The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

city

Art Fennell

Broadcast journalist Art Fennell was born and raised in Bennettsville, South Carolina. One of twelve children, he graduated from South Carolina State University with a communications degree.

Fennell began his broadcasting career as a radio announcer in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He went on to work in on-air positions at The South Carolina Educational Television Network; WBTW-TV in Florence, South Carolina; WCBD-TV in Charleston, South Carolina; WSAV-TV in Savannah, Georgia and WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Virginia. Fennell then moved to WCAU NBC-10 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he served in various roles, including as anchor, reporter, host and producer. He was subsequently named principal anchor and managing editor for CN8 News on the Comcast Network based in Philadelphia, and hosted the nightly 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. newscasts. From 2006 to 2014, CN8-TV aired “Art Fennell Reports,” where Fennell was executive producer and anchor.

Fennell has also served on special assignments for TV-ONE and led the network’s live national coverage of “The Michael Jackson Memorial” from Los Angeles, “The Democratic National Convention” from Denver, “Election Night 2008” from Chicago, and the historic “Inauguration of President Barack Obama” from Washington, DC. In addition, he taught as an adjunct communications professor at Delaware State University.

Fennell served as president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) from 1995 to 1997. He also served on the boards of UNITY: Journalists of Color and the NABJ, as well as president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, and founding president of the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals. In 2001, he founded The Arthur Fennell Foundation, which is committed to raising funds and awareness to assist community based organizations dealing with disease, education and prevention in diverse, under-served populations.

Throughout his career, Fennell has been honored with more than seventy-five awards, including the prestigious Vanguard Award presented by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. He also received the 2009 “Journalist of The Year Award” for his work in the Philadelphia region and the 2006 Emmy Award for “Outstanding News Anchor” in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Art Fennell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.173

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/12/2014

Last Name

Fennell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Blenheim High School

South Carolina State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Arthur

Birth City, State, Country

Bennettsville

HM ID

FEN01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa, The Caribbean, West Coast, South

Favorite Quote

I Hope The Good News Is Yours.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

1/10/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Art Fennell (1961 - ) was a principal anchor and managing editor for CN8 News, and served as executive producer and anchor of CN8-TV’s 'Art Fennell Reports' from 2006 to 2014. He was president of the National Association of Black Journalists from 1995 to 1997.

Employment

Comcast NBC Universal

WCAU

WAVY

WSAV

WCBD

WBTW

SC ETV

Fennell Media

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:19364,249:41100,496:50502,631:50790,636:54390,691:55038,702:56470,713:56742,718:59598,771:60414,785:60754,791:67795,975:68434,986:71984,1070:73901,1120:77736,1166:85420,1341:86032,1352:90384,1448:90792,1456:91064,1461:99217,1550:99549,1555:102537,1607:103118,1616:106936,1681:107517,1689:108264,1701:109592,1719:110256,1728:112580,1771:113908,1798:121750,1862:124717,1913:130168,2037:131755,2065:136695,2085:137865,2126:144037,2212:144432,2218:145143,2230:147513,2263:151147,2328:151779,2337:152174,2343:159332,2415:162776,2464:163280,2471:164456,2489:175214,2647:175806,2656:176176,2663:176768,2674:179210,2718:184337,2758:188155,2813:188570,2819:190960,2827:191743,2839:192091,2845:192787,2855:193396,2863:194092,2875:198860,2950:202624,2980:203129,2986:206330,3031:209760,3054:210052,3059:210855,3070:211731,3086:212388,3097:212753,3103:214810,3110:216730,3132:217410,3141:218430,3158:228622,3325:231104,3370:231469,3376:234316,3461:246195,3638:246585,3645:246845,3650:248535,3766:268694,4037:269378,4049:269682,4054:269986,4059:270290,4064:270594,4069:270898,4074:276674,4195:278270,4218:284236,4268:285832,4310:288688,4360:295225,4435:295485,4440:295745,4445:307370,4639$0,0:1743,49:2905,61:4067,90:4648,99:6474,148:15982,224:20064,267:20392,272:21294,285:22934,334:27116,402:27444,407:28510,419:34488,453:37712,488:38336,496:38752,501:43910,565:44306,573:44768,581:45164,589:45890,602:48662,687:49058,695:49454,708:50378,724:50708,731:50972,736:51764,754:52292,765:61590,884:64910,895:66860,908:70030,918:70694,929:71524,940:72603,962:80715,1063:81315,1073:82365,1090:83415,1114:83865,1121:84840,1136:85665,1144:86265,1153:86565,1158:88140,1179:96684,1252:98644,1275:99036,1280:99722,1288:100408,1296:100800,1301:101878,1316:102662,1334:103152,1340:104622,1352:105896,1367:106484,1374:106974,1380:107856,1399:108542,1408:114076,1446:114607,1457:114961,1464:115374,1476:123380,1586:126496,1638:130266,1658:130784,1666:131080,1671:134968,1726:137514,1740:138036,1747:138645,1756:138993,1761:139863,1774:142442,1788:142790,1793:143225,1799:144878,1827:147314,1874:152112,1909:157970,2031
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Art Fennell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Art Fennell lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Art Fennell describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Art Fennell talks about his maternal grandparents' life in South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his maternal grandparents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Art Fennell talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Art Fennell describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Art Fennell describes his paternal grandfather's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Art Fennell talks about his father's education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers his family's ghost stories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his father's occupations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Art Fennell describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Art Fennell lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Art Fennell describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Art Fennell remembers Blenheim High School in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers the ginger ale factory in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Art Fennell remembers the integration of Blenheim High School in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his early interests

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Art Fennell recalls his decision to attend South Carolina State College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Art Fennell recalls his start in the broadcasting industry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Art Fennell remembers working at WDIX Radio in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Art Fennell talks about Max Robinson

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Art Fennell recalls the newscasters of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Art Fennell talks about his influential professors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers studying under Eloise Usher Belcher

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Art Fennell recalls his start as a photographer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Art Fennell talks about the civil rights history of Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Art Fennell remembers his training at SCE-TV in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Art Fennell describes the lack of African American politicians in South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Art Fennell remembers Armstrong Williams

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Art Fennell describes his experiences at WBTW-TV in Florence, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Art Fennell remembers anchoring at WSAV-TV in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Art Fennell remembers moving to WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Art Fennell talks about the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Art Fennell recalls founding the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about being recognized in public

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Art Fennell remembers joining WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Art Fennell talks about the change in network affiliation at WCAU-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Art Fennell describes his experiences as a talk show host

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Art Fennell recalls becoming president of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers hosting President Bill Clinton at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Art Fennell recalls President Bill Clinton's arrival at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Art Fennell talks about the speakers at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Art Fennell recalls the founding of the NABJ Media Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about his time at WCAU-TV

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Art Fennell remembers founding a media consulting company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Art Fennell remembers his awards and accolades

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Art Fennell remembers developing 'Art Fennell Reports'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Art Fennell recalls his special assignments with TV One

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Art Fennell talks about 'Murder in Memphis: Timeline to an Assassination'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Art Fennell recalls the acquisition of NBC Universal by the Comcast Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers the cancellation of 'Art Fennell Reports'

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Art Fennell describes his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Art Fennell talks about his interest in photography

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Art Fennell reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Art Fennell talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Art Fennell reflects upon his professional legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Art Fennell describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 1
Art Fennell remembers joining WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Transcript
The most vivid childhood memory came in April of 1969 I think it was. It may have been '68 [1968] or--I think it was '68 [1968] or '69 [1969]. We had just gotten off the school bus coming home from school. And the weather was ominous, and it was just starting to rain very lightly. And me and my brother Dennis [Dennis Fennell] were the only ones on the bus. My other brothers--they had done an experiment. And I won't digress too far with this, away from the story, but they were doing an experiment back then in, in, in Bennettsville [South Carolina] and Blenheim [South Carolina], another small town, where they wanted to test integrating the schools. But for that year, they were asking for volunteers from families, to volunteer children to see if this would work in rural South Carolina. So my next two brothers, Jeffrey [Jeffrey Fennell] and Tommy Lee [Tommy Fennell], were volunteered by my parents [Sarah McLeod Fennell and James Fennell], because they were bigger and older, and they could probably deal with it better than Dennis and myself, who were much younger. So we were still in the segregated school. We were coming home from, from, from school this day, Dennis and I. We get off the bus, and we're walking down the dirt road. And it was this--clouds were getting a little dark. And as we got to the house, my mother was taking in the clothes, 'cause it was obviously just starting to rain. And she said, "Children, help me with these clothes to get 'em off the clothesline, because bad weather is coming." And as we were taking in those clothes, the winds began to pick up more and more and more. And, and it, it became fun for me and my brother because this was an adventure. But I remember going out on probably the last trip to the clothesline. And I looked across the cotton field, and I saw a tornado coming. It was as clear as day, and it was happening now, and it was coming right for us. And so we gathered the last bit of clothes, and we rushed into the house. And as we closed the door, because the winds were very strong, it took all three of us by the way to push and close that door from the force of the wind. But we did close it. And it stayed closed for about five to ten seconds before it exploded open, because at this point the tornado was right on top of us, and we couldn't close that door again. Windows began to explode, and air was all through the house. The tornado was on top of us. And so my mother grabbed me and my brother. And on a, a small little sofa--and I have a picture of us on this small sofa, and it was in the corner of the room by the stove--and she huddled us together like a mother hen gathering her biddies. And she said, "Pray children pray." And we started praying while that tornado sat down upon us. It destroyed our whole house. When it was over, there was nothing left in the house. The roof was gone. All of the other furnishings in the house were gone. The wall behind us was still there, but on the other side of the wall was nothing. But that sofa with myself, my brother, and my mother was still intact with us on it. And I remember looking up at as small boy, and I could see the sky. And I looked around, and we were in a daze, but we were unharmed, not a scratch. So I knew right then about the miracle of God. Because we were there praying and--you know, small children, you know, we were praying. But I was peeping, 'cause I wanted to see this phenomenon happening around us. But we were un- we were unhurt. And so that was--that was a very vivid moment for me, for everyone. The community--once the story had passed, people were rushing to our aid to see if we were okay, if anyone had been harmed, and to see how they could help, 'cause that's what communities do in those types of times.$$That's quite a story.$$Yeah.$$I mean--did you close your eyes while it was going? Did you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Some of the time. I have to admit I was peeping. I remember peeping. But we had an old iron stove that was no more than five feet away from where I was. That was where we put the, the wood in and you know to warm the house. And I saw that old iron stove with the, the tin pipe that went up to the chimney started to bounce and rock as it was sitting there. It bounced like this, 'cause I was praying and peeping. And then I saw that stove lift off. I've never seen that stove again. It was five feet from me.$$Yeah, that's--$$So, yeah, I think after I saw that, I, I started praying harder than ever because I, I didn't wanna follow the direction of where that, that--where that stove had gone.$Nineteen ninety [1990] now, how, how did the op- opportunity come to--come to--come, come about to come to WCAU-TV in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]?$$Well, I, I was doing the news one night and I got a phone call. And it was from a gentleman named Paul Gluck, who had been visiting his mother who lived in the Hampton Roads [Virginia] area. Paul Gluck I didn't know from a can of paint, but he was the news director in Philadelphia. And he said, "I've watched you; I, I like what I see; when is your contract over in Virginia [WAVY-TV, Portsmouth, Virginia]?" It just so happens that my contract was coming to an end in the next couple of months, and I told him. And so he said, "I'd like to bring you to Philadelphia to take a look around and to see what we do here, and to see if it's something that you and I can come to terms with." And so I do, came to Philadelphia and, and loved it. This was big time TV. This was a completely different animal than anything that I had been accustomed to up until that point. But at least for me by then I'd already worked in several other TV markets. I was used to moving around. I was used to starting from scratch, and so that experience helped me to, to get acclimated in Philadelphia early. I was brought on as the, the five o'clock evening news anchor. I was young, but didn't carry myself in a young way. It became clear that I knew my way around a story in the field, and I knew my way around the anchor desk in the studio, 'cause I'd--by that point I was seasoned. And I wasn't intimidated, but yet, again, I didn't present myself in an arrogant type of way. One thing about Philadelphia that I learned very early, and it's--was true then, and it's true now. In this town, if people like you they will let you know. And if they don't like you, they will let you know. And if they don't like you, you are not long for this city. I'm fortunate that they like me, and so I was able to survive. And as they say, the rest is history. I've had a very good tenure here.

Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman, founder and President of the Children's Defense Fund, was born on June 6, 1939, in Bennettsville, South Carolina. Edelman was the youngest of five children and credits her father with instilling in her an obligation to right wrongs. When African Americans in Bennettsville were not allowed to enter city parks, Arthur Wright, her father, built a park for African American children behind his church.

Edelman is a graduate of Spelman College and Yale Law School. While working as director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund office in Jackson, Mississippi, she became the first African American female admitted to the Mississippi State Bar. She also became nationally recognized as an advocate for Head Start at this time. In 1968, Edelman moved to Washington, D.C., and subsequently became counsel to the Poor People's Campaign that was organized by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. She founded the Washington Research Project (WRP), where she focused on lobbying Congress for child and family nutrition programs and expanding the Head Start program. In 1973, the Washington Research Project became the Children's Defense Fund (CDF), the United States' leading advocacy group for children. As president of the CDF, Edelman has worked to decrease teenage pregnancy, increase Medicaid coverage for poor children, and secure government funding for programs such as Head Start.

Edelman has served as the Director of the Center for Law and Education at Harvard University and is the first African American female to have been on the board of directors of Yale University. Edelman has written many articles and books, including the autobiographical New York Times best-seller, The Measure of Our Success: A Letter to My Children and Yours

Accession Number

A2001.030

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/24/2001

Last Name

Edelman

Maker Category
Middle Name

Wright

Organizations
Speakers Bureau

No

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Marian

Birth City, State, Country

Bennettsville

HM ID

EDE01

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water, Mountains

Favorite Quote

Service Is A Rent You Pay For Living.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/6/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Foundation chief executive Marian Wright Edelman (1939 - ) was the founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund where she worked to decrease teenage pregnancy, increase Medicaid coverage for poor children and secure government funding for programs such as Head Start. Edelman was also the first African American female to have been on the board of directors of Yale University.

Employment

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Legal Defense Fund

Poor People's Campaign

Washington Research Project

Harvard University Center for Law and Education

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:4725,107:6480,165:7830,238:11880,308:13635,326:19298,344:19888,356:20714,373:21422,388:21776,395:22366,410:23664,455:24254,467:24667,475:25375,490:28207,552:28443,557:29387,580:29623,585:30508,611:30862,618:31393,628:31806,637:32101,643:32573,653:33340,669:33694,676:34166,688:34402,693:34874,702:35523,718:35818,725:36231,734:37116,761:39771,818:40243,832:41954,874:42544,886:44314,891:45199,929:51540,944:51788,949:52284,958:52656,965:53090,974:53834,989:54764,1020:55260,1029:55632,1038:55942,1044:57926,1091:58174,1096:58608,1116:58856,1121:60034,1145:60468,1154:61274,1172:61646,1180:64560,1262:65304,1286:65738,1295:66544,1314:68032,1345:68528,1354:72977,1363:73205,1369:73433,1374:74060,1387:74972,1409:76226,1436:76739,1447:77480,1461:77708,1466:78278,1477:79019,1495:79247,1500:80159,1518:81755,1576:82154,1584:82439,1590:82952,1602:83294,1610:83693,1621:84320,1634:85859,1659:86486,1671:89720,1682:90020,1703:90860,1716:91520,1729:93320,1771:93740,1780:94400,1793:95060,1806:95360,1812:95840,1823:96560,1837:97220,1850:98120,1868:98480,1876:99080,1890:99320,1895:101780,1931:102020,1936:104840,1962:105200,1972:105560,1980:105980,1988:107000,2003:107600,2015:108020,2024:108680,2040:109220,2050:109640,2059:109880,2064:112024,2078:112329,2084:112695,2091:113854,2112:114098,2117:114525,2125:115013,2134:115440,2143:115684,2152:116050,2159:118795,2170:119405,2201:119771,2208:120686,2225:121052,2232:121479,2242:122211,2258:122699,2268:123187,2278:124163,2297:124773,2310:126969,2362:129430,2368:130162,2384:130589,2393:130894,2399:131260,2411:131626,2419:132053,2428:133273,2476:133761,2486:134310,2496:134737,2504:135408,2517:135835,2526:136140,2532:136811,2546:137116,2552:137787,2567:138580,2587:138946,2597:139556,2609:143941,2645:144490,2656:145222,2672:147113,2706:147723,2719:148150,2727:148394,2732:148699,2738:151078,2799:154280,2810:154802,2820:155208,2829:156194,2858:156484,2864:157354,2882:157644,2888:158282,2901:158514,2906:159732,2928:160138,2936:160428,2942:161008,2955:161414,2963:161704,2969:162400,2988:162748,2996:163154,3005:163618,3015:163850,3020:164894,3045:165416,3055:166228,3071:166692,3081:168084,3110:168490,3119:169244,3143:169476,3148:175775,3189:176285,3197:176625,3202:177305,3212:179940,3247:180875,3260:181640,3270:182235,3279:183170,3293:183510,3298:186878,3314:187302,3327:187726,3337:187991,3343:188256,3349:188521,3356:189740,3387:189952,3392:190217,3398:190429,3403:191065,3419:191595,3431:193609,3493:193874,3499:194192,3514:195305,3585:195517,3590:195835,3597:196153,3605:197372,3637:197902,3656:198220,3663:198591,3672:204114,3713:204578,3723:204868,3729:205738,3746:206202,3760:206956,3774:207188,3779:207594,3787:208116,3797:208522,3806:208928,3815:209160,3820:209682,3831:210088,3839:210842,3862:211480,3880:211944,3889:212234,3895:214206,3939:214438,3958:217164,4021:222269,4057:222899,4069:224285,4149:224789,4159:225419,4174:225923,4184:226364,4192:226742,4200:227435,4213:227687,4218:229451,4257:232036,4265:233485,4299:234493,4324:235186,4336:236572,4363:236824,4368:237076,4373:237958,4388:238651,4402:239596,4419:240856,4446:241108,4451:241360,4456:241864,4465:242431,4475:243124,4489:243439,4495:246425,4536:246709,4541:247064,4547:247561,4558:248555,4574:249620,4593:250472,4607:252034,4631:252602,4641:253525,4659:254164,4669:254945,4686:255442,4695:256507,4715:256791,4720:257288,4728:261400,4739:261725,4745:262180,4753:262700,4764:263025,4770:263415,4778:263675,4783:264455,4804:264845,4812:265170,4818:265625,4826:266080,4834:266990,4859:267445,4867:268160,4886:268680,4895:269850,4916:270305,4924:271085,4941:275115,5012:275895,5025:277810,5035:278095,5041:278551,5050:279178,5063:279577,5072:280033,5082:280261,5087:280717,5097:281515,5114:282313,5130:282712,5139:283054,5146:283282,5151:283909,5169:284308,5178:284593,5184:285106,5195:285448,5202:285790,5210:286303,5222:286531,5227:287158,5239:287386,5244:287899,5252:288127,5257:288355,5262:288868,5275:289267,5283:293155,5319:293839,5333:294409,5342:294808,5381:295036,5386:295549,5397:296347,5414:297259,5438:299425,5496:299881,5506:300223,5513:300736,5523:301249,5533:302788,5576:303358,5588:304612,5612:305353,5627:305581,5632:305809,5638:310930,5680:317125,5834:318659,5870:318954,5877:320016,5897:320311,5903:320960,5916:321373,5925:322317,5944:322789,5954:323320,5965:323615,5971:326453,5983:327182,6017:327506,6026:328235,6038:328640,6044:328964,6049:330179,6067:330989,6080:333176,6115:333500,6120:336450,6132:336730,6137:337080,6143:337360,6148:338200,6162:338690,6171:339460,6186:340090,6198:340440,6204:340790,6210:341420,6221:341770,6227:342470,6240:343590,6257:343940,6263:344430,6272:344990,6281:346250,6305:346950,6318:347440,6327:348420,6341:349400,6357:354016,6378:354272,6383:354976,6396:355488,6406:356320,6422:357472,6445:357920,6453:358176,6458:358752,6470:359072,6476:359712,6488:360160,6497:361696,6527:362336,6539:362976,6555:363488,6566:363744,6571:364320,6581:368030,6598$0,0:3848,86:4514,96:6290,127:6586,132:6882,137:8066,159:8436,165:9176,180:9620,187:9916,192:10360,199:13394,255:13690,287:13986,292:14726,305:15096,311:15466,318:16280,328:22039,362:26524,439:27145,448:27421,453:27904,462:28663,475:29146,485:33838,678:34321,686:34873,696:35356,705:35977,717:36529,727:36943,734:39151,830:39841,842:41014,917:41290,922:41911,934:42256,940:42877,951:51940,982:53060,992:54580,1017:55540,1034:56580,1051:56900,1056:57460,1065:58820,1085:60180,1112:60580,1118:62900,1156:63460,1165:67150,1170:67726,1180:68158,1188:68806,1198:69454,1208:69886,1216:70606,1228:71254,1240:71830,1250:72190,1256:72766,1265:73342,1272:73918,1282:74350,1290:75070,1302:75430,1308:76150,1320:76798,1327:77446,1338:78814,1358:79318,1367:80182,1382:80830,1397:81550,1412:82270,1423:83350,1442:83710,1448:84070,1454:88860,1459:89100,1464:89340,1469:89880,1481:90180,1487:90540,1494:90840,1500:91080,1505:91380,1511:91800,1520:92100,1526:92340,1531:92640,1537:93780,1567:94440,1581:94680,1586:94980,1592:95580,1604:95940,1612:97500,1650:98040,1661:100740,1778:100980,1783:101400,1792:105808,1813:106180,1820:106490,1826:107358,1844:108970,1882:109342,1889:110086,1901:110334,1906:110768,1911:111388,1923:112070,1936:112628,1947:113000,1954:113372,1961:114364,1981:114984,1997:115790,2031:116534,2044:117030,2052:117836,2067:118208,2074:118456,2079:118890,2087:119262,2095:120192,2117:120750,2127:128445,2238:141000,2404:141600,2411:143911,2471:144316,2477:145855,2528:146422,2537:148609,2575:149095,2582:149419,2587:149824,2593:150229,2599:150796,2608:153870,2620:154782,2641:155808,2664:156036,2669:156321,2675:157005,2689:157290,2695:157575,2701:158259,2716:158544,2722:159855,2746:161052,2772:161508,2782:162021,2794:162249,2799:162990,2819:163446,2866:163845,2874:164472,2889:164757,2895:164985,2900:165213,2905:165498,2911:165840,2918:170621,2950:171170,2964:171414,2969:172695,3005:172939,3010:173244,3017:173793,3029:175013,3054:175257,3059:176172,3076:176965,3091:177697,3106:178002,3112:178795,3128:179344,3138:179649,3144:180259,3156:180503,3161:181784,3193:182028,3198:185960,3210:186649,3224:186861,3229:187497,3242:187921,3252:188663,3269:189246,3284:189829,3296:190412,3310:190624,3315:191048,3325:193050,3344
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marian Edelman interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marian Edelman lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marian Edelman recalls her father and other family members

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marian Edelman talks about her mother's family and memories of her great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marian Edelman describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marian Edelman recalls her home and her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marian Edelman describes life with her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marian Edelman recalls the tradition of independent women in her family

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marian Edelman describes her parents' educational influence

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marian Edelman recalls the church community of her youth

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Marian Edelman decribes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marian Edelman details her father death

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marian Edelman talks about her difficult first year at Spelman College

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marian Edelman talks about her Spelman experience

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marian Edelman talks more about her Spelman experience

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marian Edelman talks about her civil rights experience while at Spellman

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marian Edelman talks about her Yale experience

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marian Edelman details taking the bar exam in Mississippi and her activities in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marian Edelman discusses the founding of the Children's Defense Fund

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marian Edelman discusses the accomplishments of the Children's Defense Fund

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marian Edelman talks about her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman watches as two children play chess, ca. 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with Mrs. Mae Bertha Carter, ca. 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman posing in front of Mary McLeod Bethune Statue in Lincoln Park, Washington, D.C., ca. 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman in her mid-twenties, 1966

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman in a jail cell after a sit-in, Atlanta, Georgia, March, 1960

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman in a jail cell after a sit-in, Atlanta, Georgia, March, 1960 (detail)

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with her family at age six or seven

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at age six or seven

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with family and friends at her graduation from Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia, 1960

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with her Brownie Scout troop, ca. late 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with her mother and siblings, ca. 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at her Yale University Law School Graduation (?), New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at her Yale University Law School Graduation (?), New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman speaking at a Children's Defense Fund rally, Washington, D.C., ca. 1990s

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Photo - Portrait of Marian Wright Edelman, 1999

Tape: 3 Story: 17 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman's father, Reverend Arthur Jerome Wright, Sr.

Tape: 3 Story: 18 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman's mother, Maggie Leola Bowen Wright

Tape: 3 Story: 19 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman as a bridesmaid at her sister, Olive Wright's wedding, June, 1950

Tape: 3 Story: 20 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman's parents with Reverend Riddick at the First Home for the Elderly, Bennettsville, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 21 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with Edward Steichen and Carl Sandburg, Moscow, USSR, 1959

Tape: 3 Story: 22 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman and Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, recipients of honorary degrees from SUNY-Old Westbury, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 23 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at a meeting in Mississippi for the NAACP Legal Defense Education Fund, ca. late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 24 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman visiting families in Canton, Mississippi, ca. late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 25 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman and Senator Robert F. Kennedy visiting hungry families along the Mississippi Delta, April 11, 1967

Tape: 3 Story: 26 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman weds Peter Edelman in Virginia, July 14, 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 27 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with Robert G. Clark at Mississippi Capitol Building, Jackson, Mississippi, January 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 28 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with her family and Miss Amy at her Washington, D.C. home

Tape: 3 Story: 29 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at the first Stand For Children Day march, Washington, D.C., June 1, 1996

Tape: 3 Story: 30 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman at the first Stand For Children Day march, Washington, D.C., June 1, 1996 (detail)

Tape: 3 Story: 31 - Photo - Cover of 'Marian Wright Edelman: The Making of a Crusader', by Beatrice Siegel, 1995

Tape: 3 Story: 32 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman's high school yearbook photo

Tape: 3 Story: 33 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with high school friends Romaine Covington, Douglass Gregg and Ruth Thomas

Tape: 3 Story: 34 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with student civil rights leaders Julian Bond, Lonnie King and Ben Brown, 1960

Tape: 3 Story: 35 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman with Harrison E. Salisbury from the 'New York Times' after receiving the 'Mademoiselle' Magazine Annual Merit Award, 1965

Tape: 3 Story: 36 - Photo - A mule train arriving for the Poor People's Campaign, Washington, D.C., 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 37 - Photo - 'Resurrection City,' as part of the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C., 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 38 - Photo - Marian Wright Edelman and others at a White House Rose Garden signing ceremony with President Bill Clinton, Washington, D.C., 1993

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

9$3

DATitle
Marian Edelman discusses the accomplishments of the Children's Defense Fund
Marian Edelman talks about her Spelman experience
Transcript
And what are the things that you're most proud of that you accomplished in these thirty-some years, I mean when you look at it? I know that you say you never would have thought, you know, getting child - I mean getting health care would have been so difficult so I'm just wondering?$$We have a framework of laws that did not exist. You know, millions of children who are disabled go to school every day. We take it for granted. We still have a lot of problems in special education, and people misuse it, but there's a law that's [Public Law] 94142 that became the Individuals With Disabilities Act [1975]. That's something that our first report on children out of school that showed that disabled children didn't have a right to education. Now we changed that, and millions of lives have been affected. We kept children from being put in jails with adults, and we're fighting to keep that, but there's a new law that is a framework. We have expanded health care for millions, Head Start [program] for millions. Adoption laws and child welfare laws have been reformed, and so we can look back, and there are many laws that never existed that are there. Secondly, when we started, I think there were - the word advocacy and child advocacy was not in the lexicon, and there were very few local groups where children are now at the top of national debate. Many, many hundreds and thousands, indeed, of people who call - who have groups and organizations call themselves child advocates. Many organizations are gradually beginning to understand that if you're going to address these issues, you need to start with children and families and address the substantive issues. I think we - you know, we've issued hundreds and hundreds of reports that have defined the needs of children and solutions to those needs, and thousands and thousands of advocates are now part of that, and the fact that we could get up to 1996 and in four months get 250 or 300,000 people to show up without celebrities to address the needs of children and to translate that the next year into the Child Health Insurance Program to help working families after we lost the income safety net that is $48,000,000,000 and to giving working families health care, and here we are now trying to write the biggest law in our lives to put everything we've learned over the last thirty-three years into the act to leave no child behind, but here we have the President of the United States [George W. Bush] using our trademark mission statement to leave no child behind in his daily work. Now the chore is how do you build the movement to make him do it? And how do you get people now just not to use children as photo ops and as nice slogans, but because they don't vote and don't lobby and don't make contributions, how do we really get something done for children? How do we get the black community and the white community to deal with our hypocrisy of talking about families and talking about children, but boy, when it comes to doing the hard work on lobbying for the budget or challenging tax policies, that's hard work, and so the next ten years, I think, are the most important in trying to now translate all that we know works for children into humane, well-crafted policies and practices that are funded and of high quality for all children. I think the other thing that I would say I'm very proud of is what we've been able to achieve through the Black Community Crusade for Children which has been below the radar screen because like my daddy [Reverend Arthur Jerome Wright, Sr.], we don't - you get more things done in Washington [D.C.] if you do the work and let other people take the credit, and a lot - if you look now, the number of black organizations as well as white organizations that address children, more and more and more people are putting children at the top of their agenda, the National Urban League and Hugh Price, who's been a part of that. You see the incredible, wonderfully gifted emerging leaders who are on our board, Jeff Canaday at the Rheedlen Centers for Children [later the Harlem Children's Zone, Inc., New York], Angela Blackwell. These are people who are doing the complex work of building the next movement for children, which is not so easy to define as in the '60s [1960s] and requires, you know, very complicated policy analysis but at the same time sophistication about the new technologies and communications, but at the same time building community networks, and Haley Farm [in Clinton, Tennessee] - we bought Alex Haley Farm, in a sense to try to train a successive generation of children to reweave the fabric of leadership and of community across faith and race and income and age. We have trained over 5,000 black college students. Every summer, this coming summer, there will be sixty freedom schools based on very thoughtful reading curriculum, I mean conflict resolution manned by college students. We'll graduate 600 of them at commencement this year. Jonathan Kozol is the commencement speaker. We're bringing together all kinds of people to talk about how they can rebuild community, give them the skills they need and over the next few years taking the vision that is laid out in this complicated bill that we have been drafting and working with the Hill [Capitol Hill] to get introduced to tell Mr. Bush [President George W. Bush] and to tell members of Congress what it means to leave no child behind. We're trying to back that up now with first-rate media and public education campaigns with, you know, very specific mobilization activities, including Wednesdays in Washington and back home, building on the Wednesdays in Mississippi that Miss [Dorothy] Height and Polly Cowan and the National Council of Negro Women did in the '60s [1960s]. Well, we want to do the twenty-first century version of that and really begin to have a witness of presence every Wednesday at home and back, tied to this vision of leaving no child behind, and lastly, it doesn't do any good to pass the laws if you don't have dedicated servant leaders, and what has disturbed me a lot is how this country has gone crazy over celebrity and fame and money, and too many of our black young people and black leaders have bought in to the false idols of American materialism. How do we create a new sense of service and a redefinition of success so the Haley Farm programs and trying to prepare the new generation for the new century with some of the older values that don't go away - faith and fairness and justice and service - is, I think, the most important work ahead of us.$So what happened at chapel then? Was it a religious service or was it?$$Chapel was a religious service. You sang hymns. You also sang spirituals. We had a great choir. We had people like Howard Thurman, some of the great speakers of the day, and Dr. King [Martin Luther King, Jr.], come through, the first time I heard Dr. King, and it connected us through spirituals with our past. It connected us through great preachers and great teachers with what was important in life, and that was service. I mean imagine the Dr. Mayses [Benjamin E. Mays, President, Morehouse College] and the Rufus Clements [Rufus E. Clement, President, Atlanta University] and all them coming. Whitney Young was then the Dean of the School of Social Work at Atlanta University [later Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia]. Carl Holden was teaching at Clark [later Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia], and so we got to hear some of the great people and great minds, and so it was the spiritual preparation. It was the education of the heart and of the soul that was complemented by the education of the mind, and those things are crucially important, and I worry so much about the lack of spiritual formation that is going on on many of our black and white campuses today, about the lack of exposure to great leaders who have a context of values to offer and that put education in a context that's beyond kind of individual achievement, and I worry about that fact that some of our young people don't know their stories, don't know their history, and that's not being taught on too many black campuses as well as white campuses, and that's one of the reasons we started Haley Farm [run by the Children's Defense Fund, Clinton, Tennessee] was to see how we could begin to reweave that sense of history, teach young people their stories, let them understand that they are empowered to change things, let them hear examples of children and others who change things because they're not getting it, and that's why they don't know how to struggle and keep at something, and that's been robbing them of what I consider their important birthright.$$But that was also an interesting time, too, because you were, you know, in a place of which - you know, exposure and of time, the '50s [1950s]. I think that was an interesting good time.$$The '50s [1950s], '60s [1960s] was just at the nascent period of the civil rights movement. The Montgomery [Alabama] boycott, that was right after Brown [Brown vs. Board of Education]. There was a sense of expectancy, and while the majority of people were still happy with the status quo, there was a rumbling underneath, and we had been given permission to think about building a new world thanks to Brown and the incredible brilliance and planning, which I was very aware of because my daddy [Reverend Arthur Jerome Wright, Sr.] was waiting with me to see Brown come down every Monday morning, and he died the Monday before it did come down, but it was something that was very much a part of our consciousness, and I was very conscious of the effort and the courage of the black parents and the brilliant black lawyers who were planning that, and again all of this feeds in to understanding that transforming change is possible, but it takes a lot of individuals working for a long period of time to achieve it.