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Carol Randolph-Jasmine

Television anchor, journalist and literary agent Carol Randolph-Jasmine received her B.A. degree in biology from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and her M.A. degree in science education from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. She went on to earn her J.D. degree from the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine entered television broadcasting in the early 1980s as the co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WDVM-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C. While there, she also worked as an anchorwoman and interviewed politicians and celebrities such as Senator Ted Kennedy, comedian Richard Pryor, former first ladies Roselyn Carter and Nancy Reagan, and musician Stevie Wonder. Randolph-Jasmine then joined Court TV, where she served as an anchorwoman, and as the host and moderator of the show, “Your Turn,” until 1986.

In 1987, Randolph-Jasmine joined the literary firm of Goldfarb, Signer & Ross (now Goldfarb, Kaufman & O’Toole), where she specialized in representing authors and clients in television from 1988 to 1991, and, during that time, she also wrote a bi-weekly column, “Metropolitan Life,” for the Washington Times. She then served as general counsel for New African Visions, Inc., the non-profit organization responsible for editing the book, Songs of My People (1992). She is the co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, a firm that represents authors, artists and athletes. Randolph-Jasmine was later appointed as the vice president of strategic communications for Miller & Long Concrete Construction, and was then named senior vice president of legal affairs for Walls Communications, Inc., a minority-owned public relations firm in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, the District of Columbia Bar Association, and The Links, Inc., where she served as chair of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Committee. In 2005, she launched a “Construction Academy” at Cardoza Senior High School in Washington, D.C. for students interested in the construction business. Randolph-Jasmine is also a member of the board of directors for the Center for Dispute Resolution.

As co-host of “Harambee” in the 1980s, Randolph-Jasmine won several awards including an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming.”

Carol Randolph-Jasmine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.335

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/5/2013

Last Name

Randolph-Jasmine

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Catholic University of America

Washington University in St Louis

Fisk University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

RAN11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Better To Wear Out Than To Rust Out.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/10/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Television anchor, newspaper columnist, and book publisher Carol Randolph-Jasmine (1941 - ) , co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, is the former co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WUSA-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington D.C. She received an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming."

Employment

Miller & Long Concrete Construction

New African Visions, Inc.

Walls Communications

Akin & Randolph Agency

Court TV

Washington Times

Goldfarb, Kaufman & O' Toole

WDVM TV

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Randolph-Jasmine's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her maternal grandfather's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the neighborhood where her parents grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her grandfathers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her similarities to her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood neighborhood in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning to read and beginning kindergarten at age four

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning about black history at Riddick Elementary School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers a social science project in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her early desire to become a psychologist and her high school biology class

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about St. Louis, Missouri's black entertainment scene during her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood career ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her decision to attend Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee as a married woman

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about various professions as well as her professors at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes going to the 1963 March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about teaching at McKinley High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about life in Washington, D.C. and working for the United Planning Organization

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the 1968 riots in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about auditioning for the television show 'Harambee' in 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls her early days on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes a black history segment on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the African American community of Washington, D.C. during the early years of 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the impact of producer Beverly Price on the show 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the organization Blacks in Broadcasting group

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes 'Harambee's AIDS segment

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about earning her law degree and taking the bar exam

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls traveling to Israel to cover the First Intifada

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about working at Goldfarb, Kaufman, & O'Toole

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her role in the publication of "Songs of My People"

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she was hired at Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine analyzes the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she came to work with Miller and Long Concrete Construction

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her civic engagement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects on her hopes and what she would do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the portrayal of black people in the media

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the importance of teaching black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recounts a memorable experience from her time as a teacher

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her family and second husband

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake
Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV
Transcript
Okay, okay. So now 'Harambee' lasted until?$$I don't remember when it went off the air.$$Okay. But it morphed?$$Yeah, it did. I morphed into "Everywoman" was (unclear) the show that followed and it had Rene Carpenter as the hostess and she at one time had another person hosting with her, I think it was JC Hayward. Well I came over and replaced JC, so I would get off the set of Harambee and then go over and walk across the studio and get on the set for "Everywoman". And then they put that together and it became "Nine In The Morning". They added a male host. It was 90 minutes that we did and Doug Llewelyn was the male host. Then they cut it back to an hour again for "Morning Break" and I did that by myself. And then I did the Carol Randolph Show by myself.$$Okay. Did the format change?$$It was still very much like you see today. You know, we had--sometimes we would--we'd have, sometimes a theme, dependent upon what the topic was, segments, musical, phone-in. I remember doing a show, and I don't know why this sticks in my mind, but we were talking about homosexuality and there was a tendency for the members of the panel that was up there to be condescending to some of the questions that were coming in, cause some of them could be really rather ridiculous and show a definite lack of knowledge. And I remember saying that if you hear it from one person then you know there's many more behind him that believes this. You need to give them an answer. And the guy on the program said she's absolutely right. And then he went around and answered that question. Now stands out in my mind simply because it was an open phone question. One of the best fun shows I ever did was with Billy Eckstine and Joe Williams. That was--cause as a teenager I had a crush on Billy Eckstine. And who didn't love Joe Williams with that deep voice of his and they performed. So it was a great show that I'm so sorry that we don't have. And we did a special with Eubie Blake. Claude Matthews was the co-host at that time. And we did a--that was just before Eubie actually died and he played. It was a wonderful, wonderful experience.$$Now he's a pioneer black (unclear). How old was he when he died?$$Was he in his nineties or something like that when he died, I think he was. His fingers could still move up and down the piano, you know, so. Yeah, I think they did this show. What was the Broadway show did in his--$$Oh, "Scott Joplin." Oh no, "Ragtime." Was that what you were talking about. Oh, no, not "Ragtime".$$--It was a Eubie Blake show and he was on '60 Minutes.'$$Yes. Uh-huh, but we were before them. And I don't know how we happened to get him before them, but we did, you know, and we did a special with him that aired at night time. Now I remember doing a show, who was the co-host of that one. I don't even remember now, but we did a late night show cause somebody had decided that there was an audience for late night, and we were talking about sex and a whole bunch of things on that one. That was an interesting show. That was a fun show.$$So it lasted for a few years, or--$$That was only for a pilot. We just did it just to see if there was an audience out there. There was. I don't remember now why they didn't decide to go on and, in fact, just sitting here talking to you about it has brought that back to me, you know, to my mind. But I had forgotten about it, yeah.$So did you have to move out to L.A. [Los Angeles, California] for that?$$No. They had a reporter out there. Actually, I was on the air when they had just gone into making the decision, cause you know these views about what was gonna happen and so forth. And I always felt that the prosecution had not done a very good job in terms of laying out their case. They'd over done it in terms of the DNA evidence, etc. And I remember one of my professors in law school said, "If you gonna go out to shoot a king, you better have a kings-sized rifle." I didn't think they had it and especially with that bit about with the glove, you know, if it doesn't fit, you must have acquit which is the way it was presented in the closing arguments.$$Yeah, by Johnnie Cochran?$$By Johnnie Cochran. And I thought--I remember when O.J. Simpson put on those gloves, I think he was just as surprised as anybody that the things didn't fit. 'Cause you know, I had done domestic law, not a lot of it when I was in Washington [D.C.], and the one thing I always thought, when a woman--when a man finally understands that a woman may really, one who has been abused, is really leaving you, she's in the most danger at that point. Because they don't see whatever, the beating up or any of these other things that they've done as being criminal because she deserved it, I'm entitled, that kind of thing. And so when the first story broke that she was dead and he was arrested, I thought he had done it. I just didn't think the prosecution ever proved it. So I was on the air talking to Ricky Clemmon [ph.], she was out in California, and all of a sudden they said, oh, oh, we got a verdict. But they didn't know what it was 'cause they had to bring in all the people, but it was very quick. So everybody thought it was gonna be a guilty verdict. And Steve Brill [ph.] had sent around this notice to saying there would be no outburst, you know, if you did that, you would be fired. But that was Steve Brill, you know, he would give you these extreme kind of you know notifications. And then when it came in, it was a not guilty thing. It was like most amazing to a lot of people. But it really wasn't to me because I think Marcia Clark thought she could handle that kind of a jury. I understand black people, I understand black women, whatever. Well, I have been, since, on a jury here and I can't tell you I can understand black people because we don't march in the same way. You know, you can say, you know, black people are gonna do this that and the other as she thought she could identify with and what they did was, you know, they were waiting for some kind of a hook, and Johnnie Cochran gave it to them with this, "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit." And there you have it. But it was on the air, and then O.J. Simpson called in and I was on the air one time. I didn't recognize his voice. I don't remember now exactly what it was he wanted to talk about-$$Did he call incognito or did he-$$--He even--no, he said this is--I was on the air and somebody came flying into the studio and said, O.J. Simpson is on the air. And he was trying to explain, I think, this was when his--the second trial was up, you know about the civil trial. I don't remember his question, but he and I got into a discussion about that, so those are things that stand out in my mind about Court TV.

Richard Prince

Journalist Richard Prince was born on July 26, 1947 in New York, New York, to Jonathan and Audrey Prince. Prince was raised in Roosevelt, Long Island, where he graduated from high school in 1964. Then, while a student at New York University, where he graduated in 1969 with his B.S. degree in journalism, he worked as a newspaper reporter for Newark, New Jersey’s Star-Ledger.

Upon graduation, Prince was hired as a reporter for the Washington Post. In 1972, he and six other African American reporters filed a complaint against the Washington Post with the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Their case for equal opportunity in the workplace triggered other similar events at news agencies across the country. In 1979, Prince accepted a new position as assistant metro editor of the Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester, New York. Two years later, he was promoted to assistant news editor. Then, in 1985, Prince was promoted again to editorial writer and columnist. From 1988 to 1993, his columns at the Democrat and Chronicle were syndicated by the Gannett News Service for publication in other newspapers across the country, giving Prince nationwide attention. Finally, in 1993, he was promoted once more to editor of the “Speaking Out” page.

In 1992, Prince became a founding member of the William Monroe Trotter Group, an association of African American newspaper columnists. Then, in 1994, he was hired as the publications editor of the organization Communities In Schools. Prince would stay in that position until 1998, when he became the interim director of communications at the National Association of Black Journalists. After shortly serving in that role, Prince returned to the Washington Post in 1999 as a part-time copy editor on the foreign desk, while working in investigative journalism for two years as editor of The Public i, an online news report of the Center for Public Integrity. In 2002, he became founding editor of the news service Black College Wire and also began writing his own column entitled Richard Prince’s Journal-isms through the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education.

In 2010, Kent State University awarded Prince the Robert G. McGruder Award for his accomplishments in encouraging journalism diversity. In 2013, he was awarded the Ida B. Wells Award, presented by the Medill School at Northwestern University and the National Association of Black Journalists. Prince has also chaired the Diversity Committee of the Association of Opinion Journalists.

Richard Prince was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 22, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.253

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/22/2013

Last Name

Prince

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Everett

Occupation
Schools

New York University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Richard

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

PRI09

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Well All Right

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

7/26/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Health Food

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Richard Prince (1947 - ) was a member of the 1972 “Metro Seven” group that fought for equal employment rights at the Washington Post. He is also the author of the column Richard Prince’s Journal-isms.

Employment

Maynard Institute for Journalism Education

Black College Wire

Washington Post

Center for Public Integrity

Communities in Schools

Democrat and Chronicle

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Richard Prince narrates his photographs

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Slating of Richard Prince's interview

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Richard Prince lists his favorites

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Richard Prince describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Richard Prince describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Richard Prince talks about his paternal grandparents' West Indian background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Richard Prince talks about his parents' childhoods in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Richard Prince describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Richard Prince talks about his father's education and service in the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Richard Prince describes how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Richard Prince considers which parent he takes after most

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Richard Prince describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Richard Prince talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Richard Prince talks briefly about the history of his family's name

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Richard Prince describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Richard Prince talks about the influence of the Presbyterian church in his his childhood community in Roosevelt, Long Island

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Richard Prince describes his childhood community in Roosevelt, Long Island,

Tape: 2 Story: 17 - Richard Prince talks about segregation in Roosevelt, Long Island

Tape: 2 Story: 18 - Richard Prince talks about his short-lived experience in kindergarten

Tape: 2 Story: 19 - Richard Prince remembers his first experience with overt racism

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Richard Prince remembers an influential sixth grade teacher at Long Island Grade School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Richard Prince recalls having an early interest in journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Richard Prince talks about cultural diversity in Long Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Richard Prince recalls the names of newspapers his family kept at home

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Richard Prince talks about the absence of mentors in grade school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Richard Prince talks about developing an interest in journalism in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Richard Prince talks about his experiences at Roosevelt Junior-Senior High School in Long Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Richard Prince talks about being the first person in his family to go to college

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Richard Prince talks about popular music in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Richard Prince recalls attending the March on Washington in 1963, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Richard Prince recalls attending the March on Washington in 1963, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Richard Prince talks about graduating from Roosevelt Junior-Senior High School in Long Island, New York in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Richard Prince talks about choosing to attend New York University in New York City, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Richard Prince describes his experience at New York University in New York City, New York in 1964, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Richard Prince describes his experience at New York University in New York City, New York in 1964, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Richard Prince remembers the faculty advisors in the journalism department at New York University in New York City, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Richard Prince describes covering the 1967 riots in Newark, New Jersey for the Star-Ledger newspaper, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Richard Prince describes covering the 1967 riots in Newark, New Jersey riots for the Star-Ledger newspaper, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Richard Prince talks about joining the United States National Guard

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Richard Prince talks about the cultural transition from "Negro" to "Black"

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Richard Prince talks about finishing his degree at Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Richard Prince explains how he was hired to the Washington Post in 1968

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Richard Prince talks about his experience in the U.S. National Guard

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Richard Prince talks about the Metro Seven's discrimination complaint against the Washington Post, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Richard Prince talks about the Metro Seven's discrimination complaint against the Washington Post, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Richard Prince lists the members of the Metro Seven

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Richard Prince describes the requests made by the Metro Seven to the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Richard Prince describes the impact of the Metro Seven at the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Richard Prince talks about where the members of the Metro Seven are now

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Richard Prince talks about black professionals organizing in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Richard Prince talks about issues in public school education in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Richard Prince talks about journalists' responsibility to their community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Richard Prince talks about the Janet Cooke controversy at the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Richard Prince describes covering the 1977 Hanafi Siege in Washington D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Richard Prince describes working at the Democrat and Chronicle in Rochester, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Richard Prince talks about the African American history in Rochester, New York, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Richard Prince talks about the African American history in Rochester, New York, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Richard Prince describes Rochester, New York in the 1980s

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Richard Prince describes his decision to return to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Richard Prince describes where he worked after returning to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Richard Prince recalls his whereabouts at the change of the millennium as well as on September 11, 2001

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Richard Prince remembers an experience with HistoryMaker Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Richard Prince describes working on the Black College Wire, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Richard Prince describes working on the Black College Wire, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Richard Prince remembers how he got started at the Maynard Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Richard Prince talks about colorism in Central and South America

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Richard Prince talks about the football boycott at Grambling State University in Grambling, Louisiana

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Richard Prince describes his writing style and journalistic philosophy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Richard Prince talks about opportunities for young journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Richard Prince shares his advice to young journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Richard Prince talks about his awards

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Richard Prince considers what he would change about his past

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Richard Prince describes his future goals

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Richard Prince considers his professional legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Richard Prince talks about the consequences of being a journalist

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Richard Prince expresses gratitude toward his family

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Richard Prince describes how he would like to be remembered

Donna Britt

Journalist and author Donna Britt was born in Gary, Indiana, to Thomas and Geraldine Britt.  The sole daughter among four children, Britt grew up in a tight-knit, achievement-focused household.  She graduated from Gary West Side High School in 1972, and attended Hampton University, where she graduated in 1976 with her B.A. degree in Mass Media Arts. The following year, Britt began working on her M.A. degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. In 1977, her older brother Darrell was shot and killed by a pair of Gary policemen.  After internships with the Charlotte Observer and the Ann Arbor News, Britt graduated with her M.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1979.

After graduation, Britt was hired as a staff writer for the Detroit Free Press, working for six years as a general assignment reporter, feature writer and fashion columnist. While in Detroit, Britt married a local public relations executive, a union that lasted three years and produced two sons. In 1985, she was hired as an editor at USA Today, eventually becoming the newspaper’s Los Angeles bureau chief and co-movie critic, positions she held until 1989. That year, Britt attained her “dream job” as a writer for the Style section of the Washington Post . After three years in Style, Britt was promoted to Metro columnist. Her opinion pieces covered a range of subjects, including gender and race relations, pop culture, books, film, and personal recollections. Syndicated by The Washington Post Writer’s Group, Britt’s column eventually appeared in sixty-two newspapers. From 2009 to 2010, Britt served as a columnist for the Politics Daily online news website.                       

In 2011, Britt published the critically-acclaimed book Brothers (& Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving, which was excerpted by Essence magazine and listed as one of “10 Titles to Pick Up Now” by O Magazine.  Winner of numerous local and national awards, Britt was nominated by the Washington Post for the Pulitzer Prize in journalism in 1990. That same year, she won Best Commentary from the National Association of Black Journalists. Britt’s columns won numerous local and national awards, including the Distinguished Writing Award for commentary and column writing by the American Society of Newspaper Editors, and honors from the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors. Britt is married to Washington Post Managing Editor Kevin Merida. They have three sons: Justin Britt-Gibson, Darrell Britt-Gibson and Skye Merida.

Donna Britt was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 6, 2013.
      

Accession Number

A2013.212

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/9/2013 |and| 3/20/2014

Last Name

Britt

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

West Side Leadership Academy

Hampton University

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Donna

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

BRI07

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ranch La Puerta

Favorite Quote

I Know Nothing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/1/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vanilla Ice Cream

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Donna Britt (1954 - ) was an award-winning columnist and the author of 'Brothers (& Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving.'

Employment

Detroit Free Press

USA Today

Washington Post

Delete

Favorite Color

Blue, Coral, Orange

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Britt's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donna Britt lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donna Britt shares her mother's stories about growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donna Britt shares her mother's stories about growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about her grandmother's high school field trip to Washington, D.C. and service work

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses growing up watching television and the experience of otherness

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about her mother's college education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Donna Britt talks about her paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Donna Britt talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Donna Britt describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donna Britt describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donna Britt describes Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about growing up in Gary, Indiana in the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about starting grade school in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about the role of church in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about what books she liked to read while growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about her favorite TV shows and movies from her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donna Britt remembers her favorite teachers from Garnett Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about the racial makeup of Ernie Pyle Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Donna Britt remembers watching Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s March on Washington speech

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Donna Britt remembers her family trips to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Donna Britt talks about junior high school during desegregation

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Donna Britt talks about the first African American mayor of Gary, Indiana, Richard G. Hatcher

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about the periodicals that she read when she was growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donna Britt discusses her high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about choosing a profession in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about seeing the Jackson Five in Gary, Indiana, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about seeing the Jackson Five in Gary, Indiana, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about high school graduation and deciding to go to college

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donna Britt describes working at the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about the Black Power Movement and its influence on her as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the transition from the term "Negro" to "black" in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about summer jobs and internships

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Donna Britt talks about journalism courses at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Donna Britt talks about extra-curricular activities and teachers at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Donna Britt talks about being encouraged to write at Hampton University

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Donna Britt talks about graduating from Hampton University and graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about activism and graduate school at The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donna Britt talks about her brother, Darrel Britt's death, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about her brother, Darrell Britt's death, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the suspicious circumstances of her brother, Darrell Britt's death

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donna Britt discusses the official report of her brother's death and the death of Trayvon Martin

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about writing about her brother's, Darrell Britt, death

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about writing for the Detroit Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donna Britt talks about an article that she wrote on Ebonics for the Detroit Free Press

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses the role of language in race and power politics

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the Black Arts Movement and Blaxploitation

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Donna Britt talks about leaving the Detroit Free Press for USA Today

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about working for USA Today as an editor

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donna Britt discusses her favorite interviews while working at USA Today

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donna Britt talks about interviewing celebrities

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donna Britt discusses leaving Hollywood for the Washington Post

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about accepting an offer by Milton Coleman to write an opinion column

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about the subjects of her opinion column

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donna Britt discusses writing about the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donna Britt discusses writing about Nelson Mandela's release

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donna Britt discusses her article about the widening gulf between the middle class and the poor

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Donna Britt discusses writing about her encounter with George Bush's physician

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Donna Britt discusses her approach to writing about race, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Donna Britt discusses her approach to writing about race, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Donna Britt and Geraldine Britt describe their photographs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Britt's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Donna Britt remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Donna Britt remembers the O.J. Simpson trial, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Donna Britt recalls the public's reaction to the O.J. Simpson trial verdict

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Donna Britt talks about the implications of the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her coverage of President Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Donna Britt remembers President George Walker Bush's election

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Donna Britt remembers the attacks of September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Donna Britt talks about the Iraq War of the 2000s

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the perception of print media within the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about the public's perception of print media during the Iraq War

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Donna Britt talks about Bill Cosby's Pound Cake speech

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Donna Britt describes her column, 'Cosby Becomes the Grandpa of Tough Love'

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Donna Britt remembers the presidential nomination and election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Donna Britt recalls the black community's concerns following the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about skin color bias within the black community

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Donna Britt talks about the role of President Barack Obama's family in his election

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Donna Britt describes her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Donna Britt reflects upon the administration of President Barack Obama, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Donna Britt reflects upon the administration of President Barack Obama, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the implications of President Barack Obama's election

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Donna Britt describes her book, 'Brothers (and Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving,' pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Donna Britt describes her book, 'Brothers (and Me): A Memoir of Loving and Giving,' pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Donna Britt remembers appearing on 'The Oprah Winfrey Show' and in O Magazine

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Donna Britt recalls the shooting of Trayvon Martin, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Donna Britt recalls the shooting of Trayvon Martin, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Donna Britt talks about the exoneration of George Zimmerman

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Donna Britt talks about her future plans

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Donna Britt describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Donna Britt reflects upon her life

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Donna Britt talks about the role of women within the family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Donna Britt reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Donna Britt talks about her family

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Donna Britt describes how she would like to be remembered

Mary C. Curtis

Newspaper editor and news correspondent Mary C. Curtis was born on September 4, 1953 in Baltimore, Maryland. She was the youngest of five children born to Thomas Curtis and Evelyn Curtis. After graduating from Seton High School in Baltimore, Maryland in 1971, she enrolled at Fordham University in New York City and graduated form there in 1975 with her B.A. degree in communications. In 2006, Curtis was awarded a Nieman Fellowship from Harvard University.

From 1985 through 1994, Curtis served in a variety of editing positions at The New York Times, including as editor of “Home, Education, Life” and “The Living Arts,” a section in the National Edition that she helped to develop. She also served as the Features editor for the Arts and Entertainment section at The Sun in Baltimore. In addition, Curtis held positions as a reporter and as an editor with The Associated Press in New York, Hartford, Connecticut and with the Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. She also contributed news articles to TheRoot.com, theGrio.com, National Public Radio Creative Loafing , and served as a national correspondent for AOL’s PoliticsDaily.com. In 2011, she joined the The Washington Post as a contributor for the blog, “She the People.” She covered the 2012 Democratic National Convention for The Charlotte Observer.

Curtis is a member the National Association of Black Journalists. Curtis received the Carmage Walls Prize in 2005 for commentary in a competition sponsored by the Southern Newspaper Publishers Association. She is the recipient of several Green Eyeshade Awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). The North Carolina Associated Press recognized Curtis with the Thomas Wolfe Award for her writing “My Rebel Journey,” an examination of Civil War heritage groups. She received the Clarion Award from the Association for Women in Communications in 2010 and 2012. Curtis was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Region IV National Association of Black Journalists in 2004.

Curtis and her husband, Martin F. Olsen, live in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Mary C. Curtis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 8, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.156

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/8/2013

Last Name

Curtis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Schools

Harvard University

Fordham University

The Seton Keough High School

St. Pius V Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Mary

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

CUR05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Tropez

Favorite Quote

To whom much is given, much is required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

9/4/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Charlotte

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Newspaper editor, newspaper correspondent, and newspaper columnist Mary C. Curtis (1953 - ) former reporter for The Baltimore Sun and editor at The New York Times, was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Region IV NABJ.

Employment

Washington Post

Creative Loafing Atlanta

Fox Charlotte

AOL

Grio, The

CNN

Charlotte Observer

New York Times

Baltimore Sun

Arizona Daily Star

Associated Press (AP)

Traveler's Insurance, Co.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Mary C. Curtis

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis describes her mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her maternal great-grandmother, who was born into slavery

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis recalls her mother's upbringing in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis continues to describe her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis describes her father's family background and her father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Mary C. Curtis describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Mary C. Curtis lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis describes being the youngest of five children

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis recalls her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis describes her neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis remembers being on the television show 'Romper Room'

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis describes her elementary school, St. Pius the Fifth, run by the Oblate nuns

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis recounts how books influenced her as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis describes her impressions of her family's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Mary C. Curtis shares her love of the Arts and how the Arts have shaped her life and career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis talks about Seton High School, an integrated Catholic high school in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis discusses her experiences at Seton High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis remembers attending her fortieth high school class reunion

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis shares her memories attending Fordham University in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis recalls meeting her husband at Fordham University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her favorite professors and guest speakers at Fordham University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis reflects on her family's upward mobility

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis discusses the journalists she admired in the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis describes working with the Associated Press after graduation from Fordham University, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis describes how she was treated as a young black female reporter in the 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis describes taking a break from journalism during the years of 1977-1981

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis recalls attending the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education in 1981

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her experience in Tucson, Arizona from 1981-1983

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis describes being a black female journalist in the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis shares some memories of living and working in Tucson, Arizona

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis describes moving back to the East Coast and working at The Baltimore Sun in 1983

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis talks about joining the National Association of Black Journalists in 1984

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis talks about diversity and the benefits of being involved with the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis talks about the importance of diversity of views in news stories

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her work at the Baltimore Sun

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis describes her transition to the New York Times

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis describes moving to Charlotte, North Carolina to work for the Charlotte Observer

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her son, Zane, and the move to Charlotte, North Carolina from New York

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis describes the vibrancy of Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her Neiman Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University in 2005, part 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her Neiman Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University in 2005, part 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her Neiman Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University in 2005, part 3

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis describes her return to Charlotte, North Carolina after her 2006 year at Harvard University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her 2004 Thomas Wolfe award-winning article

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis talks about the aftermath of her Thomas-Wolfe award winning article in 2004

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her coverage of the 2007-2008 primary elections

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis recalls covering the 2008 elections and interviewing President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis talks about being laid off at the Charlotte Observer in 2008 and her journalism work since then

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis talks about how she covers conservative news stories

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Mary C. Curtis talks about interviewing Franklin McCain of North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Mary C. Curtis describes her different journalist affiliations

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Mary C. Curtis describes the arts events she covered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Mary C. Curtis talks about her family and her son, Zane

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Mary C. Curtis talks about the future

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Mary C. Curtis talks about being on 'Jeopardy'

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Mary C. Curtis describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Mary C. Curtis narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Mary C. Curtis talks about diversity and the benefits of being involved with the National Association of Black Journalists
Mary C. Curtis talks about her coverage of the 2007-2008 primary elections
Transcript
Now, this is something I hear from a lot of black journalists, that they really feel, there's a particular kind of loneliness working at a white newspaper, basically, where you just don't have the--they feel, you know, it takes a lot of stamina to, you know, to stay, you know, withstand it, I guess, and you know, that's what I--that's what people keep saying, that it's a lot of pressure (unclear) (simultaneous)-$$Well, I'm not sure I'd use the word stamina as much as, you know, you are, you're doing your job, but say, if you're talking about news judgment or how a story is played or you wanna make sure that when you have people of color in the paper, that you--I'm in features. So most of the minorities you would see on the pages are in Metro or news, when they're doing something or is the face of welfare or poor people or--I mean not always. But it's usually news. And to me, I love features because it humanizes people. And you have the universal experiences. We all garden, we all cook, we all go to church. We have these experiences we share, so it's especially important that minorities are represented in stories in the food section, in the feature section, in the faith section, you know, all of these--in the entertainment section, and all of these sections. So you see people doing the same things you do. When you have a home story that is about a minority family in a home, these kinds of things. So you're always trying to make sure that happens, to make sure if you do a feature story, say, on romance, on couples, that there's diversity, and not just diversity of race, but of income level, of geography, so you're not just picking people from some part of the city, certain neighborhoods, of age. So if you have a romance story, maybe older people, and so you're mindful of that. But when you're making that, you're making that case every day in the newsroom, and you are doing your job and trying to make people understand that this is just not an extra to be put in a story, but it makes the story more complete and more accurate. So it's good journalism, and sometimes that's pressure because people are under deadline pressure. People, of course, relate more to people like themselves, so when you are alone in the newspaper or in any media organization, you're it or there's a few of you. So it is, I would say it's not stamina, but it's every day, it's--it takes energy. It takes energy, and I do think, you know, people kid about the parties at NABJ [National Association of Black Journalists], but part of it is the relaxation of being there and of knowing, when you say--it's, you're talking in a shorthand because when you say, I was trying to convince my editor, and they say, oh, I know, you know (laughter). So it's a meeting, you don't have to explain yourself. You don't have to be anyone but yourself. And I think there's a certain comfort level in that. It's the people, the way, reason people belong to any club. And I think a misnomer when people say, well, we, there's no national organization of white journalists. Well, first of all there're people of every color that belong to NABJ [National Association of Black Journalists]. White people do belong to it, Hispanic people, it's, if you believe in the mission of diversity. So it's not an exclusive organization. It's an inclusive organization, just like NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] or any of those organizations. It is inclusive. It's about the message, and it's just nice knowing you're with people that, people who, that particular message is important to those people. And so, yeah, I think it is relaxing, and when, that very last night before you come back, there usually is a dance. And there's music and people are dancing, and it is a release of sorts. And I think there's nothing wrong with that. You know, you've worked hard, you're--you know, even at NABJ [National Association of Black Journalists], you're wearing your business clothes. You never know who you're gonna run into, that give you a future job. You're going to the job fairs. So it's about business and it's about skills development, but it's also about being with folks, you know, who--I like to say it is a shorthand. And it's about catching up with people that you haven't seen for a while because the nature of the business is that you travel to different places. You get a job here or there. So it's saying, oh, my goodness, you know. I haven't seen you. You're working in Detroit [Michigan] now, that kind of thing. So I, it's work and it's therapy (laughter). We all need that, so I agree, I agree. It's, you know, I've never--I don't think that newspapers or media organizations are any more discriminatory or whatever as any part of society. But I do think sometimes we have to emphasize that they are, indeed, a part of society. So it's not as though the people who work there--I do think sometimes journalists think, we don't have those problems because we're more open minded than that. Well, the people are human beings. When you go into the door of whatever organization, you don't drop society's roles. You don't drop any prejudices at the door because you're a journalist. You hope to, and you work at it, but we all bring something to it. So that's a part of it.$And Ed Sanders was just--and later, they made him the principal of the school, a white school that--and he hired the first black teacher there, B.B. Delaine, I think, who was the son of the Reverend Delaine of the Clarendon County case in South Carolina that was part of the 'Brown v. Board of Education' [1954]. So there's so much Civil Rights history here. But it's, you're right, you know. It, sometimes it takes a lot, but if you just say, "I'm gonna do what I have to do." So he taught me something, but I was--so that was in the '[Charlotte] Observer' too, and then when the South Carolina primaries happened in 2000--started going in 2007, I went to the debate in South Carolina, the first Democratic debate. And I saw on the stage, [President] Barack Obama and [Senator] Hillary Clinton and [Senator] John Edwards and [Governor] Bill Richardson and all these folks, [Senator] Joe Biden, I thought, you know, this is gonna be something. This is gonna be something. So I really hadn't been that involved in politics, but, you know, sometimes you see a story and you gotta grab a hold of it. And you go to that debate and then you go to the Republican debate, and you have to, you need a cheat sheet because they all look the same, you know, well, you know who [Mayor Rudy] Giuliani and [Senator John] McCain and [Governor Mitt] Romney are, but, and you realize how different it's gonna be, and this is gonna be historic. So I just got a hold of that story, tried to make it mine, got the paper's first two interviews with [President] Barack Obama, the only interview with [Senator] Hillary Clinton, followed [Governor] Mike Huckabee around South Carolina, just tried to tell that story, and that--tried to tell that story, tried to tell it.$$Now, this is a campaign that North Carolina's favorite son, [Senator] John Edwards, kind of went down and the--he had issues with his marriage and all that got in the press and-$$Yeah, although, not at the beginning there. I mean in 2000--the 2008 campaign, remember that famous debate in Myrtle Beach [South Carolina] where [Senator] Hillary Clinton and [President] Barack Obama were going at each other, and their supporters were in front with dueling cards. And [Senator] John Edwards was sort of the peacemaker.$$Oh, sure, John Edwards was-$$So calm.$$--a favorite of a lot of people, you know-$$Yeah, and then there were some people who thought, "Well, this isn't gonna be the time for a woman or a minority, that the Democrat--he would be the white guy Democrat that people come back to" because, remember that was the year after [President George W.] Bush where it was such a prime year for a Democrat. So, that's why a lot of people got frustrated when what came out, came out because if he had gotten it, of course, it would have come out, and that would have totally ruined it for it. But, yeah, it was obviously, another great time to be a journalist. Even though North Carolina's primary was late, it actually counted. But I initially covered the--South Carolina is one of the first in the South. So I got to go down there and write columns off of the appearances, see [Presdient] Bill Clinton just hang out and go out around South Carolina with the Republicans and Democrats, watch a Baptist minister bless [Governor] Mike Huckabee and, you know, all of that. It was, I really liked to see the--my piece, my column started to be on the intersection of all of these things, to look at it, and to see the culture piece in the campaigns because what are debates, but political theater? So when you're in a Republican debate and they're talking about torture and all of them are, you know, Romney's, I'm pro-Guantanamo, let's expand it, and, you know, you have [Representative] Tom Tancredo talk about, you know, Jack Ry[an], you know, "Send in the guy from '24'" and [Senator] John McCain says, "You know, we shouldn't torture because it's not about who they are. It's about who we are." And no one applauds, and you realize the only guy against it on the stage is the guy who's been tortured. So that's the story. You know, so it's finding that piece of, looking at it and saying, wow, you know. To watch Oprah [Winfrey] appearing with [President Barack] Obama in South Carolina in a stadium. It was just covering the scene. And I went on to Denver, not for the '[Charlotte] Observer', actually. They didn't send me to the Democratic National Convention. But I got a chance to go and I went and covered for Neiman [Foundation], wouldn't have missed it, went on my own time. That's when the papers were cutting back. I was starting to see the writing on the wall. So, although, you know, it was a great experience.

Joe Davidson

Newspaper columnist Joe Davidson was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1949. He graduated from Mumford High School in 1967. In 1971, Davidson received his B.A. degree in education and political science from Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. He received his M.P.P. degree in public policy from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 1974.

Davidson’s professional career began in 1971 at the Detroit News. He moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1974, and joined the Philadelphia Bulletin, where he became City Hall bureau chief. Davidson later served as City Hall reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and managing editor for the National Leader. In 1984, Davidson moved to Washington, D.C., to work for The Wall Street Journal. During his tenure at The Wall Street Journal, Davidson covered a broad range of domestic issues and agencies, including the U.S. Justice Department as well as national politics. He was also based in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he served as a news correspondent during the aftermath of Nelson Mandela’s release from prison and subsequent election as the president of South Africa. After serving as a consulting editor for the Rev. Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow/Push organization and as an editor at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Davidson joined The Washington Post in 2005. Davidson has also appeared as a commentator or contributor to PBS’s “Religion & Ethics Weekly,” National Public Radio, BET, MSNBC, and Emerge Magazine.

Davidson is a founding board member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and is past-president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists (PABJ). He is also the recipient of numerous journalism awards, including the Founder’s Medal from the NABJ, the Alfred G. Wilson Outstanding Male Graduate Award from Oakland University, a First Place NABJ Award for International Reporting, and a First Place Award for reporting from Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri.

Davidson lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife, Bernardine Watson. They have three sons: Hakimu and Jasiri Davidson and Robert Watson, as well as a granddaughter, Naomi Grace Sebelko-Watson.

Joe Davidson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.037

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2013 |and| 3/1/2013

Last Name

Davidson

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Samuel C. Mumford High School

Oakland University

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Joe

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

DAV29

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Grand Haven, Michigan

Favorite Quote

Tell No Lies, Claim No Easy Victories.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/26/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cake (Chocolate)

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Joe Davidson (1949 - ) founding board member of the National Association of Black Journalists, has served as a reporter for the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal.

Employment

Philadelphia Bulletin

Philadelphia Inquirer

National Leader

Wall Street Journal

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Washington Post

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joe Davidson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson describes his mother's upbringing in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson talks about his parents' social life in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson talks about his mother, Margaret Drew Davidson

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson describes his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson describes his father, Joseph Davidson, Sr.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Joe Davidson describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Joe Davidson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Joe Davidson describes his neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson describes his childhood interests and hobbies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson shares his elementary school memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson talks about the media during his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson remembers the Civil Rights Movement and labor movements in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson talks about Motown music in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson describes attending Mumford High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson talks about his activities at Mumford High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson remembers his teachers at Mumford High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson recalls the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson remembers being a copy aide at the Detroit News

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson describes his decision to attend Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson talks about his interest in journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson describes his professors at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson talks about the different terms used to refer to black people in the past

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson talks about his involvement with black student organizations at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson describes his professors at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson recalls the social life at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson describes his graduation honors at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson talks about his fellowship at Washington Journalism Center in 1971

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson talks about the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson remembers hearing the news of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson talks about race relations at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson recalls the 1967 riots in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson talks about black journalists he met during his fellowship at Washington Journalism Center in 1971

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson talks about earning his master's degree in public policy at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson recalls working for the Detroit News while in graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Joe Davidson talks about his work in radio

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson talks about working at the Philadelphia Bulletin in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson describes covering City Hall Bureau Chief for the Philadelphia Bulletin in the 1970s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson talks about teaching at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennyslvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson talks about HistoryMaker Chuck Stone

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson talks about the formation of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson talks about the case of Mumia Abu-Jamal

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson talks about HistoryMaker Reverend W. Wilson Goode's election as Mayor of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson describes HistoryMaker Reverend W. Wilson Goode

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson describes the MOVE bombing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Joe Davidson describes becoming managing editor of the National Leader newspaper in 1982, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Joe Davidson's interview

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson describes becoming the managing editor of the National Leader newspaper in 1982, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson remembers the stories that the National Leader covered

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson describes his accepting a position at the Wall Street Journal

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson talks about the various beats he covered for the Wall Street Journal

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson talks about his coverage of Nelson Mandela for the Wall Street Journal

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson contrasts social movements in South Africa to those of the United States

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson talks about HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse Jackson's 1988 presidential campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson recalls leaving the Wall Street Journal in 1997

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson describes the political leanings of The Wall Street Journal

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson describes his various career moves after leaving The Wall Street Journal

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson describes working at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson describes writing a story on the kidnapping and death of journalist Daniel Pearl

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson recalls the dangers he faced while reporting in South Africa in 1986, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson recalls the dangers he faced while reporting in South Africa in 1986, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson describes becoming an editor and columnist for The Washington Post

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson remembers winning the Peabody Award

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson talks about the 2008 presidential election

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson talks about the economic concerns of federal governmental employees, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson talks about the economic concerns of federal governmental employees, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson talks about the challenges facing the United States Postal Service and its impact on the black workforce

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson describes the impact of the 2008 sequester on federal employees

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson describes writing about his opposition to the Defense of Marriage Act [DOMA]

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson describes writing articles on federal employees' pay freeze

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson describes his approach to writing his column in the Washington Post

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Joe Davidson describes his involvement in the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Joe Davidson talks about his involvement with the Trotter Group and his other activities

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Joe Davidson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Joe Davidson talks about his lack of regrets in life

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Joe Davidson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Joe Davidson describes his journalistic philosophy and ethics

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Joe Davidson comments on African Americans' distrust of the news media

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Joe Davidson talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Joe Davidson talks about his pride in being involved with the National Association of Black Journalists [NABJ]

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Joe Davidson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Joe Davidson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$7

DAStory

7$6

DATitle
Joe Davidson talks about his involvement with black student organizations at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan
Joe Davidson recalls the dangers he faced while reporting in South Africa in 1986, pt. 2
Transcript
Well, let's see. So were you part of a black student organization on campus [Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan]?$$Oh, yeah. Yeah.$$Okay.$$Yeah, in, well, in high school, we didn't have one then, but we did have like the Black History Club was kind of about as close as we got to it. In college though, yeah. Yeah, we had as--was it the Black Student Alliance, I think we called ourselves the Black Student Alliance. And there was this, some, a smaller group of, I think only black male students. We got together from time to time. We would talk about trying to put out a newspaper or something, and it never really went anywhere. And, now, the group I ran though, it was both black and white students. I ran this group called "Pontiac Oakland Educational Tutorial Assistance Team" or something like that. We called ourselves POETAT. And we would have, we would bring in black elementary students from Pontiac, Michigan to campus which was in Rochester, Michigan, bus them in. It was like a four-day a week program, and then for two days, say like a Monday or a Wednesday, they would come to campus. And on Tuesday and Thursday, we would take buses and go to their schools and tutor them there. So this was like four days a week throughout the school year. And I was basically, I basically directed that program for a year or two. And, but, yeah, we were, on campus I was part of the black student group. We took over a cafeteria, you know, and a lot of--but we, I mean I was, I'm still, frankly, impressed with our goals. We just, we talked about things like having an African Studies program, but we also demanded such things as having an ambulance on campus that would be for everybody. You know, it wasn't just, our demands just weren't narrowly focused on, you know, quote, unquote "black" issues. They were also focused on some issues that would make life better for campus generally. And I remember one of 'em was--Oakland University at that time was fairly isolated. It was kind of out in the country. And I think it started when some, I think a black, female student somehow got hurt, and I might not be recalling this correctly. And so we ended up taking over the cafeteria, you know, a whole list of demands. But one of 'em was like have an ambulance on campus. And so it was, I mean I thought that, I was proud of us, in fact, because it was like, this is serious business about making campus life better generally, in addition. And, of course, I think things like African Studies courses make the school better too, generally, in terms of its academics. But those were things that clearly we wanted as black people, whereas the ambulance was something like, you need to have this because people get sick, you know, on campus, and we're isolated. So, yeah, I was a member of, yeah, I was definitely a part of those organizations.$So about the guys coming into the Shabene?$$I was in a Shabene, which was one of these, kind of informal, off-the-books bars in the black communities within the South African townships. And this was during a period when there were, it was very tense in the townships. A lot of, you know, the Army or the police would come through, and might arrest people. I've seen 'em basically knock over these shacks, these shanty, in these shanties with these big armored personnel carriers, a lot of people throwing rocks, you know, at these armored personnel carriers, the soldiers and the police firing back. It was a very tense time. And there was also a lot of necklacing or at least some necklacing, which is the, you know, this horrible way of really executing people where a gang will douse a person or a tire with gasoline or kerosene and then set it alight and burn the people alive. And so here I am in the, you know, this outsider, this American. And they came up to me in the Shabene, this group of young, black men. They were all over the townships really, kind of considered themselves the enforcers of what was right, I guess, trying to make, advance liberation but in their own kind of way. And they said, people are saying you are with the CIA. And, listen, I'm telling you, that's not what you wanna hear when you're in a Shabene. This was not--and they basically called me outside to--and we started talking, you know. And I basically talked my way out of it, you know. And I said, look, whatever you have against the [President Ronald] Reagan administration, because the Reagan administration was in cahoots basically with the South African regime. I mean Reagan considered those racists his allies, his friends. I said, look, whatever you have against the Reagan administration, black Americans have that against it, plus the way he's treating black Americans (laughter) in the United States. And by the time we got done, you know, we were friends. One of these guys, next time he saw me, he actually gave me a kiss on the cheek, and so it was, that was a closer a call than I would necessarily wanna have again. But, but, you know, and, you know, I didn't, my last trip to South Africa, I went over there with my wife, and I met some of the people that was with back in '86 [1986]. And they told me how, in some ways, they protected me, in ways that I didn't know about at the time. And because it was a very tense time, but I had, I knew the political leaders, you know, the grass roots political leaders. And so, you know, they made it clear that they had to, they protected me in ways that probably had I not done my homework, I might not have had because, I mean I went over there--before I went to South Africa, I stopped in Lusaka, Zambia and talked to the ANC [African National Congress], to let them know I was going to South Africa. It's not like I asked their permission, but I wanted the leadership of the African National Congress to know what I was doing because there was, you know, there was a boycott against South Africa. And, you know, I might have been a journalist, but clearly my heart was with the South African people, and the black people, in particular and not with the racist regime that was doing everything it could to keep these people down. And so I went through Lusaka, Zambia. I talked with the leadership of the African National Congress. In fact, I went back the home of Thabo Mbeki who later became president. He was like the chief information officer at the time, and a guy named Joe Slovo [ph.], who was, you know, kind of, a renowned white Communist within the ANC. He came by my hotel. And so I got to know at least on that level, at least a, I mean at least on an introductory level, the leadership of the African National Congress. And it helped, you know, when I got to South Africa 'cause I got, I got in touch with the right people. But that's not to say that everybody on the street knew who I was. And so some of these young guys who were, you know, basically, like tasking their law in their own hands. You know, they were suspicious of me. Another time, I was at a gas station, and I looked up--and the gas stations in South Africa were just like in New Jersey. You don't pump your gas. They have people to do it for you. So I was just sitting in the car. And I looked up and the car was surrounded by these teenagers. They weren't after me. They were just gonna steal the car. But, fortunately, an older guy there, he recognized that I was American, I guess he could hear my accent. And I told him I was a journalist. I'm trying to tell your story, and with his help, you know, he and I basically talked my way out of that situation. So there were some tense times, no question about it.$$Yeah, it sounds like it. So, I'm glad we had a chance to go back to that and get some of those stories,--$$Yeah.$$--those were interesting stories and gives a flavor to what was going on then.

Jackie Trescott

Journalist Jacqueline E. Trescott was born on January 2, 1947 in Jersey City, New Jersey to Alfred P. and Adelaide C. Miller Trescott. In 1964, Trescott enrolled at St. Bonaventure University, and was mentored by Dr. Russell Jandoli. As a student, she interviewed Levi Stubbs of the Four Tops and interned at the The Newark Evening News when the urban uprisings of 1967 were raging. Trescott graduated from St. Bonaventure University in 1968, earning her B.A. degree in journalism.

In June 1970, she joined The Washington Star as a staff reporter. Her assignments were primarily for the Portfolio section, covering cultural personalities and events. From 1976 to June 2012, Trescott worked for The Washington Post, reporting for its award-winning Style Section. Her assignments included political and celebrity profiles, National Public Radio and the local radio stations, and arts events. Beginning in 1992, Trescott became the principal arts news reporter, covering Washington’s museums, performing arts centers and theaters. She coordinated the sprawling beat and raised the national profile of the Post coverage. The stories ranged from the attacks on the National Endowment for the Arts, to the rise of arts facilities as economic engines for their communities to the construction of the National Museum of the American Indian. Coverage included fund-raising to administrative changes to investigations of management and building conditions. The Virginia Press Association cited Trescott and James Grimaldi for their reporting in 2007. The use of the Freedom of Information Act by Trescott and Grimaldi in reviewing records at the Smithsonian was a finalist in 2009 in the Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc. competition.

In her last two years at the Post Trescott helped create the Style Blog – originally called the Arts Post – which combined arts news and culture. The blog has also served as a destination for features on the dedication of the Martin L. King Memorial – Trescott posted a month of civil rights songs to salute the occasion. In her four decades, Trescott has often interviewed musical and literary personalities, who helped define their craft: Toni Morrison, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Chita Rivera, Denzel Washington, Oprah Winfrey and Alice Walker.

Jacqueline E. Trescott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.228

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/28/2012

Last Name

Trescott

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Elaine

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

St. Bonaventure University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jackie

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

TRE01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jersey Shore, Martha's Vineyard, New York City, New Orleans, Louisiana

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/2/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster Rolls

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Jackie Trescott (1947 - ) , was a reporter in the award-winning Style Section of The Washington Post from 1976 to 2012.

Employment

Washington Post

Washington Star

Favorite Color

Coral, Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jackie Trescott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's education in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her great-grandmother, Josephine Matthews

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her father's military service in the U.S. Army

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott describes Christ the King Catholic Church in Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott shares the story of how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's support of Catholicism

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about her brother, Paul Alfred Trescott, and her childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott shares her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Jackie Trescott talks about growing up in the Greenville section of Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Jackie Trescott describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about playing records in the basement of her parents' home and dancing with her friends

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about buying new records every Friday and listening to them with her friends

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about a Girls Scouts leader who took her to Broadway shows

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about going to Broadway plays and museums in New York as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about the black publications of her youth, her exposure to black leaders and her parents' interest in basketball and baseball

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about her education and her early interest in writing

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about attending Catholic school and her cousin, who was a nun

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott talks about celebrities and cousins she admired as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about her Catholic all-girls high school, Sacred Heart Academy

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott remembers President John F. Kennedy's assassination in 1963 and his significance within the Catholic and black communities

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her high school newspaper and her awareness of black journalists

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about choosing to attend St. Bonaventure University in Bonaventure, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott talks about a high school mentor

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about working for the newspaper and at the library as well as basketball at St. Bonaventure University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about Dr. Russell Jandoli, her journalism mentor at St. Bonaventure University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott remembers news media coverage of the murder of Emmett Till in 1955 and of the 1964 Freedom Summer

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott remembers her shock upon learning of Malcolm X's assassination in 1965 at the Audubon Ballroom, where she attended dances as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her family's view of the Civil Rights Movement and attending the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about working for St. Bonaventure's newspaper and radio station

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her college internships and jobs, and the 1967 Newark Riots

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott discusses the 1967 Newark Riots and the election of minority mayors across the country

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott discusses her senior year in college, the death of her father in 1967 and the assassination of Robert Kennedy in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her first job at Western Publishing after graduating from St. Bonaventure University in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about meeting people who integrated media at the Washington Journalism Center

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott describes her first job as a reporter at the Washington Star in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott describes her article at the Washington Star on African American church history

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott describes the Washington Star's closure and other newspapers in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about writing on black history and black cultural figures during the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about reporting on the Black Arts Movement and important figures at Howard University in Washington D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about working at the Washington Star and her interviews with Nina Simone and Marvin Gaye

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her move from the Washington Star to the Washington Post at the end of 1975

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about working in the Washington Post's style section and her first column

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about covering the National Endowment for the Arts and other arts organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott discusses Washington, D.C.'s black cultural organizations and their subsequent closures

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about the U.S. Bicentennial in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her approach to covering the arts from an administrative and management perspective

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about the development of various African American museums in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about the formation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC)

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about the acquisition of materials for the NMAAHC

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about her coverage of the authentication of Nat Turner's Bible

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott discusses the conflict over using public funds to support arts and culture

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott describes her views on arts funding in the U.S.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott discusses her coverage of the Smithsonian secretary's misuse of funds

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott talks about her favorite stories

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott describes her interviews of Kennedy Center honorees including Stevie Wonder and Quincy Jones

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her coverage of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. statue on the National Mall

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about doing a story on family histories at Monticello

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about Letitia Woods Brown and Maya Angelou, two of her mentors in black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott continues to talk about her mentors, including Eleanor Traylor and Lori Stokes Sims

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her art collection

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott describes her retirement and her planned book on churches in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about what she might do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her passion for live concerts and baseball games

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

3$2

DATitle
Jackie Trescott talks about reporting on the Black Arts Movement and important figures at Howard University in Washington D.C.
Jackie Trescott talks about doing a story on family histories at Monticello
Transcript
Okay. Now, would you consider yourself to be, to have been a part of the black cultural movement, I guess, in that period of time? Or is this a black arts movement, or--?$$Well, certainly I was, you know, very deeply interested in the black arts movement, and did a lot of reporting, you know, on it. But I think there was a separation between, you know, those who were reporting on what was happening--reporting on, you know, poets and their work--you know, from, you know, Sterling Brown, who was certainly was an established figure at Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.] at that point. He was an elder, you know, of the movement. But the younger people in the movement loved him, and made sure that some of his work was again re-issued and stuff. But I think the role of the reporter was to sort of explain, you know, what was happening. But I don't think many of us considered ourselves part, you know, of the movement. We were a part of a different kind of journalism movement.$$Okay, okay. So, yeah. So, you mentioned, like Sterling Brown. Washington, D.C. was like, was one of the, I guess, places where a lot of the black artists and poets worked, were celebrated and housed and--$$Well, the--first of all there were people who were actually teaching in the classrooms at Howard who were famous. You know they were famous for, you know, all sorts of achievements. And it was a real, you know, privilege to, you know to go to their classrooms and you know, to do stories about what they were talking about, and talk about their own achievements. And this went across a lot of fields. Besides, you know, Sterling Brown, there was Montague Cobb who was a doctor, and also was very much a force in recording the history of blacks in medicine and stuff. So, he was someone I interviewed. And then Dorothy Porter was a librarian at Howard at the Moorland-Spingarn Collection. And that had been her job for years, just to document this black history, and to make sure that the Howard library was a leader in research, and you know, people could come and they could read Alain Locke's papers and other, you know, documents of important people. So, she was someone I profiled also, you know, just to have this unique role in black culture. You know, as well as, you know, talking to, you know, the people who were just, you know, getting started. You know, Jeff Donaldson was an artist who had started in Chicago and came to Howard. And he was, you know, one of the people who helped define what the Black Arts Movement [BAM, Black Aesthetics movement]--as far as painting and realistic portrayals of blacks... were. You know, so it was a very exciting time, because there was the growth of black theatre and the people who came through, you know, those kinds of programs. You know, the Howard theater department itself, you know, had produced Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen, and other people. And, you know, so they were around, you know, to talk to. And then there were--there was a black book store which was very influential, the Drum & Spear Bookstore [Washington, D.C.]. And all these people who were writing these new books that were being published, would come there to give a talk. So, you had, you know, an opportunity to connect, you know, with a lot of people and to meet people, maybe even if you didn't write a story about them. But you knew who they were, and they became part of the arts vocabulary.$Okay, okay. Now, you did a story--I believe you did a major story on Charlottesville--on Monticello [Charlottesville, Virginia], right? On [Thomas] Jefferson's--?$$Well, this year the people from Monticello and the developers of the African American Museum got together and decided they would do a joint show about the families of Monticello. And, you know, not only focusing on the slave labor, but also on the history of those families. And they were able to, you know, do pretty full histories on about five of those families, you know, who had really interesting jobs around Monticello. You know, carpeting and blacksmithing. And, you know, there was one family that was in charge of driving, you know, all the Jeffersons from place to place (laughter) and stuff. So, there was, there was certainly the rigors of slavery. But there were also some options that people could do different jobs and then be able to see the world, you know, outside of Monticello. So, you know, they did this joint history exhibit which has been really, really popular. And some of the descendents of the slave families of Monticello actually came, you know, to the opening, you know, and added more, you know, to the history. But Monticello is probably the most researched plantation in the country. And they have not only done the white side of Monticello, they've been very diligent about getting the black side right, too, you know, through oral histories, through architectural digs and stuff like that. So, yes, that was a groundbreaking exhibit. You know, and a lot of people's, you know, eyes were open to, you know, the humanization of, you know, that period of history. Because sometimes we don't know, even know people's names. So, it was important to have a human story. "Here's the guy who made the nails," you know.$$Right. I can remember the nail story, for some reason.$$Yeah.$$A nailery, they called it.$$Right, yeah. It was just, you know, fascinating, you know. And then there's been a lot written about the Hemings. And so there were a couple of, you know, descendants of--not Sally Hemings' line, but her--it's her brother's line. Her brother was actually an employee of Jefferson's for years. He went to France with him and he paid--Jefferson paid for him to go to culinary school.$$Yeah, James Henry Jefferson?$$Uh huh, uh huh. So, you know, just interesting to know those facts and to hear some of the stories, you know, from the descendants themselves.

Juan Williams

Television personality and news journalist Juan Williams was born to Rogelio and Alma Geraldine Williams on April 10, 1954 in Colon, Panama. At the age of four, Williams and his family moved to Brooklyn, New York. In 1969, Williams won a scholarship to attend the Oakwood Friends School in Poughkeepsie, New York, a Quaker school. Williams then attended Haverford College, where he graduated with a B.A. degree in philosophy in 1976.

After interning at the Washington Post, Williams was hired by the newspaper in 1979. He worked as an editorial writer, op-ed columnist and White House reporter in 23 years at the Washington, D.C. newspaper. Williams published his first book, Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years (1954-1965) in 1987, the best-selling companion to the award winning documentary of the same name. Williams was then hired by Fox News Channel in 1997 as a contributor. A year later, his second book, Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary, about the pioneering Supreme Court justice, was published. It was designated a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. After serving as co-host of the television news program America’s Black Forum, Williams was hired as host of the National Public Radio call-in program Talk of the Nation in 2000. He wrote his third book, This Far by Faith: Stories from the African American Religious Experience, a companion to the critically acclaimed Public Broadcasting System documentary. Williams then wrote My Soul Looks Back in Wonder: Voices of the Civil Rights Experience and Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It; the former was co-written with Pulitzer-prize winning author David Halberstam and published in 2005, and the latter was published two years later. Williams has authored six books in total.

He is also the recipient of several awards for his writing and investigative journalism, he won an Emmy Award for television documentary writing and received widespread critical acclaim for numerous projects, including a series of documentaries like Politics: The New Black Power and A. Phillip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom. Williams has also written numerous articles for national magazines including TIME, Fortune, The Atlantic Monthly, The New Republic, Ebony and GQ.

Juan Williams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.061

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/15/2012

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Schools

Haverford College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Juan

Birth City, State, Country

Colón

HM ID

WIL58

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Outer Banks, North Carolina

Favorite Quote

Check It Out.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/10/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Panama

Favorite Food

Wife's Cooking

Short Description

Newspaper columnist, radio personality, and television commentator Juan Williams (1954 - ) is one of the most prominent African-American journalists on television, having appeared on Fox News Channel and award-winning Public Broadcasting System (PBS) documentaries.

Employment

Washington Post

National Public Radio

Fox News

Favorite Color

Blue, Orange, Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Juan Williams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Juan Williams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his father's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses his father's occupations in Panama and New York

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Juan Williams shares the story of how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about his likeness to his parents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his likeness to his parents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about his mother's move to Bedford-Stuyvesant, New York, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Juan Williams describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Juan Williams describes the sights, sounds, and smell of growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Juan Williams describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about the apartments where he lived in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his favorite subject in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about his favorite teachers in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about playing sports in Brooklyn, New York, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about playing sports in Brooklyn, New York, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his childhood interests

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about earning a scholarship to attend Oakwood Friends School in Poughkeepsie, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Juan Williams talks about the racial makeup and his extracurricular activities at Oakwood Friends School

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Juan Williams remembers the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Juan Williams talks about his father's move to New York and how it affected him

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about Malcolm X's impact on his family, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Juan Williams talks about Malcolm X's impact on his family, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his family's discussions about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about going to black bookstores and movies in downtown Brooklyn

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about his grades in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his brother's and sister's roles in his early development

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses his mentors and role models at Haverford College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about his early writing

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about how he started writing

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his African American influences from the news media

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Juan Williams talks about the racial makeup of Haverford College

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Juan Williams discusses his studies at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about his influences at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses how he majored in philosophy at Haverford College and the usefulness of critical analysis

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his philosophy professor at Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his internships and jobs during and after Haverford College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about the black reporters at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about being hired at the Washington Post after working as an intern

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about the stories that he worked on and his career at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about covering Marion Barry at the Washington Post

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Juan Williams discusses Marion Barry's strengths and weaknesses as mayor of Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Juan Williams discusses Marion Barry's strengths and weaknesses as mayor of Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Juan Williams discusses some of the scandals surrounding Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Juan Williams discusses political philosophy in relation to Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses public sector jobs and public services during Mayor Marion Barry's administration

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses his coverage of public schools in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Juan Williams discusses his first impressions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Juan Williams shares his opinions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Juan Williams shares his opinions of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Juan Williams discusses U.S. Supreme Court Justices Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Juan Williams discusses U.S. Supreme Court Justices Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Juan Williams discusses the appointment of African Americans to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about what led to his work on PBS's "Eyes on the Prize"

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about meeting documentary producer, Henry Hampton

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses writing the book 'Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years: 1954-1965'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Juan Williams discusses what he remembers most about writing 'Eyes on the Prize'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about interviewing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about interviewing U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Juan Williams talks about writing his biography on Thurgood Marshall, entitled, 'Thurgood Marshall: An American Revolutionary'

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Juan Williams talks about 'America's Black Forum', pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Juan Williams talks about 'America's Black Forum', pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about how his book, 'Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary' was received

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Juan Williams talks about his book on Thurgood Marshall and the media attention it received

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Juan Williams talks about the conflict between Carl Rowan and Thurgood Marshall

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about working at CNN and at Fox News

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about his interview with Bill O'Reilly that led to his departure from NPR

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Juan Williams talks about the reaction to his Bill O'Reilly interview

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Juan Williams talks about his experiences at Fox News

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Juan Williams describes his professional philosophy as a journalist

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Juan Williams responds to criticisms of his book, Enough

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Juan Williams discusses the organizational efforts that are required to make progress on civil rights

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Juan Williams talks about his future projects

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Juan Williams reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Juan Williams discusses the political culture of Fox News

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Juan Williams reflects upon his legacy and what he would do differently

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Juan Williams talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Juan Williams talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Juan Williams describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Juan Williams talks about covering Marion Barry at the Washington Post
Juan Williams talks about being investigated for his writings on U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, pt. 1
Transcript
Okay, now, when you were hired as a report--now, you covered Marion Barry, didn't you as mayor--$$Um-hum.$$--of the City of Washington [Washington, D.C.]. And what was that like?$$Oh, gosh, it was a mess. You know, I was covering--when I was young--when I had, first was working on the City Staff, I was covering the School Board, and then went from the School Board to covering some of City Hall, the district building is what we call it here in the District of Columbia. And Barry was a character in both settings for me. And Barry's history with the paper, remember "The Washington Post" is the big white newspaper in town, had always been problematic. They had fallen in love with his image as kind of the Dashiki-clad, civil rights activist, and the reality on the ground is that Barry was oftentimes involved in all kinds of political shenanigans and questionable activities from way back in his days with "PRIDE" and all that. But he had the kind of dashing, charismatic energy, absent from the people who were the pioneers of what we call in the District of Columbia, "Home Rule," and these were older, more bureaucratic, administrative-type black men. I'm thinking here of Walter Washington. I'm thinking here of Sterling Tucker. These are suit and tie type guys, but they were at the cutting edge of making deals that led to Home Rule for the District of Columbia, that allowed control of budgetary authority for the District of Columbia to come to local hands, established the whole notion of the right to vote and proper representation for the people of the District of Columbia as opposed to having Congress control it. Barry comes from a different tradition, if you will. Whereas you had Walter Washington, Sterling Tucker, Walter Fauntroy, as kind of establishment, political and church leadership in the black community, Barry comes in as someone who'd been in SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee], someone who then comes to town with the Civil Rights Movement, comes from Mississippi, comes to D.C., and gets involved with these job training organizations that are taking advantage of federal grants. And he is much more kind of the voice of young, impatient and challenging to whites, black America. And, you know, the paper fell in love with Barry, especially, the editorial board and all that. And so when I start writing about Barry, writing editorials about Barry and the like and being critical of him, the newspaper is like whoa, you know, why are you writing critically about Marion Barry? But Barry was always up to tricks, and I was always critical of some of Barry's activities and willing to write in that way. And then Barry, of course, has his own issues, once he gets into elected office on the City Council and as the Mayor. And writing about him, and writing about his deals and his missteps, and the like, I think it was very difficult for lots of people to see those stories in "The Washington Post," and I remember being castigated and criticized, you know, why are you writing, why are you writing critically about a black leader in a white newspaper and those kind of things.$In 1992, you left "The Washington Post"?$$Yes.$$Okay, so what happened?$$I didn't leave "The Washington Post" in '92 [1992], but--$$Okay, well--$$I think in '92 [1992] is when I start working on the Thurgood Marshall book which comes out in '98 [1998]. But in the course of the Clarence Thomas hearings--remember Thomas was charged with--Anita Hill said, oh, he's, he's sexual harassment and all that stuff had emerged. And in the course of those hearings, then at the paper, people said, well, Juan Williams tells dirty jokes, and Juan Williams flirts with women. And all of a sudden they would say oh, well, should we be investigating Juan Williams, you know? And, you know, they--I remember the editors at the "Post" [the Washington Post], I think fearing for lawsuits against the "Post" said, well, you should be going on TV. You shouldn't be talking about this. And I had been writing about Clarence Thomas for, as we've discussed for some time. But it was so painful to me that this institution which I regarded as my home, would suddenly turn on me. In other words, they hadn't turned on me, although they had been very skeptical about my critical writings about Marion Barry. And that was highly politically charged in this black majority town. They hadn't turned on me in that situation, but in this situation where I was involved in a controversy about Clarence Thomas because I said I thought what was going on there was really unfair to him, the human being, the woman in the newsroom clearly said, "You're either with us or against us on this issue," and anybody who's writing anything favorable about Clarence Thomas is out of bounds. And so I became part of the story. And it was again, to me, just the wildest thing, I mean just--you know, they came. They had me sit through interviews with people. Did you say this? Did you do this? And it ultimately came down to write an apology and let's get over with this thing. But it was very painful to me, and I don't think, I don't think my relationship with the Post was ever the same after that. It was searing for me, and it was very public. It was all over. So-

E. Lee Lassiter

Newspaper columnist and journalism professor E. Lee Lassiter was born on July 11, 1936, in Carpenter, North Carolina. His father, Narvie Lassiter, was a tenant farmer while his mother, Margie Upchurch Lassiter, was a housewife and sold cosmetics. Lassiter’s parents made a pact that all of their children would graduate from high school and, unlike most tenant farmers, insisted they attend school every day. Lassiter attended the segregated Apex Elementary School in Apex, North Carolina and Barry O’Kelly High School in Method, North Carolina, graduating in 1954. He worked his way through college at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in, receiving his B.A. degree in secondary education in 1959. He earned his M.A. degree in journalism from Boston University in 1963 and his Ed.D. degree from Morgan State University in 1993.

While a student at Tuskegee, Lassiter joined the Reserve Officers Training Corps. In 1961, he served in the Adjutant General’s Corps of the Army as a correspondence officer and technical writer and remained in the Army Reserves for another ten years. Near the close of 1961, he joined the editorial staff at the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper before moving, in 1965, to the Baltimore News-American, where he remained until the newspaper ceased operations in 1986. During his time at the Baltimore News-American, Lassiter wrote editorials and worked in various positions in the editing department. In 1974, he became a regular columnist at the newspaper, with syndicated columns in newspapers around the nation. After the paper closed, Lassiter accepted a position as an associate professor of English at Coppin State University. He retired from teaching in 1999, and began working as a public relations associate for the University. In 2003, he retired from that position, but accepted a contract to work in the same capacity online from his home.

Lassiter is an active member of numerous associations, including the NAACP, the Baltimore Tuskegee Alumni Association and the Black Writers’ Guild of Maryland. He has been a member of Mount Ararat Baptist Church in Baltimore for forty-four years. Active in community service for almost forty years, among his numerous awards are the Tuskegee University Presidential Associate Award, African Methodist Episcopal Church Christian Service Award and the Council for Cultural Progress Public Service Award. In 1981, he was honored with a Giant in Journalism trophy. Lassiter lives in Baltimore with his wife, Hannah Louise Lassiter.

E. Lee Lassiter was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 16, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.070

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/16/2010

Last Name

Lassiter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lee

Schools

Apex Elementary School

Berry O'Kelly High School

Tuskegee University

Boston University

Morgan State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

E.

Birth City, State, Country

Carpenter

HM ID

LAS03

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Carolina

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

7/11/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hot Dogs, Beans

Short Description

Journalism professor and newspaper columnist E. Lee Lassiter (1936 - ) worked at the "Baltimore News-American" for twenty years, writing a nationally syndicated column for twelve of those years. He joined Coppin State University in 1986 as an associate professor of journalism and English before retiring in 2003.

Employment

Boston University

United States Army

Afro-American Newspapers

Baltimore News-American

Coppin State University

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black, Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:1701,11:2286,17:10044,118:25373,322:34580,442:35175,451:35685,458:43810,537:44235,543:60048,860:60702,867:69256,950:69760,957:97449,1288:98539,1341:112920,1535:126898,1690:133110,1758:138484,1821:147842,2001:158758,2100:164416,2180:165844,2215:184635,2417:194864,2526:198057,2585:198778,2593:214020,2819:215140,2834$0,0:6560,106:6995,112:20588,391:54982,788:99536,1297:100052,1331:109720,1489:134104,1796:171298,2312:171682,2317:180272,2414:185698,2468:201664,2698:210527,2869:222816,3035:251965,3383:262525,3484:263630,3500:277236,3644:293767,3914:321120,4284:329150,4364
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of E. Lee Lassiter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - E. Lee Lassiter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his maternal grandfather, Claude Upchurch

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about her mother's lack of education, but her own emphasis on the importance of education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his paternal grandfather who was a farmer

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his father's growing up in Chatham County, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - E. Lee Lassiter describes how his parents met and married

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his parents' personalities and his likeness to them

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - E. Lee Lassiter discusses his parents' emphasis on their children's education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - E. Lee Lassiter describes her earliest childhood memories of Christmas with his family

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - E. Lee Lassiter describes the community where he grew up

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his father's reputation as a farmer, and his efforts as a parent

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - E. Lee Lassiter recalls his favorite radio programs

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about the show 'Amos 'n' Andy'

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his mother's entrepreneurship and his interest in magazines

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about being bused to his elementary school in Apex, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his family's car

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his teachers in school and his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about the importance and role of church in his upbringing

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his experience in high school, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his experience in highs school, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about how he learned about black history and black literary giants while in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his extracurricular involvement in school

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his father's taking he and his brother to the black museum in Raleigh, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about being the editor of his high school newspaper

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - E. Lee Lassiter discusses his awareness of civil rights and the 'Brown vs. Board of Education' ruling

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - E. Lee Lassiter discusses his decision to attend Tuskegee University, and he and his brother's long trip to high school during their senior year

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about graduating from high school and the teachers who influenced him

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - E. Lee Lassiter describes how his family raised the money for him to attend Tuskegee University in 1954

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - E. Lee Lassiter discusses his journey from North Carolina to Tuskegee University, and being away from home

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - E. Lee Lassiter describes his experience at Tuskegee University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about the five-year program at Tuskegee University, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about his education at Tuskegee University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about the teachers who influenced him at Tuskegee University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - E. Lee Lassiter talks about graduating from Tuskegee University and applying to Boston University for graduate school in journalism

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
E. Lee Lassiter discusses his journey from North Carolina to Tuskegee University, and being away from home
E. Lee Lassiter describes his experience at Tuskegee University
Transcript
We got the train ticket, and I got on the train. I took it, 900 miles, almost a thousand miles to Tuskegee [Alabama] from Raleigh [North Carolina]. And one of the experiences that I remember--two. One, my family was there, and I'd never been on a train. And they said their good-byes. And I walked away to get on the train, and I never looked back because I had read that when you--one of these philosophical things that I took too far, when you change directions, and you set a new sight, don't look back. So I didn't look back. Years later, I found out it broke my mother's [Margie Ree Upchurch Lassiter] heart. She wanted me to look back and give me that last wave as I get on the--you know how mothers are, any parent. I never looked back, and she cried and cried and hurt for years. I didn't know. But that was the reason. I'd heard, when you change course, don't look back (laughter), so I didn't. So I got on the train, and after thirty miles on the train, we went through Sanford [North Carolina]. That's where my grandparents on my mother's side had grown up, and I mean where she had kind of grown up. The nearest town was Sanford. And I realized, going to visit my grandparents in Sanford was the furthest I'd ever been from home. That was the last sign I saw that I'd ever seen, recognized, knew anything about, thirty miles from home, going 900 miles. It was the end of the world for me. I had never--and it registered with me, what you're really doing, you know, and this kind of thing. So I took the train ride to Tuskegee, and that's how I got there. And no pocket change, arrived on Saturday, and school doesn't really crank up till Monday. You can't register, you can't anything. I had no way to eat for two days, no money, no anything. But my friend who had been there one year before me, broke the rule and let me eat one meal on his meal ticket. And that's how I--I wouldn't have starved, but I had, didn't have a dime. Interesting that my wife had come from another town, same lack of preparation for (laughter) those two days. So she starved for two days too. But we didn't know each other (laughter). But the 150 [dollars], on Monday, you gave--I gave it to the school and started the five-year plan. And it was a hard experience, so I didn't go home for four years. I never saw my family again for four years. And that, when I went home for four years, it was just for overnight. And I went back to Tuskegee [University] to finish that one year. Then I went. When I finished, I didn't have money to go home. I had to borrow fifteen dollars to have enough to catch a bus to go home with my diploma. So--$$So nobody from your family was able to come to see you graduate?$$No. Her family--we had kind of gotten engaged by then. Her mother was there. No one from my family.$In the whole time I was at Tuskegee [University, Tuskegee, Alabama], I got eleven dollars from home. The first Christmas, I wrote home, and everybody was writing home or going home. And I wrote home and said, it'd be nice if I had a few dollars for Christmas. And my father [Narvie Hester Lassiter] didn't have it, which I should have remembered. But I forgot, you know. So I wrote and asked, and he sent me ten dollars, and that was it. And then I had one aunt, one cousin, who sent me one dollar in a card in those five years. And I still have it. I have the card, and the dollar. She's passed, but that's what it meant to me. And she was a special cousin because in all of these thirteen children that my mother's [Margie Ree Upchurch Lassiter] mother had, they had children that I grew up with, cousins. She was in an awkward age, and there were no girls. So she played with the boys. So, she was a special cousin to me. I knew her, you know, I think she knew me. So when I went off to college, she sent me a dollar (laughter). And when I went home years and years later, looking forward to telling her how much it meant to me that she had done that, she had been in an automobile accident, and her mind was damaged. She hardly knew me. So I never got the chance to tell her like I'm telling you, but I still have it. I can put my hand on the card and the dollar. But in those five years, that's all I got from home. So I had to work it. At one point, I had five jobs, back-to-back. I would do my Tuskegee regular job. Then I had a job cleaning the faculty clubhouse, and drinking their sodas and playing their music. Nobody came, nobody--two faculty members came to the clubhouse, two younger ones. The older ones never came over, so I had the run of the place. I studied, and I drank their sodas. I watched Bill Russell play his first game on their television (laughter) and listened to Edward Griggs [ph.]. There was only one classic album in the building. So I listened to it all--Pierre Gent suite over and over and over. I love it. And every time it plays, I can't resist telling her, that's Edward Griggs. She says, you know so much about classic music. [Whispering]. That's the only one I know (laughter). But that was--and then I'd leave that job and I went to a shoe store and sold, supposedly sold shoes. And then I would leave there and go to the Dean of Men's Office and work during the night in the Dean of Men's office, one summer--not every, but--$$Okay, now--(unclear) (simultaneous)--$$--that's how I got through it. And the one student who went before me, from Apex [North Carolina], he was majoring in veterinary medicine, and he never finished. He was brilliant--we were talking about Dr. Dibble, earlier, you and--(simultaneous)--$$Right, Dr. Eugene Dibble, yeah.$$--who managed the hospital, one of his friends was a Dr. Ford who had a daughter. And my friend became the boyfriend of Dr. Dibble--Dr. Ford's daughter, living the life, and had access to their home, had access to their car. So he got off the five-year plan. Then Dr. Ford moved to California. And his last year there, he couldn't eat because you--once you get off the plan, you can't get back on it. And he was real good in school, and I used to watch him--and I got to repay that favor where he let me eat on his card. I let him eat on my card, which was illegal, but we did it. And I used to watch him dissect those animals, eat crackers, soda crackers, white crackers. That's all he had. And eventually he just--and he would go down to the edge of the campus. There were some plum bushes. This is a true story. He wasn't the only one eating those plums (laughter). You know, a lot of five-year plan, you had to make it the best way you could. And he would eat plums, eat those crackers, dissect those animals, and keep trying, but it was just too much. So he never finished.$$Did he just leave school?$$He left school. I think he was a junior.$$Did he go back home?$$Went back home, and then what exactly became of him, I don't know. One of the reasons that's so significant to me is because that was my motivation to stay on the plan, to maximize the plan, don't get carried away with whatever might happen to you in this process. This is your ticket out from the farm and poverty and all of this. Act like it.

Clarence Page

Pulitzer Prize-winning news columnist Clarence Page was born in Dayton, Ohio on June 2, 1947, to Clarence Hannibal Page, a factory worker, and Maggie Page, the owner of a catering service. During his senior year of high school, Page served as feature editor at the school’s biweekly newspaper. In 1965, he won his first award from the Southeast Ohio High School Newspaper Association for the year's best feature article. It was at this point that Page, under the guidance of Mrs. Mary Kendall, his high school newspaper instructor, became very interested in journalism. He graduated from Middletown High School in 1965, and that summer, he earned his first pay as a journalist by selling freelance photos and stories to the Middletown Journal and Cincinnati Enquirer. In 1969, he received his B.S. degree in journalism from Ohio University, where he worked on the student newspaper while at college.

That same year, Page joined the Chicago Tribune as one of its few African American reporters. Six months later, he was drafted into the military, where he served in the press office at the 212th Artillery Group, Fort Lewis, Washington. In 1971, Page returned to the
Chicago Tribune, where he covered a variety of topics, including police, religion, and neighborhood news, with freelance assignments as a rock music critic for the Tempo section at night. In 1976, he became a foreign correspondent in Africa, and in 1980, after eleven years at the Chicago Tribune, he joined WBBM-TV, a CBS-owned station, in August 1980, and while working there, was assigned the Harold Washington mayoral campaign. In 1984, Page returned to the Chicago Tribune as a columnist and a member of the editorial board. Three years later, his column became syndicated nationally, and in May 1987, he married Lisa Johnson. Their first and only son, Grady Jonathan, was born on June 3, 1989, and in 1991, they moved to Washington, DC.

The recipient of honorary doctorates from Columbia College in Chicago, Chicago Theological Seminary, and Ohio University, Page is a regular contributor of essays to "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" and an occasional commentator on National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition
Sunday." In 1972, he participated in a Chicago Tribune Task Force series on voter fraud that won him a Pulitzer Prize. Four years later, he won the Edward Scott Beck Award for overseas reporting on the changing politics of Southern Africa. An investigative series written by
Page, "The Black Tax," was awarded the 1980 Illinois UPI award for Community Service. In 1989, Page’s column won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, and in 1992, he was inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame. In 1996, Page published his first book, Showing My
Color: Impolite Essays on Race and Identity
.

Clarence Page was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 28, 2010 and March 6, 2012.

Accession Number

A2010.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/28/2010 |and| 3/7/2012 |and| 5/22/2014

Last Name

Page

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Garfield Elementary School

McKinley Junior High School

Middletown High School

Ohio University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Clarence

Birth City, State, Country

Dayton

HM ID

PAG02

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

You Must Think Money Grows On Trees.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/2/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue Ribs

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Clarence Page (1947 - ) was one of the most prominent nationally syndicated journalists in the country.

Employment

Chicago Tribune

Dayton Journal Herald

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:2080,25:23830,366:35800,582:62547,842:62902,855:64038,877:64393,883:64748,889:66239,934:66523,939:68653,987:70357,1028:71422,1163:85624,1373:87664,1409:87936,1414:100294,1624:100798,1632:103606,1697:125573,2010:128609,2066:128954,2072:129506,2082:129989,2090:131507,2119:140540,2233:140812,2238:142036,2259:142512,2267:143872,2290:144688,2306:144960,2311:145572,2322:149312,2398:163098,2607:165015,2644:165299,2649:165583,2654:167216,2709:167713,2718:170127,2787:197936,3278:210650,3431:212075,3444:216760,3513$0,0:2726,63:5186,105:5678,112:8220,162:8958,175:9368,181:14698,281:16010,309:23126,367:31883,574:35663,659:43150,752:66146,1044:78439,1127:83866,1209:99090,1400:104841,1563:107042,1611:112509,1714:113787,1739:114142,1745:124640,1848:136692,2003:140614,2146:141428,2158:152655,2294:204128,3094:204808,3121:229950,3398
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Clarence Page lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes his biological mother's family background and talks about his adoption

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Clarence Page describes his adoptive mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Clarence Page discusses his adoptive parents' migration to the north, his mother's job as a housekeeper, and how she met his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his mother's employers and their close relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his mother's restaurant and catering business

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about a lynching in his mother's hometown of Carrollton, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about being adopted and not knowing the identity of his biological father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Clarence Page describes his adoptive father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his grand-uncle, Monroe Page

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Clarence Page describes his father's growing up in Elba, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his father's family's move to Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about why his parents adopted him

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his father's influence on his life

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about race relations in Middletown, Ohio, while he was growing up, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about race relations in Middletown, Ohio, while he was growing up, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Clarence Page describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Clarence Page describes his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about watching television while growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about becoming aware of segregation as a young boy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his exposure to segregation, which taught him to see the world with empathy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about the desegregation of the North in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his positive attitude in school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about well-known people who come from Middletown, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about becoming interested in pursuing journalism in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about frequenting the Middletown public library

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about the first black reporters on national news networks, and watching political conventions on TV in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Clarence Page reflects upon changes in media trends since the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about how television changed media coverage in America since the late 1950s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about Louis Lomax and Mike Wallace

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes his first experience as a journalist

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Clarence Page discusses African American publications

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about businessman and publisher, John H. Johnson, as a role model

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about the black media

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his decision to attend Ohio University to study journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about news reporters in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about stuttering as a child

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about how he and others overcome their stutter

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about working at the Ohio University college newspaper

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the bands and entertainers who came to Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interview with Bill Cosby and his opportunity to attend Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about the number of journalists trained at Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his social life at Ohio University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about the political changes in the African American community in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks the political scene at Ohio University in the 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about black students at Ohio University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about Ohio University in the aftermath of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about teaching a black literature course at Ohio University as an undergraduate student

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about reading Malcolm X's autobiography

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about being drafted into the Vietnam War and his views on the war

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his decision to join the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about mainstream newspapers and the African American newspapers in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his mentor, HistoryMaker Vernon Jarrett

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about his early days at the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about HistoryMaker Joseph Boyce, who was the first black reporter in the newsroom at the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about spending two years in the U.S. Army

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting assignments in the 'Chicago Tribune'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about politics in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about Chicago's influence on his journalism

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about being a journalist in Chicago, Illinois, in the late 1960s and the 1970s

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about HistoryMakers Lu Palmer and Vernon Jarett

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about reporting on the Black Panthers in Chicago

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Clarence Page talks about the student killings at Kent State University and Jackson State University

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Clarence Page talks working undercover as an election worker in the primary of 1972

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Clarence Page talks about Chicago politics and the murder of Fred Hampton and Mark Clark of the Black Panther Party

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his experience in reporting Chicago politics

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about being assigned to become the Chicago Tribune's foreign correspondent to South Africa in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about finding out about his adoption

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his experience in South Africa and Rhodesia in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Clarence Page describes the city of Soweto, South Africa, and his experience there in 1976

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about the Soweto uprising

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about black journalists in South Africa and local black publications

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his trip to South Africa in 1976 and prominent South African political figures at the time

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his work as an assistant city editor at the 'Chicago Tribune', and his desire to work as a columnist

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the poor representation of African Americans on television shows prior to the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about the increase in black television talk show hosts in the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's suicide, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's suicide, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Clarence Page discusses the suicide rate in the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his investigative series, 'The Black Tax', pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his investigative series, 'The Black Tax', pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about the progress made by the African American community in the 1970s and 1980s

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his experience at WBBM-TV in Chicago, Illinois, and the boycott of Chicago Fest

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about covering Harold Washington's mayoral campaign at WBBM-TV in Chicago, and returning to the 'Chicago Tribune' in 1984

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Clarence Page discusses Harold Washington's mayoral campaign, and his win in the Chicago Democratic primary elections, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Clarence Page discusses Harold Washington's mayoral campaign, and his win in the Chicago Democratic primary elections, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Clarence Page talks about his relationship with Bernie Epton, the Republican mayoral candidate against Harold Washington in 1983 in Chicago

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about Reverend Jesse Jackson's presidential run in 1984

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interview with Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about his first wife, Leanita McClain's articles, and the black middle class, and its social divide

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Clarence Page discusses the similarities and differences in the background of he and his first wife, Leanita McClain

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarence Page's interview, session 3

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Clarence Page recalls meeting his wife for the first time

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Clarence Page remembers the transition of his column to national syndication

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his favorite columnists

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Clarence Page describes his writing style

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about African American recipients of the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Clarence Page describes his experience of winning the Pulitzer Prize

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Clarence Page recalls his reporting on the administration of Eugene Sawyer

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Clarence Page remembers moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Clarence Page recalls being inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting on social issues, pt. 1

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Clarence Page talks about his reporting on social issues, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his interest in economic justice

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Clarence Page reflects upon the recent political changes

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Clarence Page talks about his television appearances

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about the relationship between the African American community and bi-partisan politics

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Clarence Page talks about his political affiliation

Tape: 13 Story: 9 - Clarence Page describes his essay collection, 'Showing My Color'

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Clarence Page remembers the Million Man March in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about the presidency of Bill Clinton

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Clarence Page remembers the National Rifle Association campaign against Al Gore

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Clarence Page talks about his coverage of reverends Al Sharpton and Jesse L. Jackson

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Clarence Page talks about President Barack Obama

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Clarence Page describes Washington, D.C.

Tape: 14 Story: 7 - Clarence Page talks about overcoming his stutter

Tape: 14 Story: 8 - Clarence Page reflects upon the changes to the news media industry

Tape: 14 Story: 9 - Clarence Page reflects upon his life

Tape: 14 Story: 10 - Clarence Page talks about his film appearances

Tape: 14 Story: 11 - Clarence Page reflects upon the state of black media

Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Clarence Page reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Clarence Page talks about his parents' support

Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Clarence Page describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

7$8

DAStory

8$6

DATitle
Clarence Page talks about reporting on the Black Panthers in Chicago
Clarence Page talks about the Soweto uprising
Transcript
But anyway, enough of my grand old man reminiscing, back to the [Black] Panther days, I got to know the Panthers really on my own. Nobody ever assigned me to go out and cover the Panthers--maybe once. They were doing a food give-a-way one Saturday, a slow news day. I was sent out undercover. But mostly, I went out on my own and got to know the Panthers, and I also got to know some of the SDS [Students for a Democratic Society] folks. I met Bernadine Dohrn and Bill Ayers way back then, before they became Weather underground fugitives. And that's another story, we can go into if you want, but I--what really broke my heart was I was in basic training in Fort Dix, New Jersey when I got the news that Fred Hampton and Mark Clark had been killed. And I felt like, you know, I said right away, this was murder for one thing. It was early in the morning, and ain't no black folks around plotting any revolution (laughter) at four o'clock in the morning in a West Side apartment like this. I mean even in Fort Dix, New Jersey, just what I could read of the piece, I knew this was a setup. I wasn't as paranoid as the Panthers were. Panthers had always been telling me about, "Well, our phone's tapped, listen to the click," and blah, blah, blah. And I said, "Yeah, right, everybody's phone is tapped," it's the '60s [1960s] and all this. Little did I know, we found out when the COINTELPRO files were revealed, J. Edgar Hoover's entire plot, it really was a--sometimes there really is a conspiracy when people have a conspiracy theory.$$What they called the Red Squad in Chicago--$$That wasn't even part of the Federal effort, but he did work with the Red Squad, yeah. Yeah, the Red Squad was Keystone Cops by comparison. I mean, it's significant in that, I don't know how many departments had an actual, what, anti-subversion division they called the Red Squad, you know, (laughter) but Chicago had it. But they were kind of a joke with a lot of people. I remember the SDS convention in 1969 where the, at the old Chicago Coliseum, which was "the" place where the Weather Underground was born in that convention. There was, it was very high profile. They were, you know, us reporters were sent down there and did news conferences with the Weather underground folks, and everybody could look across the street and wave at the Red Squad folks in the abandoned building across the street there. You could see 'em up there with their cameras, you know, blah, blah, blah. And so like I say, it was kind of a joke. And the, a lot of things were kind of a joke. I mean the Weather, the SDS folks were so proud of all the press they were getting, and they said, "Well, we ought to use this to help the people or something." And Bernadine Dohrn announced they were gonna charge reporters like $25 (laughter) or something, the major press, to pay $25 per reporter or photographer and the Chicago Seed, the underground paper, and said, "Well, what about us? We don't have any money." They said, "Well, you can get by free and the others"--I said, "Well, that's not fair, you know," blah, blah, blah, "Here I'll pay your $5." And that finally passed. But it shows you how unprofessional (laughter) all of this was and how it was kind of a combination of, well, politics for the hell of it as Abbie Hoffman used to say, the Yippies and all that. I say the fun went out of it all when folks found out you could get killed doing this. The Panthers got killed. The Panthers were conspired against.$But you asked about the Soweto [South Africa] uprising. Yeah, just the Soweto uprising occurred because school children led it in response to a government order that all the black children would have to learn how to read and write and speak Afrikaans. Until then, it was kind of understood that most of the black folks did not wanna, didn't want to learn Afrikaans because, for one thing, that was the language of the oppressor. It was the Afrikaners, when they got into power, and I should, again, define Afrikaners. They're primarily Dutch, historically, Dutch. As I mentioned, there'd been white folks in South Africa since, you know, 400 years. The initial settlers were Dutch. These were merchants, just like the U.S. At the same time the Dutch landed in New Amsterdam, now known as New York, they were landing in Cape, what we know as Cape Town, down there in the Cape of South Africa. And they were Dutch and French Huguenot came along afterwards. They were fleeing Europe, etc. And then when the Brits finally came, made war with the Boers as the, what we now call Afrikaners, drove them inland, that became most, what, most of the white South Africans were and I think are still Afrikaans speakers. But English became the language of money. So blacks then and now wanted to learn English 'cause that's the language that you're gonna really, you know, go somewhere with. And so this order came down in '76 [1976] like other orders do in saying, you will now have to learn Afrikaans. Well, it was like that was the last straw. A lot of the black kids, their beginning was Soweto, and the kids took to the streets. And then the authorities came out. The police came out, many of them black police, and shot some of these kids. It was like Sharpeville all over again, and the pictures flashed around the world of these dead school children in their school uniforms and all this. And that was the beginning of the Soweto uprising. And it never stopped after that. It was like, there was constant--the ANC [African National Congress] kicked up their terrorist activities, as it was called. The working South African and Rhodesia, I learned the old saying, "One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter," and I could see it first hand, you know. This was, the situation after Soweto, and we, it was suddenly Afrikaans--excuse me, Apartheid was thrust in front of the world in a whole new way after that. And we saw things happening on a lot of different fronts. Of course, there in the '80s [1980s] Americans, led by black Americans and their liberal allies began doing sit-ins at the South African Embassy during the [President Ronald] Reagan administration because Reagan's policy changed to one of what they called, constructive engagement. And this was viewed by liberal activists as being another sell out to the South Africans and all. Constructive engagement diplomatically proved to be a failure, but it did work in Southwest Africa in Namibia, right next door, which was a sister country, you could say, to South Africa. Separate development did work there in transferring that country from white rule, white minority rule to black rule. But South Africa itself, you didn't see the real change come about until the '80s [1980s] after the protests here in the U.S. and around the world in support of the same movement that led to the Soweto uprising.

Theresa Fambro Hooks

Theresa Fambro Hooks was an award winning columnist and photographer for The Chicago Defender. Born May 5, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois, Hooks graduated from Parker (now Robeson) High School in 1953 and went on to attend the University of Illinois, Roosevelt University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in their Fashion Design Department.

Joining The Chicago Daily Defender in 1961, Hooks served as woman’s editor and society columnist and published articles in the daily pages about social and community events, food and fashions. She also wrote an advice column as “Arletta Claire” and a column called “Social Whirl,” later renamed “TeeSee’s Town.” In “TeeSee’s Town,” Hooks covered the “good news” in the community including art, theatre, culture and the movement of Chicago’s business, corporate, community and social leaders. Her other professional positions included manager of community/public affairs for Philco-Ford’s Chicago Residential Manpower Center and special assistant to the president of Olive Harvey College for public information. As president of Theresa Fambro Hooks and Associates, she provided public relations, communications and marketing services for ETA Creative Arts Foundation, National Newspaper Publishers Association, the Abraham Lincoln Center, The Woodlawn Organization, among others.

Hooks was active with the Girl Scouts, various YWCAs, the Westside Association of Community Action (WACA), Midwest Sickle Cell Association, West Chesterfield Garden Club, and Adoption Information Services. She was national president of the National Association of Media Women and received the Phenomenal Woman Award at V-103’s Expo for Today’s Black Woman, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Black Public Relations Society, the Russ Ewing Legacy Award of Excellence, Outstanding Journalist from the Chicago Association of Black Journalists, and The Fashion Connection Award. Hooks was a member of Christ United Methodist Church.

Hooks was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 16, 2009.

Hooks passed away on January 31, 2016.

Accession Number

A2009.145

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/16/2009

Last Name

Hooks

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Fambro

Occupation
Schools

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Paul Robeson High School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

St. Anselm's School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Theresa

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HOO06

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Have A Blessed Day.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/5/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tuna

Death Date

1/31/2016

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Theresa Fambro Hooks (1935 - 2016 ) was a longtime society journalist at the Chicago Defender where she maintained a popular column, 'Teesee's Town.'

Employment

Chicago Defender

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Theresa Fambro Hooks' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her mother's early experiences in Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about the origin of her father's name

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks recalls her paternal grandparents' home in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her parents' organizational activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the Woodlawn neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers segregation on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her mother's civic involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about the Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her interest in photography

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks lists the social clubs she covered for the Chicago Defender

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about black-owned publications in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers covering President Barack Obama's inauguration

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her coverage of social events in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her coverage of social events in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about reporting on cultural events in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her public relations firm

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the challenges she faced as a society columnist, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the challenges she faced as a society columnist, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about gossip columns

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her authority at the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her hiatuses from the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes her writing style

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes the process of writing her column

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the election of Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Theresa Fambro Hooks reflects upon her career at the Chicago Defender

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Theresa Fambro Hooks talks about her family and friends

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Theresa Fambro Hooks describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Theresa Fambro Hooks narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Theresa Fambro Hooks narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$9

DATitle
Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers covering President Barack Obama's inauguration
Theresa Fambro Hooks remembers the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Transcript
Is there any particular event that you enjoyed covering the most? I mean--$$Um-hm.$$--most of 'em are annual events, right? Most of 'em are annual (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes. Well, I always enjoyed going to the Snakes [Royal Coterie of Snakes] and the 40 Club [Original 40 Club]; those were the two top ones. And Mr. Sengstacke was--John Sengstacke [John H. Sengstacke] was a member of both, and he always would invite me, or make sure that I got an invitation to cover it for the Defender [Chicago Defender], and I always looked forward to that.$$Okay. What made that event more exciting?$$Well there was the, it was the caliber of the members; they were all the professional men, the doctors and the lawyers and judges, and you know, it was just the caliber of men that--they were all very professional men. And the--of course their ladies were all gorgeously dressed and wore the latest of fashions, and so that would--that always made it fun to watch them and to see what they were wearing.$$Okay.$$And I didn't--I wasn't taking pictures then, so we always had--like Tony Rhoden or somebody would be taking pictures for them, and we would run them in the paper the next week--usually the next week.$$Okay. When you look back on your career, is there any (cough)--or what would--excuse me--what would be the biggest events that you covered?$$Well, the biggest event is the most recent event, and that was the inauguration of [HistoryMaker] President Barack Obama. I didn't cover it for the Defender, I went on my own, but I went to several of the parties and took pictures. They--but we had a photographer that took pictures for the Defender that ran in the paper, but that was the biggest thing; that was very exciting for me. I had decided early on when it looked like--that he was gonna win, that I was gonna be there. I say I've got--there's no way in the world that I cannot be there. So I looked forward to that from the summer, I had made up my mind that I was going. I had gone--I was in Washington [D.C.] for an anniversary party with some friends, and that's when they were talking about, "He's gonna win." I said, "Well if he's gonna win, I'm gonna be there." So that was the biggest thing I covered, but it really--I didn't cover it for the Defender. I covered it for my, for myself. But that was the biggest thing that I've done--I've been involved in in my life. I do believe I will treasure that moment forever (laughter).$The most memorable moment in my life at the Chicago Defender was the night that Dr.--was the afternoon that Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was assassinated. I was down in the, in the new- in the composing room. At that time, we were in the basement of the 2400 South Michigan [Avenue]. And I was down there. It was a Thursday, and the paper came out that Friday. And I was down there overseeing the women's pages. And I heard someone from upstairs hollering, saying, "Dr. King has been shot, Dr. King has been shot." And I ran up the steps and the teletype machines were just going. They were just ding, ding, dinging. And I said, "What is, what is going on?" And they said, "Dr. King has been shot." So immediately, I mean the people were just--phone calls were coming into the Defender, you know, "Is it true? Dr. King's been shot?" And we were saying yes. So we knew that our night ahead of us was gonna be long and tirome--tiring. So we decided, the newsroom, Sam Washington, Dave Potter and I think Betty Washington and I, we decided we better go get something to eat because we were gonna be there for quite a while. So we went down to the--there was a restaurant on 22nd Street/Cermak Road, called Batt's [Chicago, Illinois], and we went down there to eat. And I guess it was about, at that time it was about four o'clock, and we were sitting there, not saying much of anything. And the waitress came over and said, "He's dead." And, of course, we all just dropped, you know, our hearts just dropped. So the owners of Batt's [Nathan Batt] came over to the table. He knew us, and knew who we were. And he came over, and he said, "It's on me." And we were, you know, getting ready to pay. We're trying to get out of there and get ready to pay. And he said, "It's on me. You don't have to pay." So we came back to the Defender. And we started giving out assignments, who was gonna do what and cover--I was gonna try to get, call people and get some reaction on the phone, and somebody else was gonna go in the library and pull out photographs. Somebody else was gonna pull out some of his, his quotations and we were gonna have to just almost redo the front part of the paper all over again. And we started, and we went on and, and people who had gone home for the day, like Audrey Weaver and Lloyd General, they came back, I mean without--it amazed me because this was the first time I had ever seen a newsroom really at work and had come together. And people just start coming in, you know, without anybody calling them; they just knew that they needed to be there. And they all came in, and we sat there, and we worked. We cried, we worked, we cried. Eventually, John Sengstacke [John H. Sengstacke] who had been in Detroit [Michigan] called and said, you know, "What's going on?" And, "How's the city?" And we're saying it's, you know; it's upheaval. You know, there're fires all over the place. So he said, "I'll be right there." So, he jumped on a plane and came home, and he said when he was in the air, and they were circling Midway [Chicago Midway International Airport, Chicago, Illinois], he could see the fires down on the ground. And it just bothered him so much 'cause he loved Chicago [Illinois] so much. And he came back to the Defender, and we worked again. And Tom Picou [Thomas Maurice Sengstacke Picou], who was our managing editor at that time, he was there. He came in. And we all sat around, and we finally put the paper together. And then we sat there, and then we cried. We just all cried. We tried to--we had done what we could. We knew we had put a paper together that we could be proud of, that Dr. King could be proud of if he could see it. We had done the best we could. And the king was dead and all we could say was, "Long live the king." And we had done a job that nobody thought--nobody ever reckoned that we would have to do. But we did a good job, and we were very proud of ourselves. And it was the moment that I will never--I never will forget at the Chicago Defender; how we all came together and produced, without anybody hollering at anybody, anybody getting angry with anybody, anybody upset with anybody else. We were all, we just were there, we were there for Dr. King. And we had done a job, and the king was dead. And long live the king.$$Thank you very much.