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Gerald Adolph

Management consultant Gerald S. Adolph was born on December 30, 1953 in New York City, New York. His father, Leroy Adolph, was a New York City department of sanitation worker; his mother, Beryl Adolph, a nurse. Raised in New York, Adolph attended Cardinal Spellman High School in the Bronx, where he graduated from in 1971. He then received his B.S. degrees in management science and chemical engineering in 1976 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Adolph went on to receive his M.S. degree in chemical engineering from MIT in 1980, and his M.B.A degree from the Harvard Business School in 1981.

Adolph was hired as a research engineer at the Polaroid Corporation in 1976, where he worked in the company’s development labs and chemical manufacturing division. In 1981, Adolph was hired at Booz Allen Hamilton, now Booz & Company, as an associate of technology management services. After being promoted to a senior associate in 1983, and as principal of technology management services in 1985, he was made partner of the chemicals practice at Booz & Company in 1989. While employed as partner of the chemicals practice, Adolph also served as the practice leader of global chemicals. Then, in 1999, Adolph was promoted to a senior partner of consumer, health and M&A, as well as practice leader of global consumer and health at Booz & Company. In 2001, while still serving as senior partner, he led the global mergers and restructuring group. In 2010, Adolph was promoted to a managing senior partner for the New York region at Booz & Company.

Adolph has served on numerous corporate and educational boards throughout his career, including the Corporate Advisory Board at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, Helen Keller International, and Co-Chair of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Adolph also served on Booz & Company’s board of directors, and as board chair of the Executive Leadership Council in 2004. He was elected to the board of Cintas in 2006 and the board of his alma mater Cardinal Spellman High School in 2010. In 2009, Adolph co-authored the book Merge Ahead: Mastering the Five Enduring Trends of Artful M&A. He was awarded the Pierre Toussaint Medallion from the Archdiocese of New York in 2009. Booz & Company has also honored Adolph with their Professional Excellence Award.

Gerald S. Adolph was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 20, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.258

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/20/2013

Last Name

Adolph

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Stephen

Schools

St. Charles Borromeo School

Msgr. William R. Kelly School

Cardinal Spellman High School

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Harvard Business School

First Name

Gerald

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

ADO01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

For those whom much has been given, much is expected.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/30/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Management consultant Gerald Adolph (1953 - ) has worked at Booz & Company for over thirty years. He is the co-author of Merge Ahead: Mastering the Five Enduring Trends of Artful M&A.

Employment

Polaroid Corporation

Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc

Favorite Color

Blue

Reginald Van Lee

Management consultant Reginald Van Lee was born on May 8, 1958 in Houston, Texas to Tommie Lee and Eva Elnora Jefferson Lee. Van Lee received his B.S. degree in engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1979; and, in 1980, he earned his M.S. degree in civil engineering from MIT. Upon graduation, Van Lee was hired by Exxon Production Research Company as a research engineer. In 1982, he entered the M.B.A. program at Harvard Business School, and he interned at Booz Allen Hamilton during the summer of 1983. In 1984, after graduating with his M.B.A. degree in business administration, Van Lee was hired at Booz Allen Hamilton.

In 1993, Van Lee was promoted to partner at the Booz Allen Hamilton; and in 2003, he was promoted to senior partner. Van Lee leads Booz Allen Hamilton’s health and not-for-profit businesses, where he has helped numerous private and public health organizations and not-for-profit organizations, such as Habitat for Humanity and the American Cancer Society. As an industry expert on strategy implementation, Van Lee has contributed a number of articles on the topic. His articles have appeared in The Journal of Business Strategy and Business Horizons. Van Lee also co-authored the book, Megacommunities: How Leaders of Government, Business, and Non-Profits Can Tackle Today’s Global Challenges Together. He has appeared on ABC-TV’s “World News This Morning” and CNBC, and co-led the Urban Enterprise Initiative with the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation, where he focused on driving enhanced competitiveness for small businesses in Harlem. Van Lee is also a founding member of the Clinton Global Initiative.

Van Lee’s many recognitions include the 2008 Black Engineer of the Year Award and New York University’s C. Walter Nichols Award for community service. He was also chosen as one of the 2009 Washington Minority Business Leaders by the Washington Business Journal. Van Lee served as chairman emeritus of the board of the Evidence Dance Company, trustee of the Studio Museum in Harlem, and chairman of the Washington Performing Arts Society. In 2008, he was appointed by President Barack Obama to the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

Reginald Van Lee was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 14, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.149

Sex

Male

Interview Date
9/14/2012
Last Name

Van Lee

Maker Category
Schools
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Harvard Business School
James R. Reynolds Elementary School
Crispus Attucks Middle
Carter G. Woodson K-8 School
Evan E. Worthing Senior High School
First Name

Reggie

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

VAN06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

The Two Most Important Days In Your Life Are The Day You Were Born And The Day You Understand Why.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/8/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Management consultant Reginald Van Lee (1957 - ) is an executive vice president at Booz Allen Hamilton.

Employment
Exxon Mobil
Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3752,109:5494,144:8174,227:12127,326:14338,381:38222,851:38698,859:39174,888:39514,894:51915,1132:58440,1274:58890,1285:62790,1385:63165,1391:63465,1396:68050,1425:68310,1430:68960,1461:71820,1566:82536,1740:86752,1831:87636,1848:88384,1862:90084,1911:101406,2059:101714,2064:114313,2363:114605,2368:116503,2456:136528,2823:137860,2859:138748,2961:147188,3050:153268,3162:161079,3232:161673,3242:171020,3435$0,0:637,31:922,37:18704,475:26474,756:27066,765:28324,809:28620,814:32024,970:32542,978:33134,987:33652,998:34022,1004:41190,1032:42165,1048:43890,1083:44565,1093:46140,1123:48540,1167:48990,1192:57756,1293:58862,1312:59415,1321:59968,1329:61943,1364:62259,1369:62654,1375:63602,1397:64155,1405:69843,1486:74017,1518:74638,1534:74983,1540:75466,1548:76708,1572:76984,1577:77881,1592:78157,1597:80503,1649:81124,1660:85678,1778:91020,1814:95445,1897:96345,1912:101985,1993:102310,2001:104390,2058:104780,2065:105495,2095:106600,2122:106860,2127:107315,2139:107575,2144:107900,2150:108745,2178:109655,2195:110175,2215:110890,2229:111280,2239:111865,2250:112320,2259:112645,2265:119219,2402:119786,2412:120272,2419:120596,2428:133454,2560:134766,2576:137718,2625:141850,2687
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reginald Van Lee's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reginald Van Lee describes his mother's childhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reginald Van Lee describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reginald Van Lee describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reginald Van Lee describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reginald Van Lee lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reginald Van Lee describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reginald Van Lee describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reginald Van Lee remembers James R. Reynolds Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reginald Van Lee describes his childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee remembers his mother's parenting style

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee recalls his junior high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his family's influence

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reginald Van Lee remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reginald Van Lee describes his early academic success

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reginald Van Lee remembers Evan E. Worthing High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reginald Van Lee remembers developing an interest in engineering

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reginald Van Lee remembers entering the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reginald Van Lee describes his experiences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee describes the racial makeup of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee remembers his influential professors

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reginald Van Lee describes the racial tensions in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reginald Van Lee remembers the black community at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reginald Van Lee recalls his mentors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reginald Van Lee recalls earning a master's degree from at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reginald Van Lee recalls the start of his career at the Exxon Mobil Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reginald Van Lee recalls his decision to attend the Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reginald Van Lee remembers enrolling at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee describes the black student community at Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee remembers his coursework at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reginald Van Lee recalls his start at Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his mother's role in his success

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reginald Van Lee describes his early career at Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reginald Van Lee remembers his projects at Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reginald Van Lee describes the highlights of his career at Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee describes the formation of the Urban Enterprise Initiative

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his awards and recognitions

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Reginald Van Lee remembers coauthoring 'Megacommunities'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Reginald Van Lee describes his involvement in the arts

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his career plans

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Reginald Van Lee reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Reginald Van Lee reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Reginald Van Lee describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Reginald Van Lee describes how he met his husband, Corey McCathern

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Reginald Van Lee describes his wedding

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Reginald Van Lee talks about his racial and sexual identity

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Reginald Van Lee describes his parents' views on his sexuality

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Reginald Van Lee describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Reginald Van Lee narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

9$1

DATitle
Reginald Van Lee remembers developing an interest in engineering
Reginald Van Lee describes the Harlem Small Business Initiative, pt. 2
Transcript
In high school had you figured that you were going to become an engineer, in high school?$$When I was in the eighth grade, I was watching 'Star Trek,' well actually when I was in kindergarten I told my mother I wanted to be an artist and she said, "Well artists starve so you need to be something else like an architect." So from kindergarten to eighth grade I was going to be an architect. Then in eighth grade my mother said, "Well the latest thing is engineering so you should be an engineer. You can be an architectural engineer but you need to be an engineer." I was very obedient, my mother said do it, made sense to me. So I'm watching 'Star Trek' and this guy comes on the USS Enterprise who had gone to MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts], Ph.D. MIT, master's [degree] MIT all this stuff and they were, Captain Kirk [James T. Kirk] and Mr. Spock were like bowing to this guy like he was a deity and to me Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock were deities. So if they are bowing to this guy he must be something. So I asked my mother, "What is MIT?" Actually to my surprise she said, "It's a school of engineering in Massachusetts." And I said, "Well I want to go to MIT," and she says, "You're going to MIT," just like that. So she called the school and they sent the bulletins. When the recruiters came from MIT they didn't come to my little black high school, they came to I think Rice University [Houston, Texas] or something. My parents [Eva Jefferson Lee and Tommie Lee] put me in the car and we went over to meet the recruiters and I did the interviewing and everything filled out the forms and wrote the essays and then I went to MIT. So that's what got me--my mother got me interested in engineering and at that time, once I really did my research, I discovered that MIT was the best engineering school in the world, highest rated. So that's where I went to school.$$So counseling played virtually no role in this, I guess?$$No as a matter of fact not Mrs. Freddie Gaines [ph.], my senior counselor who is very encouraging, but one of the other counselors basically told me that I should go to University of Houston [Houston, Texas] or Texas Southern [Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas] or maybe University of Texas [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas] because while I was smart for Worthing High School [Evan E. Worthing High School, Houston, Texas], you know, I probably wouldn't be smart enough to compete with those other kids and she didn't want me to go and be disappointed, she didn't want me to feel failure. So she felt she was protecting me. As you can imagine once I got my MIT degree I went back and showed her the degree and said, "Thank you for the encouragement because I decided that I had to go to MIT and graduate after you were so discouraging to me."$$Now this is a white counselor?$$No this is a black counselor, black counselor, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Black counselor, okay, interesting so was Worthing High School mostly black since it was closer to the neighborhood?$$Yeah, yep, at the time I graduated because we'd gone through the majority/minority zoning sort of thing, we had probably twenty white students and maybe twenty or thirty Hispanic students, but it was more than predominantly black.$$Okay. So you graduated in what nineteen seventy- (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Seventy-five. [1975].$$Seventy-five [1975].$Yeah we were talking about the small business initiative [Harlem Small Business Initiative; Urban Enterprise Initiative] in Harlem [New York, New York], and--$$And, so the small businesses came to the president [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] and said, "We need your help so that we can continue to be competitive and live and grow in Harlem." So the president went to a number of consulting firms to ask them if they would do this pro bono and we wanted to do this partnership as a collaborative approach. So we had the Clinton Foundation [New York, New York], we had the Harlem Small Business Alliance [sic. Harlem Business Alliance, New York, New York], we had Congressman Charlie Rangel's [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel] office, we had Columbia University [New York, New York], we had New York University [New York, New York], we had the National Black MBAs [National Black MBA Association], we had Booz Allen Hamilton [Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.] all working together with these small businesses to add different resources as we could deliver to them. We did the technical assistance and the consulting thing. We had attorneys to give them legal help on their leases, on their rent. We had the M.B.A.s to give us some leverage of students doing analysis, et cetera. And what we did was to create a program that actually changed the lives of many small businesses in Harlem. Several hundred have gone through the program now since 2001. We started with ten pilot businesses and it's interesting because when we first started looking at who would be good candidates for this program we said well we want the program to run for almost two years so we have enough time to really help them and test the results and see the progress we've made. So let's make sure that the businesses either own their building or they have at least a two year lease. We discovered that some 80 percent of the businesses of Harlem at that time operated on a month to month lease. So at any point a landlord could say, "I can get more for this, you've got thirty days, you've got to get out," right. And they were okay with that in the lean years because they didn't want to sign a long term lease and go out of business in a couple of months and still be stuck with having to pay the lease. So it was a good deal for them and it was a good deal for the landlords at the time. But long story made short, we worked with the businesses to bring just modern management 101 techniques to them, inventory management, receptionists for people, marketing plans, business plans, analysis of their consumer base through surveys, just very simple things; and we turned some businesses around.

Toni Fay

Communications executive Toni Fay was born on April 25, 1947 to George E. and Allie C. (Smith) Fay. Fay received her B.A. degree from Duquesne University in 1968. She obtained her M.S.W. degree, four years later, from the University of Pittsburgh. She also received her M.Ed. degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1973. Fay began her professional career in 1968 when she was hired as a caseworker for the New York City Department of Welfare. She was then named the director of social services for the Pittsburgh Drug Abuse Center in 1972. Fay was also appointed regional commissioner of the Governor's Council on Drugs & Alcohol for the state of Pennsylvania, serving in that capacity from 1973 to 1976. In 1977, she was named director of planning and development for the National Council of Negro Women. She was then hired as an executive vice president of D. Parke Gibson Associates, a public relations firm.

In 1982, Fay was named manager of community relations for Time-Warner, Inc. in New York. After only a year with the media conglomerate, she was promoted to the position of director of corporate community relations and affirmative action. She would go on to serve in that role for ten years before being appointed Time Warner’s vice president and corporation officer. After eight years as vice president, Fay launched her own management consultant firm TGF Associates in Englewood, New Jersey.

In addition to her corporate career, Fay was a member of the transition team for former U.S. President William Clinton in 1992. She was also appointed by President Clinton to the boards of the National Institute for Literacy and the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Fay has served on a number of boards for civic, social and educational entities, including that of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, UNICEF, the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and Library, the Apollo Theatre Foundation, the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Bethune Cookman College, the Coro Foundation, the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, the U.S. Capitol Historical Society and the Quincy Jones Listen Up Foundation, among many others.

Toni Fay was interviewed by the The HistoryMakers on August 1, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.162

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/1/2012

Last Name

Fay

Maker Category
Middle Name

Georgette

Schools

Duquesne University

University of Pittsburgh

A Whizz Kids Preschool Inc Ii

A-Karrasel Primary Grade Center

Benjamin Franklin Junior High School

Teaneck Senior High School

P.S. 169 Robert F Kennedy School

First Name

Toni

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

FAY01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France, Morocco

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

4/25/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Englewood

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Communications executive Toni Fay (1947 - ) was vice president of Time Warner, Inc.

Employment

New York City Department of Welfare

Pittsburgh Drug Abuse Center

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)

D. Parke Gibson Association

Time Warner, Inc.

TGF Associates

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
0,0:4058,57:6102,105:6540,112:6905,118:13122,203:14114,223:14548,231:16904,279:17214,285:17772,296:18144,303:18516,310:19756,335:21182,368:21740,379:27322,445:27618,450:28358,464:29468,488:29838,494:30282,502:33020,552:33538,560:37980,576:38920,587:40424,610:41458,626:42022,633:43432,652:46285,670:46620,676:48027,703:48362,709:48898,720:53789,822:55732,861:56067,867:58144,900:58680,909:60422,943:68618,1013:69458,1025:72483,1055:72909,1063:73761,1080:74258,1088:74755,1099:75678,1138:76175,1146:77595,1174:78021,1181:79725,1227:80009,1232:80932,1252:81784,1271:83701,1293:84127,1300:85192,1317:88902,1333:89790,1347:90456,1357:92158,1403:94452,1453:103782,1607:104522,1620:105262,1633:106520,1654:114390,1750:117414,1800:118206,1812:119286,1833:121374,1872:122238,1886:126670,1933$0,0:516,15:1032,22:1634,31:1978,36:3096,52:6250,81:7457,106:8096,119:10297,167:10723,175:11007,180:14202,230:14699,239:15409,255:17539,318:18178,329:18888,341:19243,346:26460,404:26790,410:27054,416:27450,424:29166,469:29760,479:30618,496:31674,519:36030,637:41830,672:42726,690:43878,717:45286,745:45862,761:46310,770:46566,775:46886,782:47398,796:49830,847:50278,856:51942,889:52198,894:52646,902:53286,915:57539,938:58178,949:58604,956:62935,1050:64142,1074:66201,1130:66911,1141:67550,1152:73233,1239:76709,1294:77262,1302:81799,1331:82380,1343:86754,1412:87557,1427:88068,1436:90477,1490:92520,1498:95220,1562:96645,1594:97020,1600:97545,1609:98070,1617:101326,1647:115338,1856:116994,1885:117282,1890:117642,1896:118290,1907:120018,1940:120378,1946:121386,1964:122898,2002:123258,2008:124626,2038:125274,2053:132790,2128:133430,2151:134870,2180:136470,2219:139270,2277:140470,2296:141350,2316:142870,2342:147280,2365:150605,2422:154350,2437:155022,2450:155406,2455:157902,2507:163270,2579:165370,2625:167170,2658:167545,2664:173298,2753:182630,2861:183725,2873:184674,2890:185331,2903:185623,2908:186426,2924:187375,2934:187813,2941:188689,2957:189127,2964:192120,3023:193507,3058:195624,3102:199598,3114:200372,3125:200802,3131:203636,3194:204548,3208:205384,3226:207740,3274:211768,3387:217392,3499:218000,3508:223836,3548:224750,3562
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Toni Fay's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Toni Fay lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Toni Fay describes how her maternal grandparents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Toni Fay describes her maternal grandfather and great uncle's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Toni Fay remembers visiting her grandfather in New Jersey after the 1967 Newark riots

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Toni Fay describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Toni Fay talks about her family's relationship to the Presbyterian Church

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Toni Fay recaps her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Toni Fay describes her mother's childhood in Harlem, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Toni Fay talks about her father and paternal family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Toni Fay talks about her father and paternal family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Toni Fay describes her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Toni Fay talks about her father's start of an African American high school football league

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Toni Fay talks about her father's draft into the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes her family's perspective toward the draft

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Toni Fay explains how her parent met and fell in love

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Toni Fay describes her childhood home in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Toni Fay describes her parents' dispositions and considers her likeness to them

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Toni Fay describes experiencing discrimination in the Teaneck, New Jersey schools

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Toni Fay recalls her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Toni Fay describes her childhood activities in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Toni Fay describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Toni Fay remembers beating Roosevelt "Rosey" Brown in ping pong

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Toni Fay talks about the distinction between Harlem and Washington Heights

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Toni Fay describes her experience at P.S. 169 elementary school in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Toni Fay describes her experience at Stitt Junior High School and moving to Teaneck, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Toni Fay describes playing in the band at Stitt Junior High School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Toni Fay describes leaving New York City for Teaneck, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes how she avoided being held back from the eighth grade

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Toni Fay talks about her neighbors in Teaneck, Jersey, including the Isley family, and northern migration to the suburbs

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Toni Fay describes attending summer camp and other structured activities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Toni Fay describes the racial discrimination she experienced in Teaneck, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Toni Fay talks about entertaining her parents' friends

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Toni Fay talks about her father's establishment of a football team in Teaneck, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Toni Fay recalls attending the March on Washington in 1963 and boycotting companies that were segregationist

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Toni Fay talks about Malcolm X and remembers visiting "Southern" cousins in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Toni Fay talks about her decision to attend Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Toni Fay explains why she elected not to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Toni Fay describes her undergraduate experience at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Toni Fay talks about HistoryMaker Ronald Davenport, then-professor in the Duquesne University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes being accepted into graduate school at the University of Pittsburgh

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Toni Fay talks about her graduate studies at the University of Pittsburgh, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Toni Fay talks about her graduate studies at the University of Pittsburgh, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Toni Fay talks about heading the Governor's Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse in Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Toni Fay talks about her parents' mentorship

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Toni Fay talks about C. Delores Tucker, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Toni Fay describes moving to San Francisco, California briefly after leaving her job in Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Toni Fay talks about C. Delores Tucker, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Toni Fay talks about moving back home after spending one year in San Francisco, California

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Toni Fay describes interviewing with and being hired by HistoryMaker Dorothy Height

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes initiatives she oversaw at the National Council of Negro Women

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Toni Fay describes being hired by the D. Parke Gibson Association public relations firm

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Toni Fay describes being hired at Time Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Toni Fay describes her experience at Time Inc. and relationship with executive William J. Trent, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Toni Fay describes making connections with Betty Shabazz, Coretta Scott King, and others through the Black Leadership Family

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Toni Fay talks about the members, requirements and objectives at the Black Leadership Academy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Toni Fay describes the development of her literacy program at Time Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Toni Fay describes the literacy program she developed at Time Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Toni Fay talks about Time Inc.'s merger with Warner Communications Inc. in 1990

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes working on 'Songs of My People' photography book

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Toni Fay describes meeting HistoryMaker Quincy Jones and her involvement in the Listen Up Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Toni Fay talks about becoming Time Warner's first African American officer

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Toni Fay describes working on 'Americanos: Latino Life in the United States' and Gordon Parks' 'Half Past Autumn' at Time Warner

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Toni Fay talks about the external projects she worked on, including the Business Policy Review Council

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Toni Fay explains why the Business Policy Review Council stopped operating

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Toni Fay talks about her retirement from Time Warner

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Toni Fay talks about challenges surrounding the preservation of the Apollo Theater

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Toni Fay talks about her role in the revitalization of the Apollo Theatre in Harlem, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Toni Fay remembers HistoryMaker Ossie Davis

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Toni Fay describes her role on President Bill Clinton's transition team

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Toni Fay describes her literacy work with the Clinton Administration and Time Warner Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Toni Fay lists various boards she has served on over the years

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Toni Fay describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Toni Fay reflects considers what she might have done differently

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Toni Fay considers her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Toni Fay talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Toni Fay shares her advice to young professionals

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Toni Fay describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Toni Fay narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Toni Fay narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Toni Fay talks about heading the Governor's Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse in Pennsylvania
Toni Fay describes working on 'Songs of My People' photography book
Transcript
And I got--as I said, I think I've been blessed my whole career. All of a sudden, there was a brand new agency being started by Governor Milton Shapp in Pennsylvania. And it was to be the single-state agency for drug and alcohol abuse. Again, this was a whole new wave in the whole health and mental health arena nationally. So he started it, and the single-state agency was called the Governor's Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse. And for some reason, I was hired to be head of the whole region, which put me in charge of twenty-four counties in western Pennsylvania in allocating their drug and alcohol money for their county programs and other things. It's the first time I'm managing a staff, first time I was traveling statewide to look at programs. So I learned so much, and the first time I had to deal with administration, with panels. So I was taken from a community-based activity, thinking about, you know, we're just gonna improve the lot of people, to an administrative position dealing with budgets and money and plans and, and more racism, which was easier because outside of Pittsburgh [Pennsylvania], if you know western Pennsylvania and you should coming from Dayton [Ohio], I mean it's Appalachia in some places. I remember going to one of my counties and the, the county commissioner was blind. And I'm walking in to introduce myself, and he said, "Oh, yeah, I heard this, this colored gal got that job." I said, yes, and she's right here in front of you, you know (laughter). And what, and, and you have a request before me, you know. So, you know, I learned those--it was like the sum total of the things I had learned from Teaneck [New Jersey] (laughter), that I had to bring to that experience too. But it was a great job. I mean it propelled me totally out of traditional social work into now looking at this whole understanding of public health systems and administration and managing people.$There were two things going on that propelled me in getting my officer's stripe, which was unbelievable. First, I had this, "what the hell" attitude. I'm just gonna keep my head down and not stay in the gossip, rumor mill about who's on first, who's on second. My boss, who was then Jerry Levin [Gerald Levin], who became the chairman of Time Warner later on and did the AOL deal to our, our chagrin, Jerry said, call me only if you need me 'cause he was in his own political battle. So, you know, we were all just holding on. None of us were gonna put our hands up to say, "I'm leaving" 'cause they said, "Oh, at least let's get a package if we're gonna leave." So that's when I was approached to take on this project called 'Songs of My People.' I had gotten a call from a couple of the photographers that were looking at some way--quite frankly, they were a little outraged that this project around black women had traveled all around the United States and gotten such notoriety and there weren't any black photographers engaged in it. So many of them had gotten together, who were the top photographers in many of the newspapers around the country to say, let's do a day-in-the-life kind of concept. They brought it to me. I said, this is fabulous. Now, how am I gonna talk this company into it? I went to our book company and said, you all got to do this. They said, it sounds good. I said, I want us to get into the exhibition thing. We could travel this to all of our markets because in the newspaper--I'll never forget, when I went to the chairman, I said, "Look, Jerry, every paper is talking about records and synergy and movies and synergy. Not one is mentioning books, not one is mentioning magazines, not one is mentioning--it's all about now, this new entertainment complex. I have a book project that I wanna get all of our businesses engaged in." And it's gonna propel our agenda in terms of saying to the black community, we are here and the white community too. And think about all these museums. You like culture. Well, I sold it to Jerry to say--he said, "Toni, I like your thought." He said, but I don't even know how we're gonna pay for this. If we have to commit to fund an exhibition, all our money's tied up in this deal. Do you know how I got the exhibition funded? There was a line that the banks had not attached that was the retirement gift for Dick Munro, who was the outgoing CEO. That was the only line not attached in the deal we're paying for this merger (laughter). So if you ever see any literature from 'Songs of My People,' 'cause it traveled in over a hundred countries, you know, through the State Department [U.S. Department of State]. I mean it's just great. It always says, and "Is dedicated to Dick Munro through his retired," (laughter). It went on for five years. It was a major book, gangbusters exhibition. And what I liked most about it, and I think why people remember me and always come up to me and all of our executives in the company and said, "I'm one of the 'Songs of My People' photographers. They all got better jobs. Some became the press secretaries for Clinton [President William "Bill" Clinton] and everybody got promoted at their newspapers. And that's also how we got so much press 'cause when we would hit town, all of a sudden they could go to their publisher and say, look, I'm in this exhibition, and this is in our town. So you're gonna get some play. I mean it was just gangbusters. It was a landmark thing for the craft of photography. So that was one--

Dennis Paul Kimbro

Author of Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice, Dennis Kimbro was born December 29, 1950, in Jersey City, New Jersey. In 1972, he received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Oklahoma. He later earned his PhD in political science at Northwestern University, researching wealth and poverty in underdeveloped countries.

Kimbro wrote Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice as an updating and extension of the work of Napoleon Hill, who wrote the 1937 bestseller Think and Grow Rich after researching the practices of highly successful persons, and who left at his death an unfinished manuscript directed towards African Americans. Kimbro was commissioned by the Napoleon Hill Foundation to complete the manuscript. Published in 1991, Kimbro and Hill's book became a number-one bestseller.

Clients of Kimbro’s lectures have included General Motors, Walt Disney, Frito-Lay and Wells Fargo. He has appeared on television shows including Today and CNN’s Larry King Live, and in publications including Success, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and USA Today. He is listed in Who’s Who in Black America; a recipient of the Dale Carnegie Achievement Award; and a past Director of the Center of Entrepreneurship at Clark Atlanta University. In addition, in 1996, he served as one of eight national judges for the prestigious Ernst & Young USA Today Entrepreneur of the Year, held in Palm Springs, California.

In 2005, Kimbro’s second edition of What Keeps Me Standing: A Black Grandmother’s Guide to Peace, Hope & Inspiration was released. He is married, lives in Atlanta and is the father of three daughters.

Accession Number

A2006.074

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/12/2006

Last Name

Kimbro

Maker Category
Middle Name

Paul

Schools

University of Oklahoma

G. Washington Carver Institute

Benjamin Franklin Junior High School

Teaneck Senior High School

Northwestern University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Dennis

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

KIM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Learn How To Say 'I Can.'

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/29/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Management consultant and author Dennis Paul Kimbro (1950 - ) wrote the popular books, 'Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice' and 'What Keeps Me Standing: A Black Grandmother’s Guide to Peace, Hope & Inspiration'. He was highly sought after as a public speaker and management consultant.

Employment

Clark Atlanta University

Texas Instruments

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dennis Paul Kimbro's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his father's experience in World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes Kearny, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls Columbia Elementary School in East Orange, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls those who influenced him to pursue education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon the education of the African American community

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers the assassinations of civil rights figures

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes New Jersey's Teaneck High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls New Jersey's race relations in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his decision to attend the University of Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the process of writing his first book

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers pledging Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his studiousness

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his parents' thoughts on him attending college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his interview with Johnnetta B. Cole

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 4

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 5

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers a lesson from William Clement Stone

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the publication of 'What Makes the Great Great'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers how he struggled financially in the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his book 'Daily Motivations for African-American Success'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the impact of 'What Makes the Great Great'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the inspiration for 'What Keeps Me Standing'

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes 'What Keeps Me Standing,' pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes 'What Keeps Me Standing,' pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls Janey Coverdale's letter on forgiveness

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his decision to become a professor

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his future projects

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon the success of Barbara L. Thomas

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon his life

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

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DATitle
Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the process of writing his first book
Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the inspiration for 'What Keeps Me Standing'
Transcript
And then, right when I finished in 1972, I graduated in 1972, my first job, I worked for Texas Instruments [Texas Instruments Incorporated] in Dallas, Texas, okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Doing what?$$I was a front line supervisor. Back then, they were just starting to manufacture Texas Instruments, the silicon chips, okay. That was used for the TI [Texas Instruments] calculator. Remember the two calculators that they had, one was the financial calculator and the other one was--there was a financial and scientific calculator and the other one was a regular calculator. I can't gloss over this--got married my senior year in college. Yup. Me and my wife got married by a justice of the peace. We were both seniors at the University of Oklahoma [Norman, Oklahoma], got married and went back to class after we got married (laughter), had our first child, okay--$$While you were still in school?$$Yeah, um-hm, and got married. Several months later my first daughter was born, went to Dallas, Texas, worked for Texas Instruments, worked there for one year, but I knew that I wanted to go to grad school.$$Did you know what you wanted to do?$$Yes. Back then I was still studying wealth and poverty, okay? And I went to grad school. I got a free ride from Northwestern [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois]. They had a program in political science, of all things, and I took it because it was a free ride, okay? Because I don't know what I actually want to do. I want to do international business and this, that, and the other, so I took it and they had a three-year program, and it was a free ride, but I was looking at wealth and poverty among under-developed countries, okay? And, all that time, the three years that I was at Northwestern, I just started collecting data and I started looking at why is one country, you know, impoverished while another one is wealthy. What are the linkages, what are the mindsets, what are the institutions that these wealthy countries, you know, particularly in sub-Sahara [Sub-Saharan Africa] and Africa, what do they produce? How are they galvanized, you know, how are they pulled together? Who organizes them? Well, by the time I got to my third year and I defended my dissertation, I didn't want to study countries. I still wanted to ask that question about wealth and poverty. I didn't want to study countries. I wanted to study individuals, and I didn't want to study anything about Africa. I wanted to study African Americans here in the United States, and so, I did a 180. I started looking at the wealthy African Americans here in the United States, and I started collecting data, you know, because there weren't any books, and no one had published anything on these individuals. Again, at the time it was get a job, work on a job, work for the government, that type of whole mindset, and I was, there were only a few people that were creating wealth, and I was collecting data on them, and so I had all this data, all this research that I conducted, and I turned to my wife and I said, "Pat [Patricia McCauley Kimbro]," I said, "I think there's a book here and I'm not sure, but I think that maybe I could write a book off of everything that I learned on the surface, you know, circuitous with these individuals, but I won't know," and she said, "Well, when will you know if you have a book or not?" And I said, "Well, you gotta conduct face-to-face interviews," and she said, "How do you do that?" And I said, "Well, maybe I'll apply for a grant or somebody will blah-blah-blah," and she says, and it was really my wife's idea, she said, "Don't wait for a grant. Go ahead and do it now." I said, "Well, you don't understand. I mean, you gotta fly to these locations, you have to stay in a hotel, and we don't have money for that." She said, "Well just get started. Maybe some people around here, you can drive to with this, that and everything, and somehow, some way, the money will come." Well, that's one year ordeal. I thought I could finish this book in eighteen months, Shawn [Shawn Wilson]. That book took seven years of my life. It took me longer to write what became 'Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice,' [Dennis Kimbro and Napoleon Hill] than to finish my Ph.D., and the money never came (laughter) but I just went around the country interviewing successful African Americans. I had a list of fifty individuals. What did I know? I said these are the fifty that I've got to interview and you can go back to this particular time. We're going back to late '70s [1970s], early '80s [1980s], and you can imagine who were the fifty, you know, John Johnson [HistoryMaker John H. Johnson] of Ebony magazine, Don King, the fight promoter, Wally [Wally Amos], Famous Amos chocolate chip cookies, you know, those type of individuals--Ernesta Procope [HistoryMaker Ernesta G. Procope], she was the only black woman on Wall Street, E.G. Bowman investment company [E.G. Bowman Company, Inc., New York, New York]. So, those were, Ral--those were the individuals that I was going to meet and interview.$So, by the time that the third book, 'What Makes the Great Great' ['What Makes the Great Great: Strategies for Extraordinary Achievement,' Dennis P. Kimbro], has come out, you've become a motivational speaker and you're speaking (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And I never see it in myself. I don't even claim being a motivational--people may, you know, they may hear me, you know, and they might say, man, your words are inspiring. Your words motivate me. But I'm just a college professor. I've never said that I was a motivational speaker. I mean, you may capture me and you may pigeonhole me into that, and I have no problems with that, okay, but I teach. That's what I do for a living. People come up to me all the time, Shawn [Shawn Wilson], "Man Dr. Kimbro [HistoryMaker Dennis Paul Kimbro], I wanna do exactly you want to do." I said, "You--you're a teacher?" "No, I don't teach." "Oh, you're a writer?" "No, I don't wanna write." "You're a college professor?" "No, I don't wanna--." "What is it that I do that you wanna do?" "Man, I wanna be a motivational speaker." I said, "Okay, go do it," (laughter).$$So, the reason I say that is because out of you travelling country, the book, the standing--what's the title?$$'What Keeps Me Standing' ['What Keeps Me Standing: Letters from Black Grandmothers on Peace, Hope and Inspiration,' Dennis Kimbro].$$'What Keeps Me Standing' comes about--$$Yup.$$And it's just a great idea for a book.$$And that was the idea of my youngest daughter. Again, you gotta rewind the videotape and go back to this time period where Bill Clinton [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] is running for reelection against Bob Dole, okay, and I was about to go on another wing of the tour for 'What Makes the Great Great,' and I knew that I was gonna be gone for several days, blah-blah-blah, and this, that and everything, so my wife [Patricia McCauley Kimbro] said, "Well, takes a mini-vacation. Let's get all the girls together." I had one in college, one was about to go in college, and I had my youngest daughter, who was about to go into high school and the girls always loved going up to North Carolina, this, that and the everything, so no one wanted to fly. They wanted to drive and this, that and everything, so we're driving, I've got the three girls in the back, my wife is reading USA Today, and I'm driving, and when she gets through reading it, she just throws it in the back to the girls, and my youngest daughter, MacKenzie [MacKenzie Kimbro], she gets a hold of it and right there on the first page, it's about the impending, upcoming presidential election, and while I'm driving she says to me, she says, "Dad, who you gonna vote for?" And I said, "MacKenzie, that's a good question. I don't know. You tell me, who should I vote for?" And she said, "Well, if I could vote, I know exactly who I'd vote for." I said, "Who would you vote for?" She said, "I'd vote for Grandma Mary [Mary Anderson Kimbro] for president and Grandma Ruby [Ruby McCauley] for vice president." I was driving and I said, "And why would you want to do that?" She said, "Because Dad, man, they know everything, man. Grandma Mary helps me with this, Granma Ruby helps me with that," and these are two black women. If you put their entire education together, you still wouldn't get a high school diploma, but in the mind and in the eyes of a young child, they know everything. So I just thought about that and even when I'm on tour and signing books at 'What Makes the Great Great,' and blah-blah, and it just stayed in my mind, days turned to weeks, weeks turned to months, I guess about six months later, this thing just wouldn't let me go, so I turned to my wife and I said, "Pat, you know, I'm thinking about this grandmother book and even if I were to write this book, even if I were to write this book, I can't go around the country interviewing all these folks. It would take me forever. How would I get this information?" And my wife says, completely passe, completely off the cuff, in passing, she says, "That's easy." I said, "What do you mean, easy?" "Tell them to write you a letter." And I said, "What do you mean?" "Tell them to write you a letter." I said, "Who, in this day and age, will write a letter, in this day of emailing, faxes, phone call, call waiting, (laughter) voicemails?" I said, "No one takes the time to write a letter." She said, "Yeah, they'll write you a letter." So, whenever I gave a presentation, if I thought the audience would lend itself, the audience was apropos to that type of setting, people would ask me all the time, "What book are you working on now?" And I would share that with them and I would say, "By the way, if there are any black grandmothers in the audience who would love to write a letter, blah-blah-blah." And I, did I received letters over a five-year period. Oh, my God, did they respond. Over a five-year period I received letters from every type of black grandmother under the sun. I received letters from black grandmothers, Ph.D.s from Harvard [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts], high school dropouts, doctors and lawyers, third grade education, grandmothers whose children and grandchildren are thriving and surviving, to one grandmother, her name is Flora Kelly, she lives is Waterloo, Iowa, in Waterloo, Iowa. She has seven children. The day that she wrote my letter, five were incarcerated in prison. She told me, she told me right there in the letter, that she would go down to the correctional facility and she would see her sons, but she just got to the point in life where she just hated to see her sons caged up like animals, and she would write 'em letters. She sent me one of the letters that she would write to her sons. I received three letters from white women, white grandmothers raising black children (laughter). Every type of letter out there.

Nan Arrington Peete

An Episcopalian priest, the Reverend Canon Nan Arrington Peete was born on August 19, 1938, in Chicago, Illinois. She graduated from the University of Chicago Laboratory School in 1955. Her parents, Phoebe and Maurice Arrington, worked as a teacher and civil engineer, respectively. Her father lived mostly in Michigan where his work projects were located, but he traveled to Chicago every week to be with the family. After high school, Peete married and had two children, Richard and Valerie, and her family relocated to Los Angeles. She earned her B.A. degree in economics from Occidental College in Los Angeles in 1975, her M.A. degree in human resource management from the University of Redlands in Redlands, California in 1978, and her M.Div.degree from the General Theological Seminary in New York City in 1984.

Prior to entering the seminary, Peete was a management consultant with Coopers and Lybrand Accounting Firm, where she was an expert in organizational management and financial analysis. After her ordination in 1984, Peete was the curate at St. Mark's Church in Upland, California, and in 1985 became rector of All Saints Church in Indianapolis. Working with the Indianapolis Episcopal Metro Council, she involved the parish in housing the homeless in the nave of the church, which eventually led to the development of the Dayspring family shelter ministry. From 1989 to 1994, Peete served in the Diocese of Atlanta as Canon to the Ordinary. In this assignment, she was responsible for the ordination process of priests, the Training-in-Ministry program, and the deployment of clergy for congregations seeking clergy.

In 1988, Peete was invited by the Archbishop of Canterbury to be a consultant for the Lambeth Conference, a conference of Bishops representing Dioceses around the world. She was the first ordained woman to address this body, which meets every ten years in Canterbury, England. She faced opposition but also received tremendous support as she made her case in the speech she gave. The speech was well received, and resulted in an international policy change and the ordination of many women priests and the subsequent ordination of women as Bishops of the Episcopal Church. She was also a speaker at the pre-Lambeth meeting of the Afro-Anglican Bishops, held in Cambridge, England. She has been invited to speak and preach at a number of international and national meetings, conventions and assemblies.

From 1994 to 1999, Peete served on the staff at Trinity Church Wall Street as the associate for Pastoral and Outreach ministries, and as the Canon for Ministry in the Diocese of Southern Ohio from 1999 to 2003. She became Canon for Deployment and Ordination for the Diocese of Washington in March 2003.

Peete represents the Episcopal Church on the National Ministries Unit of the National Council of Churches in Christ (NCCC), and on the Inclusiveness and Justice Standing Committee of the NCCC. She was one of the keynote speakers at the 1995 Afro-Anglican conference in Cape Town, South Africa. She also participated in the first Afro-Anglican conference in Barbados in 1985. She serves on many church-related boards and commissions.

Accession Number

A2004.017

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/5/2004

Last Name

Peete

Maker Category
Middle Name

Arrington

Organizations
Schools

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Occidental College

General Thelogical Seminary

University of Redlands

Seabury-Western Theological Seminary

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Nan

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

PEE04

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

No preference

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Summer

Speaker Bureau Notes

Availability Specifics: Evenings, weekends, days by appointment

Preferred Audience: No preference

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Idlewild, Michigan

Favorite Quote

To God Be The Glory.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/19/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Oysters

Short Description

Management consultant and minister Nan Arrington Peete (1938 - ) was the first ordained woman to address the Lambeth Conference in Canterbury, England. She represented the Episcopal Church on the National Ministries Unit of the National Council of Churches in Christ (NCCC) and on the Inclusiveness and Justice Standing Committee of the NCCC.

Employment

Coopers & Lybrand

St. Mark's Church

All Saints Church

Diocese of Atlanta

Trinity Church

Diocese of Southern Ohio

Diocese of Washington, D.C.

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nan Arrington Peete's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nan Arrington Peete lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her mother's career, her family history and how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about her mother's childhood in Idlewild, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her mother's experiences in Chicago, Illinois in the early 1900s as an activist

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nan Arrington Peete describes the occupations of her extended family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her father's family history and her father's engineering degree

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nan Arrington Peete tells stories about her family in the Civil War era

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her father's personality and how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Nan Arrington Peete speculates on her family heritage

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her family and their political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about her earliest memories of her grandmother, Olive Bird Clanton

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nan Arrington Peete describes fond childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her siblings and her childhood home and community in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nan Arrington Peete describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up as well as the Thanksgiving holiday

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her attendance at the University of Chicago Laboratory School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her church and friends

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her graduation from Occidental College in Los Angeles, California and the University of Redlands in Redlands, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Chicago, Illinois, the Democratic Convention in 1968 and the Chicago Seven

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about Chicago, Illinois during the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about her church in California and her decision to enroll in seminary school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nan Arrington Peete describes her experience in seminary

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nan Arrington Peete talks her ordination and the Lambeth Conference of Bishops in Canterbury, England in 1988

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about speaking at the Lambeth Conference of Bishops in 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Nan Arrington Peete reflects on her speech at the Lambeth Conference of Bishops in Canterbury, England in 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nan Arrington Peete describes the Lambeth Conference of Bishops in Canterbury, England in 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nan Arrington Peete describes the Anglican Church

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nan Arrington Peete reflects upon her memorable life experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nan Arrington Peete explains her current position as Canon for Deployment and Ordination

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nan Arrington Peete explains her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about her aspirations and how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nan Arrington Peete talks about the importance of history and reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nan Arrington Peete narrates her photographs

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nan Arrington Peete narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Nan Arrington Peete describes her mother's experiences in Chicago, Illinois in the early 1900s as an activist
Nan Arrington Peete talks about speaking at the Lambeth Conference of Bishops in 1988
Transcript
That's wonderful, did she [Phoebe Nan Clanton Arrington] tell you any stories about Chicago [Illinois] and what things were like there growing up?$$Yes, because we lived there all the time. She talked about going to Hyde Park, being one of the few black students there and who her friends were and how she knew Ida B. Wells, and they'd come over to the family and my--she talked about being an activist but that was the word she used, but she was really involved in making life better, so my grandmother [Olive Bird Clanton], they did a lot of community involvement, they were always involved in the church, needless to say, because her father had been a minister and family was very important so--.$$Now, what years are we talking about when she was at Hyde Park High School?$$She went to Hyde Park High School [Chicago, Illinois] like in the 1915, 1916, I think she graduated in 1918.$$And when she spoke of being an activist or whatever that meant, an advocate, what causes do you suppose she was involved with? What issues?$$She was involved with children, with--that's why she went into teaching, she cared deeply about the children in the neighborhood, she cared deeply about people who were at that time on relief and who didn't have enough food, so she would provide food for people in our neighborhood, and clothes, you know, she'd give a lot of the clothes that we had out grown, not that we'd worn out, but just that we had out grown, to people who didn't have them. Very much concerned about the well-being of others and I think that also came from my grandmother [Olive Bird Clanton] 'cause I can remember my grandmother telling me that we've been given much, therefore much is expected from us. And my aunts, they'd all gone to college and, you know, so they knew all the leading people who were educators and so, even artist like Tanner [Henry Ossawa Tanner], my aunt [Aunt Johnetta (ph.) Grand (ph.)] who was a musician, you know, talked about when he came to Chicago and, I think now, I paid no attention to it back then, now I rem--wish I remembered even more the stories and the people they talked about and when, you know, their encounters with W.E.B. Du Bois and the people who started the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] and they were very active (laughter). You know, I think about this, now I see where I get some of my involvement in activity, 'cause it was part of our family.$Just a moment, but how did you get this ending? Is this where you say, the power of prayer came to--$$Oh, my goodness yes. I mean I had to--$$--Talk about that.$$--I rewrote, I wrote it out again and then the ending came to me, I don't know why, because it was on the feast of Mary Magdalene and Mary Magdalene in scriptures is the one that says, I have seen the Lord, she is the person that Jesus appears to in the garden after the resurrection and he tells her to go tell the disciples and she says, I have seen the Lord and that was the day that this was gonna be on so, I ended it with that and then the last line is from Hebrews, it's by the order of Melchizedek, I am a priest forever. And, it came, how you know, that was, to me the work of the Spirit, the whole thing was the work of the Spirit. The day of the presentation was a Friday, I was a nervous wreck, I couldn't eat, so I went to lunch and Bishop Walker who was the Bishop of Washington at that time, was a wonderful man, I was at the din--I came up to the dining room and said where's Nan, where's Nan? And I'm right there and he said, I feel like the father of the bride, I am so excited, because I had given the presiding bishop a copy of my speech and he'd shared it with a couple of the other bishops and they all just thought it was wonderful and so I went to my room to get dressed, no one, the campus is deserted, my sister [Edna Marissa Arrington Brown] comes, how my sister got into my room, (laughter) because it was secured and I said let me read this to you 'cause I don't want you to cry and so I read it to her and she thought it was fine and that's what I, that was my main critic, I wanted her to see if worked for her and she went, because the visitors had a visitors gallery where they sat. So I walk across the campus, no one is around, so I said well maybe they've cancelled it, and when I get up to where the auditorium where it's going to be held, I start hearing clicks, clicks, clicks, It felt like the paparazzi, there must have been a hundred cameras there taking my picture as I walked up and they, I went in and I said well I wanna go see Barbara Harris and they said, we'll bring her inside and I went in, a friend of mine gave me a yellow rose, she said this was on the altar at Canterbury Cathedral [England] that we prayed for you at noon today, so I took that with me and I went in this auditorium and it was jam packed with people, there were bishops, there were bishops wives, there were press, there were consultants of all the staff.