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Sister Mary Alice Chineworth

Nun and teacher Sister Mary Alice Chineworth was born on July 16, 1917 in Rock Island, Illinois. Her mother, Victoria, was German-American, while her father, Alexander, was the son of a former slave. A student of St. Joseph’s Catholic School in Rock Island from kindergarten through twelfth grade, Chineworth was inspired by the charity of the nuns who taught her. In 1936, after learning that her race prevented her from joining most religious orders, Chineworth took vows with the Order of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the oldest religious organization for black women in America. Chineworth went on to earn her B.A. degree in English from Mount Mary College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1952 as well as her M.A. degree in psychology and her Ph.D. degree in higher education from The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.

Chineworth dedicated her adult life to educating young people. For over thirty years, she taught in schools administered by her order, including St. Frances Academy, the school founded by the first members of the Oblates in 1828. In 1966, she became an administrator at Mount Providence Junior College, an Oblate community college, before serving as president from 1969 until the college closed three years later. In 1973, she began to hold higher-level positions within the Oblate administration, culminating in her appointment in 1989 to the position of superior general. She was a member of the National Black Sisters Conference, an association of African American nuns. In 1996, Chineworth edited Rise ’n’ Shine: Catholic Education and the African-American Community. In 2002, Chineworth was interviewed by Camille Cosby, a former Oblate student, for the National Visionary Leadership Project. Chineworth’s story was included in the 2004 book A Wealth of Wisdom: Legendary African American Elders Speak. In 2005, she accepted a $2 million donation from Camille Cosby to start a scholarship fund at the school.

Chineworth passed away on June 21, 2017 at age 99.

Accession Number

A2010.072

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/12/2010

Last Name

Chineworth

Marital Status

Single

Middle Name

Alice

Occupation
Schools

St. Joseph’s High School

Mount Mary College

St. Ambrose University

Catholic University of America

First Name

Mary

Birth City, State, Country

Rock Island

HM ID

CHI01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Oregon Coast

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

7/16/1917

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Butter Pecan Ice Cream

Death Date

6/21/2017

Short Description

Teacher and nun Sister Mary Alice Chineworth (1917 - 2017 ) was a member and former superior general of the Order of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the oldest religious order for black women. An educator for more than thirty years, Chineworth was profiled in the book, "A Wealth of Wisdom: Legendary African American Elders Speak."

Employment

Oblate Sisters of Providence

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sister Mary Alice Chineworth's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her maternal ancestors' emigration to the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her maternal grandparents' arranged marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her paternal grandfather's occupations

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her father's education and occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her maternal grandparents' reaction to her parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her family's relocation to Rock Island, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers the industry in Rock Island, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her father's business in Rock Island, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her mother's homemade sauerkraut

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls encountering discrimination in her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her childhood home in Rock Island, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her parents' personalities and whom she takes after

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls the black businesses in Rock Island, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her experience growing up biracial

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her studies at St. Ambrose College in Davenport, Iowa

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls joining the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes the history of the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about Mother Mary Lange

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes the mission of the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers the Oblate Sisters of Providence's property

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about discrimination in the Catholic church

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her arrival at Saint Frances Church and Convent in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls the racial demographics of the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her early teaching positions

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about African American religious orders

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her attire as a nun

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her experience as a teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her teaching experience in the South

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her brother's war experience

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her former students

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her brother, Joseph Chineworth

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls the integration of the Catholic orders, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls the integration of the Catholic orders, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls editing the magazine for the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers the construction of the Our Lady of Mount Providence in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls her role at Mount Providence Junior College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her perspective as an African American nun

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls the National Black Sisters' Conference

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about black liberation theology

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls closing Mount Providence College

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers founding a child development center

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls obtaining her Ph.D. degree from the Catholic University of America

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her election as superior general of the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth recalls editing 'Rise 'n' Shine: Catholic Education and the African American Community'

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes the challenges in recruiting nuns to the Oblate Sisters of Providence, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes the challenges in recruiting nuns to the Oblate Sisters of Providence, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth shares her hopes for the future of the religious orders

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth reflects upon her Catholic faith

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth talks about ecumenism

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes her family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sister Mary Alice Chineworth narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$3

DAStory

1$11

DATitle
Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers her arrival at Saint Frances Church and Convent in Baltimore, Maryland
Sister Mary Alice Chineworth remembers the Oblate Sisters of Providence's property
Transcript
So, well what was the experience like? I mean did you, I mean did the experience meet your expectations? I mean what, what was it like? Was it, was it a, too become involved in an order [Oblate Sisters of Providence]?$$You know, from the minute, I can still remember September 14, 1936, on Chase Street in Baltimore [Maryland], I had come by train, my, my father [Alexander Chineworth, Sr.] had gotten me a first class bedroom or whatever it is, he didn't want me to be Jim Crowed, he know that--he knew enough to do that, you know? He wasn't that naive about travel.$$Well I thought you did, didn't have a choice at a certain point and when you got to the South there they would--$$He knew I was going south of the Mason-Dixon Line, so he got me into a first class accommodation bedroom or whatever it is.$$Oh, so they couldn't segregate you if you were--?$$No.$$Okay.$$So I got that, I came in first class, I got off at B and O [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] station, which was just a walking distance from the convent [Saint Frances Church and Convent, Baltimore, Maryland], but I didn't know that and I hailed a cab and the cab took me like around the block to the--and he said, "Are you entering the convent or the academy [Saint Frances Academy, Baltimore, Maryland]?" So I must have looked kind of youngish, I was wearing a suit that I had knitted, you know what knitting is? I knitted the whole suit, skirt and, and jacket, navy blue and the trim was red, I wore a red hat and I said I'm entering the convent, he said, "Oh, well this is where you get out." So I went in and rang the doorbell and the sister who opened the door had a big red birthmark on half her face, and I said, "Oh my, they took her in spite of that birthmark?" 'Cause I thought nuns had to be perfect, you know? So, she said, "Do you--I'm, just sit here and I'll get mother for you." I said, "Mother?" 'Cause we never had any mothers in the order that I was taught by [Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary], so I sat there obediently and along came mother and she had the whole half of her face was de- deformed by lupus and I said, maybe they have to have something wrong with your face to enter here, you know? Two out of two, so I sa- she said, "Now dear tell me your real name? First of all, tell me your real name." I said, "Innocence [HistoryMaker Sister Mary Alice Chineworth]." "I mean your baptismal name?" I said, "I'm baptized Innocence." Well she didn't believe it, anyway, it was legal, so she took me downstairs, they were eating supper, September 14th it was Monday, and it was the first day that they were back in school and in school, when we were in school, we used to have reading like in monasticism, they setup monastic tables, long tables and there was one person appointed to read from a lectern during the meal. So I saw her go up to the reader and tell her she doesn't have to read, she wanted me to be comfortable and I wouldn't have been comfortable at, had I heard reading, so she stopped. So then she gave me a place at table and they had meat, cold cuts, tomatoes and lettuce, I remember so well the whole, because it's the best supper, we had it the whole week, you know, I didn't know at that time, but I enjoyed the supper and I was excited and they introduced me to my companions who then, I was the last to enter because I didn't want to enter right away so I, I'd been to a party, September 8th was my entrance date and then my mother [Victoria Schlicker Chineworth] had taken me to a party in Indianapolis, Indiana and I didn't rush home so I was a week late. So all my companions had gotten here and they were settled you know? So I was a late comer and I thought that would keep me from saying, making my vows with rest of 'em, but they didn't penalize me for that eight days, those eight days. So, I had the most unique feeling as I walked through that gate, I'm home, I felt so at home and at peace, I cannot exp- it's--the only comparison with that is when I went to Madagascar, I just felt, this is it, I'm home and I cried when I left Madagascar, now I don't know whether it's, that's all imagination or not, but that's how I felt. Well that's how I felt when I entered the convent, I just felt so at home.$This is 1936, you joined this order [Oblate Sisters of Providence], now where did you join, in?--$$On Chase Street, which is in the inner city--$$He- here in Baltimore [Maryland] (simultaneous)?$$--(simultaneous) it's the old motherhouse.$$Here in Baltimore?$$Yeah, the old motherhouse was called Saint Frances Convent [Saint Frances Church and Convent, Baltimore, Maryland] and academy [Saint Frances Academy, Baltimore, Maryland], it, it, it really was a trifle thing 'cause at one time we had orphans, so it was an orphanage, too. But when I entered it was simply an academy and the convent, the motherhouse that was really very crowded with novices and students and sisters. So, when then got a chance to by this property out here in 1933, mother superior was approached by the lawyer, Mr. Galvin [ph.], he said, "Mother, there's a property out in (unclear) that you can't afford to miss and it's on sale for," I forget what amount, what amount it was, but it was more than Mother had. But eventually, it didn't sell, it was the Depression [Great Depression], so eventually it came down to such a low price that Mother said she couldn't afford not to buy it. So she had three bonds and in cashing in the three bonds, she had just enough to buy the property, forty-six acres, a couple of buildings were on it, a mansion, which burned down in 1946, electrical wiring and a barn and a couple of other buildings there. But, we couldn't build this house for ye- decades af- after that, you know, it just, we had ride out the depression. Then one day sister said to mother superior, "Mother I know how I can get you a million dollars." And she said, "How can you get a million dollars?" She said, "We'll make aprons and sell 'em for a dollar a piece, I'll make a million aprons and we'll have a million dollars." Mother said, "Go ahead." So, we sold, made and stitched and sold aprons for some years, we, we couldn't visit home, but we knew that if we took a sales at our home, like have a Avon [Avon Products Inc.] sale. That our parents would be glad to support that because we couldn't home, at home any other way, so we had all over the country, we had sales, and we financed the building of this place [Our Lady of Mount Providence, Baltimore, Maryland], it cost a million dollars to build it, now it would cost many million, you know, but in those days it cost only one million dollars, the ground was broken in '58 [1958], I believe it was, you know, my dates are, take all this with a grain of salt.$$Okay.$$But we moved in in 1960 [sic. 1961].$$Okay.$$I moved in with the first crowd.

Lauranita Dugas

Lifetime educator Lauranita Taylor Dugas was born on December 2, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois to Dorothy and Robert Taylor. Her father was the first black commissioner of the Chicago Housing Authority, an organization he worked with for eleven years. In 1944, Dugas graduated from Parker High School and moved to Wisconsin to attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received her B.A. degree in sociology. In 1949, Dugas married Lester J. Dugas Jr., an electrical engineering student at the time who then became the first black senior manager of Commonwealth Edison in Chicago. The two of them moved to Milwaukee where the Dugas' began a family.

In 1953, Dugas moved back to Chicago. With an interest in education, she began working for the Head Start Program. Three years later, Dugas moved to the State of Illinois’ Institute for Juvenile Research and in 1974, she started working for the Chicago Child Care Society as a supervising teacher. Dugas remained with the Society for twenty-five years until her retirement in 1989. She then returned to the workforce as an educational consultant at Harold Washington College for their Child Development Associate Training Project, a position she held until 2007.

Dugas chaired the Jones-Swift Scholarship fund as part of the Chicago Metropolitan Association for the Education of Young Children, a sector of the national Association for the Education of Young Children. She was also a founding member of the Black Creativity Panel, an event hosted by the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. She was also a member of the Board of Advisors for the Department of Human Ecology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The board works to update the campus, with such projects as a new Early Childhood Development Center and renovation of the former Home Economics building. In 2009, the book The Classrooms All Young Children Need: Lessons in Teaching from Vivian Paley recognized her for her skillful teaching and support.

Dugas had three children, Gail D. Dugas, Jeffrey A. Dugas Sr., and Lauren Dugas Glover.

Lauranita Dugas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 28, 2010.

Dugas passed away on May 20, 2015.

Accession Number

A2010.032

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/28/2010

Last Name

Dugas

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Lewis-Champlin Elementary School

Parker High School

University of Wisconsin-Madison

First Name

Lauranita

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DUG01

Favorite Season

None

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Key West, Florida

Favorite Quote

A Dream Without A Plan Is Just A Wish.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/2/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

5/20/2015

Short Description

City education administrator and teacher Lauranita Dugas (1926 - 2015 ) was a former educational consultant for the Child Development Associate Training Project at Harold Washington College and teacher with the Chicago Child Care Society.

Employment

C.P.S. Head Start

State of Illinois Institute for Juvenile Research

Martin Luther King Jr Park & Family Entertainment Center

Chicago Child Care Society

Harold Washington College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lauranita Dugas' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas describes the early years of her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her paternal grandfather's architectural work in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Lauranita Dugas describes her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas describes her paternal grandfather's education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her father's collaboration with Julius Rosenwald

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas describes her father's work in the banking industry

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas talks about the Rosenwald Apartments in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas describes the racially restrictive housing covenants in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas remembers the segregated public schools in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas describes her father's legacy in the field of public housing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lauranita Dugas talks about the Robert Taylor Homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lauranita Dugas describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Lauranita Dugas recalls her community in the Rosenwald Apartments in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her sister's work at the Erikson Institute in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas remembers segregation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas recalls her nursery school in the Rosenwald Apartments in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas remembers her elementary school education

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas describes the effects of the Great Depression

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas remembers Parker High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Lauranita Dugas recalls the racial division in Chicago's South Side

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Lauranita Dugas remembers her studies at Parker High School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas remembers the prom at Parker High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas recalls her decision to attend the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas describes her academic difficulties at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her accomplishments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas remembers returning to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas recalls her father's death

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lauranita Dugas remembers raising her children in the Rosenwald Apartments in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas remembers the community of Hyde Park-Kenwood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas remembers the community of Hyde Park-Kenwood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas describes the University of Chicago's impact on the communities of Hyde Park and Kenwood

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas talks about the changes in the Kenwood neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas remembers teaching at a Head Start program

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas describes her role at the Institute for Juvenile Research

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas remembers joining the Chicago Child Care Society

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas remembers her tenure at the Chicago Child Care Society

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas describes her philosophy of early childhood education

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas describes her work with Head Start

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas talks about the Black Creativity exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas describes her board memberships, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her husband's community involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Lauranita Dugas describes her board memberships, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her family, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Lauranita Dugas talks about her family, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Lauranita Dugas reflects upon her heritage

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Lauranita Dugas describes her friendship with President Barack Obama

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Lauranita Dugas talks about politicians from the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Lauranita Dugas describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Lauranita Dugas narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

10$7

DATitle
Lauranita Dugas recalls her community in the Rosenwald Apartments in Chicago, Illinois
Lauranita Dugas remembers joining the Chicago Child Care Society
Transcript
And he [Dugas' father, Robert Rochon Taylor] was a penny pincher. All of the Taylors are (laughter). But mother [Dorothy Jennings Taylor] was in a different way because she had, she grew up with--without a lot. And my [maternal] grandmother [Laura Smith Jennings] knew how to make a lot out of a little. So, it was a different kind of economy from her side of the family than from his side of the family. And we had almost everything needed--we thought we needed or wanted growing up. We knew that we were privileged, because he had a job, and not everybody did. And we were taught very, very early to accept people as they are and that we were no better than anybody else. And we just happened to fall into a better situation, and that everybody needed an opportunity. And you never knew who would take advantage of an opportunity and surpass us if they had a chance. So, we had opportunities because of his connections to be diverse, to have diverse relationships and cross cultural relationships. Because of the Girl Scouts [Girl Scouts of the United States of America] and the persistence of Mrs. Pacheco [ph.] who was a Girl Scout leader in the Rosenwald building [Rosenwald Apartments; Michigan Boulevard Apartments, Chicago, Illinois]. She made sure that we were not just isolated. That we, the Girls--that Girls Scout troop went places and did things that the other Girl Scouts did. They couldn't keep us out. We didn't know that, we just went (laughter). So, I did grow up feeling that we were just only one, one kind of people. We would go back to Wilmington [North Carolina] in the summer to see my [paternal] grandparents [Robert Robinson Taylor and Dugas' step-grandmother, Nellie Chesnutt Taylor], and all the rest of the kids came too; my father's siblings. We had lots of fun and visit the cousins and the uncles, 'cause most of the uncles were bachelors. So, we had a good time. In the summers we went back to Wilmington. I had what was double mastoids as an eight year old. Because--this was before antibiotics and before shots. The only shots that we had were diphtheria and small pox. We caught everything else. One winter, my father lived with my grandmother because we had the big red sign, quarantine on the door. First one, then the other. And so, he was very close to his mother-in-law, and he lived with her prob- because he couldn't, he couldn't come in and go out. Everybody--if you were quarantined, you were quarantined. He had to run the building so he lived over with my grandma. I had double mastoids, which was repeated ear infections and the mastoid bone which is behind your ear, both of them became infected. If they'd gone to my brain I would've died. They--and there was no antibiotics. That came with the Second World War [World War II, WWII]. And there was doctor at Children's Memorial [Children's Memorial Hospital; Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois] had perfected an operations to take both these bones out. Our family doctor was a pediatrician. He was one of the few black pediatricians in the city. He could not take me into Children's Memorial Hospital. He called his classmate who was this surgeon, and they operated on me and took those two mastoid bones out. The following winter, I began to catch cold again, and Dr. Beasley [ph.] said, "You know, you got to get her out of this climate. Well, at least for this winter." So, we went to California, mother, Barbara [Dugas' sister, HistoryMaker Barbara Bowman] and I. We spent six months in California. And by this time, by the time I came home I was robust (laughter). And I never was too thin again (laughter).$Then '69 [1969] came (laughter), and it was chaos. It was chaos, and the riots and everything. We had to get evacuated out.$$Was this after Dr. King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was assassinated?$$Yeah.$$Sixty-eight [1968], near '68 [1968], yeah.$$And the school [Institute for Juvenile Research, Chicago, Illinois] closed down for a while and that's when I came over here to Chicago Child Care Center--Society [Chicago Child Care Society, Chicago, Illinois].$$Okay.$$And I was really enthusiastic about Chicago Child Care because it was going to combine social work and teaching. Child development and social work. The social workers were advocates of the parents. And the teachers were the advocates of the child. And sometimes the two didn't meet. Social workers was telling us, "She's not--the mother's not ready for that," (laughter). And we would say, "But the child is sinking in the, in the deep mud." And so, we had, we had the opportunity to, under the leadership of Marion Obenhaus [Marion Pendleton Obenhaus], who was the director of Chicago Child Care, to bring these two professions together in the interest of the family. And it worked out to be such an exciting adventure. I really enjoyed every minute of it. And we staffed children together; we staffed families together. We worked with families together. Social workers began to come into the classroom and could see what we were talking about and how, how--what was going on at home was affecting the children away from the home. And so, it, it was beautiful experience, exciting experience. I began to supervise two assistant teachers; more Erikson [Erikson Institute, Chicago, Illinois] students--they were there for a quarter--nursing students from Michael Reese [Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois]. Because early childhood develop was foreign to almost every profession. Nobody looked at it as a profession. You sat with kids. You watch kids. (Laughter) You didn't get involved in their development in an educational kind of way.

Geraldine Johnson

Geraldine Johnson is a distinguished retired educator, community activist, and volunteer. She was born on April 11, 1919, in Bridgeport Connecticut – the third in a family of seven children. She grew up in the East End of the city where she attended McKinley, Harding, and Bridgeport Normal Schools, which she later went on to lead as Superintendent of Schools. Johnson received her B.A. degree in teacher education at New Haven Teachers College (now SCSU) in 1940 and her M.A. degree at New York University in 1959. Following graduate school, she went on to earn her sixth-year professional certificate at the University of Bridgeport in 1969.

In 1961, Johnson became a principal after achieving the number one score on Bridgeport’s civil service examination. She served in many other educational capacities as well and taught first, seventh, and eighth grade, as well as a music class. She also worked as a Director of Title I Programs in Bridgeport, assisting disadvantaged pupils with achievement in school programs. In 1969, she served as the Assistant Superintendent of Bridgeport Public Schools, the second largest school system in Connecticut. She went on to become Superintendent of Schools in 1976, notably working through the 19-day teachers’ strike over salary contracts in 1978. She became Interim Superintendent of Schools in Fairfield, Connecticut in 1986, after her retirement in 1981.

Governor Ella Grasso listed Johnson as one of Connecticut’s 100 Most Distinguished Women in 1976. The Girl Scouts also named her a “Woman of Distinction.” She was bestowed Honorary Doctorate Degrees from Fairfield University, Sacred Heart University, and the University of Bridgeport. To honor her work as a superintendent and her commitment to education, in 2008 a new elementary school was dedicated to her and named the Geraldine W. Johnson School.

Geraldine Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 29, 2010.

Johnson passed away on November 28, 2015.

Accession Number

A2010.004

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/29/2010

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

Harding High School

Southern Connecticut State University

New York University

University of Bridgeport

McKinley Elementary School

Sacred Heart University

Fairfield University

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Geraldine

Birth City, State, Country

Bridgeport

HM ID

JOH36

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Connecticut

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Hurry Up!

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

4/11/1919

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bridgeport

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak (Filet Mignon)

Death Date

11/28/2015

Short Description

Teacher Geraldine Johnson (1919 - 2015 ) was the first African American woman to serve as superintendent of the Bridgeport Public Schools.

Employment

Bridgeport Board of Education

Fairfield Board of Education

Greater Bridgeport Adolescent Pregnancy Program

Connecticut Symphony

Connecticut Parole Board

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geraldine Johnson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geraldine Johnson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geraldine Johnson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geraldine Johnson remembers her mother's career as a beautician

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her mother's organizational activities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geraldine Johnson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geraldine Johnson remembers her father's storytelling

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Geraldine Johnson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her relationship with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her family

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geraldine Johnson describes the East End of Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geraldine Johnson talks about the integration of the public school faculty in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geraldine Johnson describes her experiences in a majority-white school district

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geraldine Johnson describes her childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geraldine Johnson recalls a discriminatory teacher at Warren Harding High School in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geraldine Johnson remembers her social life

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geraldine Johnson remembers her first cello recital

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her enrollment at the Bridgeport Normal School in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her mentor at the Bridgeport Normal School in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geraldine Johnson remembers graduating from the New Haven State Teachers College in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geraldine Johnson remembers joining the faculty of the Prospect School in Bridgeport, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geraldine Johnson reflects upon the changing attitudes towards educators

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geraldine Johnson describes her transition to school administration

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her start as a school principal

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geraldine Johnson remembers developing programs for low-income students in the Bridgeport Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her nomination as superintendent of the Bridgeport Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Geraldine Johnson remembers meeting with the Bridgeport Board of Education

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her marriages

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Geraldine Johnson recalls her challenges as the superintendent of the Bridgeport Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Geraldine Johnson remembers a teachers' strike in the Bridgeport Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her tenure as superintendent of the Bridgeport Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Geraldine Johnson recalls serving as the interim superintendent of the Fairfield Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her retirement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Geraldine Johnson describes her international travels

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Geraldine Johnson talks about the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her membership in The Links

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Geraldine Johnson describes her organization activities

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Geraldine Johnson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Geraldine Johnson describes her daughter

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Geraldine Johnson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Geraldine Johnson talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Geraldine Johnson narrates her photographs

Prudence Burrell

Nurse Prudence Hathaway Burns Burrell was born on March 23, 1916, in Mounds, Illinois, to Al Wade and Mary Burns. Burrell was raised in Danville, Illinois by Gwendolyn Chambliss, her caretaker. Growing up in Southern Illinois, she attended Douglas Elementary School in Danville. An outstanding Latin student, Burrell graduated from Lovejoy High School in Mound City in 1934. She attended nursing school at Kansas City’s segregated General Hospital No. 2. Burrell passed the state nursing board certification examination in 1939 as a registered nurse and soon enrolled in the University of Minnesota.

With the onset of World War II, Burrell decided to join the United States Army Nurse Corps at Fort Huachuca, Arizona in 1942. There, she tended to the famed Buffalo Soldiers and met dancer Fayard Nicholas. Although she attained the rank of first lieutenant of the United States Army Nursing Corps, she was not allowed to treat white troops because of her race. In 1943, Burrell was sent to Station Hospital 268 in Sydney, Australia, then to Brisbane, and eventually to Milne Bay, New Guinea in 1944. There, she taught first-aid techniques to other units, treated gun shot and other wounds, and specialized in the treatment of malaria. Transferred to the Philippine Islands in 1945, Burrell met and married Detroit native, Lieutenant Lowell Burrell. After a simple ceremony consisting of a wedding gown made from a parachute and a fifty-cent ring, she was transferred to Germany during the integration of the United States Armed Forces.

Returning to the United States, Burrell taught at Pacific Lutheran Hospital and earned her B.S. degree in public health from the University of Minnesota in 1951. Eventually, she and her husband moved back to Detroit where she taught mathematics in the Detroit Public Schools and became a health care analyst for the State of Michigan. An active volunteer in Detroit, Burrell delighted in sharing her past with school children. Burrell published her life story in a book called Hathaway in 1997.

Burrell passed away on February 29, 2012 at age 95.

Accession Number

A2007.077

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2007

Last Name

Burrell

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Lovejoy High School

Douglas Elementary School

University of Minnesota

First Name

Prudence

Birth City, State, Country

Mounds

HM ID

BUR17

Favorite Season

None

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Hello, How Are You?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

3/23/1916

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Death Date

2/29/2012

Short Description

Teacher and nurse Prudence Burrell (1916 - 2012 ) attained the rank of first lieutenant of the United States Army Nursing Corps and served during World War II. She also taught mathematics in Detroit Public Schools, and became a health care analyst for the State of Michigan.

Employment

United States Army Nurse Corps

Detroit Public Schools System

Tuskegee Institute

Pacific Lutheran University

State of Michigan

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:1760,27:3740,44:4730,55:32845,429:33440,437:34290,450:44446,530:45866,555:46860,579:47499,605:66950,766:79048,993:80296,1015:81160,1027:93480,1238:109456,1427:114420,1445:114924,1453:142002,1896:164640,2197:169600,2291:178170,2385:178639,2394:180850,2438:185650,2489:195066,2696:195594,2704:196738,2714:197178,2720:204858,2816:218483,3036:219275,3056:220760,3079:220900,3103$0,0:2850,44:12255,279:32082,588:45664,660:64279,747:82772,877:96508,1010:113785,1222:130442,1291:130934,1317:137808,1399:160472,1628:161418,1640:161762,1645:178418,1854:180138,1882:180482,1887:181772,1914:182116,1919:185986,2051:199390,2182
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Prudence Burrell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Prudence Burrell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Prudence Burrell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Prudence Burrell describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Prudence Burrell lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Prudence Burrell remembers her maternal uncle

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Prudence Burrell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Prudence Burrell remembers her maternal grandmother's embalming

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Prudence Burrell describes her likeness to her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Prudence Burrell describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Prudence Burrell remembers her love of dancing

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Prudence Burrell describes her schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Prudence Burrell remembers Lovejoy High School in Mound City, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Prudence Burrell recalls her experiences of discrimination in southern Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Prudence Burrell remembers the Chambliss family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Prudence Burrell recalls her accomplishments at Lovejoy High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Prudence Burrell recalls becoming a nurse at the General Hospital No. 2 in Kansas City, Missouri, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Prudence Burrell recalls becoming a nurse at the General Hospital No. 2 in Kansas City, Missouri, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Prudence Burrell recalls the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Prudence Burrell remembers the start of World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Prudence Burrell recalls her assignment to Fort Huachuca in Arizona, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Prudence Burrell recalls her assignment to Fort Huachuca in Arizona, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Prudence Burrell remembers her deployment to the South Pacific

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Prudence Burrell describes her experiences of discrimination in Australia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Prudence Burrell recalls being stationed in New Guinea

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Prudence Burrell recalls her U.S. military service in the Philippines

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Prudence Burrell remembers Eleanor Roosevelt

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Prudence Burrell recalls her meeting with Mary McLeod Bethune

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Prudence Burrell remembers her rescinded promotion

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Prudence Burrell describes her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Prudence Burrell describes her wedding dress

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Prudence Burrell remembers moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Prudence Burrell recalls facing discrimination at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Prudence Burrell recalls her career as a healthcare analyst

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Prudence Burrell remembers teaching in the Detroit Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Prudence Burrell talks about her nursing education

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Prudence Burrell describes her work as a healthcare analyst

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Prudence Burrell talks about her book, 'Hathaway'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Prudence Burrell describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Prudence Burrell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Prudence Burrell talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Prudence Burrell describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Prudence Burrell narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Prudence Burrell recalls becoming a nurse at the General Hospital No. 2 in Kansas City, Missouri, pt. 1
Prudence Burrell describes her wedding dress
Transcript
Then that's when I decided that I was going instead of teaching, I was gonna be a nurse. And that's when the guy who had been a principal at the school when I was at--in Lovejoy [Lovejoy High School, Mound City, Illinois], he had been the principal. And he was a doctor and he was head of the hospital for blacks in Kansas City [Missouri]. And he and Gwendolyn Chambliss, you see, the Chambliss family, so therefore they made contact with him and helped me to get ready and sent me there to become a nurse.$$Okay, so this is a black hospital in Kansas City?$$Yes, and we were connected with the whites with a tunnel.$$Okay.$$It was all segregated.$$Okay, now, what was the name of the hospital?$$General Hospital No. 2, Kansas City, Missouri.$$Okay.$$And General Hospital No. 1 [Kansas City, Missouri] was the white.$$Okay, General Hospital No. 2.$$Yes, and that's when that ol' buzzard had a haberdasher [Truman and Jacobson Haberdashery, Kansas City, Missouri] down from our hospital and from the prostituting area of the white women, and he had a haberdasher, that ol' president.$$What was his name?$$The one that died, I mean, you know, what was ol' buzzard's name?$$Oh, a president of the United States?$$Yes.$$From Kansas?$$Yes, from Kansas City, Missouri.$$Oh, Truman.$$Yes.$$Harry Truman [President Harry S. Truman].$$Yes, ol' Harry Truman. I remember when he had a haberdasher and his store there at the red light district. And we used to tell the students when they would come in the mail, "Get in the car, we're gonna show you something." And we'd say, "Now get down, get down." And we'd drive by there, you see, 'cause we had friends with cars. And so we'd say, "Okay, sit up so we can see them knocking on the windows at you," (laughter). And ol' Truman had a haberdasher there, 'cause he was from Independence [Missouri], you know.$$Okay, right, exactly.$$Yes.$$Okay.$$And they would make us vote at five o'clock in the morning. They'd send a big truck thing there and wanted us to get in there and come in there and vote. And I'd go in there and mark everything on the thing.$$You'd vote for everything?$$(Laughter) I'd just mark every square on the thing.$$Now, did you have any idea then that Truman was gonna be important?$$No, no. He was a haberdasher working hard. And we didn't know that we were gonna be--I was gonna be a, a visiting nurse, you see, which is called public health nurse, but we then was called visiting nurses. And when I did my student work then I was sent to university--when I finished they had a job and they sent me up to University of Minnesota [University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota], and that's when I went up there and start working on my degree.$$Okay now, I don't wanna go too fast--$$Yes.$$--but in Kansas City at the hospital, were you the only black student there?$$No, there was all black (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay. All right, because it was in a colored hospital?$$Sure.$$Okay.$$That was all black.$$Okay, so how, how many years did you go to school there?$$Three.$$Three years.$$And then--$And I, I believe that you carry an artifact around with you that commemorates that occasion (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, there is. There it is.$$And now is the time to show it I think.$$You want me to show it to you?$$Yeah, just reach over. And now, this is--it has a special significance. And you carry this around in your purse is what I've been told.$$Um-hm.$$And you show it when you speak, right?$$Um-hm.$$So, let's see this.$$You wanna see it?$$Yes.$$Did you see me take it out of the purse?$$Yeah, he's got it on camera here, we're--. Maybe you can explain to us what this is.$$A Filipino made it.$$Okay.$$One of the American girls with us designed it, and the Filipino made it. Uh-oh, that's all right.$$So what is it? Now, what are we looking at here? This is--well that's--that looks pretty well designed there too, yeah.$$I've got to get it together here. I have to get it together for you. See.$$Yes, okay. And that's the top.$$Isn't that something?$$Okay, all right. I guess I have to say it but this is a wedding gown, right?$$Uh-huh, yes.$$All right, and what is it made out of?$$Out of a parachute--$$Okay.$$--material, see.$$So that's ingenuity I'd say.$$Yeah, can you see it? That's enough, isn't it?$$Yes mam.$$And you see, and I didn't bring my ring that cost fifty cents and it's pure gold with Philippines written on it, my wedding ring.$$So the ring only cost fifty cents in the Philippines?$$Um-hm, yes.$$Pure gold?$$Fifty cents, pure gold. You ought to see it and you'll see that it's still just like it just came out. Well, that was during the war [World War II, WWII] where the people were just getting rid of whatever they could. I have tablecloths and everything down there in the bottom part of my drawer, for serving and everything from the Philippines. Yes indeed, napkins and everything that are just beautiful, and I don't know what I'm gonna do with all that stuff now 'cause I don't really do a lot of entertaining anymore. You finished with this, young man?$$Yes, ma'am.$$And you see how that fits into a purse?$$Folds up pretty nice just like a parachute should.$$Yes, yes (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) That's right.

Harold Pates

Educator and cultural activist Harold Pates was born October 31, 1931, in Macon, Mississippi. His great aunt, raised in slavery, lost two fingers to her master for attempting to read. Pates’ parents, Amanda Beasley Pates and Squire Pates were graduates of Bolivar Training School in Mound Bayou, Mississsippi. Migrating to Chicago, Illinois, Pates attended Forestville Elementary School and DuSable High School graduating in 1948. Taught music by DuSable’s Captain Walter Dyett, Pates played with Eddie Harris, Richard Davis, John Gilmore, Jimmy Ellis and other future greats. Pates graduated from Wilson Junior College in 1952 and DePaul University with his B.A. degree in English in 1954. He earned his M.A. degree from DePaul in 1956 and received his PhD degree from the University of Chicago in 1976.

Pates taught at Fuller Elementary School and Forestville Elementary School, and was assistant principal of DuSable Upper Grade Center from 1964 to 1968. He served as a counselor at DuSable Upper Grade Center and High School and as a guidance counselor for the Hyde Park Evening School. As teacher and administrator, Pates joined Lawrence Landry, Lu and Jorja Palmer, Rev. C.T. Vivian, Lorenzo Martin, Bobby E. Wright, and others in agitating for African American concerns in the Chicago Public Schools. In 1968, he joined Loop College where he became director of the Admissions Department. Pates also taught at Loyola University, George Williams College, Northeastern Illinois University, and Concordia College. He also helped plan the first Upward Bound Program. Appointed dean of career programs at Malcolm X College in 1981, Pates moved on to Kennedy-King College as a dean in 1983. In 1986, Pates was named president of Kennedy-King College, serving until 1997. At Kennedy-King, he provided access for cultural and civic organizations and events at an unprecedented level.

Active in efforts to generate an African version of the history and culture of Africa and to infuse the black experience into the educational system, Pates was a founder of the Chicago Communiversity and the Association of African Educators with Anderson Thompson in the late 1960s. He was a founding member of the Kemetic Institute, the Association of Black Psychologists, the National Association of Black School Educators, the Black United Front, the Chicago Task Force for Black Political Empowerment, the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations, and the Harold Washington Institute. Recipient of numerous awards, ranging from the Chancellors Award for outstanding Leadership to the Muntu Dance Theatre’s Alyo Award, Pates currently serves on the board of the Black United Fund of Illinois and the advisory board of the Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies of Northeastern Illinois University. He is founding director of the All African World Virtual University. Fit, playing full court basketball into his 70s, Pates, now retired, enjoys golf and playing jazz on the cornet.

A widower, Pates has a grown daughter and son.

Accession Number

A2005.263

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/12/2005 |and| 7/10/2006

Last Name

Pates

Maker Category
Schools

Du Sable Leadership Academy

University of Chicago

DePaul University

Kennedy–King College

Forrestville Elementary School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Harold

Birth City, State, Country

Macon

HM ID

PAT04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Palm Springs, California

Favorite Quote

Ain't Nobody Right But God.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/31/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pie (Sweet Potato)

Short Description

Cultural activist, college president, and teacher Harold Pates (1931 - ) is the former president of Kennedy-King College in Chicago. He has worked with numerous organizations dedicated to infusing the African American experience into the educational system, and is founding director of the All African World Virtual University.

Employment

Fuller Elementary School

Wisconsin Steel Mill

Forestville Elementary School

DuSable High School

Loop College

Malcolm X College

Kennedy-King College

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:21420,206:21987,214:25718,254:44501,452:45025,459:53755,551:57626,606:87314,899:91822,996:92190,1001:98300,1030:116865,1202:119688,1241:120816,1298:159040,1744:173679,1985:174658,2088:193630,2262:196750,2327:198190,2358:198990,2378:200750,2406:201310,2414:201710,2420:230230,2794:231130,2804:231490,2809:234010,2894:244384,3040:250104,3161:250832,3169:256510,3231:259570,3287:271136,3435:271432,3440:273208,3476:278900,3590$0,0:14673,127:15037,132:16038,144:26678,312:27194,319:30497,336:31892,367:38867,446:39239,451:44982,470:54843,604:87960,1128:88300,1133:92465,1214:97790,1268:102020,1284:108160,1314:108889,1324:110509,1346:112320,1354:115354,1416:121390,1467:123290,1498:132869,1600:133487,1608:134002,1614:134517,1620:136474,1643:156384,2004:158270,2045:170548,2268:171277,2278:191640,2544
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harold Pates' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harold Pates lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes his mother's family history in the A.M.E. church

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls working conditions in his maternal family's community in the South

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls traveling to Mississippi as a boy

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Harold Pates explains why his parents sent him south for the summers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Harold Pates describes his mother's personality, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his mother's personality, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harold Pates relates his paternal family's stories from the era of slavery

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls spending summers in Macon, Mississippi as a boy

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harold Pates describes confrontations with whites in Mississippi, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls confrontations with whites in Mississippi, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Harold Pates describes his father's community in Mound Bayou, Mississippi

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harold Pates recalls his father's move from Mississippi to Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls his father's work for the post office

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes his siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes his sister's career as an opera singer

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harold Pates describes his earliest childhood memory, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Harold Pates describes his earliest childhood memory, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Harold Pates describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harold Pates remembers learning to drive at the age of twelve

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood during his childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls performers who lived in and visited Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls his activities as a child in Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harold Pates describes being a paperboy in Chicago's white neighborhoods

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls running policy as a child in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes influential figures in Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls famous musicians from Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes the geography of his childhood neighborhood on Chicago's South Side

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes his father's civil rights activism

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harold Pates talks about systemic racial oppression

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls segregation in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Harold Pates describes racial tension in Chicago's South Side neighborhoods

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harold Pates recalls Chicago's political machine in Bronzeville

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls institutions in Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes businesses in Chicago's Bronzeville neighborhood

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls a teacher at Chicago's Forrestville Elementary School

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Harold Pates describes his grade school experiences in Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Harold Pates describes his extracurricular activities during grade school

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Harold Pates recalls his childhood neighbor William Cousins, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes his favorite activities at Chicago's DuSable High School

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes politically radical community groups in Chicago

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls hearing W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson speak, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls hearing W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson speak, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Harold Pates describes the social atmosphere of Chicago's DuSable High School

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Harold Pates recalls musicians who studied at Chicago's DuSable High School

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Harold Pates remembers working as a musician as a teenager

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Harold Pates recalls graduating from Chicago's DuSable High School

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes working for Wisconsin Steel, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes working for Wisconsin Steel, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes his initial setbacks at Chicago's Wilson Junior College

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Harold Pates reflects on his father's support for his education

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Harold Pates describes his experiences at Chicago's DePaul University

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Harold Pates explains how his DePaul University degree helped him to find a job

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his academic pursuits at DePaul University

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls befriending Italian Americans at DePaul University

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes his impressions of DePaul University

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes his own and his brother's careers during the 1950s

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls his first position as a teacher in Chicago

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Harold Pates describes teaching at an all-girls school

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Harold Pates describes the lessons he learned early in his teaching career

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Harold Pates recalls his fellow teachers at Chicago's Fuller Elementary School

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls his concern over expulsions at Fuller Elementary School

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes discrimination against black teachers in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls students from Chicago's Forrestville Elementary School

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls how he enjoyed teaching at Forrestville Elementary School

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls his decision to leave Forrestville Elementary School

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his disagreements with the principal of Forrestville Elementary School

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls becoming a teacher at Chicago's DuSable Upper Grade Center

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls tension between the students and teachers at DuSable Upper Grade Center

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes a violent incident with a student at DuSable Upper Grade Center

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls the overcrowding of Chicago's black schools

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Harold Pates explains how the Willis Wagons controversy mobilized black leadership

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Slating of Harold Pates' interview, session 2

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls racial discrimination in Chicago's trade schools

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls biases in the hiring of principals in Chicago Public Schools

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes working for Galeta Kaar at DuSable Upper Grade Center

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Harold Pates talks about Reverend Dr. C.T. Vivian

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls joining Loyola University Chicago's Upward Bound program

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Harold Pates describes his career ambitions during the late 1960s

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Harold Pates recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes tensions around integration in Chicago during the 1950s and 1960s

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes the reaction of Chicago's black community to Dr. King's death

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls incidents that led to the Selma to Montgomery marches

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls his experience in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery march

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls becoming director of admissions at Chicago's Loop College

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Harold Pates remembers black organizations in Chicago in the late 1960s

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes the influence of the University of Chicago in Chicago's Woodlawn neighborhood

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls the rise of the Blackstone Rangers

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls mediating between gangs in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls the growth of African American studies programs

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls his involvement in the National Association for College Admission Counseling

Tape: 14 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls the founding of Chicago's Communiversity

Tape: 14 Story: 7 - Harold Pates recalls the rise of the Black Power movement in the late 1960s

Tape: 15 Story: 1 - Harold Pates reflects on the importance of black institutions

Tape: 15 Story: 2 - Harold Pates talks about the educational philosophy of Chicago's Communiversity

Tape: 15 Story: 3 - Harold Pates describes problems with the Eurocentric version of history

Tape: 15 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes the structure of Chicago's Communiversity

Tape: 15 Story: 5 - Harold Pates recalls a quarrel with Sol Tax at the University of Chicago

Tape: 15 Story: 6 - Harold Pates reflects upon the mission of the Communiversity

Tape: 16 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his administrative tenure at Chicago's Loop College

Tape: 16 Story: 2 - Harold Pates recalls fellow faculty members at Chicago's Loop College

Tape: 16 Story: 3 - Harold Pates recalls becoming a dean of Chicago's Malcolm X College

Tape: 16 Story: 4 - Harold Pates recalls being appointed president of Chicago's Kennedy-King College

Tape: 16 Story: 5 - Harold Pates describes the politics of Kennedy-King College

Tape: 16 Story: 6 - Harold Pates recalls a negative news story about Kennedy-King College

Tape: 16 Story: 7 - Harold Pates recalls community engagement at Kennedy-King College

Tape: 17 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his policies as Kennedy-King College president

Tape: 17 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes programs he introduced at Kennedy-King College

Tape: 17 Story: 3 - Harold Pates talks about plans for a new facility for Kennedy-King College

Tape: 17 Story: 4 - Harold Pates describes life after his retirement from Kennedy-King College

Tape: 17 Story: 5 - Harold Pates talks about a controversy at Kennedy-King College

Tape: 17 Story: 6 - Harold Pates reflects upon his life

Tape: 18 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 18 Story: 2 - Harold Pates describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 18 Story: 3 - Harold Pates considers contemporary leaders in the African American community

Tape: 18 Story: 4 - Harold Pates reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 18 Story: 5 - Harold Pates reflects upon his family life

Tape: 18 Story: 6 - Harold Pates talks about the importance of rejecting materialism

Tape: 18 Story: 7 - Harold Pates reflects upon the role of music in his life

Tape: 19 Story: 1 - Harold Pates describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 19 Story: 2 - Harold Pates narrates his photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

4$16

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Harold Pates describes being a paperboy in Chicago's white neighborhoods
Harold Pates recalls being appointed president of Chicago's Kennedy-King College
Transcript
I remember the first time I ever got afraid of a policeman. I told you I was twelve years old, I was tall. I started delivering papers in the white neighborhood; the paper branch was in the alley between Cottage Grove [Avenue] and Drexel [Avenue]. We would, I would go from 46th [Street] and Evans [Avenue], down 47th Street into this alley. There was a drugstore on the corner of 47th and Cottage Grove, it was called Orenstein's [ph.], there was also a newspaper stand right in front of it. One day I had my paper bag, 4:30 in the morning, I'm going to the paper branch. I walk down 47th Street, a white woman was coming in front of me, she saw me and ran across to the south side of 47th Street. It was a policeman standing at the newsstand, and this is one of these pivotal experiences too. I saw this lady, I knew that this lady was afraid of me, it was very clear, she went across the street and walked to the newsstand. There was a policeman at the newsstand, and I saw her doing like this, the policeman took out after me running. And I saw that, I started to run but I didn't because you know how white policemen dealt with black people at that time was no myth. I mean it was very real, I started to run but I didn't, I continued to walk, and I tried to act like I didn't know that he was coming behind me. He came up to me, right when I got in front of the Vee show, he pulled his gun out, put it up to my head and he said, "What are you doing over here?" He said, "Turn around," where my back would be to him, he put the gun up against my head, and he said, "What are you doing over here?" And I went to turn around to talk to him; he said, "If you turn around, I'll blow your head off." So I just stood there, but I said, "You see this paper bag, I'm about to go to the paper branch," but it occurred to me I can't see this man's face. If he killed me nobody will know who he is, but I wouldn't have been able to tell it anyway, you know. So I'm standing there and he's--then he cocked the gun and I thought, Crowe [Larry Crowe], I really thought I was gone then, as a young boy you know. So finally I said, "See the paper bag, see the paper bag, I'm going right back here, the paper branch is right here." So then he, I guess he took the latch off the gun and then he turned around and went on away. And there was a florist shop and when I got back in the paper branch, I thought about that because I never told any of the fellows. See back at that time, there was only one white boy working in the branch, his name was Tommy North, N-O-R-T-H, and he lived in the white community. All the rest of us who delivered papers in the white community were black. My brother [Henry Pates] delivered the papers over in five hotels which are now, which have--many of them have been replaced by 50th on the Lake [50th on the Lake Motel, Chicago, Illinois]. There was also an [U.S.] Army barracks over there that was called the [U.S.] Fifth Army, now that's important. Because in the '60s [1960s], the Fifth Army came out in the '60s [1960s] after Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was killed and posted a .50 caliber machine gun right there on--this is what I saw with my eyes. Right there on Stony Island [Avenue] and 63rd Street, I guess they decided they were gonna shoot down 63rd Street. Because young people were setting 63rd Street on fire, you understand? And they didn't know what to do, so the Army--I came out that night to see, but I was, you know. This is not when I was young; this is when Martin Luther King got killed.$My presidency, I think I became president either in '86 [1986] or '87 [1987], I don't remember the exact date. And that was a very interesting experience, the presidency of Kennedy-King [Kennedy-King College, Chicago, Illinois] because my orientation for the presidency was to make sure that the pres- that the school reflected of the community and its values. And that it took the community to a higher level with respect to the offerings and with respect to, to--it operating as a resource for community development.$$Before I get, I just want to ask you did you, were you surprised when you became, when you were appointed, I mean did, you went after the job I'm sure. But, but were you, I mean how, how was the lay of the land? I mean were you assured of (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--of being, of becoming the president at that time? Did you have, was it a done deal or what?$$Well you know no, it wasn't a done deal. It was very interesting because you see there was, within the college, the faculty council had decided on another person. I'm coming in out of the community with a community support, but also with the, with the support of the student government, who was both a part of the school and a part of the community at the same time. Well, my coming into the presidency, when the selection committee, it just so happens that members of the selection committee, the president of the selection committee--now this just so happens, the president, the chairman of the selection committee was a fellow named Mayo [ph.]; I can't remember his first name, simply because we were in third grade together in elementary school [Forrestville Elementary School, Chicago, Illinois], and when he discovered that they were searching and that they were looking at me as the president, he came to see me. He said, "[HistoryMaker] Harold Pates," he said, "do you realize that, do you realize how far we go back?" And I begin to talk, I said, "Look, I remember when we were in elementary school." We started talking about--. He says, "With your credentials," because everybody knew me in the City of Chicago [Illinois], you know, "you got to be the president over here." He says, "You got to be the president." Well, I don't know what went on in the selection committee, but the student government chairman came out one day and told me while I was in the counseling office he says, "Now Dr. Pates are you ready to be president?" I said, "Oh?" He said, "Are you ready?" I said, "Of course," and that's the way that happened.

Marva Collins

A woman passionate about learning, Marva Collins received her early education in Atmore, Alabama, a town where the segregated school system provided very few resources for African American students. Marva eventually attended Clark College in Atlanta and, after graduation, returned to Alabama. She taught for two years in the Alabama school system before moving to Chicago, where she worked in the public school system for fourteen years.

Frustrated by the Chicago Public Schools’ low standards, Collins decided to open her own school in 1975 on the second floor of her home, naming it the Westside Preparatory School. The first students included her son, daughter and several neighborhood children, some of which were considered learning-disabled. At the end of the first year, every student scored at least five grades higher on their standardized tests. Soon, Collins’ success attracted national attention. She and the Westside Preparatory School were profiled by 60 Minutes, Good Morning America, Time and Newsweek, and were the subject of a television movie, The Marva Collins Story.

Her achievements prompted President Ronald Reagan to offer her the post of secretary of education, which she declined in order to continue the development of Westside Preparatory School.

At the end of 1996, Collins decided to return to the Chicago Public Schools to supervise three schools that had been placed on probation. She specifically requested the schools with the worst academic records and lowest parental involvement, and in only half a year improved the rating of two of the three schools by 85 percent. During the following year, the Marva Collins Preparatory School of Wisconsin opened its doors to its first class of students, and other schools have since opened in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Florida. Collins trained more than 100,000 teachers since the opening of the Westside Preparatory School and traveled to Africa with the Young Presidents’ Organization in order to spread her methodology to educators worldwide. She received more than forty honorary degrees and in 1982 was honored as one of the Legendary Women of the World.

Collins passed away on June 24, 2015 at the age of 78.

Accession Number

A2000.017

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/2/2000

Last Name

Collins

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Marva

Birth City, State, Country

Monroeville

HM ID

COL02

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Mark D. Goodman

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

Peace.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

8/31/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hilton Head Island

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Southern Food

Death Date

6/24/2015

Short Description

Teacher and education administrator Marva Collins (1936 - 2015 ) was the founder of the Westside Preparatory School in Chicago, Illinois, as well as schools in Wisconsin, Ohio, and Florida. Collins also worked within the Chicago Public Schools and, in 1982, was honored as one of the 'Legendary Women of the World.'

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Westside Preparatory School

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Orange, Red

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Marva Collins' favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marva Collins shares stories of her grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marva Collins remembers the closeness of family life in the South

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marva Collins discusses the strong values she was taught as a youth

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marva Collins highlights the differences between today's youth and her generation

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marva Collins details how her environment shaped her values

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marva Collins validates the axiom, "It takes a village."

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marva Collins on the modernity's loosening of familial ties

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marva Collins recalls how her personal philosophy was shaped

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marva Collins shares stories of her avid reading habits

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Marva Collins details how reading has enriched her life

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marva Collins describes how she entered teaching

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marva Collins reveals the role fate played in her life

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marva Collins discusses how valuable reading has been to her

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marva Collins discusses her children's private school education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marva Collins details her leap of faith to open her own school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marva Collins discusses her philosophy on education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marva Collins on her concept of self-validation and success

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marva Collins continues with her thoughts on self-esteem

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marva Collins remembers former students who have touched her life

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marva Collins recalls the airing of the 60 Minutes TV episode on West Side Prep School

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Marva Collins enjoys life's simplicity

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Marva Collins continues with her thoughts on what makes her "wealthy"

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marva Collins details how simplicity brings her great happiness

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marva Collins' hopes for today's youth

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marva Collins thoughts on the future of black American youth

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marva Collins details what is wrong with society today

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marva Collins discusses what brings her happiness

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marva Collins decribes her plans for the future

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marva Collins believes she's fulfilling a divine purpose

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marva Collins continues with thoughts on her life's mission

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marva Collins discusses what her legacy will be

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marva Collins shares why she forms strong bonds with children

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Marva Collins continues with her bonding abilities with children

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The most influential people in Marva Collin's life

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Marva Collins discusses her favorite historical period

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Marva Collins Creed

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Marva Collins shares her passion for helping others succeed

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Marva Collins continues with her thoughts on achievement