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Karen Thomas

Education administrator and marketing executive Karen Thomas was born on August 19, 1955 in Newark, New Jersey to Howard and Ruth Young. After graduating from Abraham Clark High School in 1973, Thomas received her B.S. degree in communications from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts in 1977, and her M.S. degree in sports and special events marketing from New York University in 1989. Thomas went on to receive both her M.A. degree in educational administration in 2008 and her Ed.D. degree in urban education in 2012 from Kean University in Union, New Jersey.

Upon graduating from Simmons College, Thomas worked as a copywriter in the public relations and marketing departments at Chemical Bank in New York from 1978 to 1980. She joined McGraw-Hill Publishing Company as a copywriter and worked in the book club direct marketing sales group from 1980 to 1982. From 1982 to 2000, Thomas served as marketing director at Essence magazine in New York City. During this time, Thomas created and produced The Essence Awards, an Emmy-award winning prime-time television special, The Essence Music Festival, and Essence television program. In 1999, Thomas founded Marion P. Thomas Charter School; and, a year later, she became its chief executive officer. In 2011, Thomas joined Kean University as adjunct professor for the graduate school of education where she taught organizational theory, supervision and leadership, and curriculum development. In 2019, she also served as an adjunct professor at Simmons University, where she taught a course on digital culture before retiring from academia later that year.

In 1998, she received the NAACP Image Award for Excellence in Television Production, and an Emmy Award for the Essence Awards Prime Time TV Special, Patti Labelle tribute. Thomas received the Alumnae Achievement Award from Simmons College in 2000. She was also the recipient of the 2015 Profiles in Diversity Journal Company and Executive Women Worth Watching Award for her contributions to education. In 2017, she received the Education Innovator of the Year Award from New Jersey Charter School Association.

Thomas resides in Paris, France, where she studies art history.

Karen Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 26, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.202

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/26/2018

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Karen

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

THO30

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Expected.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

8/19/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Newark

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Education administrator and marketing executive Karen Thomas (1955- ) served as marketing director at Essence magazine from 1982 to 2000, before serving as founder and chief executive officer the Marion P. Thomas Charter School since 1999.

Favorite Color

Turquoise

Ronald J. Temple

Education administrator Ronald J. Temple was born on September 10, 1940 in Chicago, Illinois. A graduate of Marshall High School in Chicago, Illinois he received his B.A. degree in 1964 from Eureka College, in Eureka, Illinois, and his M.A. degree in 1965, and later his Ph.D. degree in 1985, both from the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In 1965, he began his career teaching at Lyons Township High School and Junior College in La Grange, Illinois. Temple was hired by the University of Cincinnati as assistant dean of student groups, becoming the university’s first black senior-level administrator in 1967. In 1969, he founded and served as the first president of the United Black Faculty Association as well as the University of Cincinnati’s first American urban history instructor. In 1971, Temple was promoted to serve as special assistant to University of Cincinnati president Warren Bennis where he campaigned for increased state support for the university. That same year, he was appointed to the Cincinnati Public Schools Board of Education where he served for four years until 1975. Temple was then promoted to dean of the university and served in this role for ten years from 1975 to 1985.

Then in 1985, Temple became president of Wayne County Community College in Detroit, Michigan and over a five year period worked to reduce the college’s $2 million deficit. He was then hired as the third president of the Community College of Philadelphia, in Pennsylvania where he served from 1990 to 1993, focusing on improving the college’s vocational training programs and partnerships with area businesses. Temple served as chancellor of Chicago City Colleges from 1993 to 1999 before becoming chancellor of Peralta Community College District in Oakland, California where he served from 1999 to 2003 before retiring.

Temple was appointed to serve on the National BSA Executive Board in 1994 and on the Program Group Committee. He later served on the Chicago Area Council Executive Board. Temple was also a recipient of the Silver Beaver and Silver Buffalo Awards in 1998.

Ronald J. Temple was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.143

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/14/2018

Last Name

Temple

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

John Marshall Metropolitan High School

First Name

Ronald J.

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

TEM02

Favorite Season

Late Spring, Early Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Maryland and Venice

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/10/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish and Chicken

Short Description

Education administrator Ronald J. Temple (1940- ) served as chancellor Peralta Community College District and Chicago City Colleges and as the third president of the Community College of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania and the president at Wayne County Community College in Detroit, Michigan.

Employment

Peralta Community College

City College of Chicago

Community College of Philadelphia

Wayne County Community College, Detroit

University of Cincinnati

Lyons Township High School and Junior College

Favorite Color

Blue

Alice H. Young

Education administrator Alice H. Young was born on September 29, 1923 in Wise, Warrenton County, North Carolina to John and Lucy (neé Allen) Holloway. She graduated valedictorian with honors and received her B.S. degree in childhood development and nutrition from Bennett College, in Greenville, North Carolina. She completed her graduate studies, and obtained her M.S. degree in education supervision and administration in 1952, and later her Ph.D degree in education supervision and administration in 1969 both from the University of Rochester, in Rochester, New York.

Young served at a local migrant camp in upstate New York, and established a childcare program and taught nutrition in 1944. Young moved to Rochester, New York, where she was employed as a teacher with the Rochester City School District in 1952.
During her Rochester City School District tenure, she served as 6th grade substitute teacher at School #9, and a reading teacher at School #7. She served four years as vice-principal for instruction at School #19. Young was the first African American principal in the Rochester City School District, assigned to School #24, where she served for three years.

Young was named a trustee in 1961, and helped to establish Monroe Community College, in Rochester. She was also selected by the Rochester School District superintendent to serve as the director for Title One, the program created by the U.S. Department of Education to distribute funding to schools and school districts with a high percentage of students from low-income families. She crafted various proposals and supervised the programs for the integration of Rochester public schools in 1965. Young returned to the Rochester City School District as principal of School #5 on Plymouth Avenue (1969-1971). In 1971, Young was then promoted to the position of Administrative Director of Elementary Schools, City of Rochester School District and elected board chair of Monroe Community College in 1978. Named for Young, in dedication to her support for the institution, The Alice H. Young Teaching Internship for Ethnic Minority Graduate students at Monroe Community College (MCC) was inaugurated in 1987. The Alice Holloway Young Society for Charitable Giving of the MCC Foundation was also established to honor Dr. Young as a twentieth-century American pioneer in education.

Young has been the recipient of numerous honors and awards including: Urban League of Rochester's Distinguished Community Service Award, Award for Humanitarian and Distinguished Achievement in Community Service, Civic Award from the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce for Meritorious Contributions in the Field of Education, University of Rochester Distinguished Alumna Award and Anne M. Bushnell Memorial Award for Special Achievement, the highest honor conferred by the State University of New York Association of the Boards of Trustees of Community Colleges.

Young, the widow of James Taylor Young, Sr., has four adult children, including stepson, James Jr., sons Rodney and Calvin and daughter, Kathleen. She has two grandchildren.

Alice H. Young was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2017.

Accession Number

A2018.073

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/20/2018

Last Name

Young

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Organizations
First Name

Alice

Birth City, State, Country

Wise

HM ID

YOU09

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Black Lake, Rochester, New York

Favorite Quote

Don’t Ask Anyone To Do Anything That You Would Not Do Yourself

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/29/1923

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Rochester

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Education administrator Alice H. Young (1923- ) was the City of Rochester School District’s first African American vice principal and principal.

Favorite Color

Blue

Randall Dunn

Education administrator Randall Dunn was born on January 10, 1965 in Kingston, Jamaica to his mother, Yourland Depass. Dunn moved with his family to the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, where he received a scholarship from the A Better Chance program to attend the Milton Academy, a boarding school in Milton, Massachusetts. Upon graduating in 1983, Dunn earned his B.A. degree in psychology from Brown University in 1987, and his M.Ed. in human development and psychology from Harvard University in 1992.

Dunn began his career as a teaching intern at Potomac School in McLean, Virginia in 1987, later becoming a full-time teacher. He also taught at Runkle Elementary School in Brookline, Massachusetts from 1992 to 1993, when he was then hired as the director of multicultural enrollment and services at Concord Academy. Dunn went on to head the upper school at Derby Academy in Hingham, Massachusetts, and worked as middle school senior master at the Landon School in Bethesda, Maryland from 1997 to 2004. From there, Dunn headed the Roeper School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan until 2011, when Dunn became the first African American head of school at the Latin School of Chicago. Under his leadership, the Latin School of Chicago launched Uptown Partnership, and enrolled in the Global Online Academy program. In 2017, the Latin School of Chicago bought the historic Lurie Mansion, and Dunn began supervising the lower schools’ transition to this facility.

In 2008, Dunn was one of forty-five alumni honored by A Better Chance. Dunn was selected as a 2010 fellow in the Klingenstein Program for Visiting Heads of Schools at Columbia University’s Teachers College. He also served as co-chair of the National Advisory Board of the Principals’ Center at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and was a trustee at the National Association of Independent Schools, a trustee of “High Jump,” a board member of the National Network of Schools in Partnership, and a board member of the Mastery Transcript Consortium. He served on the board of directors of the Norwood School in Bethesda, the Association of Independent Maryland Schools, and the Association of Independent Schools of Greater Washington.

Dunn and his wife, Elizabeth Hopkins Dunn, have two daughters, Hunter Hopkins and Chase Demetreou.

Randall Dunn was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 22, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.022

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/22/2018

Last Name

Dunn

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Randall

HM ID

DUN06

Favorite Season

Fall

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Warm Place With A Beach

Favorite Quote

I Am The Master Of My Fate: I Am The Captain Of My Soul.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/10/1965

Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

Jamaica

Favorite Food

Oxtails

Short Description

Education administrator Randall Dunn (1965 - ) was the first African American to serve as head of school of the Latin School of Chicago.

Favorite Color

Purple

Kathleen Christy

Education administrator Kathleen Christy was born on September 15, 1952 in Compton, California, and graduated from Compton High School. In 1970, Christy moved to Salt Lake City and enrolled at the University of Utah, where she received her B.S. degree in education in 1975. Two years later in 1977, she obtained her M.A. degree in education. She later went on to receive her Ph.D degree in education, culture and society from the University of Utah’s College of Education.

She began her career in education as a teacher at Edison Elementary School in the Salt Lake City Public School District in 1975. She returned to California, where she joined the Los Angeles Unified School District, where she taught largely Mexican-American students in inner city Los Angeles. Christy returned to Utah in 1985 to accept a State Office of Education post as an equity specialist. In 1993, she was selected as principal of Bonneville Elementary in Salt Lake City, a position she held for five years. In 1998, Christy was named assistant superintendent for equity and advocacy in the Salt Lake City School District. She has worked in the area of diversity and multicultural education and she has conducted numerous trainings and presentations on diversity issues. She retired in 2017.

Her board memberships included the Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice as part of the Office of the Governor for the State of Utah, The Center for Documentary Expression and Art, Utah Foster Care, and the Intermountain Primary Children's Hospital. In 2008, she served as chairwoman of the board of directors for the inaugural Pastor France A. Davis University of Utah Scholarship Fund, raising funds for scholarships specifically to assist traditionally marginalized African-American students.

She is the recipient of numerous awards including the NAACP Albert B. Fritz Civil Rights Worker of the Year Award, Educator of the Year Award by the Omega Psi Phi Iota Iota Iota Chapter in Salt Lake City and the KUTV 2017 Pioneers of Progress
Award for Education, Health and Humanitarian Assistance.

Kathleen and her husband Raymond Christy have three adult children and six grandchildren.

Kathleen Christy was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.011

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/17/2018

Last Name

Christy

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Kathleen

Birth City, State, Country

Los Angeles

HM ID

CHR05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

All Things Are Possible

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Birth Date

9/15/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Mexican

Short Description

Education administrator Kathleen Christy (1952- ) was assistant superintendent for equity and advocacy in the Salt Lake City School District from 1998 to 2017 after serving as principal at Bonneville Elementary School in Salt Lake City, Utah, from 1993 to 1998.

Favorite Color

Red

Nola Lancaster Whiteman

Education administrator Nola Lancaster Whiteman was born on October 25, 1938 in Harlem, New York to Ruby Lolita Davis Lancaster and Ernest Alfred Lancaster. She graduated from Franklin K. Lane High School in Brooklyn, New York in 1955 at sixteen years old, and received her B.A. degree in early childhood education from Queens College, City University of New York in Flushing, New York in 1959, and her M.Ed. degree from The City College, City University of New York in New York.

In college, Whiteman worked at Martin’s Department Store as one of few African American employees. After graduation, Whiteman worked at P.S. 90 Edna Cohen School in Brooklyn, New York. She then became a professor’s assistant while obtaining her M.Ed. degree and went back to teaching at P.S. 115 Alexander Humboldt in Upper Manhattan, New York. Whiteman was then promoted as curriculum assistant at New York City District 12 in the Bronx, New York, and during the decentralization of New York Public Schools, Whiteman became executive assistant to the superintendent. During this period, she also helped develop teacher centers with the United Federation of Teachers to conduct seminars for public school teachers. When Dr. Arnold Webb was named dean of the School of Education at The City College, City University of New York, Whiteman was hired as assistant to the dean and became director of the office of academic advisement, student teaching and teacher placement in 1979. In 1983, Whiteman returned to the New York Public Schools as executive assistant to the chancellor, Anthony Alvarado. She later took a leave of absence and secured a position at Bank Street College in New York, New York where she ran a principal retraining program. Whiteman returned to New York Public School and joined the Professional Development Center in 1991, and remained in the position of executive assistant to the chancellor until 1994.

Whiteman served on the board of directors for the Children’s Art Carnival. Young Audiences Arts for Learning, New York, and Young Audiences National, and was a member of the board of trustees of the Sigma Pi Phi, Boule Foundation. Whiteman also was a member of The Links, Inc. and served as the national president of the Girl Friends, Inc. from 2002 to 2004.

Nola Lancaster Whiteman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 20, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.144

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/20/2017

Last Name

Whiteman

Maker Category
Middle Name

Lancaster

Organizations
First Name

Nola

Birth City, State, Country

Harlem

HM ID

WHI26

Favorite Season

All seasons

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Wherever I go.

Favorite Quote

Stamp out dependency.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

10/25/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Martha's Vineyard

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Education administrator Nola Lancaster Whiteman (1938 - ) served as executive assistant to the chancellor of New York Public Schools and assistant to the dean of The City College, City University of New York.

Favorite Color

Powder blue

Geoffrey Canada

Nonprofit executive Geoffrey Canada was born on January 13, 1952 in South Bronx, New York to Mary Canada and McAlister Canada. Canada graduated from Wyandanch Memorial High School in Wyandanch, New York in 1970; and earned his B.A. degree in psychology and sociology from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine in 1974. Canada received his M.S. degree in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1975.

Canada was hired as director of the Robert White School in Boston, Massachusetts in 1975. In 1983, he founded the Chang Moo Kwan Martial Arts School, and became the education director and program director of the truancy prevention program at the Rheedlen Center for Children and Families. He was promoted to president and chief executive officer of the Rheedlen Center in 1990. Under his leadership, Rheedlen opened the first Beacon School at the Countee Cullen Community Center, and launched the Neighborhood Gold program, the Harlem Peacemakers Program, and the Harlem Children’s Zone initiative. The Rheedlen Center changed its name to Harlem Children’s Zone in 2002, and opened its first charter school in 2004. Impressed by Canada’s success with The Harlem Children’s Zone model, President Barack Obama announced in 2008 that he planned to replicate the program in thirty cities across the country. In 2014, Canada stepped down as chief executive officer of the Harlem Children’s Zone, retaining the title of president, he was succeeded by Anne Williams Isom who became chief executive officer.

Canada authored two books: Fist Stick Knife Gun: A Personal History of Violence in America and Reaching Up for Manhood: Transforming the Live of Boys in America. He was also the main subject of the 2010 film Waiting for Superman. Canada served on multiple boards for organizations including the Black Community Crusade for Children at the Children’s Defense Fund, the board of directors of the Fund for the City of New York and Foundation Center as well as in the capacity of co-chair of the New York Commission on Economic Opportunity in 2006, and the New York State Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board in 2007. He received multiple awards for his work including the Heinz Award in the Human Condition and the National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Award.

Canada and his wife, Yvonne Canada have four children: Melina, Jerry, Bruce, and Geoffrey, Jr.

Geoffrey Canada was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.144

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/12/2016

Last Name

Canada

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Wyandanch Memorial High School

Bowdoin College

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Morris High School

John Dwyer Junior High School #133

P.S. 99, Dimitrious Myers School

First Name

Geoffrey

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

CAN06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/13/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cherries

Short Description

Nonprofit executive Geoffrey Canada (1952 - ) founded the Harlem Children’s Zone, an initiative following the academic careers of children in a 24 block area of Harlem.

Employment

Camp Freedom

Robert White School

Rheedlen Center for Children and Families' Truancy Prevention Program

Harlem Children's Zone

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/653998">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geoffrey Canada's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/653999">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654000">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654001">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada remembers visiting his mother's community in Kinston, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654002">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his maternal great-grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654003">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his mother's education and interests</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654004">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada remembers his mother's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654005">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada describes his relationship with his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654006">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geoffrey Canada remembers learning about his father's ancestry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654007">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geoffrey Canada recalls visiting the land where his paternal ancestors were enslaved</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654008">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his parents' relationship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654009">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654010">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654011">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada recalls the basis of his short memoir, 'Cherries for My Grandma'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654012">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada describes his mother's relationship with his maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654013">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada lists his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654014">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his experiences of violence in the South Bronx, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654015">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his older brother, John Canada</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654016">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geoffrey Canada remembers the athleticism of his brother, John Canada</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654017">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his brother, Daniel Canada</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654018">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654019">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geoffrey Canada remembers J.H.S. 133 in the Bronx, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654020">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geoffrey Canada recalls his decision to move to Long Island, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654021">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654022">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/654023">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Geoffrey Canada recalls hiring Michael Adams at the Harlem Children's Zone</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Geoffrey Canada recalls the basis of his short memoir, 'Cherries for My Grandma'
Geoffrey Canada talks about his friendship with Michael Adams, pt. 2
Transcript
Now I'm in high school [Wyandanch Memorial High School, Wyandanch, New York], and my grandmother [Canada's maternal grandmother, Lydia Pearson Williams] and I still have this wonderful sort of relationship; and I talk with her and try to understand her and she told me some of her, you know their challenges growing up [in Kinston, North Carolina] and but the, the thing about me and the cherries happened because and I actually--$$(Unclear).$$--wrote about this and, and actually I, I gave this as a talk and The New York Times ended up printing it as an op-ed. It's called 'Cherries for My Grandmother' ['Cherries for My Grandma,' Geoffrey Canada] was that the, the thing that my grandmother loved the most in life were cherries, but they were so expensive we couldn't afford to get a pound, and she didn't have money, right, I mean the money was to saving the house [in Wyandanch, New York], but she would sequester I will say fifty cents, and she would send me to the store to get fifty cents' worth of cherries and I would come back with those cherries and we just delighted in them and there was always just enough. So, we wished we could have eaten a lot more but we never could and I tell folks, I used to measure our summers by how good the cherries were, and we'd be like, "Aw, this is a great cherry summer, they're really all great this year." And my, and it wasn't even a fantasy but I was absolutely gonna do it. When I went away to college [Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine] and I graduated and got a job and I was gonna have money, I was gonna buy her a crate of cherries. I mean a whole crate, I could see them in the crate and I was gonna sit there and we were gonna eat cherries 'til we didn't want any more which we had never had that experience, and she died my sophomore year in college. Just, never happened. It's interesting to me the sort of love that folks have and when people say you know, I, I love my mother [Mary Williams Canada] and very close to her even 'til this day, but I spent those times with my grandmother and my grandfather [Leonard Williams, Sr.] and they really shaped a lot of my sort of belief structures growing up.$And I tell folk, my first interaction with a gun was when--we had this kid named Gregory [ph.] who said something nasty to one of the women who were on the block, who was a drunk and he said something you know, "You're drunk, or you're ugly or something." So, her nephew who was this huge guy, the guy was--the guy had to be about 6'4" and weighed maybe about 260 [pounds]. We hadn't seen people like that. He came in a car and he came up, we were all sitting on the side and I was fourteen now, maybe. I was--I had wanted then--maybe I was fourteen, thirteen and he said, "I'm looking for Gregory." Two guys then, you know a bunch of teenagers and they was like, "Why?" He said, "'Cause he said something about my aunt, I'm gonna kick his butt." He used a little stronger language, and they were like, "We don't know him." So, Gregory's there and the guy said, "No, I'm looking for this guy. Y'all gotta tell me where he is." And finally, Gregory says, "Here I am, I'm him." So, the guy said, "Now, you said that to my aunt, I'm gonna whip your--." So, Gregory's like, "Come on, let's fight." We knew Greg couldn't fight very well. Well, I was amazed, he gonna fight this huge guy. So, the guys were like, "Oh, this is gonna be good." So, he goes up, Gregory puts up his hands and this guy begins to smack him all over the street. He is so big, Gregory can't do nothing with the guy and then finally Mike [Michael Adams (ph.)] says, "Okay, that's enough." (Unclear) the other guy, "Look, that's enough." And the guy said, "No, that ain't enough. I'm not done." He said, "No, no that's enough, you won, you did your point." And the guy said, "No." So, it was about six of us on the fence. So, all six get up. Now, I'm the youngest one and these are teenagers. I'm like a little skinny kid. I'm like okay, there's six of us, this looks like we can win. This guy is huge, but I guess six against one, we can whip. The guy goes and he gets in his trunk, goes in his trunk and he take out a .22 [caliber] and he takes out the .22 and he says, "Back up." And I said, "This is over. That's enough, let's go sit back down. Let him beat up Gregory, we'll--." He didn't move, just didn't move. Here's the deal and, and Gregory's yelling, "Come on, I ain't (unclear), come on and fight me." The guy puts the gun in his pocket and starts fighting again, everybody gets closer to the guy. He pulls the gun out again. Now, Mike had told me one of these words of wisdom, "A real gangster you shouldn't worry about. They won't shoot you accidentally. It's a person who is scared who will shoot you. So, if you see somebody and you see they're scared with a gun, that's the person you have to be worried about, not a professional who does it for a living, they go stick up people, they--." So, I'm looking and the guy's hand is shaking with this gun and I'm thinking you know, someone's gonna die. Didn't no one back down, they took another step forward and the guy was gonna be forced to either shoot or get jumped and he just jumped in his car and he left and that, that kind of city bravery stuck with me and changed the way I thought about existence and whether or not your group will protect you. Now, this was before guns were around. Nowadays, somebody would have shot all those guys. They wouldn't have thought nothing of it, right. But they back then people didn't shoot folks with guns.$$This is like 1967?$$This is, yeah this is '67 [1967] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, right--$$It was just not, not--$$It was more of a fist thing.$$Yeah, it was more of a fist thing. This was really about fists and maybe a knife, but it really, the gun thing hadn't come in for another you know ten, twelve years before they became prolific, but that was the group and this guy Mike was my hero. He was just a guy who he wouldn't bother anybody, but he, nor would he ever back down from what he thought was a principle, and he both protected me and coached me and made me feel special. Now, I'll tell you a funny thing. You fast forward twenty years, I'm a grown man, I'm working, I come back to New York [New York]. I meet other people. You know what they said to me? "Mike saved me, I was the most special guy Mike--." I said, "No, you weren't the most, I was the most special." This guy was like, "No Mike, I was the most--." This guy had gone through life just reaching in, saving kids, convincing them that he saw something so special in them that they were gonna get out of this mess that was devastating our community. You, fast forward, I'm gonna be sixty-five in a month. Out of all the kids that I grew up with as friends, the guys--I know two who are alive today. One has cancer, and the other is waiting on a kidney transplant, everybody else is gone. Those streets in the Bronx [New York], they destroyed everybody. And some died young, some died middle age, but no one really got to be healthy, and sort of you know, their senior years it was just too devastating all of the stuff that people went through and so, that again when people think about why I wanted to recreate, right, a community. You get a toxic community, it will destroy everybody; and that's essentially what the South Bronx [Bronx, New York] was.

Joan Langdon

Mathematician and education administrator Joan Sterling Langdon was born on August 1, 1951 in Marion, South Carolina. After graduating from Hampton University with her B.A. degree in 1973, she enrolled in the College of William & Mary where she received her M.A. degree in 1977. Langdon went on to graduate from Old Dominion University with her M.S. degree in 1985, and American University with her Ph.D. degree in 1989.

Langdon began her career in higher education as an instructor at Rappahannock Community College in 1977. From 1979 to 1985, she was appointed instructor/lecturer at Hampton University where she also served as the first director of the Mathematics/Science Laboratory. After completing her doctorate at American University in 1989, Langdon joined the Bowie State University community as an Associate Professor in 1989. During her tenure at Bowie State University, she has served in several administrative positions, including as Director of the Summer Institute in Engineering and Computer Applications Program; Coordinator of the Computer Science program in the Department of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Computer Science; and, as the Faculty Administrative Intern. In 1994, she initiated the Senior Year Progression and Transition Program (SYPAT) and served as coordinator of the program. While there, Langdon served as Founding Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. In 2006, she was appointed as Director of the Title III Program and Director of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Langdon has also served as chair and/or as a member of numerous committees at Bowie State University and in the University System of Maryland. She was appointed as a curriculum, proposal, and paper reviewer for the Maryland State Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), respectively. In 1996, she was appointed to the ACM National Program Committee for SIGCSE. In addition, she has made presentations at all levels of higher education, participated in numerous workshops and conferences, published in conference proceedings, and developed software programs. She has also served as the principal investigator or co-principal investigator for several grants and sub-contracts, and has authored technical reports.

In 1999, Langdon received the ROTC Army Achievement Medal. Bowie State University honored her with the Distinguished Faculty Award in 2003 and the Distinguished Services Award for Outstanding and Dedicated Leadership in 2012. In 2007, she was awarded the NASA Administration Diversity Enhancement Award.

Langdon is married to Larry L. Langdon. They have four daughters: Tomaysa Sterling, Yvonne Langdon, Yvette Langdon, and Heather Langdon.

Joan Sterling Langdon was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 22, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.160

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/22/2013

Last Name

Langdon

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Sterling

Schools

American University

Old Dominion University

College of William and Mary

Hampton University

Bryn Mawr College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Joan

Birth City, State, Country

Marion

HM ID

LAN09

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alaska

Favorite Quote

God bless the child who has his own.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/1/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fruit

Short Description

Math professor and education administrator Joan Langdon (1951 - ) , the Founding Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Bowie State University, also served as director of the Title III Program and Director of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Employment

Bowie State University

American University

United States Census Bureau

Hampton Institute

Rappahannock Community College

York County Public Schools

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26523">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joan Langdon's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26524">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26525">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon describes her mother's family background - part one</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26526">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon describes her mother's family background - part two</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26527">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon talks about her maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26528">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon talks about her maternal grandmother's lineage and her grandfather's service in World War I</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26529">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon talks about his grandfather purchasing land in South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26530">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about her mother's growing up in Marion, South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26531">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joan Langdon describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26532">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon describes her father's growing up on a farm, his livelihood as a farmer, and his purchase of land in Marion, South Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26533">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon talks about her father's desire to become a brain surgeon, his aptitude for math, and her parents' home remedies for illnesses</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26534">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26535">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about church and about the name "Marion"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26536">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26537">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26538">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon talks about her siblings - part one</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26539">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about her siblings - part two</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26540">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joan Langdon describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26541">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon talks about her interest in television as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26542">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon talks about reading her older siblings' textbooks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26543">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon describes her experience in elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26544">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about her interest in math in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26545">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon talks about being removed from the Civil Rights Movement, segregation in South Carolina, and growing up attending segregated schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26546">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon describes her experience in middle school and high school - part one</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26547">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon describes her experience in middle school and high school - part two</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26548">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about the teachers who influenced her in school, and her decision to attend Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26549">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon talks about her initial experience at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26550">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon talks about her mentors, Geraldine Darden and Genevieve Knight at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26551">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon talks about her social experience at Hampton University and the teachers who influenced her confidence in school and college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26552">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about the encouragement that she received from her math teacher, Geraldine Darden, at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26553">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon talks about her academic performance at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26554">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon talks about her experience of taking a computer science class at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26555">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon talks about getting married, graduating from Hampton University, and pursuing graduate studies at The College of William and Mary</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26556">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about teaching mathematics at Rappahannock Community College and at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26557">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Joan Langdon talks about attending Old Dominion University for her master's degree in computer science</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26558">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Joan Langdon talks about the evolution of computer science in the 1980s and later</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26559">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon talks about how she decided to pursue her Ph.D. degree in computer science at American University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26560">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon discusses her experience in the Ph.D. program in computer science at American University and African American female Ph.D.s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26561">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon talks about Dr. Mary Gray and her class of African American female graduates at American University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26562">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about balancing her family life and children with graduate school at American University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26563">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon talks about the success of the Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowship program at American University while she was there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26564">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon talks about her doctoral dissertation at American University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26565">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon talks about Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26566">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about STEM education at Bowie State University, and her involvement with the SIECA program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26567">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon talks about receiving the NASA Diversity Award</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26568">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon talks about serving on the University of Maryland System Chancellor's Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26569">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon talks about the Maryland Collaborative for Teacher Preparation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26570">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about becoming a full professor at Bowie State University and her involvement in professional mathematical societies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26571">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon talks about her work-load at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26572">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon talks about serving as the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26573">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon talks about her involvement in the 'Writing Across the Curriculum' initiative</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26574">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon talks about her involvement with the military science department at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26575">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Joan Langdon talks about serving as the interim director of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26576">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Joan Langdon talks about her involvement with the NASA Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) program and other university programs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26577">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Joan Langdon describes her service as the director of Title III programs at Bowie State University and as the acting director of the office of research</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26578">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Joan Langdon talks about the major sources of grants at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26579">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Joan Langdon talks about African American doctoral graduates in the computer science department at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26580">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Joan Langdon talks about her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26581">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Joan Langdon talks about her plans for the future</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26582">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Joan Langdon reflects upon her career and her choices</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26583">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Joan Langdon talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26584">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Joan Langdon reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26585">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Joan Langdon describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26586">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Joan Langdon talks about attending the HERS program at Bryn Mawr College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/26587">Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Joan Langdon talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Joan Langdon talks about her father's desire to become a brain surgeon, his aptitude for math, and her parents' home remedies for illnesses
Joan Langdon talks about her initial experience at Hampton University
Transcript
Okay, I have to ask you this question. I have to go back to what your father's [Albert Moody] aspiration was to become a brain surgeon because it's a STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] aspiration, a science aspiration. Is there a story behind how he came up with that?$$Well, he liked working on animals, okay, and he decided he liked to do that. So on the farm he didn't have a whole lot of opportunities to do those things, because you had to do the manual stuff. But every opportunity that he got, he actually worked on the animals. So he worked--we had cows and we had swine, so, not so many goats, a goat was just there for people's pleasure, things like that. But if anything went wrong with them, he would work on them, and he liked doing that; didn't have the opportunity to work on people, but he never wanted to be a veterinarian. He said, he wanted to actually to be able to do those kinds of things on people, and he had a hard time, this is what he told us, he had a hard time when they told him that he had to stop going to school and actually start working because they needed him to work all day, making money. Before he stopped completely, he told us he would get up at four o'clock in the morning, he would go and work on the farm, then he would come back, eat and go to school. And then when he came home from school, he would get back out into the fields and work until dark, so you couldn't see. So he actually tried to prolong it by working early and by working late so he could go to school in between, but eventually that just didn't work, so he had to stop going to school.$$Okay. Now did your father or mother [Julia Ann Smalls] have a particularly high aptitude for math?$$My father did. Everything that he did on the farm, he did himself. When he laid out his acreage and made decisions on what the yield would be for the land--we planted cotton, corn, tobacco, wheat and lots of garden-related things, how much land you needed to plant for the yield that he wanted to make the amount of money, he figured all that out himself. In fact, I can tell you, one day when--this was after I was in college and went back. I used to go back home and work on the farm every summer. He was telling me how to figure out what to do with the land, how to get the yield that you wanted and how many acres and what you had to do. And it was amazing to me that he could do this, and he did it all in here (indicating head). He didn't--no calculators, no whatevers, he did it here (indicating), and he did a few things on paper, but mostly, he did it in here (indicating). Early on he helped us with our homework. So up to the point where he had gone to school, he helped us all do our work for grade school and the early part of grammar school. He's the one who helped us do our work. So, he could do those things. He surprised me because there were times I had to use the calculator to get it done.$$Okay. Like I said, you know, a brain surgeon is an aspiration, it seems like a pretty big aspiration, but he was already doing veterinary things. He had a sense that he could do something. Did he have any--did he know like the traditional herbal remedies for--$$Oh, my goodness, yes. We never went to the doctor, never went to the doctor until things were really, really serious, otherwise, between my mother and my father, we didn't go. Brewed us tea and drink it, you felt better, eat this, you felt better, making combinations of things so that you would have a medication that would solve the problem, that's all that they did. In fact, I can honestly tell you, I probably went to the doctor for the first time--somehow, I had low blood pressure and I was getting weak, and nobody could figure out why. That's the first time that I could remember having gone the doctor when I was growing up, first time. Other than that--$$How old were you?$$Early high school.$$Okay.$$Now, we went--you had to go for shots, you know what I mean.$$Vaccinations?$$Yeah, vaccinations and things like that, but I mean literally seeing a doctor, didn't do that, didn't have to, they gave us the remedies. We were okay.$$Okay.$All right, 1969, at Hampton University. Well, tell us about your first day at Hampton?$$Well, believe it or not, my first day was a little different than what people would expect. I had to go early, okay. So that means the first day we were supposed to arrive, it would have been on Monday. But my father's [Albert Moody] truck had problems, so we had to hire somebody to take me to school. So, literally, I had to go a day early. So they took me on Saturday, because the person who took us had to be at work on Monday and, of course, couldn't take me on Sunday. So, literally, my mom [Julia Ann Smalls] and one of our neighbors drove me to school on Saturday, and so there were only--and two other people had the same problem. So three of us were in the dorm that night, and the dorm mother was there. And when we showed up, of course, we surprised her to death, because of course we weren't supposed to be there. So we were there that day and the next day. And then on Monday, when we were actually supposed to be there to sign in and register and all of that stuff, so I was able to do that and my scholarships were all there in place, everything was there, and you know, well in those days we had a week of orientation. So we went around, we registered during that week, we learned the Hampton song, we found our other buildings that we were supposed to go to for our classes, we took our testing, we did all of those things within the first five days at Hampton, and I ended up actually taking two tests because I wanted to be a math major. So, to be a math major, I had to prove to them that I knew algebra inside and out, so they gave me this algebra test to take to prove to them that I knew some, and so I did, I to a test, extra test, you took the first one and then you had to take the second one.$$Okay. Okay, so you qualified to become a math major?$$Yes.

Lloyd Douglas

Mathematician and education administrator Lloyd Evans Douglas was born on October 5, 1951 near the Polo Grounds in New York City. Douglas’ family moved to Brooklyn where he attended Lafayette Public School (now the Eubie Blake School) and Berriman Junior High School (J.H.S. 64) before graduating from Brooklyn Technical High School in 1968. He was awarded a New York State Regents Scholarship and enrolled in the City Colleges of New York where he graduated with his B.S. degree in mathematics in 1972. While there, Douglas earned three varsity letters as a lacrosse player. He then attended graduate school at Miami University and worked as a graduate assistant in the math department and as an assistant coach of the lacrosse team. Douglas received his M.S. degree in mathematics in 1974. Douglas went on to enroll in Boston University’s doctoral program where he studied algebraic coding theory under the late Dr. Edwin Weiss. He was awarded a senior teaching fellowship in the mathematics department and worked as a mathematics tutor in the resident tutor program.

From 1971 to 1976, Douglas worked at the law offices of LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby and MacRae in New York City as a paralegal assistant specializing in litigation. In 1976, he was hired as a mathematician in the U.S. Naval Underwater Systems Center (now called the Naval Undersea Warfare Center) in Newport, Rhode Island. Douglas joined the Trident Command and Control System Maintenance Activity in Newport in 1979 as a computer specialist where he was the on-site representative for the data processing subsystem on the first Trident submarines. From 1980 to 1983, Douglas served as an operations research analyst at the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command in Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey.

In 1983, Douglas moved to Washington, D.C. where he was appointed as a computer specialist in the U. S. General Services Administration and in the U.S. Office of Advanced Planning. In those positions, Douglas assisted in conducting technology assessments for automatic data processing and telecommunications throughout all federal departments. In 1984, Douglas joined the National Science Foundation (NSF). While there, he oversaw a large increase in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program in the Division of Mathematical Sciences. Douglas was then appointed as the assistant to the Vice President for Research at the University of Nevada, Reno. In 2010, he became the associate director of the Office of Sponsored Programs at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; and, in 2012, he has been the associate director of the Office of Contracts and Grants at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Douglas served on numerous committees in the Mathematical Association of America. In addition, he was elected as president of two, the Federal Executive Institute Alumni Association and the NSF Employees Association. He received NSF’s Meritorious Service Award in 2007.

Lloyd E. Douglas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 19, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.143

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/19/2013

Last Name

Douglas

Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Evans

Schools

P.S. 25

Berriman Junior High School

Brooklyn Technical High School

City College of New York

Miami University

Boston University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Lloyd

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

DOU05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

The more things change, the more they remain the same.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/5/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Greensboro

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Candy

Short Description

Mathematician and education administrator Lloyd Douglas (1951 - ) served as a mathematician for the U.S. Army Communication and Electronics Command and the U.S. Naval Command Center, and as a research director at the National Science Foundation where he was instrumental in expanding the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program in the mathematical sciences.

Employment

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

University of Nevada, Reno

National Science Foundation (NSF)

United States General Services Administration

United States Army Communications and Electronics Command

United States Navy Trident Command and Control System Maintenance Activity

United States Naval Underwater Systems Center

Dewey & Le Bouf, LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28651">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lloyd Douglas' interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28652">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28653">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28654">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his mother's immigration to the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28655">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lloyd Douglas describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28656">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his father's education and his employment in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28657">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his parents' marriage in 1948</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28658">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lloyd Douglas describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28659">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28660">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Lloyd Douglas describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28661">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Lloyd Douglas describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28662">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the Jamaican community in Brooklyn, New York while he was growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28663">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his childhood interests</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28664">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lloyd Douglas describes his interest in science in elementary school and talks about his father helping him with his studies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28665">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his interests as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28666">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the schools that he attended in New York City and his experience in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28667">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his involvement in Christ English Evangelical Lutheran Church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28668">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the political climate in the United States in the early 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28669">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his childhood interest in space</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28670">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the 1964 New York City World's Fair and the Mobile Economy Run</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28671">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his family's infrequent vacations and their trip to Jamaica in 1961</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28672">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his desire to attend Brooklyn Tech High School in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28673">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at Brooklyn Technical High School in New York City - part one</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28674">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at Brooklyn Technical High School in New York City - part two</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28675">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas describes his decision to apply to the City University of New York (CUNY), and attend Brooklyn College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28676">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the reaction to the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in Brooklyn, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28677">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at the City University of New York (CUNY)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28678">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lloyd Douglas describes his decision to pursue his graduate studies at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28679">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28680">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Lloyd Douglas talks about starting a Ph.D. degree in mathematics at Boston University, and leaving the program to go to work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28681">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at the U.S. Naval Underwater Systems Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28682">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience with the U.S. Army</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28683">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience as a computer specialist at the U.S. General Services Administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28684">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lloyd Douglas talks about self-teaching himself computer programming</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28685">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas describes his role as the head of the central computer system at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the early 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28686">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas discusses the mission and funding mechanisms of the National Science Foundation, and Walter Massey becoming the head of the NSF</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28687">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience at the National Science Foundation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28688">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lloyd Douglas discusses the National Science Foundation (NSF)'sfunding for historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28689">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lloyd Douglas discusses his role as a program officer in the Division of Mathematical Sciences at the National Science Foundation (NSF)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28690">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lloyd Douglas talks about the National Science Foundation (NSF) Employee Association and his appointment at the University of Nevada at Reno</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28691">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lloyd Douglas describes the history of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28692">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience in the Office of Sponsored Programs at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28693">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas describes his experience as associate director of the Office of Contracts and Grants at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28694">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his service at the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28695">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lloyd Douglas lists the professional organizations where he is a member</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28696">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lloyd Douglas reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28697">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his interest in hockey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28698">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Lloyd Douglas describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community today</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28699">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Lloyd Douglas reflects upon the approach to mathematics in the educational system and in the community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28700">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Lloyd Douglas discusses his operating philosophy while reviewing grants and the importance of communicating science</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28701">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lloyd Douglas talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28702">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lloyd Douglas talks about how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/28703">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lloyd Douglas describes his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

8$10

DATitle
Lloyd Douglas talks about his family's infrequent vacations and their trip to Jamaica in 1961
Lloyd Douglas describes his experience as a computer specialist at the U.S. General Services Administration
Transcript
Now, did your parents [Calvin Sylvester Douglas and Lurline Isylda Brown] have a chance to go on many vacations in the car?$$No, in fact, they may--went on very few vacations. I think in '59 [1959] we went to Massachusetts. That was, my sister and I and my parents went. I think that's maybe the only vacation that we went on as a family. In '61 [1961] when I went to Jamaica to visit my grandmother, it was just my sister and my mother and I who went. And then we started going to New Jersey, to Asbury Park, and that was my sister and my mother and I who went. And then later, my mother would go to Pennsylvania and go on vacation. So it wasn't, we didn't vacation a lot. My father thought that he was going on vacation every time he left the house. So.$$So from what I gather, he had a keen appreciation of everything that was around him.$$Um-hum, yeah.$$Okay, so, now, your trip to Jamaica in '61 [1961], you would have been like what, nine [years old] or--$$Right, and so that's one of the reasons we went is because, so my sister is a little bit older, a year older than I am, and she--it was because of the airfares, because we could both go for less than adult fare because my sister was still young enough. And so that was the last year. So that was the year that my mother decided that we should go to Jamaica.$$Okay, 'cause if she had waited another year--$$Then my sister would have had to pay adult fare.$$Okay, so, all right, so what impression did Jamaica make on you?$$You know a lot of people go on vacation to Jamaica. I would never go on vacation (laughter) to Jamaica. It was, I mean saw the, you know, all the poverty side. And so that was, that's what struck me the most, you know. See my grandmother had a farm, but it was, there was really, there were dirt floors, and the house was pretty much a shack. And then there was, you know, a barn. And so it was, you know, even though things weren't really wonderful in New York, we lived in a house, and it was, it was a house. You didn't have chickens running in and out of the house and other creatures flying in and things like that. So that was sort of an awakening.$$Okay, so you could understand why your parents left Jamaica?$$Yeah, in fact, that was my father's thing. So people would go back to Jamaica or say they were gonna go back to Jamaica, a lot of Jamaicans (unclear)--maybe a lot of them thought they'd come to the U.S. and they'd make money and then go back. And my father would say, why would you go back? That's the reason you left there. So I think he had been in the U.S. forty years before he went back. And he had relatives there.$$It seems strange to hear that when most people consider it a vacation spot--$$Yeah, exactly.$$--but if you don't have the money there, it's not that much fun.$$Yeah, no.$$Okay, so, well, now, okay, anything else about the World's Fair? Now, but, you know, the trip in '61 [1961] in Jamaica, that's--you're actually going abroad for the first time. Did you learn anything about--$$Right, so that was the first time I had been out of the U.S. There was, as I mentioned before, the money was different, so that was unusual. People, although they supposedly spoke English, my mother had to translate for us. And so that was unusual too.$Okay, now, you started with the GSA [U.S. General Services Administration] in '83 [1983], right?$$Um-hum.$$And what was, how did that come about?$$So, I sort of had gotten back to, also--not back to New Jersey 'cause I hadn't lived in New Jersey, but New Jersey was sort of, it was close to home because it's close to New York, having lived in Ohio and Massachusetts and Rhode Island. And I thought I would just stay there because it was close, but then I started sort of looking at other opportunities, and, you know, a lot of them--being a federal employee, a lot of them were in the Washington, D.C. area, and I sort of resisted for a while, moving to D.C. I said, well, I can always move to D.C. later, and but all the interesting jobs I found were in Washington, D.C. And the job at GSA was the second that I applied for, that, where I was hired over the phone. I had applied for the job. They interviewed me over the phone, and they hired me, and they even told me that they were very reluctant to do that because they had never hired anybody over the phone before, but they, then compared my application to the other applications, they said it wasn't close. And so they, so then I moved to D.C., working at GSA as a computer specialist.$$Well, you know, you hear so many stories about job discrimination of black candidates going to an interview, and when they find out they're black, they won't even interview 'em or that sort of thing.$$Um-hum.$$And then the government's not necessarily--$$Right.$$--at this stage, it's not, isn't known for doing that kind of thing. But here you get two jobs on the telephone (laughter).$$Yeah, (laughter).$$This is fairly lucky it seems, to me. So, now, what did you--you worked for the GSA as a computer specialist, right?$$Um-hum.$$And so were you doing programming for the GSA?$$No, I was actually doing planning. So back then GSA was the government's purchaser. So if you bought anything, you had to go through GSA. So whether you bought pens or pencils or telecommunications systems, you have to go through GSA if you're with the federal government. And so I worked then in office, called the Office for Advanced Planning, and our job was to do--was to look at emerging technology to see where it could be applied throughout the federal government. And that was a really interesting job because you got to do technology--technical analysis, technology assessment, just looking at new technology and seeing where it could be applied.$$Okay, now, this is a time period when the whole computer world is changing rapidly, you know.$$Um-hum.$$Some people are still using mainframes, some people--PCs [personal computers] have come out and--$$Right.$$Just talk about some of the changes and--$$So that was the first time I ever used a PC. It was a Compaq computer, and, you know, it probably has hundredth of the capability that my phone does now. But it was not large in the sense of a mainframe. It was sort of like a desktop now and it was actually things that you could write and program and have it actually do things. So, again, with my interest in computers, I thought that was something that I really enjoyed doing.$$Okay, at this juncture, then, would you--the kind of programming you're doing, I guess would, you know, is PC-based, were you aware of Macintosh [from Apple, Inc.] computers at this point?$$No, no, I wasn't.$$Okay, and was the government--I guess the government was basically PC-based?$$Right, um-hum.

Calvin Lowe

Education administrator and physicist Calvin Lowe was born in Roanoke Rapids, Michigan in 1955. After graduating from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University with his B.S. degree in physics, Lowe enrolled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he earned his M.S. degree in plasma physics in 1979. Upon completing his doctoral thesis, “Optical Properties of Graphite Intercalation Compounds,” Lowe graduated from MIT with his Ph.D. degree in solid state physics in 1983.

Upon graduation, Lowe began teaching as an associate professor of physics at the University of Kentucky. In 1987, Lowe was appointed as an associate professor of physics at Hampton University and was named chair of the department of physics. He left Hampton University in 1992 and moved to Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical State University in Huntsville, Alabama where he served as chair of the department of physics from 1992 to 1995. In 1996, Lowe returned to Hampton University and he served as the vice president of research and dean of the graduate college. In that position, he was instrumental in building an internationally recognized atmospheric-sciences research group. Lowe was named the ninth president of Bowie State University in Bowie, Maryland and served from 2000 to 2006. While at Bowie, Lowe was as a member of the Task Force to Study College Readiness for Disadvantaged and Capable Students. Lowe has also served as the vice president of research and program development at the National Institute for Aerospace. In 2011, Lowe was appointed as the dean of the School of Science at Hampton University.

In addition to serving as faculty and administrator, Lowe served as a member of the board of Directors for the University System of Maryland from 2000 to 2006. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the National Society of Black Physicists and the Association of University Technology Managers. In 2011, Lowe received the Outstanding Achievement Award from the National Aeronautic and Space Administration’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

Lowe lives in Maryland with his wife, Tanya, and their two adult children, Maya and Calvin. His brother, Dr. Walter Lowe, is a professor of physics at Howard University.

Calvin Lowe was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 25, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.072

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/26/2013

Last Name

Lowe

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Calvin

Birth City, State, Country

Roakoke Rapids

HM ID

LOW06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/9/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hampton

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Physicist and education administrator Calvin Lowe (1955 - ) was the former vice president of research and program development at the National Institute for Aerospace and the ninth president of Bowie State University.

Employment

University of Kentucky

Hampton University

Alabama A&M State University

Bowie State University

National Institute of Aerospace

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624401">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Calvin Lowe's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624402">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624403">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624404">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe describes his mother's growing up in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624405">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624406">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe describes his father's interest in tinkering with gadgets and building tools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624407">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe talks about his father's career as a construction worker</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624408">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe talks about his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624409">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Calvin Lowe talks about his likeness to his parents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624410">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Calvin Lowe talks about growing up in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624411">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Calvin Lowe describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624412">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe talks about his family's pets</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624413">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe describes the sights, smells and sounds of growing up in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624414">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe talks about his first school in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624415">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe talks about his sister attending college at North Carolina College, and the desegregation of schools in North Carolina in the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624416">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience in elementary school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624417">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe talks about his exposure to science, television, books and magazines as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624418">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience as one of the first African American students to integrate William R. Davie School in Roanoke Rapids</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624419">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience at the integrated Northwest High School in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624420">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe talks about his relationship with his twin brother, Walter Lowe</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624421">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience in high school and graduating early</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624422">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe talks about graduating early from high school, and the political events of the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624423">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience as an undergraduate student at North Carolina A and T State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624424">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe talks about his interest in physics at North Carolina A and T State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624425">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe describes his decision to pursue his Ph.D. degree in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his experience there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624426">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe talks about losing interest in physics research while he was at MIT, and his interest in teaching</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624427">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe talks about his brother attending Stanford University, and his mentor, Mildred S. Dresselhaus, at MIT</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624428">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe describes the challenges that he faced as a graduate student at MIT, and his interest in teaching and mentoring</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624429">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe talks about his master's thesis research at MIT</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624430">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe describes his doctoral research at MIT on the optical properties of graphite intercalation compounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624431">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe describes the findings of his doctoral dissertation work on graphite intercalation compounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624432">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe describes his experience at the University of Kentucky</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624433">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe talks about the University of Kentucky and race relations in Kentucky in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624434">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe talks about meeting his wife and getting married in 1984</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624435">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe talks about his decision to leave the University of Kentucky and join Hampton University's physics faculty - part one</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624436">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Calvin Lowe talks about his decision to leave the University of Kentucky and join Hampton University's physics faculty - part two</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624437">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Calvin Lowe describes his involvement in establishing Hampton University's Research Center for Optical Physics and a doctoral program in physics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624438">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe talks about leaving Hampton University in 1992 to become the head of the physics department at Alabama A and M University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624439">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe talks about his experience as the head of the physics department at Alabama A and M University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624440">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe describes his role as the dean of the graduate school and vice president of research at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624441">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe talks about becoming the president of Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624442">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe describes his involvement in establishing new buildings at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624443">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe talks about his involvement in establishing a High Performance Computing (HPC) cluster at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624444">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe talks about his involvement in strengthening the athletic programs at Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624445">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe talks about his decision to step down from his role as the president of Bowie State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624446">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Calvin Lowe describes his decision to become the vice president of research and program development at the National Institute of Aerospace</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624447">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe describes his contributions as the vice president of research at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA)</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624448">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe talks about his son's death in 2010</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624449">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe describes the goals for the future of the School of Science at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624450">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Calvin Lowe talks about the marine science program at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624451">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Calvin Lowe talks about the computer science program and nanoscience concentration at Hampton University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624452">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Calvin Lowe talks about expanding the Ph.D. programs at Hampton University to facilitate its growth as a research institution</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624453">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Calvin Lowe reflects upon his future in academic administration and talks about the balance between research and teaching at universities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624454">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Calvin Lowe reflects upon providing outreach programs and support towards secondary schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624455">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Calvin Lowe describes his research interest in boron nitride nanotubes</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624456">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Calvin Lowe reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624457">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Calvin Lowe describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community today</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624458">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Calvin Lowe reflects upon the future of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624459">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Calvin Lowe talks about his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/624460">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Calvin Lowe talks about how he would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
Calvin Lowe describes his experience in high school and graduating early
Calvin Lowe describes his role as the dean of the graduate school and vice president of research at Hampton University
Transcript
So Northwest High School [Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina] now, now what did you, what, what kind of science did you take at Northwest?$$I took chemistry, biology. I think I took physical science. I think it was the, the first course that they taught. I took a course in physics. It was sort of a, a, you know, pretty low level kind of, I mean they really didn't have somebody that do physics, to teach it. So I think the biology teacher also taught physics and she did a good job kind of introducing the subject, but you really couldn't see, see the inner workings of the subject. You know, you just kind of got the tour.$$Okay. Now what about math and how high did they let--did you take calculus in high school?$$(Laughs) No. (Laughs) I didn't take calculus in high school, it wasn't offered. I actually didn't take trig [trigonometry] in high school either, that wasn't offered. I got through the two courses in algebra, courses in geometry. That, that was as far as I, you got to go in math in, in high school when I was there.$$Okay, okay. Now were there any special teachers, you know, or mentors at, at Northwest?$$Nah. I think, you know, my science teacher, Mrs. Clark, you know, was a uh, an excellent teacher. She taught, taught the biology course and, and as much chemistry or physics as was, as was available. You know, she was a, I think a very good teacher, very um--I guess looking back, I mean I think she was, she was inquisitive. She had the scientific, you know, interest in, in things that that got conveyed the students to even, even though we didn't always, you know, didn't get to see the, the real depth of, especially the chemistry or physics subject; but we got to see that in biology; more, more depth. That was her field, her, her major in college. So that, that teacher I remember. Also I remember, actually her, her husband taught um--what do they call it? Um, I guess its social studies or civics--no, not civics. I forgot what they called it, but anyway it was sort of, sort of world civilization kind of history course. You know, you kind of learned about different civilizations and--$$Like world history.$$Yeah, world history. He was very good at that, and I remember as we were preparing for final exams once he, he challenged the class to, to ask him a question from the, from the book that he didn't know. And so he gave, you know, we could, could open our book and you could go through it and ask whatever question and he knew it all. (Laughs) So I, I remember that af--that afternoon. It was very interesting experience there. Also I had a, I guess, in, in ninth grade I guess, had a really good English, English teacher. She taught sort of English literature I guess and so she talked about the, you know, the into Shakespeare and, you know, some plays. She was well versed in all that stuff and, and as we were learning some, I guess it was maybe English literature--it was not the right name of the subject; but, you know, she talked about some of the ancient Greek plays and she would, she would perform a little bit of it and talk about how, how they would perform on stage, and that was a really, really interesting, interesting subject.$$Okay.$$Good teacher.$$Okay. Okay, so, were you involved in sports in high school at all?$$Played football in high school. I guess I played two years.$$And what did you play? What, what position?$$Offensive guard.$$Okay. Okay, so you, you played for two years?$$Yeah, it was some college AV team one year and then played varsity one year. Actually I left high school one year early, so after my junior year I left and went to [North Carolina] A & T [Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina].$$And went to where?$$Went to A & T.$$A & T, okay.$$To college.$$Alright.$$Yeah.$$Okay. So how, how did that take place?$$Well, there, there were, we were required to have, you know, a certain number of credits courses or credit hours something in high school to graduate and if you took sort of a full load, you know, a full load (laughs), six, six classes, by the time you got to the end of your sophomore year, you were sort of like promoted to be a senior because you could in principle graduate from high school. The only thing that kept you from doing that is that you were required to take four years of English and so if you; if the summer after your sophomore year you went to summer school and you took English, which--basically junior year English, then in what would have been your junior year, you could actually graduate from, from high school. And so that's what I did. Yeah, so--$$Okay.$And then you came back to Hampton [University, Hampton, Virginia].$$Came back to Hampton.$$So what, what happened? What, what was the cause?$$I went into my office one day and, and my secretary said, "Oh, you got, you had a phone call from President [William] Harvey." I said, "Okay." (Laughs) So I called him and, and he told me that he wanted me to consider a position coming back to Hampton as, had a position as dean of the, of the graduate school and vice president for research. So I said well that sounds interesting (laughs), so, so I came to visit and interviewed with him and, and accepted the offer and we moved, moved back.$$Okay, alright. So, so you're like now Dean of the Graduate School and Vice President of Research--$$Um hm.$$--right? Okay. So what, what were some of your activities here at Hampton?$$Well you now as, as VP [vice president] for research, again I was in the role of trying to help the University secure funding. So I spent a lot of time traveling back and forth to Washington. To graduate school you know being dean of the graduate school is, is a nice job because you don't, you dont have any faculty working for you. (Laughs) The faculty work for the other deans really. So, so I spent a, mainly my time was on building the research program. You know Hampton was, was really in the, in the beginning stages of rapid growth in the science area during that time. Dr. Harvey wanted to really build up the science programs. One of the things that he asked me to do was to really look at whether or not we could make a thrust into atmospheric sciences and again, we were looking at that because of NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] Langley [Research Center]. We had a proximity to NASA Langley. It was something that, that they have a very big presence in and so, you know, we started to explore that and, and (laughs) it was interesting we were, we were able to attract two of their like really world-class scientists to come to Hampton. They, they left, they were actually retired from, from the government, and they became faculty members here at Hampton; they are still here. They, they came to Hampton and they built a really fantastic atmospheric sciences program here at Hampton.$$Who, who are they?$$Jim Russell and Pat McCormick, and Patrick McCormick. So you know they, they were, they were, I guess they were both branch heads at, at NASA. So they were you know up in the leadership of, of the branches that did atmospheric sciences and, and satellite projects and so they have lots of you know really great connections into the field and into people and, and they were, they were exactly the right two folks to capture to come to Hampton. So we created a little, a few bad feelings at Langley (laughs) when we did that. I know we, we beat out a couple of, couple of places like Virginia Tech [Blacksburg, Virginia] and the College of William and Mary [Williamsburg, Virginia] to, to capture these guys and bring them here to Hampton. And you know they are just, just a bang up job in terms of bringing resources and building an atmospheric science program that's, that's you know that's world-class, well-known. You know when you start asking about places that, that places that will do atmospheric science research, Hampton is one of those places that you actually talk about now.$$Okay. Did, did taking on the atmospheric science program require like uh much facility build out or construction?$$Not, not a whole lot, because we were, we were really looking at trying to put into place the, the sort of connection into a research community and, and if you look at atmospheric sciences I mean there are, there are you know you get these, these satellite programs to go up. These satellites are designed to study various parts of the atmosphere and then there is a science team just built around the satellite. The satellites are basically built by, you know, one of the aerospace companies, launched by NASA, run by NASA you know and, and the, the scientists are really users so the data that comes back down the, down the pipe so to speak. So McCormick and Russell gave us a, an entree into that, to that kind of science and the uh, the infrastructure for, for you know getting data. I mean all that stuff is sort of part of NASA, part of the mission of NASA.$$Okay, alright. So, okay, so you were back here at Hampton until 2000. So that's five years--$$Um hm.$$--right?$$Right. Remember I told you about it, (laughs) about every five, six, seven years. (Laughs)