Interview,” and for “In Conversation: The Senator Barack Obama Interview”. Ebony Magazine has selected Roland as one of the 150 Most Influential African Americans in the United States three times in a row. Currently he works as host and managing editor of “Washington watch with Roland Martin”, and recently launched “Roland a Fresh Perspective for the 21st Century” on rolandmartin.com.

Roland Martin currently resided in Washington, D.C. with wife Rev. Jacquie Hood Martin.

Roland Martin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May s, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.063

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/2/2012

Last Name

Martin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

S.

Schools

Jack Yates High School

Texas A&M University - Commerce

Louisiana Baptist University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Roland

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

MAR15

Favorite Season

Sunset On a Golf Course

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Negril, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

If you do good, I will talk about you. If you do bad I will talk about you. At the end of the day, I am a journalist and I will talk about you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/11/1968

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Television commentator Roland Martin (1968 - ) served as an analyst on CNN and hosts the shows “Washington Watch with Roland Martin” and “Roland Martin: A Fresh Perspective for the 21st Century.”

Employment

Austin American-Statesman

Forth Worth Star-Telegram

KRLD radio

Dallas Weekly

Houston Defender

Democratic National Committee

BlackAmericaWeb.com

American Urban Radio Network

WOL Radio

Savoy magazine

Chicago Defender

WVON Radio

CNN

Delete

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39304">Tape: 1 Slating of Roland Martin's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39305">Tape: 1 Roland Martin lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39306">Tape: 1 Roland Martin describes his mother's family history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39307">Tape: 1 Roland Martin talks about the Great Creole Migration from Louisiana to California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39308">Tape: 1 Roland Martin talks about the neighborhood of Clinton Park, where his maternal grandparents and their family lived in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39309">Tape: 1 Roland Martin talks about his parents attending Jack Yates High School in Houston, Texas, getting married, and starting a family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39310">Tape: 1 Roland Martin describes his father's family history</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39311">Tape: 1 Roland Martin talks about his grandfathers' employment in Houston, Texas, his father's high school education, and his family responsibilities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39312">Tape: 1 Roland Martin talks about how his parents met and married</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39313">Tape: 1 Roland Martin describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39314">Tape: 1 Roland Martin describes his father's interest in the news and his mother's Macintosh computer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39315">Tape: 2 Roland Martin describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39316">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about his siblings, and his physical likeness to his mother as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39317">Tape: 2 Roland Martin describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39318">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about the reason his father grew up without knowing his biological mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39319">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about the focus on skin color in the Creole population of his grandparents' generation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39320">Tape: 2 Roland Martin describes his close-knit family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39321">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about his parents' activism in his neighborhood of Clinton Park, in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39322">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about his parents' leadership at the community-level in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39323">Tape: 2 Roland Martin describes his experience in school in Houston, Texas, and his father's involvement in his academics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39324">Tape: 2 Roland Martin talks about the schools that he and his siblings attended in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39325">Tape: 3 Roland Martin talks about his teachers in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39326">Tape: 3 Roland Martin talks about challenging his teacher in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39327">Tape: 3 Roland Martin talks about being a voracious reader as a child, going to the public library, and attending summer camps</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39328">Tape: 3 Roland Martin talks about the wealth of knowledge that he gained from his reading habit</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39329">Tape: 3 Roland Martin talks about his interest in the sports teams in Houston, and playing baseball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39330">Tape: 3 Roland Martin describes his decision to attend Yates School of Communications to study television, and his experience there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39331">Tape: 3 Roland Martin describes his experience in the television studio at Yates School of Communications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39332">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about playing baseball in high school, and securing custom jackets for students in the television program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39333">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about black role models in the media and television</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39334">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about being involved in his grandmother's catering business from a young age</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39335">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about being involved in the leadership of the Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver organization in Texas, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39336">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about being involved in the leadership of the Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver organization in Texas, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39337">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about the continuation of his maternal grandmother's catering business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39338">Tape: 4 Roland Martin describes his decision to attend Texas A and M University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39339">Tape: 4 Roland Martin talks about the communications program at Texas A and M University, and his decision to not pursue sports journalism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39340">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about working at a local television station in College Station, Texas, and his experience with racial discrimination there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39341">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about his experience in the video department at Texas A&M University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39342">Tape: 5 Roland Martin describes his experience as a student at Texas A and M University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39343">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about attending the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) convention in New York in 1989</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39344">Tape: 5 Roland Martin discusses serving as the student representative on the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Board of Directors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39345">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about meeting HistoryMaker Vernon Jarett and being active in the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39346">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about being offered his first job at the 'Austin American Statesman'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39347">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about his move from the 'Austin American Statesman' to the 'Fort Worth Star Telegram'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39348">Tape: 5 Roland Martin talks about getting married, his experience working at the 'Fort Worth Star Telegram' and his reasons for leaving in 1995</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39349">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his experience at KKDA Radio in Dallas, Texas, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39350">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his experience at KKDA Radio in Dallas, Texas, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39351">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about moving from KKDA Radio to KRLD Radio in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39352">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his coverage of the "Million Man March" in 1995</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39353">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his move from KKDA Radio to KRLD Radio, and becoming the managing editor of the 'Dallas Weekly'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39354">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about moving to Houston, Texas in 1999 to save his marriage, his divorce, and working at the 'Houston Defender'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39355">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about moving back to Dallas in 2000, meeting his wife, Jacquie Hood Martin, and freelancing for eighteen months before finding a job</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39356">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about being diagnosed with appendicitis during the Democratic National Convention in 2000, and his financial hardships that year</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39357">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about becoming the news editor of BlackAmericaWeb.com and publishing his book, 'Speak Brother! A Black Man's View of America'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39358">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his faith and spirituality, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39359">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about his faith and spirituality, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39360">Tape: 6 Roland Martin talks about becoming the executive editor of the 'Chicago Defender'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39361">Tape: 7 Roland Martin describes his experience at the 'Chicago Defender', pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39362">Tape: 7 Roland Martin describes his experience at the 'Chicago Defender', pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39363">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about leaving the 'Chicago Defender' in 2006, and signing on as a CNN contributor in 2007</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39364">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about his radio show on WVON in Chicago, Illinois, and his decision to join the Tom Joyner Morning Show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39365">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about becoming visible on CNN, and President Barack Obama's rapid ascent from state senator to president in four years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39366">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about meeting Senator Barack Obama for the first time</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39367">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about his syndicated column</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39368">Tape: 7 Roland Martin talks about his growing career since 2008, his busy schedule, and his marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39369">Tape: 8 Roland Martin talks about his perspective on the media and the news profession</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39370">Tape: 8 Roland Martin discusses various news platforms and their merits</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39371">Tape: 8 Roland Martin analyzes the critique of President Barack Obama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39372">Tape: 8 Roland Martin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39373">Tape: 8 Roland Martin talks about his goals and being content in his career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/39374">Tape: 8 Roland Martin reflects upon his legacy</a>

DASession

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DATitle
Roland Martin talks about his parents' activism in his neighborhood of Clinton Park, in Houston, Texas
Roland Martin discusses serving as the student representative on the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Board of Directors
Transcript
Now, how was the neighborhood, Clinton Park [Houston, Texas] in terms of--$$Clinton Park was a, it was a perfect example of a working-class neighborhood. You had, growing up, a number of the people in Clinton Park were homeowners. And folks took care of the homes, and they took care of their yards and things along those lines. And then you could, and then, I mean you had, you had folks, you had drugs. It wasn't like it was prevalent, but then all of a sudden, you can--I can remember the transformation as it went from homeowners to folks passing away to their kids taking over the homes or then renting it out. What was in, I remember watching as the neighborhood began to slowly crumble. But what was interesting about my street really, the, that portion of Pennsylvania, all of that mess was sort of kept out. Our home, the home next to us, the home across the street, the other home across the street, I mean all these other homes, they took care of their yards, took care of their homes and would not allow any sort of foolishness. But then you saw it begin to change. It was a picturesque neighborhood in terms of trees and yards--what was interesting is about, as the neighborhood began to go down, that's when my parents [Emelda Joyce Lemond Martin and Reginald Lynn Martin, Sr.] hooked up with several other people and they said they wanted to start a civic club. A lot of people said, man, you guys are crazy. I mean that's just nuts. And so they began to meet, and the Saturday they launched the Civic Club, I mean it was like eight o'clock in the morning, and I remember it when we had--and again, my parents had five kids, so they had day laborers. So I remember having to make the signs and the leaflets and stuff, and we had to go door-to-door, passing the stuff out.$$You were in high school then?$$Un-un.$$Grade school?$$I was in elementary school. I remember it was, I had to have been, let's say sixth, fifth, sixth, seventh grade, something like that. But it was, but I remember being a kid, and it was so funny because KTRK, the ABC affiliate did a story on launching the Civic Club. And the reporter was Arthur Wood. And how things happened, of course, I later go into journalism, and later, I'm a member of the National Association of Black Journalists [NABJ], and I meet Arthur Wood again. And Arthur--and I follow Arthur's career. He followed mine. It was always interesting that we came, our paths crossed that early. But they really, they said, we want to change our neighborhood, and they began to work on it. And, again, people say it can't be done. And I use this in my speeches all the time, when I talk about how do you change a community? And they began to meet in homes and they began to, you know, how do we do it, and talk to the police and talk to the fire department. Who do we pick--who picks up trash or whatever? And they began to make those calls, and the next thing you know, they had small, you know, let's have a trash pickup day. And then let's have a--we had one success. And the next thing is what else can we get? You know what? We need our park refurbished. And we need a senior citizen's center. Then it was, we need new street lights, and we need paved streets and a new sewer system. And literally watching my parents--and again, my parents were not people who were in the newspaper, didn't have mega homes, didn't go down to the City Council. They weren't in the paper or on television, but they were just your real-life community activists who cared about their neighborhood and all of the things that they fought for, they got. And so I watched as a child, I literally watched parents who understood the value of change, the value of activism, the value of commitment and never forgot it.$And just going there [National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) convention in New York], and, in fact, that's, the convention, I'd already decided I was running for the student rep on the board of directors, threw my name in the hat, same thing. And, in fact, going back to Parliamentary procedures with Junior Knights of St. Peter Claver, the guy who was a regional director forgot to submit my information for the ballot. And I was initially off the ballot, and I remember going to his hotel room, this John Hansen, and I said, you're going to fix this or I will do everything in my power to destroy you at every turn. So I was always--and people were like, man, I can't believe you threatened him like that. I said, he screwed up. I said, he screwed up, and it was so badly run, the student election was so--they blew us off so bad that they really even forgot I was in the election. Thirteen students were there, thirteen students, no, sixteen students were there, sixteen students. I won thirteen to three. And the rest is history. Students, everything that most of the students have today, I led and created. It was, and the board had never, and, again, I go back to KPC, I go back to catering, I go back to all of that leadership development. The board had never, ever come across--I was the second student rep. The first one, she never even showed up. To this day, I never even met her. And so they were like, you know, who is this kid? They had never, ever come across a high school student, a college student like me 'cause when I went to board meetings, I went to board meetings. I read the constitution, the bylaws, procedures, and I got more, I got more initiatives passed than any other board member while I was on the board. And it was, it was an interesting experience, and, in fact, I was on the board with Jonathan Rodgers, who later became, later was the one who hired me at TV One. Neal Foote who made it happen for me to get hired at 'Black America Web', Neal was on the board. And so, so many different folks, but that experience also was critical in terms of my development because that's where I got to meet some of the top people in media, head hunters, organizational folks, all the different media companies. And so that, the NABJ has played a crucial role, the most significant role, I would say, in my professional career.$$Okay.

Maj. Gen. Marcelite Harris

Major General Marcelite J. Harris was born in Houston, Texas on January 16, 1943 to Cecil O’Neal Jordan and Marcelite Terrell Jordan, Sr. Harris graduated from Kashmere Gardens High School before attending Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia in 1960. After graduating from Spelman with her B.A. degree in speech and drama in 1964, Harris enrolled at Lackland Air Force Base for military training and then joined the Women in the Air Force (WAF) program. She also earned her B.S. degree in business management from the University of Maryland.

Harris enrolled in an Aircraft Maintenance Officer Course at Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois in 1970. One year later, Harris was named a maintenance supervisor for the 49th Tactical Fighter Squadron at the Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base in Thailand. She successively held the positions of job control officer and field maintenance supervisor at the 916th Air Refueling Squadron at Travis Air Force Base in California. In 1975, Harris was named personnel staff officer and White House social aide under the Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter presidential administrations before becoming an air officer commanding for the Cadet Squadron 39 at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Harris then served as the maintenance control officer for the 384th Air Refueling Wing at McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas. She was the first woman to hold the post of commander of the 384th Avionics Maintenance Squadron at the McConnell Air Force Base in 1981 before assuming the role of commander for the 384th Field Maintenance Squadron. In 1982, Harris was named the director of maintenance at the Pacific Air Forces Logistic Support Center at Kadena Air Base in Japan. Four years later, she became deputy commander for maintenance at Keesler Air Force Base in Mississippi. Harris was the first women to hold the positions in those just listed.

In 1990, Harris took the position of vice commander for the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker Air Force Base and later became the director of technical training at the Air Education and Training Command Headquarters at Randolph Air Force Base in Texas. In 1994, Harris was named director of maintenance at the U.S. Air Force Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Before retiring from the Air Force, Harris helped to establish a permanent office for the Committee on Women in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), within its military committee.

Harris’s tenure with the Air Force saw her rise from the rank of Second Lieutenant in 1965 to Major General thirty years later, becoming the first ever African American Female General.
Harris joined the United States Alliance as Director of Operations Support and Logistics Processes in 1999. She also served a brief time as the chief of staff for New York Schools Chancellor Joel I. Klein. In 2010, Harris was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as a member of the Board of Visitors for the United States Air Force Academy. She has been featured in Ebony and was the recipient of the Trailblazer Award by the Black Girls Rock Foundation. Harris is listed in many Who’s Who publications.

Maj. Gen. Marcelite J. Harris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 21, 2012.

Harris passed away on September 7, 2018.

Accession Number

A2012.074

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/21/2012

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Middle Name

J

Occupation
Schools

Spelman College

University of Maryland

Harvard Kennedy School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Marcelite

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

HAR33

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Let your reach far exceed your grasp.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/16/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Barbecue

Death Date

9/7/2018

Short Description

Major general Maj. Gen. Marcelite Harris (1943 - 2018) is the first African American woman ever to be named General in the United States Air Force and the first African American woman ever to become a Major General in the Department of Defense.

Employment

New York City Board of Education

United Space Alliance

United States Air Force

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36200">Tape: 1 Slating of Marcelite Harris' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36201">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36202">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36203">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris talks about her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36204">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris describes her maternal great-great grandfather's life as a slave and his success as a blacksmith as a free man</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36205">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris talks about her mother's growing up in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36206">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36207">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris talks about her parents' education and their life in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36208">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris talks about how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36209">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris talks about her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36210">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris describes her likeness to her father and Pilgrim Congregational Church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36211">Tape: 1 Marcelite Harris describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36212">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36213">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience in elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36214">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about her personality and her interests as a youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36215">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about her family's first television set</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36216">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris describes her experience in junior high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36217">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about attending high school in Houston during the era of segregation, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36218">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about attending high school in Houston during the era of segregation, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36219">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about her favorite teacher in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36220">Tape: 2 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience in high school and going to the senior prom</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36221">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris describes her extracurricular activities in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36222">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris describes her decision to attend Spelman College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36223">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris talks about here experience at Spelman College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36224">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris talks about majoring in speech and drama at Spelman College and President Kennedy's assassination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36225">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris discusses the Civil Rights Movement and her involvement in the Student Movement while attending Spelman College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36226">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris discusses the Civil Rights Movement and the Student Movement in Atlanta in the early 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36227">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris talks about Lonnie C. King, Jr., and reflects upon the problems faced by the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36228">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris talks about looking for a job in theatre, law school, and becoming a teacher in the Head Start Program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36229">Tape: 3 Marcelite Harris describes her decision to join the U.S. Air Force in 1965</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36230">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris describes her experience in officer training school at the Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36231">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about her assignment in the 60th Military Airlift Wing at Travis AFB</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36232">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about her assignment at the 71st Tactical Mission Squadron at Bitburg Air Base in West Germany</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36233">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience as an African American and as a woman in the U.S. Air Force in the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36234">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about being titled as 'Miss Zero Defects' at Bitburg Air Base in West Germany</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36235">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about being assigned as a maintenance analysis officer and the role of women in the U.S. Air Force</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36236">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience at maintenance officer school at Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36237">Tape: 4 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience as maintenance supervisor for the 49th Tactical Fighter Squadron in Thailand</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36238">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris talks about having to fire a master sergeant</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36239">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris recalls handling a difficult situation concerning the inspection of ten F-4 planes</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36240">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris explains how on-the-job training helped develop her leadership skills</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36241">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris comments on the war in Vietnam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36242">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris describes her experience as job control officer at Travis Air Force Base</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36243">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris talks about taking charge of the field maintenance squadron</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36244">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris explains her supervisor's philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36245">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris talks about standards in the military that were aimed at blacks and their hair</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36246">Tape: 5 Marcelite Harris comments on the lack of recognition for black culture in the military</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36247">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about being a member of the Air Force Management Improvement Group</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36248">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about being a White House aide and being promoted to Major</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36249">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience as Air Office Commanding at the Air Force Academy, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36250">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about her experience as Air Office Commanding at the Air Force Academy, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36251">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about her marriage to her husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36252">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris describes her promotion to lieutenant colonel and the birth of her daughter</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36253">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about her performance reports and being commander of Pack Aff Aircraft Logistics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36254">Tape: 6 Marcelite Harris talks about her assignment to Keesler Air Force Base in 1986</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36255">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris talks about the publicity she and her family received after she was promoted to brigadier general</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36256">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris discusses the roadblocks to her promotion as Major General</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36257">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris discusses her participation in NATO's Committee on Women, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36258">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris discusses her participation in NATO's Committee on Women, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36259">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris talks about her retirement, her high blood pressure and the death of her husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36260">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris discusses her post retirement activities, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36261">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris discusses her post retirement activities, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36262">Tape: 7 Marcelite Harris talks about her political plans and activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36263">Tape: 8 Marcelite Harris describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36264">Tape: 8 Marcelite Harris talks about the burdens for minorities in the military and befriending Daniel "Chappie" James</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36265">Tape: 8 Marcelite Harris reflects upon her legacy and her regrets</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36266">Tape: 8 Marcelite Harris discusses her family and how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/36267">Tape: 8 Marcelite Harris describes her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

7$7

DAStory

4$2

DATitle
Marcelite Harris discusses her participation in NATO's Committee on Women, pt. 2
Marcelite Harris discusses the roadblocks to her promotion as Major General
Transcript
I went to NATO. I met quite a few people; especially African American and women officers. And I took my women officers to NATO with me, took Tenecia with me, and there in Brussels; sat around the table, and I kind of outlined what I wanted. I didn't fill in the middle, because that is what I wanted the committee to do, was to fill in the middle of it. So when we had the meeting in NATO that next year, that's what I had them do. I broke everybody up, and I let them decide, "which committee do you want to work on?" Well, the British girl, who wasn't even a part of the committee anymore, the colonel from Britain, was all upset with me because I had--she wanted to--she had a way that she wanted it to be, but she was no longer on the committee; I'm in charge. You know, we gone(sp) do it my way. She wrote this letter about how Britain is abstaining from everything, and the British don't like this, and the British--and she passed it out to everyone of my members. I was livid. I told her--I had a closed meeting. The meetings in NATO were open, and you could bring as many military folks or civilians, or what have you, in there. So I just had a closed meeting, and I talked to those young ladies, and was older than all of them; they were so young. All the other services have women who are so much, you know, that are new to this function of air force, and the Portuguese are probably the latest to come in in the utilization of women. So I talked to them, and I told them about what was happening, what was going on and about loyalty, and what we do here. Everyone of them said, we don't feel this way, you know, general, we don't feel this way. I said okay. So we organized that way. And I was concerned about the treatment that the American women receive from countries where NATO was located--NATO forces were located and from some of the countries that NATO--the NATO--the U.S. people would be working with. Some of those countries, women are still subservient, and not in the progressive position that we are in the United States. And the expectations for my women, the U.S. women, probably would be a lot higher. So what I did is I got the United States to establish a pay-for position in NATO that would look after--it's kind of like the Committee on Women in the air force, the services, WAF [Women in the Air Force] and the WAC [Women's Army Corps] and all of those kind of ser--of things. They would look at the issues that impacted the women in those various countries and see what can be done, and to work with the NATO senior officers there to see if they could do some influence. I got all kind of kudos from the commander there from NATO on what we had done as a committee and what I had done as a committee. Got to go to Turkey. That was--the Turkish finally had it--had the committee, and got to go there. My trip to Turkey, I was still in charge, for some reason, I was retired then, though, on my trip to Turkey. But the Service paid my way--brought me in and paid my way and everything, because I was still a (unclear) and took me back. And we finally led the U.S. Got another U.S. delegate in for the remainder of the conferences.$But I'm also a woman who has some unique demographics. My career was nontraditional career field for women, I'm African American, I'm a woman and I'm a general. So I was called to sit on so many promotion boards. So many promotions boards that when it came my time to go up for two stars, my boss knocked me down. Here I get started again with my boss knocking me down on my performance report. And he said, "I did that because I think you need to stay under me a year longer because they pull you away from so many things." And I told him, I said, "You just don't work the assignment system with the promotion system. If you wanted me a year longer, don't block my promotion--block my promotion to keep me there." Well, the next year had to be '93 (1993), yeah, had to be '93 (1993), I guess. Anyway, that year, he came again when I'm supposed to be rated for general, two-star general, and he calls the four star and said, "Okay, you can promote Marci this time." And the four-star general said, "You killed Marci last year." So he tried--this is Joseph Spiers(sp). I'll never forget him. And so he gets me assigned under a four-star general at air education and training command in '93 (1993). And I worked for General Visoyal(sp). I had worked for him for three months, and he called and he said, "You're really good', he said, 'but you haven't been here long.'" So he rated me number three out of his six generals--six brigadier generals. He had more generals. But six brigadier generals, one stars. I didn't get promoted again. And I just couldn't take it. I said, "Okay. I'm going, I'll get out." He called me and he said, "I can't make you any promises, but why don't you stay in, and let's see what happens." Well, the next year, he rated me number one, and I got picked up for major general, even after all those strange reports I got in my records.$$So this was 1995?$$Yeah. I think I pinned on major general in '96 (1996).

David Lattin

Professional athlete and entrepreneur, David Lattin was born on December 23, 1943 in Houston Texas. His mother, Elsie Lattin, was widowed when Lattin’s father died in 1949. Lattin attended elementary and secondary schools in Houston before graduating from Evan E. Worthing Senior High School in 1963. Lattin was named All-State and All-American both his junior and senior years and was the first Texas player to be named to a High School All-American team.

Lattin left Tennessee State in 1964 citing the lack of basketball competition. He returned to Houston and played the AAAU before receiving a full scholarship to attend Texas Western College in 1965 where he played with the Miners, a Division 1 team in the NCAA. Under the leadership of Coach Don Haskins, the Miners won the 1966 Division 1 NCAA National Championship with five black starting players. Lattin was named All-American during the 1966 and 1967 seasons.

In 1967, Lattin left Texas Western College after he was drafted as the number one pick by the NBA’s San Francisco Warriors. He went on to play with the Phoenix Suns, the Pittsburgh Condors, and the Memphis Tams, ending his professional career with the Harlem Globe Trotters from 1973 to 1976. Returning to school, Lattin earned his B.S. degree in business administration and started several successful business ventures including Your Maison Housing.

Lattin was inducted into the Texas Black Sports Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2007. That year, he also wrote Slam Dunk to Glory.

Lattin has a son Clifton, a daughter Leslie, and several grandchildren.

David Lattin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 11, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.016

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/11/2010

Last Name

Lattin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

L.

Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

William E. Miller Junior High School

Evan E. Worthing Senior High School

University of Texas at El Paso

Tennessee State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

LAT04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

The Judge.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/23/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate foundation executive and basketball player David Lattin (1943 - ) was part of the historic Texas Western College team that was the first to start an all-black lineup at the NCAA championship. He went on to play for professional teams like the Phoenix Suns and the Harlem Globetrotters.

Employment

Golden State Warriors

Phoenix Suns

Memphis Tams

Harlem Globetrotters International

Republic National Distributing Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1600,23:2160,31:3040,50:5360,87:7440,118:11680,252:30452,491:32804,526:38516,661:53741,788:54033,793:61552,1074:81822,1354:94930,1510:102935,1651:120215,2029:120653,2036:128026,2145:131311,2181:141350,2391:141670,2396:143750,2441:144470,2448:148230,2554:164936,2791:170312,2885:183019,3003:192746,3249:201240,3355:204210,3411:209340,3497:227622,3781:230150,3827:240580,3948:242020,4029:245780,4122:255960,4210$0,0:1048,13:2358,23:8960,56:19551,154:29740,306:30068,311:32610,358:33102,365:41110,468:41510,477:57666,751:57938,756:59366,800:62086,877:65962,1015:66234,1020:66914,1077:84165,1379:84520,1385:87431,1480:93578,1522:97924,1608:98334,1614:102434,1695:102926,1702:106862,1793:119790,1919:132678,2080:141266,2250:143318,2311:149622,2388:150196,2397:152328,2438:173120,2961:182206,3101:183447,3134:192572,3358:193010,3365:193375,3371:194981,3398:201245,3459:213947,3616:214375,3621:215830,3626:217343,3651:220006,3689:222086,3714:223850,3726:224305,3735:237400,3865:242734,3983:265058,4253:266612,4278:267204,4290:269054,4330:275060,4414:275860,4429:283277,4539:296698,4740:297230,4750:301334,4835:301714,4841:303766,4893:304298,4901:314453,5010:316597,5060:317937,5089:318808,5116:319813,5152:320148,5158:321354,5187:322359,5206:323833,5246:329570,5332:330220,5357:333230,5417
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614214">Tape: 1 Slating of David Lattin's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614215">Tape: 1 David Lattin lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614216">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614217">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614218">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614219">Tape: 1 David Lattin recalls his childhood activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614220">Tape: 1 David Lattin remembers his community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614221">Tape: 1 David Lattin recalls his involvement with the Boy Scouts and YMCA</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614222">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his experiences at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614223">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614224">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his junior high school experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614225">Tape: 1 David Lattin describes his early success as a basketball player</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614226">Tape: 1 David Lattin remembers his first basketball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614227">Tape: 2 David Lattin remembers learning to swim</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614228">Tape: 2 David Lattin describes his college scholarship offers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614229">Tape: 2 David Lattin remembers his mentor, Lloyd C.A. Wells</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614230">Tape: 2 David Lattin describes his senior year at Evan E. Worthing High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614231">Tape: 2 David Lattin recalls his experiences at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614232">Tape: 2 David Lattin describes his first impressions of the Texas Western College of the University of Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614233">Tape: 2 David Lattin describes the basketball team at Texas Western College of the University of Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614234">Tape: 2 David Lattin remembers Coach Don Haskins</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614235">Tape: 2 David Lattin talks about his transition to college basketball</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614236">Tape: 3 David Lattin recalls the first game in the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614237">Tape: 3 David Lattin talks about the NCAA final game against the University of Kentucky</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614238">Tape: 3 David Lattin remembers Coach Adolph Rupp</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614239">Tape: 3 David Lattin describes the final game of the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614240">Tape: 3 David Lattin recalls his preparation for the NCAA finals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614241">Tape: 3 David Lattin talks about slam dunking</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614242">Tape: 3 David Lattin recalls winning the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614243">Tape: 3 David Lattin describes the aftermath of his victory at the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614244">Tape: 3 David Lattin recalls being drafted by the Golden State Warriors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614245">Tape: 4 David Lattin describes his professional basketball career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614246">Tape: 4 David Lattin talks about his children and business career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614247">Tape: 4 David Lattin shares his opinion on student athletes' compensation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614248">Tape: 4 David Lattin describes his mentorship efforts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/614249">Tape: 4 David Lattin reflects upon his legacy and message to future generations</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

12$4

DATitle
David Lattin describes his early success as a basketball player
David Lattin describes the final game of the 1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament
Transcript
Now you, you said very quickly about how, how you built up your stamina, stamina to be able to, to play the following year during that summer that you grew. Can you tell me again, you, you said you rode your bike to--$$Rice Stadium [Houston, Texas].$$Rice Stadium, okay--$$Right.$$--and what did you do?$$Ran seventeen hundred stairs a day in the sun at about two o'clock in the afternoon. I knew nothing about nutrition. I don't know why I didn't pass out (laughter).$$Okay, so you, you were ready once you got to the new school?$$Yeah, because it was--and actually even though I was running the stairs I was playing basketball as well, so I was getting my skills together and I was getting stronger and then I found out I could jump and then the rest is history.$$Okay, so now, what high school do you go to?$$I went to Worthing [Evan E. Worthing High School, Houston, Texas], Attucks [Crispus Attucks Junior High School; Crispus Attucks Middle School, Houston, Texas] first and then--Attucks was Worthing and then they built another, a bigger high school, senior high school and that was Worthing, so I left Attucks and went to Worthing.$$And tell my about the experience there?$$At Worthing?$$Um-hm.$$It was a good experience for me because in the eleventh grade, when I got to the eleventh grade then I was high school All-American and I was the first high school All-American from the State of Texas in basketball at that level and so things started to really happen for me after that because the day that I was All-American, yeah, I got to tell you this story. They was announcing that I was All-American, the principal announced on the PA system that, you know, "We have an All-American in our school in basketball and it's Big D [HistoryMaker David Lattin]" and all that stuff you know, so everybody was--had a great time with that and so I got home that afternoon and somebody had called my mom [Elsie Boyd Davis] and gave her this pitch about I was the high school All-American, so I had my feet propped up on the coffee table and she walked in the door, she said--I'll never forget this, this is funny, she said, "Okay, Mr. High School All, All-American, it's okay that you are high school All-American, but get your foot off my coffee table." I said, "Yes ma'am, yes ma'am, yes ma'am." (Laughter), "You still can't put your foot on my coffee table."$$Your mother, was she very supportive? Did she come to your games?$$My mother never saw me play but once when I was playing for the Globetrotters [Harlem Globetrotters]. If I told my mother that--she couldn't tell you what a rebound was. She knew nothing about the game, didn't really care. All she cared about was that I was having fun and I was happy, so she knew nothing about the game at all.$$Did your grades get better?$$My grades did improve. There was a teacher by the name of Ms. Douglas [ph.] in high school and she was an English teacher and she was quite serious about making good grades, about everybody making good grades, so she would stay back and make sure that all the athletes, not just me, but other athletes as well, if they weren't studying like they were suppose to then she would make sure that, that they got their homework together before they left school. And actually she would stay until after basketball practice was over and we would go down in her room and she would, she would work with everybody, make sure that everybody got their grades together; because it was very stressful going to school, being an athlete and then having to--and the last thing you felt like doing was studying after practice, so you know, it's very difficult. The athletes have to, have to, they have to compete in the classroom the same, just like everybody else, there's no excuse.$$Were there rules in place that said that athletes had to have a certain average?$$No, there was, there were no rules in place that they had to, but everyone was aware that they, that that's this was what they needed to do. I mean, the guy--the kids were not like the kids are now, you know, you could talk to us, you know. If somebody said something that made sense, I mean, most, most of us would listen, so, it's nothing like it is now.$With all the publicity about you and, and your team, to keep you from not being so cocky you said that the, the coach [Don Haskins] would make you work a little harder, but did you begin to see that it wasn't this tournament [1966 NCAA University Division Basketball Tournament] and the players--it wasn't just about you and basketball, but that there was a bigger picture?$$Oh absolutely and of course, in the beginning we were just playing basketball, but you know, later in life, you know, the next year for instance--right after the game no reporters came to our locker room to talk to us. Nobody brought--put mics in front of our face to, to get an interview or anything. And so you know never--we didn't think about it that much, you know, we just were anxious to get back to El Paso [Texas] where everybody--we had a lot of love there, in El Paso. It's just that the newspaper guys were stunned, you know, they didn't know what to write after the game because, you know, they thought it was going to be a walk over. They didn't know what to say, you know, this team with five African American players on, on the court beat all white Kentucky [University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky]--it was impossible, can't happen. They really did not know what to say or what to write. They were just, they were just stunned and, and no one after the game mentioned anything about five African American players had defeated all the white boys at Kentucky, nobody talked about that, not until next year when it really, when it really hit home and Sports Illustrated wrote articles and started writing and stuff about all of the, the African American players that had beat all white Kentucky, that's when it really, really, really hit home. No one said anything in the beginning because it took a while to catch on to what had happened.$$This, this--well, walk me through when you got off the bus to play this, this game, I mean, this, this changes history for the N- NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association]? Describe for me that game.$$You know, getting off the bus, first of all, we're living in a hotel where the Duke team [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina] and all its supporters stayed in the same hotel as we did. We didn't have hardly anybody there, just Bobby Joe Hill's brother and sister and a few others from Detroit [Michigan]. And they had "Go Duke" all over the place, I mean, I mean we couldn't hardly even walk out of the door, everything was Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, Duke, not, nothing for Texas Western [Texas Western College of the University of Texas; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas]. We didn't have not one little sign, not anything. So the bus driver, I told the story about the bus driver, the bus driver in my book ['Slam Dunk to Glory,' David Lattin], where I was the last one to get off the bus, you know, I'm always the last one to get off the bus. I would get--I was getting--I was disembarking and the bus driver said to me, "Why are you playing this game? Why are you wasting your time? You cannot beat Kentucky. You cannot beat them. They've got a white coach and that's Adolph Rupp. You, you African American guys think you can beat Kentucky? You're out of your mind, are you crazy? Why don't you just get back on the bus and let me take you back to the hotel and just forget about this game." (Laughter) So anyway, I didn't say anything, I just looked at the guy, you know, and proceeded on to the, to the game. I saw him after the game; he didn't say anything he just kind of looked straight ahead.$$So how it--because you said that everything, there was no signs and you had very few supporters there. What was it like walking out onto the court?$$Wow, you know, with the Confederate flags flying all over the place and you know, all the signs you know, just, you know, some of the things that I can't tell you that were said (laughter), "We got them by the toe now, they can't get away, it's all over." (Laughter) But it was, it wasn't intimidating for me. I never felt for one second that we were going to lose. I was hoping, I was hoping that I could stay in the game, you know, because, because the referees can control the game because they can just call fouls at random and control the game if they need to. This was a final game with every, every, with everyone looking, so I guess they called, called it as close to being right as they could. I had four fouls anyway, but that's as close as it could be.$$So you felt that the refs were more or less true to form?$$I thought as, as well as they could be. I, I, I mean there were fouls--the first foul against Pat Riley was not a foul, you know, and if you look at the tape over and over, and over, Pat--I talked to Pat about it--he said, "No man, it was a foul," you know, but still again I had to live with that. So I had to be very careful that I would--couldn't, couldn't foul out of the game. I had to be very, very careful. There were things I just couldn't do, I mean the coach had complained about the--about me, and the game and, and I talk about that in the book a little bit. The night before some of the games the coaches complained that they couldn't let me get away with some of the things I was doing, you know and I wasn't really doing anything, but just working harder under the basket doing what I do, you know, and that's about it, but--

H. B. Barnum

Legendary music producer and arranger H. B. Barnum has worked with an extraordinary cross-spectrum of performers in his long career. Barnum was born Hidle Brown Barnum, Jr., on July 15, 1936, in Houston, Texas. At age four, he won a nationwide talent contest for his singing and piano playing, which launched a film and radio career that included appearances on Amos ‘n’ Andy and The Jack Benny Program. Barnum recorded his first solo album at the age of fourteen as Pee Wee Barnum. He attended Manual Arts High School in Los Angeles, California.

In 1955, Barnum co-founded the short-lived doo-wop group, The Dootones, at the request of Dootone label owner, Dootsie Williams. When the group broke up, he joined another doo-wop group, The Robins. Barnum began producing for The Robins in 1958, and also recorded a single on his own. Barnum had his first major hit as a producer when Dodie Stevens’ “Tan Shoes and Pink Shoelaces” reached the U.S. Top 5 in 1959. Although he recorded three albums during the 1960s – The Record, The Big Voice of Barnum – H. B., That Is, and Everyone Loves H. B. – Barnum, That Is – as well as the hit single “Lost Love,” his work as a producer and an arranger began to outpace his musical career. Barnum’s reputation flourished after he joined Capitol Records, where he often worked in collaboration with producer and longtime friend David Axelrod, forging an innovative orchestral jazz-funk sensibility much copied and sampled in later decades. Barnum has arranged for many notable musicians including Gladys Knight & The Pips, Johnny Bristol, Lamont Dozier, Jimmy Norman, Aretha Franklin, Count Basie, Etta James, Nancy Wilson, Martha Reeves, The Temptations, The Jackson 5, The Marvelettes, O.C. Smith, Frank Sinatra, Lou Rawls, The Supremes, Al Wilson, B.B. King and Puff Daddy. By the mid-1970s, Barnum switched from pop music to television, scoring countless series and specials in addition to composing numerous advertising jingles. He won international awards for his musical compositions for commercials. Barnum has claimed to be responsible for around 100 gold LPs and 160 gold singles.

Beginning in 1967, Barnum has held an annual Thanksgiving dinner for the homeless in his Los Angeles community. In 1981, he founded and began directing H. B. Barnum’s Life Choir, a large well-known gospel group that assists him in helping feed nearly one thousand needy people every Thanksgiving. Barnum has also served as minister of music at St. Paul’s Baptist Church of Los Angeles.

Accession Number

A2008.110

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/16/2008

Last Name

Barnum

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Manual Arts High School

Utah Street Elementary School

First Name

H.B.

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

BAR11

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Golfing

Favorite Quote

Praise The Lord.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/15/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cobbler (Peach)

Short Description

Music producer H. B. Barnum (1936 - ) has arranged music for many notable jazz, R & B and pop musicians over several decades, and has won international awards for his musical compositions for commercials.

Employment

Little Star Records

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:3880,52:14840,352:20376,470:38090,821:38525,827:46007,1025:46442,1031:51322,1123:74884,1610:83090,1676:86015,1766:86540,1775:91179,1818:92559,1849:96915,1898:97340,2010:101080,2088:114170,2394:116295,2433:131508,2625:149384,2892:155754,3030:160304,3148:169905,3297:171440,3305$0,0:12902,192:20376,569:30886,669:44400,861:45008,894:48580,1009:50328,1043:63790,1199:67054,1236:67418,1241:68055,1250:68692,1259:69420,1269:69875,1275:70239,1280:72787,1341:77920,1430:92640,1905:100760,2000
DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609243">Tape: 1 Slating of H. B. Barnum's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609244">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609245">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609246">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum talks about his mother's dreams and aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609247">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum talks about his father's family background and career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609248">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum remembers leaving Texas with his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609249">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum remembers becoming a child radio actor in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609250">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum describes the Aliso Village in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609251">Tape: 1 H. B. Barnum describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609252">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609253">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum remembers his mother's jobs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609254">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum rememberrs Eddie "Rochester" Anderson and Nick Stewart</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609255">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum describes his extracurricular activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609256">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum remembers Hollenbeck Junior High School in Los Angeles, California, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609257">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum remembers Hollenbeck Junior High School in Los Angeles, California, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609258">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum describes the fights between students at Hollenback Junior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609259">Tape: 2 H. B. Barnum recalls registering at Manual Arts High School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609260">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum recalls meeting his childhood mentor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609261">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum recalls his early musical talent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609262">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum remembers playing on the football team at Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609263">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum remembers his early aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609264">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum remembers playing in bands as a teenager</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609265">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum talks about H. B. Barnum and the Circats</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609266">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum remembers his early touring experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609267">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum describes his experiences of racial discrimination in Tennessee, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609268">Tape: 3 H. B. Barnum describes his experiences of racial discrimination in Tennessee, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609269">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum recalls being stopped by the police in Florida</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609270">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum describes an experience of discriminatory policing in Sanderson, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609271">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum remembers performing with The Dootones</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609272">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum remembers his start as a music arranger</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609273">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum talks about his record labels</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609274">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum remembers writing the arrangement of 'Pink Shoe Laces'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609275">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum recalls his attempt to play at country music club in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609276">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum remembers his recordings in the late 1950s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609277">Tape: 4 H. B. Barnum talks about his music's popularity in Europe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609278">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum remembers serving as Dinah Washington's pianist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609279">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum remembers recording Lou Rawls' 'Live!' album</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609280">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum recalls recording the music of O.C. Smith</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609281">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum remembers his work with the O'Jays</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609282">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum recalls buying a home in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609283">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum recalls buying a home in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609284">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum talks about his annual Thanksgiving dinner</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609285">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum remembers his paternal aunt</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609286">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum talks about writing musical arrangements for commercials</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609287">Tape: 5 H. B. Barnum remembers establishing the LIFE Choir</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609288">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum describes the LIFE choir</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609289">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum reflects upon the lessons of older generations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609290">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum talks about his musical arrangement clientele</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609291">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum remembers learning to write music arrangements</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609292">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum reflects upon the universality of music</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609293">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum remembers conducting the Cincinnati Orchestra</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609294">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum recalls meeting Placido Domingo's conductor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609295">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum talks about the politics of musicians' contracts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609296">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum describes his sister's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609297">Tape: 6 H. B. Barnum talks about his early musical performances</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609298">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum remembers an Aretha Franklin show in Paris, France, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609299">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum remembers an Aretha Franklin show in Paris, France, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609300">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum remembers dealing with gangsters at Aretha Franklin's concerts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609301">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609302">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609303">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/609304">Tape: 7 H. B. Barnum describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
H. B. Barnum recalls his early musical talent
H. B. Barnum remembers recording Lou Rawls' 'Live!' album
Transcript
So, the next thing that happened was (makes sound), that tuba I was carrying was heavy and cold--that old tuba, you know, and I only weighed 125 pounds. So I went up to Mr. Ferrar [John Ferrar (ph.)], "Mr. Ferrar," I say, "I don't wanna play the tuba anymore." He say, "Why not?" I say, "Because I, I wanna play something else." He say, "Well, you can't play anything else." I say, "But I could learn something else." He said, "How you gonna learn it?" I said, I said, "Can I, can I take something home and learn?" He say, "Yeah. Are you gonna learn by yourself?" I say, "Yes, sir." He says, "What are you wanna learn?" I say, I say, "What do you need in the band?" He say, "We need clarinets." I say, "Can I, can I take a clarinet home?" He say, "Yeah, you can take it home." He just laughed, you know. About three weeks later, somebody else was carrying the tuba, and I was playing with the clarinets. I mean I went home and just got that thing and looked at the book and (demonstrates). So this began a whole thing with me because Mr. Ferrar, he would challenge me to things, you know. Like, like he would say, "Aw, look, they need a--there's gonna be an opening in the all-city orchestra for French horn next semester." I say, "Ooh, you think I could do it?" He said, "Nah, you couldn't do it." I say, "Well, can I borrow a French horn?" "Yes, sir." And next year, I was in this all-city orchestra playing French horn. And that's the way I learned how to play different instruments; it was almost like, it was almost like somebody learning languages; I could learn instruments by myself, and I could've just played in the orchestra at school and then play in the all-city orchestra and, and I, I developed piano playing by just sitting down and learning, and it was, it was almost like a game, you know. But I can see what he did--now I can see it; I couldn't see it then. So--and I used to hate him 'cause sometime he'd make me feel--I mean he--you know, he'd say, "How do you think you're gonna learn that? It takes people years to learn something like that," you know. I say, "Well I--can I, can I take it home?" I even took a bass home one time, and I didn't get home 'til almost eleven o'clock 'cause nobody would pick me up in--hitchhiking, you know. So I had to wait 'til almost eleven o'clock 'til a guy on the bus--streetcar let me get on with the, with the bass. 'Cause when I was with people, you know, he would make it--so I really--I mean Mr. Ferrar was a guy that just, just drove me, drove me, drove me, and drove me.$$Now, how many instruments did you learn how to play?$$Well, in high school [Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, California] I learned how to play French horn, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, harp, all--the percussion stuff was easy 'cause just a matter of (demonstrates), you know. So, I could basically play anything that there is to play, you know. So--and I got good enough where I could, you know, I couldn't do no, no solos, but if I had to sit in a section and play a part, I could do that 'cause I could read very good, you know--read the music very good. So that, that kind of got me through school, you know--that and playing a little football, running a little track and stuff. I didn't have to go to too many classes.$I've had some, you know--Lou Rawls. I mean Lou and I met--Lou--I knew Lou but I didn't really know him. I knew who he was and everything. He was coming out of Capitol [Capitol Records] one night and--on the elevator, and he, he gets on the elevator, you know, "Hey, man, how you, how you doing?" You know. And he was looking a little sad. I said, "What's the matter?" He said, "I just got dropped from Capitol." This is after he was on an album with Onzy Matthews--good album, but he wasn't selling any records. Lou--I say, "Well, man, you can't drop you like that; come on back upstairs." This was--my friend, Dave Axelrod [David Axelrod] had just got hired that day at Capitol, A and R [artists and repertoire] man. So I went up and said, "Hey man, Dave, you--man, they dropped my man; you gotta take of him, man." I didn't really know Lou. Dave said, "I can't sign him at--man, they just dropped him. I'll sign him, I'm just here--they'll fire me the first day." I said--and Dave and I have been friends for life, and we're, we're like brothers now. I said, "Man, are you my friend or not?" Dave said, "Man." So Dave came up with a great idea. "We'll cut a demo, just use four musicians." And that way he can get some money to save his house and stuff like that, you know. And the money from the demo'll take care of that. And throughout the thing, we got to talking and thought about inviting people in, some of them--had people sit around and be there; it was a live album--biggest album he ever had.$$Now, that, that Lou Rawls album, 'Live!' where he talks and that sort of thing, about Walgreens [Walgreens Company] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's right, that's right, that's right.$$--and Chicago [Illinois], the hawk, and all that?$$And all that stuff--that talk and stuff didn't--that's not Lou's stuff; that stuff came from Johnny Watson. Johnny Watson was doing that long before--you know. But they, they were great friends, it's, it's all right, you know.

Mattelia B. Grays

The 18th International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Sorority Incorporated (1970-1974), Mattelia Bennett Grays was born in Houston, Texas to the Reverend and Mrs. A.B. Bennett. Bennett graduated as salutatorian from Booker T. Washington High School in 1948 and went on to attend Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana, where she was initiated into the AKA Sorority in the Beta Upsilon Chapter. She received her B.A. degree from Dillard University in 1952 and was married to Horace Grays the same year. The couple has one daughter, Karen, and a grandson, Kristopher John Howard.

Grays went on to receive her M.A. degree with honors in special education from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and later received her Doctorate in educational administration from Pacific University in Sacramento, California in 1985. Grays returned to Houston to teach in the Houston Public Schools, where she also worked as a consultant for the Continuous Progress Learning Corporation and principal of Rogers Educational Enrichment Center. Grays served as principal of Rogers Educational Enrichment Center from 1970 to 1987. Under her leadership, the center served as a teacher training center and was named “One of Six Super Schools” by Texas Monthly magazine. After several years in Houston Public Schools, she began working summers with the University of Houston as a supervisor of laboratory experiences for teachers of culturally deprived children. She became District Three Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District in 1987. Grays transferred her AKA Sorority membership to the Alpha Kappa Omega Chapter in Houston and served as Chapter President and Regional Director of the Sorority’s South Central Region. She was the youngest person ever elected National President of the Sorority in 1968 and was installed at the Sorority’s biennial national convention in 1970.

As National President, Grays emphasized member involvement and was adamant about every member embracing her financial responsibility to the Sorority. She headed the Sorority’s effort to purchase the birthplace of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and presented a check for $20,000 to Coretta Scott King. Her focus as Sorority President included Negro heritage brochures, chapter programs designed for the specific community that the chapter served, educational grants, Job Corps and leadership training.

Grays retired from the Houston Independent School District and continues to reside in Houston, Texas. She has been honored by several organizations including the AKA Sorority. AKA Sorority’s South Central Region has a scholarship fund named in her honor, and she is an Outstanding Alumna of the Booker T. Washington High School in Houston.

Grays was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 11, 2008 as part of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority’s Centennial Boule 2008 celebration. Segments of these interviews were used in a DVD entitled A.K.A. Sorority: Legacy of Leadership.

Accession Number

A2008.044

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/11/2008

Last Name

Grays

Maker Category
Middle Name

B.

Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Dillard University

University of Michigan

First Name

Mattelia

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

GRA08

Favorite Season

Fall, Winter

Sponsor

Alpha Kappa Alpha

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cities

Favorite Quote

Live Every Day As If It Were Your Last Because Tomorrow Is Not Promised To You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/26/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Association chief executive and school superintendent Mattelia B. Grays (1931 - ) was the eighteenth international president of AKA Sorority, Inc., serving from 1970 to 1974. She was also the youngest person ever elected National President of the Sorority in 1968. Grays also served as Deputy Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District.

Employment

Houston Independent School District

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Turquoise

DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598826">Tape: 1 Slating of Mattelia B. Grays' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598827">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598828">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays describes her election as the vice president of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598829">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays describes her roles in the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598830">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays describes her leadership style, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598831">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays talks about her mentors</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598832">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays describes her initiatives for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598833">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays talks about the regional directors of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598834">Tape: 1 Mattelia B. Grays describes her leadership style, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598835">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays talks about maintaining the legacy of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598836">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays remembers the mentorship of Larzette Hale-Wilson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598837">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays recalls opening the AKA boule banquet to men</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598838">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon her tenure as the supreme basileus of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598839">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays recalls leading the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to purchase the King family home</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598840">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays describes her friendship with Esther Payne</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598841">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays talks about her motivations as a leader</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598842">Tape: 2 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon her achievements at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598843">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays describes her hopes for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598844">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays recalls her pinning as supreme basileus of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598845">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon her legacy at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598846">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon her legacy at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598847">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays describes how she would like to be remembered within the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598848">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon her commitment to the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598849">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays talks about the future of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598850">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon the importance of sisterhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598851">Tape: 3 Mattelia B. Grays talks about the requirements of members in the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598852">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays reflects upon the value of sisterhood for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598853">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays describes her mother's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598854">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays describes her mother's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598855">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays recalls her mother's role as a caregiver</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598856">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays remembers her father's hardworking nature</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598857">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays describes her paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598858">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays talks about her father's personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598859">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598860">Tape: 4 Mattelia B. Grays recalls her mother's occupation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598861">Tape: 5 Mattelia B. Grays narrates her photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/598862">Tape: 5 Mattelia B. Grays narrates her photographs, pt. 2</a>

Faye Beverly Bryant

21st International President of Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Sorority, Inc., Faye Beverly Bryant was born on March 15, 1937, in Houston, Texas. Under Bryant’s leadership, the theme of the AKA Sorority became P.O.W.E.R. During her tenure, Bryant also created the Alpha Kappa Alpha Connection, completed construction on the Sorority’s national headquarters and initiated the African Village Development Program in collaboration with Africare.

Bryant was initiated into the Alpha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority at Howard University in 1955. After graduating from Howard University with her B.A. degree, Bryant returned to Houston and transferred her affiliation to the Alpha Kappa Omega Chapter of Houston in 1957. She went on to earn her M.A. degree in counseling and guidance from the University of Houston. In Houston, Bryant was instrumental in establishing the Epsilon Lambda Chapter at the University of Houston and worked as a teacher in the Houston Independent School District where the 18th International President of AKA Sorority, Ms. Mattelia B. Grays, served as Deputy Superintendent. After teaching at Booker T. Washington High School and serving as a counselor at Bellaire High School, Bryant worked as the Director of Magnet Schools for the Houston Independent School District. She was later hired as the Deputy Superintendent of Human Resources and the Deputy Superintendent for School Administration. She also served as Interim Superintendent of the Houston Independent School District.

In 1982, Bryant succeeded Barbara K. Phillips as International President of the AKA Sorority and Programs of service, Organizational impact, Women in global issues and Economic development and Renewal (P.O.W.E.R.) became the agenda for the Sorority. Bryant’s administration also sought to improve the communication with individual members by approving cluster meetings where AKA Sorority members from various chapters could convene. In addition, Bryant initiated a governmental relations team to represent the Sorority at various government affairs. Bryant added the Alpha Kappa Alpha Connection to the Sorority’s list of programs and registered new voters for the 1984 U.S. Presidential election. During her tenure, Bryant met with the Council of Presidents of the eight predominantly black Greek organizations and launched a drive to leverage the collective power of Greek organizations.

In 1998, Bryant became the first African American to serve as Deputy Superintendent for School Administration in the Houston Independent School District. In 2002, Bryant retired from the school board as Executive Deputy Superintendent after forty-two years of service.

Bryant passed away on February 20, 2020.

Faye Beverly Bryant was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 11, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.043

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/11/2008

2/5/2013

Last Name

Bryant

Maker Category
Middle Name

Beverly

Schools

Blanche Kelso Bruce Elementary School

E.O. Smith Middle School

Phillis Wheatley High School

University of Houston

Howard University

First Name

Faye

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

BRY01

Favorite Season

Winter

Sponsor

Alpha Kappa Alpha

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises, The Bahamas

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/15/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Death Date

2/2/2020

Short Description

Association chief executive and school superintendent Faye Beverly Bryant (1937 - 2020) was the twenty-first International President of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., and served between 1982 and 1986. She also was the first African American to serve as Assistant Superintendent for Enrichment Programs in the Houston Independent School District.

Employment

Blue Triangle Branch, YWCA

Houston Independent School District

Booker T. Washington High School

Bellaire High School

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608128">Tape: 1 Slating of Faye Beverly Bryant's interview, session 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608129">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608130">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her election as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608131">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her inspiration to run as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608132">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608133">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls the inspiration behind her initiatives at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608134">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her vision to ensure the longevity of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608135">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her tenure as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608136">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her leadership style</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608137">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her responsibility as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608138">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers former supreme basileus Marjorie Holloman Parker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608139">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls the lessons she learned as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608140">Tape: 1 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers the challenges she faced as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608141">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about impeding false information within Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608142">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her success as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608143">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her tenure as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608144">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her greatest moments as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608145">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her legacy as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608146">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant describes how she would like to be remembered as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608147">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the legacy of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608148">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant shares her hopes for the future of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608149">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the greatest challenge for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608150">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant describes elements of a perfect sisterhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608151">Tape: 2 Faye Beverly Bryant shares her vision for the future of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608152">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608153">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her maternal grandmother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608154">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her mother's personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608155">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608156">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her family life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608157">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608158">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers the Fifth Ward neighborhood in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608159">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608160">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608161">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her father, Willie Bryant</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608162">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls joining the Girl Scouts of the United States of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608163">Tape: 3 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her educational background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608164">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her experiences at Blanche Kelso Bruce Elementary School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608165">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her extracurricular activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608166">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls attending E.O. Smith Middle School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608167">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her childhood aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608168">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls attending Phillis Wheatley High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608169">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her high school rivalry with Jack Yates Senior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608170">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her religious upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608171">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her high school influences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608172">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her college aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608173">Tape: 4 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her social activities in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608174">Tape: 5 Slating of Faye Beverly Bryant's interview, session 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608175">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her train ride to Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608176">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her first impressions of Howard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608177">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her professors at Howard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608178">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her classmates at Howard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608179">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka, 1954</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608180">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls pledging Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608181">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.'s service projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608182">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her extracurricular activities at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608183">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers Lucy Diggs Slowe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608184">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her summer activities during college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608185">Tape: 5 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls the political climate in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608186">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her political influences at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608187">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers her college graduation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608188">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her experiences working for the Blue Triangle Branch, YWCA in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608189">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the highlights of her tenure at the Blue Triangle Branch, YWCA</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608190">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls teaching at Booker T. Washington High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608191">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the high schools in the Houston Independent School District</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608192">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her curriculum at Booker T. Washington High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608193">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her role as a counselor at Bellaire High School in Bellaire, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608194">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers the Civil Rights Movement in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608195">Tape: 6 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her challenges as a counselor at Bellaire High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608196">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her initiatives as a counselor at Bellaire High School in Bellaire, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608197">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers Superintendent Billy Reagan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608198">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her appointment as director of the magnet school program for the Houston Independent School District</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608199">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about the magnet school program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608200">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her work with the U.S. Department of Justice</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608201">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about African American representation on the school board</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608202">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her position with the Houston Independent School District department of human services</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608203">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her role of deputy superintendent of instruction</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608204">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant remembers notable Texas politicians</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608205">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about the Houston Independent School District</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608206">Tape: 7 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls her role as deputy superintendent of administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608207">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her POWER program at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608208">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant describes the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.'s political involvement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608209">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant recalls creating a government relations team for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608210">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her role as executive deputy superintendent of Houston Independent School District</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608211">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant talks about her challenges as executive deputy superintendent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608212">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608213">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608214">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608215">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant reflects upon her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/608216">Tape: 8 Faye Beverly Bryant describes how she would like to remembered</a>

DASession

1$2

DATape

1$7

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Faye Beverly Bryant describes her vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
Faye Beverly Bryant talks about the magnet school program
Transcript
Well, speaking about leadership, what was your vision for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.]?$$Oh, I had, serving as supreme basileus of Alpha Kappa Alpha was very, very important to me. And I see Alpha Kappa Alpha with now more than two hundred thousand women as really POWER. And that was my program emphasis. Now, that acronym stood for programs of service. That's the P, organizational impact and collaboration, women involved in global issues, economic development, and renewal. I see any time you have a membership of two hundred thousand, you can make a difference in many different areas. And if you come together and collaborate with others, you have even a bigger impact. And so, we did a lot of collaboration during my tenure as national president, as well as trying to create that power, saying to sorors, you can run for office and your, your city council, and your county government, and your state government, and you can do that. We were able, you know, time has a lot to do with everything. During my tenure, it was a presidential election year and so, we did a lot of voter registration. We put one hundred thousand folks on the registration rolls during that time. It was a time that we had the first woman running for vice president, Geraldine Ferraro. We had the first black Miss America. I mean, there were things happening during that time, and that became a part of our thrust. We were very, very active with other groups in pushing our agenda. We got a chance to go to Kenya to the women's conference there and make a presentation with the Kenyan university women. And so, we were not only involved at home, but with women issues across the country. It was really, really an exciting time. When people see me coming now, they say, "There's that power lady," (laughter).$Now, what was the idea behind the magnet schools anyway?$$Our theme at that time was the finest education that money can't buy. That was the theme. That's how we sold it. We believe that if you create programs of interest to students that they will achieve. And so, we had themes at K through twelve [kindergarten to twelfth grade]. Fine arts, we had math and science. We had in the high school level, we had kids learn how to fly planes with air knot--I've forgotten that title of that school, but anyway, they learned how to fly a plane.$$Aviation?$$Aviation. We had chemical science, science program in one high school 'cause it's all industry in this area. And we had the support of our industries in this area. They helped to support those programs that we put together. We had foreign language programs. We had--Yates [Jack Yates Senior High School; Jack Yates High School, Houston, Texas] had a communications high school. They still--and these programs are still going, so, and we must have done a pretty good job. We--and so, thematic--if a kid is interested in music, he's going to do well in reading and everything else 'cause he's coming to school excited about what he's doing. We had horticulture for the little kids in elementary. We had--I'm trying, I'm going through them. As a part of that magnet school program, we set up a camping program where we took a predominantly white campus, a predominantly black, and a predominantly Hispanic, and they went to camp for a week. We own this property--well, a family owns this property up in the Huntsville area, called Camp Olympia [Trinity, Texas]--best experience those kids had. Then we had, we taught them while they were there, the outdoors, science, and, you know, and they still go there. It's a wonderful pro- but all of that, we tried to make it very exciting. We had to decide--where do you put these programs, so we chose campuses where it wouldn't be too difficult to transport kids. You had to do all of that as you created this program. And it's still real--the magnet schools, they line up to get in them right now. And so, as I look back with my involvement in the Hou--that's probably my legacy to the district [Houston Independent School District], the magnet school program.

Anthony R. Chase

CEO of ChaseSource LP and Chase Radio Partners Anthony Ray Chase was born on March 17, 1955, in Houston, Texas, to architect John Saunders Chase and teacher Drucie Chase. As a youth, Chase was a high achiever, a Boy Scout and eventually earned the status of Eagle Scout. He attended Lockhart Elementary School and graduated as class valedictorian. He was then recruited as one of the first African Americans to attend Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia.

In 1977, Chase graduated with honors from Harvard University with his B.A. degree in economics and government. Then, in 1981, he earned his M.B.A. and his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. Upon graduation, Chase returned to Houston and was hired at the investment banking firm of Rotan Mosley. He then moved to New York City where he worked for the investment firm of Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette, advising telecommunications and broadcast companies.

In 1990, Chase began teaching communications law and contracts at the University of Houston Law Center, where he has since been awarded tenure. In 1992, he purchased the Dallas-based radio station, KGGR, creating a black gospel radio network. Chase continued to purchase radio stations with formats ranging from country to rap in Texas, Louisiana and California. He then formed an alliance with Clear Channel Communications in San Antonio, Texas. Then, in 1992, Texas Governor Bill Clements appointed Chase to the Board of Regents at Texas Southern University.

Chase went on to found Chase Telecommunications in 1994. However, after three years in the wireless phone industry, he decided to sell his company to a Qualcomm affiliate in 1997. A year later, Chase started Chase Com and began providing both residential and business telecommunications services. Chase Com partnered with SBC Communications and became one of the first agents to offer SBC products and services nationwide. Later, in 1998, in an effort to bridge the digital divide, Chase co-founded the Telecom Opportunity Institute with SBC Communications. In 2000, he became the chief executive officer of Chase Radio Partners. The next year, he co-founded ChaseSource LP to manage the rapidly growing Staffing Solutions Division of ChaseCom. In 2007, ChaseCom was sold to AT&T. Chase is lead director on the board of Cornell, Companies, Inc.; and serves on the boards of Western Gas Partners, LP; Texas Medical Center; and Northern Trust Bank of Texas. He is Vice Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

Chase has received numerous awards and recognitions including: The Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Businessman of the Year Award conferred by the Business and Professional Men’s Club, the Lamont Godwin National Achievement Award from the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, Outstanding Young Businessman Award from Texas Business Magazine, and Bank of America’s Pinnacle Award.

Accession Number

A2008.042

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/10/2008

Last Name

Chase

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ray

Schools

Episcopal High School

Lockhart Elementary School

Harvard Business School

Harvard Law School

Harvard University

Cullen Middle

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

CHA09

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rocky Mountains

Favorite Quote

Try Your Best.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/17/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Management consulting entrepreneur and telecommunications entrepreneur Anthony R. Chase (1955 - ) was the CEO of ChaseSource LP and Chase Radio Partners. He was involved in business ventures in the wireless phone industry, the radio broadcasting industry and taught college courses on both law and business.

Employment

Rotan Mosle Inc.

Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette

University of Houston Law Center

ChaseSource

Chase Radio Partners

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620446">Tape: 1 Slating of Anthony R. Chase's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620447">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620448">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes his father's U.S. military service and education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620449">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620450">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620451">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes his mother's upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620452">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase talks about his parents' marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620453">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620454">Tape: 1 Anthony R. Chase describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620455">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase describes his parents' careers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620456">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase describes the Riverside Terrace community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620457">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase remembers the Civil Rights Movement in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620458">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase describes his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620459">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase remembers his involvement in the Boy Scouts of America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620460">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase recalls his early aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620461">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase remembers Cullen Junior High School in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620462">Tape: 2 Anthony R. Chase describes his parents' civil rights activities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620463">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase describes his experiences at Cullen Junior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620464">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase recalls his recruitment to Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Virginia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620465">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase describes his experiences at Episcopal High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620466">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase describes his activities at Episcopal High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620467">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase recalls his aspirations during high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620468">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase recalls returning to Houston, Texas during the summers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620469">Tape: 3 Anthony R. Chase describes his decision to attend Harvard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620470">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase recalls his classmates at Harvard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620471">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase describes his studies at Harvard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620472">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase recalls working at Harvard University's WHUR Radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620473">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase recalls his decision to apply to graduate school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620474">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase recalls his joint graduate degree program at Harvard University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620475">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase remembers his early career, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620476">Tape: 4 Anthony R. Chase remembers his early career, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620477">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase describes his work at Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620478">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase talks about KGGR Radio in Dallas, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620479">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase remembers Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620480">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase describes his career in academia and business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620481">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase recalls the regulatory reform of the broadcasting industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620482">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase describes his work with AT&T Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620483">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase remembers the Telecom Opportunity Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620484">Tape: 5 Anthony R. Chase talks about his leadership of corporate boards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620485">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase talks about his membership on governmental committees</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620486">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase describes his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620487">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620488">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase talks about the black alumni of Harvard Law School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620489">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/620490">Tape: 6 Anthony R. Chase shares a message to future generations</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Anthony R. Chase describes his career in academia and business
Anthony R. Chase describes his work with AT&T Inc.
Transcript
While you are operating these broadcast stations, you're still teaching. Are you still teaching?$$Yeah. I was until, you know, you know, my story is, is--I imagine everyone thinks their story is a little unique, but mine seems so to me. I mean, I bought the first station [KGGR Radio, Dallas, Texas] in '92 [1992]. And, then between '92 [1992] and '97 [1997] bought about a dozen more. During that same period, you know, I was, you know, a real communications entrepreneur, so somewhere about '95 [1995] I got involved in an auction to buy Spectrum [Spectrum Cellular Corporation, Dallas, Texas] from the federal government of which to offer cell phone service. And a business that I sold to Qualcomm in 1998. That business actually became Cricket phone [Cricket Wireless LLC] today which is, is--and, so, I went on, and so I was on the board of directors for Cricket until about a year ago, for the last ten or twelve years. And, then around '97 [1997] or so, I started a call center company that end up doing customer service principally for AT&T [AT&T Inc.], and that I sold to AT&T in December of last year. So, really, the businesses that I was involved in were three. There were the broadcasting, the radio broadcasting business. I owned one television station during that time, but it really wasn't significant in the, in the mix. And, then I owned a, started really, a cell phone service provider which is Cricket phone today. And, then I started this customer service business, which, which we just sold to AT&T. So, it really was the combination of those three business over the last fifteen years that I've spent the majority of my time prosecuting. And, and I did start, I was teaching full-time when I first bought that first radio station. Along around '94 [1994] I got tenure at the law school [University of Houston Law Center, Houston, Texas]. And, really, when I got tenured, I went to the dean and sugg- and thought that, you know, I had a few employees then and I had travel to do and other things that were, were occupying my time, and so I asked for a leave. And, I went on leave really until, until this semester. I sold, as I mentioned, I sold that last company to AT&T December, two or three months ago. And so, I went back to teach with tenure in 1994.$$So, in 1994, okay, well, let's go to '95 [1995], you publish an article, 'Race, Culture and Contract Law' ['Race, Culture, and Contract Law: From the Cottonfield to the Courtroom,' Anthony R. Chase]?$$Right.$$Can you talk to me about that?$$Sure. Sure. I published an article in the University of Connecticut Law Review [Connecticut Law Review] called, 'Race, Culture and Contract Law.' It really was about--contract law has always fascinated me, and I in part, and history it fascinated me as I sort of describing some of my courses that I particularly enjoyed in college [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. And, one of the things that was always of great interest was, now, how bargains are made. And, the fact that, at least during slavery, people were the subject of bargains, or property and traded back and forth. And so, understanding that dynamic was important to me. And, I also had an interest in understanding the dynamic of people who were different at the bargaining table. So, you know, and whether or not it made a difference if you were a woman bargaining for, you know, your car to be fixed or whether you were bargaining, you're a black person bargaining to buy a radio station. Or, you know, whether those things made a tangible difference in the negotiation dynamic at the bargaining table. And, I, and you know, I think, you know, I think there's evidence and indication that in fact they do. And how you account for that and counteract that has always been of, not only sort of scholarly and academic interest, but practical interest as well.$So, you said, opportunities and great deals came your way like the AT&T [AT&T Inc.] deal.$$Yep.$$What, what else? Well, describe what did that mean to you, AT&T deal? Describe that to me.$$You know, it was incredible. I mean, you know, it was just incredible. I was--I think it's fair to say that my company was the premier, certainly minority vendor. But, maybe even vendor in a way. Vendor, partner to AT&T for ten years. You know, I talk to the chairman of AT&T once a month probably for ten years. You know, we were on just, you know, a whole host of topics, you know, political, and business, and legal. And, we were really in their fraternity of, of close associates. And it really made a huge difference. It made a huge difference in the opportunities that were made available to us; the capital that was made available to us; the types of employees that we had the opportunity to hire; the types of facilities that we operated from; the types of opportunities that we had the opportunity to look at. It was nothing short of incredible.$$And, ChaseCom [ChaseCom L.P.; ChaseSource], is that the company that you're talking about?$$Yep.$$So, that was formed in, or founded in 1998?$$Yeah, technically December of '97 [1997]. But, yes, it was, it was founded in December of '97 [1997], and sold to AT&T in a cash transaction in December of 2007. So--$$For how much?$$Exactly ten years. A lot (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$A lot. We did pretty good on that one.$$Now, the time that you, you had a twenty-year contract to sell, SBC Telecom [SBC Telecom, Inc.] equipment?$$Well, you really have done your homework. Yeah. We had, we had, what happened was, was that back in December of 2007, Southwestern Bell Corporation invested $20 million in ChaseCom really to help us, to give us, to provide us the resources to become their number one customer service partner. And, and we did. And, Southwestern Bell turned into SBC [SBC Communications, Inc.] and SBC bought AT&T, and the smallest Regional Bell Operating Company became the biggest telecommunication company in the world over the next ten years, and we happened to grow right along with 'em. And, they became the largest telecommunications company in the world largely by acquisition and by being opportunistic, and we were, you know, right there through all of that growing right along with them and it was great.$$But, ChaseCom was unique. How was it unique?$$At the end of the day we were unique because we were the only company who could process an order in the AT&T system that was not owned by AT&T. And that gave us a tremendous leg up because we were not unionized and they were. And, so, we could process an order cheaper than they could. And, it was a wonderful thing.$$And, you specialize in several languages. Is that right?$$Yep. We did all the customer, mostly customer service work for all of their California, and Nevada operations as well as their Ameritech [Ameritech Corporation; AT&T Teleholdings, Inc.] Midwest operations, and as a result we, we not only did business in English but in Spanish, as well as several Asian dialects.

The Honorable Albert Edwards

State Representative, Hon. Albert Ely Edwards was born in Houston, Texas on March 19, 1937. Edwards is the sixth child out of the sixteen children born to Reverend E. L. Edwards, Sr. and Josephine Radford Edwards. He graduated from Phyllis Wheatley High School and attended Texas Southern University, earning his B.A. degree in 1966.

At the age of forty-one, Edwards entered politics and was elected to the Texas State Legislature from Houston’s House District 146. His first major goal was to ensure the establishment of a holiday that recognized the emancipation of slavery. In 1979, legislation recognizing Juneteenth Day, initiated by Edwards, passed the Texas State Legislature and was signed into law. Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, is an annual holiday in fourteen states of the United States. Celebrated on June 19th, it commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery in Texas. While serving in the legislature, Edwards also founded his own real estate company.

Though deeply involved with local issues, Edwards remained active in many issues outside the Texas State Legislature. In 1983, Edwards was appointed as a member of the board of Operation PUSH. Edwards also served as the Texas State Director of Reverend Jesse Jackson’s two presidential campaigns in 1984 and 1988. In 1986, Edwards also founded Operation Justus, a community faith-based organization that serves as a referral service for persons with social problems and concerns. Edwards was also arrested in Houston and went to jail for peacefully demonstrating against apartheid in South Africa in 1987. Edwards left the Texas legislature in 2007 after twenty-eight years of serving the people of District 146. As a veteran member of the Texas Legislature, Edwards served on three influential committees. He was the Chairman of the Rules and Resolutions Committee, Chairman of Budget and Oversight of the Ways and Means Committee and a member of the Appropriations Committee.

Albert Edwards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 10, 2007.

Edwards passed away on April 29, 2020.

Accession Number

A2007.230

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/10/2007

Last Name

Edwards

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Phillis Wheatley High School

Texas Southern University

Tuskegee University

E.O. Smith Middle School

First Name

Albert

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

EDW02

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

You Can Make It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/19/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

4/29/2020

Short Description

State representative The Honorable Albert Edwards (1937 - 2020) served in the Texas state legislature for twenty-eight years representing District 146. He also initiated the passing of the bill to recognize Juneteenth Day in Texas.

Employment

Texas House of Representatives

Al Edwards Real Estate and Mortgage Company

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486479">Tape: 1 Slating of The Honorable Albert Edwards' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486480">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486481">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486482">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his mother's upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486483">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486484">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486485">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486486">Tape: 1 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes the Trinity Gardens community in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486487">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486488">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his early work experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486489">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486490">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls his employment during college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486491">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his high school experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486492">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls a lesson from his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486493">Tape: 2 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about corporal punishment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486494">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls his decision to attend Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486495">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486496">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about the religious organizations in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486497">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls the civil rights protests in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486498">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486499">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers playing sports at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486500">Tape: 3 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his experiences at Texas Southern University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486501">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls improving his grades at Texas Southern University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486502">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his career after graduating college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486503">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls filing an employment discrimination suit</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486504">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers his career in sales</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486505">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his decision to run for elected office</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486506">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls his election to the Texas Legislature</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486507">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers campaigning to mandate black history education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486508">Tape: 4 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls the civil rights protests at historically black colleges in Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486509">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about the history of Juneteenth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486510">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers introducing a bill to recognize Juneteenth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486511">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls negotiating for his Juneteenth bill</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486512">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers the passage of his Juneteenth bill</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486513">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about the national recognition of Juneteenth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486514">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his legislative accomplishments</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486515">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about President George Walker Bush</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486516">Tape: 5 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about Barbara Jordan</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486517">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about his legislative priorities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486518">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards reflects upon the mass incarceration of black youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486519">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486520">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486521">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486522">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes his plans for the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486523">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/486524">Tape: 6 The Honorable Albert Edwards describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
The Honorable Albert Edwards recalls the civil rights protests at historically black colleges in Texas
The Honorable Albert Edwards remembers introducing a bill to recognize Juneteenth
Transcript
Was black history education a major feature of Texas Southern [Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas] when you were a student?$$I think they had some degree of a black history structured thing, but not much. I think--and I know the University of Houston [Houston, Texas], they had what they called the African American something. They have it on both campuses now, and they're carefully going to cut them out because we don't participate as much like we should. But because the nature of the school didn't, there was just a lot of stuff that was talked about. You know, the news itself, because of course the issue was born out of oppression and segregation, so it had to be talked about to some degree. But not the big forefront burning issue, because TSU didn't organize the marches and the demonstrations. It just so happened we met at Texas Southern because that's where people were, but it didn't come out of the administration.$$Okay. So it wasn't led by the academics over there--$$No.$$--so much as it was--$$Absolutely not.$$Yeah. Okay, so--were you successful in getting some black curriculum in the schools (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Oh yeah, they did get some black history in our books, and a year after that of course they had to go to the legislature [Texas Legislature] to get it done. But it had to be requested by the district. But yeah, they did get some black history, much better than it was originally, you know. Most of the things like that have to be led and driven by others. Because in 2004, 2004, I led about five, seven thousand people up from Prairie View [Texas] to Hempstead [Texas] because the county judge down there said that the students at Prairie View [Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas] didn't have a right to vote. And which is totally and absolutely wrong because the law says you can vote wherever you live, and at the time they lived there, but they would not let those students vote. So we got together and organized, and met with the mayor, commissioners, and the presidents of student body and fraternities and sororities. And we marched seven miles from Prairie View to Hempstead. This has only been two or three years ago. We marched to the county steps and had a big rally right on the county commissioner's steps. Today, that county clerk and that white county commissioner is out of office, and those students are voting within a couple of blocks from the recreation building.$When I went to Austin [Texas], you know, my inclination is that if the Italians and all these other folks could have a holiday depicting their accomplishments, and who they were about, then why not us? I didn't push it that way because it never would have passed. Because during that legislative session, out of 150 house members, and 31 senators, that was 181 folk. There were only 14 that was black out of that 181. We had a Republican governor, and in a state as conservative as Texas, and holidays cost millions of dollars. And, you know, that's always the big push and cry about the budget. And so I wrote Juneteenth into the legislation seven different ways before I finally came out with it being a straight up holiday. One was an observance, another one was do it the Saturday before, another one do it the Saturday after, you know. Just different things and different ways of putting it, just in case one way did not work. Well, I also used my preference number on that particular piece of legislation [House Bill 1016, 66th Legislature Regular Session]. Your preference number is, if your bill passed the committee, and you get to the chief clerk's office, then they could have stopped it. It had to have passed to the house floor for a vote, and I was able to get it out of the committee. Congressman Green [Al Green] helped me do that, he's from here, and some others. Even Republicans and mostly whites. And so, while I was in the process of getting that bill through these processes and talking to legislators and stuff, I went to the governor. "Governor Clements [Bill Clements], will you help me?" He said, "No." He said, "I'm not gonna help you." And he said, "But if you get the bill to me, I'm going to sign it. I'm not going to veto your legislation. But, no, I'm not gonna help you." He pointed to an Abraham Lincoln statue, a mannequin he had there in his office. He said, "You know who that is?" "Abraham." He said, "Well, he's the one that signed the Emancipation Proclamation." He said, "So, you get that bill to me, I'll sign it." Well, needless to say, when I would go to white legislators with my flow chart to check off who I had and who I didn't have, my first time around, they all said no. They didn't have no blacks in their district. They would lose their seat if they voted a black holiday in. It was gonna cause division. It was gonna cost the state money. State employees had too many holidays. All these kind of things. Well, the farm and ranch bill came up that session. And they--and it was a close, close vote. And they were doing the same flow chart work on their farm and ranch bill, I mean, the bill was good. You could buy, I mean, you could get deals and you didn't have to pay it back for eight or ten years, and the interest rate was 4 percent. I mean, it was a great piece of legislation for farmers and ranchers. Well, I reminded them I didn't have a farm or a ranch in my district, but we could sure talk and I could also talk to some of the other members who would be supporting my legislation, and we were able to work something out and they began to sign up on my Juneteenth legislation.