The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Johnnetta Betsch Cole

College president, museum director and civic leader Johnnetta Betsch Cole was born on October 19, 1936 in Jacksonville, Florida to John Thomas and Mary Frances Lewis Betsch. She was admitted to Fisk University at the age of fifteen, and later transferred to Oberlin College where she received her B.A. degree in sociology in 1957. Cole earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from Northwestern University in 1959 and 1967.

In 1970, Cole accepted a faculty position at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she served as a professor of anthropology and Afro-American studies. In 1982, Cole joined the faculty at Hunter College and served as the director of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program at the CUNY Graduate Center. She was named the first black woman president of Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia in 1987. During her tenure as president, she led a campaign that raised over $113 million dollars, attracted higher student enrollment, and improved Spelman’s overall ranking. In 1992, Cole served on President Bill Clinton’s transition team as cluster coordinator for education, labor, and the arts. After leaving Spelman in 1997, Cole joined Emory University as a Presidential Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Women Studies and African American studies. From 2002 to 2007, she served as the president of Bennett College. There, she led a $50 million campaign, raised funds for an on-campus art museum, and initiated the women’s studies and global studies programs. In 2009, she was named director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in Washington D.C.

Cole authored and edited numerous books including All American Women: Lines That Divide,Ties That Bind (ed.) in 1986, Anthropology for the Ninties (ed.) in 1988, Conversations: Straight Talk with America’s Sister President in 1994, Gender Talk – the Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American’s Communities in 2003, edited with Beverly Guy-Sheftall,Who Should Be First? Feminist Speak Out On The 2008 Presidential Campaign, edited with Beverly Guy-Sheftall in 2010, and Diversity, Equity, Accessibility, and Inclusion in Museums, edited with Laura L. Lott in 2019.

Cole has served on the boards of Coca Cola Enterprises, Merck & Co., Home Depot, the Rockefeller Foundation, and United Way of America. She also served as chair of the Johnnetta B. Cole Global Diversity and Inclusion Institute at Bennett College, and she served as the President of the Association of Art Museum Directors. She is currently the chair and president of the National Council of Negro Women.

She has received numerous awards, including the 1988 Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the 2013 Alston-Jones International Civil and Human Rights Award, the Reginald Wilson Diversity Leadership Award from the American Council on Education, and the BET Honors Award for Education in 2015. Cole has been awarded sixty-nine honorary degrees and is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society.

Cole is married to James D. Staton, Jr. She has three sons, one step-son and three grandchildren.

Johnnetta Betsch Cole was interviewed by TheHistoryMakers on February 11, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.016

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/11/2019

Last Name

Cole

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Betsch

Schools

Fisk University

Oberlin College

Northwestern University

Boylan-Haven School

First Name

Johnnetta

Birth City, State, Country

Jacksonville

HM ID

COL37

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

American Beach On Amelia Island

Favorite Quote

When Women Lead, Streams Run Uphill

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

10/19/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Seafood, Peanut Butter

Short Description

College president, museum director and civic leader Johnnetta Betsch Cole (1936 - ) became the first African American female president of Spelman College in 1987 before being named director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in 2009.

Employment

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Hunter College

Spelman College

Emory University

Bennett College

National Museum of African Art

Washington State University

Bill Clinton Administration

Favorite Color

Red and Black

John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was born on August 16, 1957 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Genester Millicent Nix and John Silvanus Wilson, Sr. He received his B.A. degree in business administration and management from Morehouse College in 1979. In 1981, Wilson earned his M.T.S. degree from Harvard Divinity School. He then attended the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he earned his Ed.M. degree in education in 1982, and his Ed.D. degree in education in 1985.

Wilson began his career in 1985 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he served as an associate in the analytical studies and planning group in the office of the president. In that role, he conducted research for a report on the experiences of African American students at MIT. He then shifted to financial management and fundraising, serving first in corporate development and, ultimately, as director of foundation relations by 1994. He was an officer in two major capital campaigns at MIT, with goals of $700 million and $2 billion. In 2001, he moved from MIT to The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. During his eight-year career there, Wilson served as senior assistant vice president from September to December 2001, executive dean of the Virginia campus from 2002 to 2006, and associate professor at the Graduate School of Education and Human Development from 2007 to 2009. He was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in 2009, where he remained until 2013. From January 2013 to April 2017, Wilson served as the eleventh president of Morehouse College. He moved to Harvard University as a president in residence at the School of Education, where he began research for a book about the future of American higher education, with an emphasis on HBCUs. In April 2018, Wilson was appointed as senior advisor and strategist to the president of Harvard University.

Wilson has served on multiple boards, including Spelman College and Harvard University. He has received various awards for his work in higher education, including the 1998 Bennie Leadership Award presented by Morehouse College, Ebony magazine’s Power 100 Award in 2014, and the Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 100 Most Influential Atlantans Award in 2015.

Wilson and his wife, Carol Espy-Wilson, have three adult children: twin daughters, Ayana and Ashia, and son, John Silvanus Wilson, III.

John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 27, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.096

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/27/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Silvanus

Schools

Morehouse College

Harvard Divinity School

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

WIL93

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Perspective Is Worth A Hundred Points of IQ and Signal To Noise Ratio Is Everything

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/16/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Mushroom Risotto

Short Description

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. (1957- ) was an academic administrator for twenty eight years before becoming the eleventh president of Morehouse College.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The George Washington University

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Morehouse College

Harvard University School of Education

Harvard University

Kellogg National Fellowship Program

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Program

Educational Testing Service

Rockefeller Foundation

Favorite Color

Black

David Wilson

College president and academic administrator David Wilson was born on November 2, 1954 in McKinley, Alabama to Minnie and Henry Wilson. He graduated from Marengo County Training School in Thomaston, Alabama and went on to attend the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama where he received his B.S. degree and M.Ed. degree in 1977 and 1979. He later received another M.Ed. degree and his Ed.D. degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1984 and 1987.

In 1984, Wilson served as director of the Office of Minority Programs and as a program officer at the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey. He then became a Woodrow Wilson Foundation Administrative Fellow, serving as an executive assistant to the vice president for business affairs and finance at Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky. After graduate school, Wilson became associate provost at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and was later promoted to assistant provost in 1990. In 1995, Wilson became the first African American vice president for university outreach and associate provost at Auburn University. He was also the first African American to hold a senior administrative appointment at a predominantly white university in the State of Alabama. In 2006, Wilson was hired as the chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges, as the first person in Wisconsin to serve as chancellor of two statewide institutions simultaneously. In 2010, Wilson was appointed the tenth president of Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland. In 2013, Wilson helped launch Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication. He also oversaw the completion of the University’s Earl G. Graves School of Business and Management Building in 2016. In 2018, Wilson announced Morgan State University’s collaboration with The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In 2010, President Barack Obama appointed Wilson to serve on the President’s Board of Advisors on HBCUs. Wilson also served on the Hall of Records Commission, the Maryland Longitudinal Data System Center Governing Board, Greater Baltimore Committee, United Way of Central Maryland, Inc., the Northeast Maryland Higher Education Advisory Board, the Student Transfer Advisory Committee, the Association of American Colleges and Universities; and, in 2018, Wilson was elected to the board of directors for the Lumina Foundation.

Wilson is the recipient of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation National Fellowship and was named one of the nation’s top 100 leaders in higher education by the American Association of Higher Education in 1998. In 2010, the reading room at UW Center for Civic Engagement at UW-Marathon County was named in his honor. He was also selected as one of The Daily Record newspaper’s Influential Marylanders and was honored by the University of Alabama with an award for outstanding leadership in engaged scholarship in 2011. In 2018, Wilson received the First Citizen Award by the Maryland Senate.

Wilson has one son, Nyere.

David Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/18/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Tuskegee University

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Uniontown Negro Elementary School

Amelia L. Johnson High School

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

McKinley

HM ID

WIL89

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Any Beach

Favorite Quote

In the Vernacular

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

11/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

College president and academic administrator David Wilson (1954 - ) was chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Extension and the University of Wisconsin Colleges, before serving as the tenth president of Morgan State University.

Employment

Kentucky State University

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Auburn University

University of Wisconsin-Extension

Morgan State University

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation

Rutgers University

Favorite Color

Blue

Thomas A. Parham

College president and academic administrator Thomas A. Parham was born on October 2, 1954 in Queens, New York to William and Sadie Parham. In 1970, he graduated from Daniel Murphy High School, in Los Angeles, California. He went on to earn his B.A. degree in social ecology in 1977 from University of California Irvine, and his M.A. degree in counseling psychology in 1978 from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1982, Parham received his Ph.D. degree in counseling psychology from Southern Illinois University, in Carbondale, Illinois.

Parham served as assistant professor at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, from 1982 to 1985. He joined the faculty at the University of California Irvine in 1985 and held several positions over thirty-three years including: assistant vice chancellor for counseling and health services, counseling center director, career and life planning center director, and vice chancellor for student affairs. In 1986, he was appointed to the City of Irvine’s Human Relations Committee, and helped draft the city’s first human rights ordinance, which was passed by the city council. He also served as chair of UCI’s Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium for ten years. Parham was appointed the eleventh president of California State University Dominguez Hills in 2018.

Parham has served as a licensed psychologist for more than thirty-five years as a scholar and practitioner, with a research focus in the area of psychological negrescence, African psychology, and multicultural counseling. In addition to writing over forty-five journal articles and/or book chapters, he authored Psychological Storms: The African American Struggle for Identity in 1997 and Counseling Persons of African Descent: Raising the Bar of Practitioner Competence in 2002. He co-authored Culturally Adaptive Counseling Skills: Demonstrations of Evidence-Based Practices in 2011 and The Psychology of Blacks: Centering Our Perspectives in the African Consciousness in 2011.

Parham, an alumnus of the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program, has fellow status in divisions seventeen and forty-five of the APA and also with the American Counseling Association. He has held the title of distinguished psychologist in the Association of Black Psychologists. Parham served as president of the National Association of Black Psychologists and the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (an ACA division). He served on the editorial board for the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development for five years, completed a term on the editorial board of the Journal of Counseling and Development, and served as an ad hoc reviewer for the Journal of Black Psychology. Parham has also served as a treating clinician for the NFL substance abuse program.

He was the recipient of the 2018 Illustrious Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program.

Thomas A. Parham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 14, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/14/2018

Last Name

Parham

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Organizations
First Name

Thomas

Birth City, State, Country

St. Albans, Queens

HM ID

PAR13

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Life at it's Best is a Creative Synthesis

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/2/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

College president and academic administrator Thomas A. Parham (1954- ) served as vice chancellor at University of California, Irvine, before serving as president of California State University, Dominguez Hills.

Favorite Color

Blue

J. Keith Motley

College president and academic administrator J. Keith Motley was born on January 28, 1956 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to John Jr. and Cornelia Motley. He attended James E. Rogers Elementary School and graduated in 1972 from Peabody High School in Pittsburgh. In 1972, Motley was recruited to play Division 1 basketball at Northeastern University in Boston. Motley received his B.S. degree in education, speech pathology and audiology in 1978 and his M.Ed. degree in higher education administration in 1981, both from Northeastern University. He went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in education administration from Boston College in 1999.

Upon graduating college, Motley was hired as an admissions counselor at Northeastern, and also as a part-time assistant coach for the university’s basketball team. In 1980, he served as an intern in the Office of Senior Vice President for University Administration. He also became assistant dean of minority affairs in 1982. In 1987, Motley served as associate dean and director for the John D. O’Bryant African American Institute and served as associate head basketball coach where he helped to lead the Northeastern Huskies to seven appearances in the NCAA Tournament. In 1989, Motley served as founder and director for Concerned Black Men of Massachusetts, Inc.’s Paul Robeson Institute for Positive Self Development, providing educational, emotional and personal support to young Black males and their families. In 1993, Motley was named Northeastern University dean of student services; and, in 1996, Motley helped to establish the Roxbury Preparatory Charter School. In 2003, Motley joined the University of Massachusetts at Boston as vice chancellor for student affairs. He was named interim chancellor for the university in 2004, and served as vice president for business and public affairs. In 2006, Motley’s role expanded to vice president for business marketing and public affairs. From 2007 to 2017, Motley served as chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Motley was inducted into the Northeastern University Hall of Fame in 1999. He was named one of the Power 50 Most Influential Bostonians by Business Journal for five consecutive years, from 2012 to 2016. He received the Harvard Club of Boston’s Friends of Education Award in 2014, the John D. O’Bryant African American Institute’s Vision Award in 2015, the Boston NAACP’s W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Service Award in 2016, and Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Engagement in 2017. In 2018, the Northeastern University established the Dr. J. Keith Motley Chair to Head New Sports Leadership and Administration Program in his honor.

Motley and his wife Angela are the parents of three adult children: Keith, Kayla and Jordan.

J. Keith Motley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 18, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.219

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/18/2018

Last Name

Motley

Maker Category
Middle Name

Keith

Organizations
First Name

J.

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

MOT01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribbean

Favorite Quote

It's a small thing to a giant.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

1/28/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bosonton

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

College president and academic Administrator J. Keith Motley (1956- ) was the eighth chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Boston, where he served from 2007 to 2017.

Favorite Color

Blue

Jerry Sue Thornton

College president Jerry Sue Thornton was born on January 16, 1947 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, to Clarence and Dorothy Pritchett. She attended the J. W. Million Elementary School, and graduated from Earlington High School. Thornton received her B.A. degree in English and speech from Murray State College in 1969, and her M.A. degree in communications from Murray State University in 1970. She attended Northern Illinois University, and earned her Ph.D. degree in educational administration at The University of Texas at Austin in 1983. She attended Harvard University’s Institute for the Management of Lifelong Education in 1988.

Thornton taught at Earlington Junior High School, in Earlington, Kentucky in 1969; and at Murray High School, in Murray, Kentucky in 1970. The following year, she moved to River Grove, Illinois where she became an English faculty member at Triton College. She was promoted to assistant dean of arts and sciences at Triton College in 1978. In 1985, she became president of Lakewood Community College (now Century College) in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Thornton moved to Cleveland, Ohio to serve as the first female president of Cuyahoga Community College in 1992. During her tenure, she led $300 million worth of renovation and construction projects, also increasing the college’s foundation from $1.3 million to $40 million. In June 2013, Thornton retired as president of Cuyahoga Community College and became president of Dream Catcher Education Consulting.

Thornton’s board service included membership on the board of Applied Industrial Technologies, Inc., National City Bank, Bridgestreet Worldwide, Inc., Republic Powdered Metals, Inc., American Family Insurance, FirstEnergy Corporation, Office Max, Barnes and Noble Education, Inc., and Parkwood Corporation; in addition to serving as co-chair of the 21st Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges, on the board of visitors of the Marine Corps University, and on the Community College Advisory Board of Dynamic Campus, among others. Thornton’s numerous awards and honors include four honorary doctorates from the College of St. Catherine, Youngstown State University, Baldwin Wallace University, and Cleveland State University. She was inducted into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame, and was awarded the American Council on Education Fellows’ Mentor of the Year Award, the 2014 American Association of Community Colleges’ Community College Leadership Award, the Diverse Champions Award by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 2014 Community Service Award for Outstanding Achievement. In 2013, Thornton was named one of the “Top 25 Women in Higher Education” by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education. In 2018, she received the City of Cleveland’s Heritage Award; and the Del deWendt Award from the First Tee of Cleveland.

Jerry Sue Thornton and her husband, Walter, live in Moreland Hills, Ohio. She has two step-daughters: Kathy and Karen and four grandchildren: Sam, Jack, Alex and Kathryn.

Jerry Sue Thornton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 27, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.197

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/27/2018

Last Name

Thornton

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Jerry Sue

HM ID

THO29

Favorite Season

Fall

Favorite Vacation Destination

Pueblo Vallarta, Mexico

Favorite Quote

There’s No Elevator To The Top, It’s One Step At A Time.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

1/16/1947

Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Favorite Food

Meatloaf

Short Description

College president Jerry Sue Thornton (1949- ) served as president of Lakewood Community College and Cuyahoga Community College.

Favorite Color

Green

Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick

Physician and college president Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick was born on June 17, 1971, in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. After graduating from high school at the age of fourteen, he took pre-college courses at St. Mary’s College in Port of Spain. Frederick enrolled in Howard University in 1988, at the age of sixteen. In 1994, he earned his dual B.S. degree and M.D. degree from Howard University and went on to complete his residency in general surgery at Howard University Hospital.

In 2000, Frederick was appointed as a clinical instructor in surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine in the Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston, Texas. He fulfilled his post-doctoral research and surgical oncological fellowships at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston in 2003. That same year, Frederick was named an assistant professor in the department of surgery of the University of Connecticut Health Center, where he became director of surgical oncology and associate director of the Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2005. In 2006, he returned to Howard University as the associate professor in the department of surgery at Howard University Hospital. In 2012, he was named provost of Howard University and became president of Howard University in 2014.

Frederick has authored numerous research publications and editorials, as well as served as a member of a number of professional and scientific societies. These organizations include the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the National Medical Association. He has also been a member of the Society of Black Academic Surgeons, the Society of Surgical Oncology, and served as president of the board of the Texas Gulf Sickle Cell Association from 2002 to 2003.

Frederick’s work has won multiple awards and honors, including recognition from the U.S. Congress for his contributions in addressing health disparities among African Americans and historically underrepresented groups in 2014. He was named by the Washington Post as a “Super Doctor” in 2011, was in Ebony Magazine’s 2010 ‘Power 100’ list, and was on Black Enterprise Magazine’s list of America’s Best Physicians.

Wayne A.I. Frederick was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 30, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.012

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/30/2017

Last Name

Frederick

Middle Name

A. I.

Organizations
Schools

Diego Martin Government Primary School

St. Mary's College

Howard University College of Medicine

Howard University School of Business

Howard University

First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

Port of Spain

HM ID

FRE09

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Montego Bay, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Man's Greatest Imperfection Is His Passive Acceptance Of His Imperfection.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/17/1971

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

Trinidad & Tobago

Favorite Food

Doubles

Short Description

Physician and college president Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick (1971 - ) served as the provost of Howard University from 2012 to 2014, and then became Howard University’s seventeenth president.

Employment

Howard University Hospital

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

University of Connecticut Health Center

Howard University Cancer Center

Howard University College of Medicine

Howard University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:19240,325:20010,343:23790,421:34962,561:39330,680:43308,758:44790,786:60418,991:70150,1128$0,0:1309,25:1848,37:4158,76:4620,84:10241,204:10549,209:11319,226:14168,307:20880,342:21370,351:29280,518:29910,529:35860,774:36840,792:38380,816:39080,827:39780,873:45063,890:46557,916:46889,921:47553,942:50707,1017:51620,1033:54110,1098:62400,1180:66458,1218:67472,1237:68486,1252:68798,1257:69188,1264:70592,1352:74868,1406:76056,1446:78460,1464:79540,1485:82708,1552:83068,1559:86308,1698:87028,1780:101303,1955:118805,2308:121560,2342:122820,2363:123360,2370:123990,2379:125700,2417:131184,2472:131688,2477:133720,2482:134440,2495:143142,2654:144000,2728:144312,2737:145014,2752:147822,2804:148134,2809:151020,2863:151332,2868:152112,2882:152424,2887:175450,3233:176844,3252:177500,3263:177828,3268:185526,3366:186056,3373:187646,3406:188070,3411:193705,3448:194130,3454:196340,3487:196680,3492:197530,3531:198465,3543:198805,3567:200250,3581:200590,3586:203990,3639:208485,3664:210310,3698:212062,3724:212865,3737:213303,3744:219999,3858:226380,3928
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his mother's community in Trinidad

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his father's death

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about sickle cell anemia

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes the research on sickle cell anemia

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his diagnosis with sickle cell anemia

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his treatment for sickle cell anemia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about the culture of Trinidad

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick remembers his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his love of reading

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his interest in soccer

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his musical interests

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about Eric Williams

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about the history of St. Mary's College in Port of Spain, Trinidad

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his education at St. Mary's College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick remembers applying to Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick remembers moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his first impressions of Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his influences at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls entering the Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his assimilation to the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his assimilation to the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about Dr. LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick remembers Clive Callender

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick recalls Dr. LaSalle DLeffall, Jr.'s position in the American College of Surgeons

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick recalls his focus during medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick recalls his fellowship at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes the impact of his sickle cell anemia on his career

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick talks about working as a surgeon and university president

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes the challenges of surgery

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his experiences at University of Connecticut Health Center

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his decision to return to Howard University Hospital

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his role as deputy director of the Howard University Cancer Center

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about the future of cancer treatment

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about the influence of positive thinking on recovery

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his administrative duties at Howard University Hospital

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls obtaining an M.B.A. degree

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about the culture of Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes the administrative challenges at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick talks about his challenges as president of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls his administrative positions at the Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalls the resignation of Howard University President Sidney A. Ribeau

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes his initiatives at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick talks about the Graduation and Retention Access to Continued Excellence program

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes his mention in the Congressional Record

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick shares his plans for the future of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes alumni engagement at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes the federal support for Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick talks about the importance of historically black universities

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick reflects upon his life and legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick talks about STEM education

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick reflects upon the legacy of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick reflects upon his family

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

10$5

DATitle
Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick describes his earliest childhood memory
Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick remembers Clive Callender
Transcript
Now, do you have an earliest childhood memory?$$Me, yeah, I do. You know, at the age of three I remember lis-overhearing my [maternal] grandmother [Christine Roach (ph.)] talking to some neighbors about my having sickle cell [sickle cell anemia]. And I, I didn't quite understand what it was, et cetera. I was riding on a tricycle. At the time I remember stopping her to ask her to explain to me what it was, and she attempted to do so. I rode off and came back and said to her I was gonna become a doctor to find a cure for sickle cell. She, she repeats that story a lot, and that's, but, and that's probably my earliest childhood memory.$$That seems like an indication of focus (laughter), purpose.$$Yeah, from a pretty early age. She, you know, my grandmother and I were very close. She was a huge motivating factor in terms of she never made me feel that I would not be able to accomplish the things that I set, set out to do. And so, you know, and that, anytime I would repeat that, you know, she would just encourage me and act as if of course that's gonna happen. And so it was a, a strong motivator growing up.$The other person who has been a huge influence on not just my career but my life as well, is [HistoryMaker] Clive Callender. And I think, I, I think I have been attracted to both of these men because of what happened with my father [Alix Frederick] so early in life. I think I've always been attracted to strong men who lead with a certain level of integrity and have embraced not just the surgeon in me or the career aspects of what I do, but they've been concerned about my personal life. And Dr. Callender is an example of that. He, he became the chair of surgery [at Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.] after Dr. Leffall [HistoryMaker Dr. LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr.] became the president of the American College of Surgeons. When I was graduating from the surgical program, he gave me the Chairman's Award [Chairman's Award of Excellence] as the chief of--as the best chief that graduated that year. It was a very humbling honor at that time, 'cause I remember sitting in those seats as a junior resident watching, you know, who the chief resident of the year was every year and thinking to myself, wow, you know, I, I--it's not something I could even think I could aspire to be. What was critical about his involvement is that when I went to MD Anderson [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas], he tried to get me to come back here. I had just met my wife [Simone Frederick], and I couldn't take any chance. They took forever to make me an offer. And I was so apprehensive about the whole thing that I took a job at the University of Connecticut [University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut] because they were taking so long. And I remember him calling me in April to then make me an offer. I had to move in July. I had already accepted MD Anderson's offer--I mean UConn's offer. And I remember telling him that I wasn't gonna come, that I would go to UConn, and he was so devastated he stopped talking to me (laughter). It was--$$Who, Dr. Callender, right, the--$$Yeah--$$--Dr. Callender?$$--that, this is Dr. Callender. And you know, obviously I went to University of Connecticut, and two years later I found myself back at Howard [Howard University Hospital, Washington, D.C.]. He got to recruit me again and sealed the deal. And I remember when I came back here, one day I walked into his office and I said you know, "A lot of things are going well, and I'm pretty happy. But I do have this aspect of my life around my spirituality that concerns me." And I, and I remember telling him it's not a church thing. I, I was an altar boy growing up in, when I was in high school [St. Mary's College, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago]. So from the ages of ten to sixteen I was an altar boy. I went to all Catholic high school. I was an Anglican. And so it wasn't so much that aspect, but I felt like it was a deeper personal journey that I needed. And so you know--$$You were a practicing, practicing Anglican?$$Yeah, I was practicing. I, I, I wouldn't say--$$So did you, you go to--$$I wouldn't say--$$--church as a--$$--very active. I did, but not, not very often. I wouldn't say very often at all. And he came to me one day, and his solution was every morning, I will send you a text with a piece of scripture in it, and you know, it'll just be random. And you can take a look at it. And, and so we have done that for as long as I can remember. Every single morning he does it, up to this morning. And I send back a note that, that simply says, "Thank you." And that has been very helpful because that has spurred other conversations with us, you know, about questions that I might have about decisions I need to make, personal and career wise in particular. And so I'm very appreciative for that. And I, I've kept all of the, the texts interestingly enough. But that's the type of mentor that he has been to me as well.

Ronald A. Crutcher

Academic administrator and cellist Ronald A. Crutcher was born on February 27, 1947 in Cincinnati, Ohio to Andrew and Burdella Crutcher. Crutcher graduated from Woodward High School in 1965, and went on to attend Miami University of Ohio, where he received his B.M. degree in 1969. He earned his M.M.A. degree from the Yale School of Music in 1972. Crutcher received a Fulbright Fellowship in 1972 to study in West Germany until 1977. In 1979, he became the first cellist to receive a D.M.A. degree from the Yale University School of Music.

Crutcher debuted at Carnegie Hall in 1985. He also performed around the world with a number of groups, including the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Springfield Symphony Orchestra, the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra, the Klemperer Trio, and the Chanticleer String Quartet. In addition to his music career, Crutcher worked as an educator and school administrator. Crutcher was head of the string program at Wittenberg University School of Music from 1977 to 1979. He was then hired as an assistant professor of Music at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and was promoted to coordinator of the string area of their School of Music in 1984. In 1989, Crutcher became the associate vice chancellor for academic affairs. In 1990, he joined the Conservatory at The Cleveland Institute of Music as a vice president for academic affairs and dean. He became the director of the Butler School of Music at the University of Texas – Austin in 1994. In 1999, Crutcher was hired as the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at his alma mater, Miami University of Ohio. In 2004, he was hired as president and professor of music at Wheaton College. In 2016, Crutcher became the first African American president of the University of Richmond.

Crutcher co-founded Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) within the Association of American Colleges and Universities, where he also served on the board. He also served on numerous community and corporate boards including the board of the American Council on Education, The Fulbright Association, and multiple boards for symphonies and music associations. Crutcher has received various awards and honors for his work in higher education and music including honorary doctorates from Muhlenberg College, Colgate University, and Wheaton College. Crutcher has also received the Presidential Medal of Honor from the University of Cordoba in Spain, The Cultural Excellence Award from The Cleveland Music School Settlement, and a Certificate of Merit from the Yale School of Music Alumni Association.

Crutcher and his wife, Betty Neal Crutcher, have one daughter, Sara.

Ronald A. Crutcher was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 6, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.099

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/6/2016

Last Name

Crutcher

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Andrew

Schools

Miami University

Yale University

University of Bonn

Frankfurt State Academy

Woodward Career Technical High School

First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Cincinnati

HM ID

CRU03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Marthas Vineyard

Favorite Quote

I've been terrified all of my life but thats never stopped me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

2/27/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Richmond

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All food

Short Description

Academic administrator and cellist Ronald A. Crutcher (1947 – ) was the first cellist to receive a D.M.A. degree from the Yale University School of Music. He also served as president of Wheaton College before becoming the first African American president of the University of Richmond.

Employment

University of Richmond

Wheaton College (MA)

Miami University of Ohio

University of Texas at Austin

The Cleveland Inst. of Music

University of North Carolina, Greensboro

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Wittenberg University (Germany)

The Bonn School of Music (Germany)

Favorite Color

Blue

Wayne Riley

Dr. Wayne Joseph Riley, President and CEO of Meharry Medical College was born on May 3, 1959 in New Orleans, Louisiana to Jacqueline Cerf Riley and Dr. Emile Edward Riley. His late father, who grew up with Andrew Young, Dr. Walter Young and Ellis Marsalis spoke of his days at Meharry Medical College. Raised in San Francisco, Buffalo and New Orleans, Riley attended San Gabriel School, Arch Angel Elementary School and St. Francis Cabrini Elementary School. In 1977, Riley graduated from Brother Martin High School in New Orleans as the top student and a member of the National Honor Society. He also was an active member of Youth for (Ernest “Dutch”) Morial for mayor. At Yale University, Riley, an officer in the Black Student Alliance, marched in Washington against South African apartheid in 1979. He graduated in 1981 with his B.S. degree in medical anthropology.

Riley was hired by Mayor Dutch Morial as part of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA). By 1986, Riley, at age 26, was elevated to deputy mayor of New Orleans, while taking pre-med courses at Xavier University. In 1991, Riley enrolled in Morehouse School of Medicine. There, under the leadership of Dr. Hugh Glouster and Dr. Louis Sullivan, he served twice as class president and earned his M.D. degree in 1993. Riley completed his residency training in internal medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in 1996. He also holds a M.P.H. degree in Health Systems Management from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and was awarded an M.B.A. from Rice University’s Jesse H. Jones School of Management in 2002.

Riley was named vice president and vice dean for health affairs and governmental relations for Baylor College of Medicine. There, Riley was instrumental in the development of Baylor’s Community Economic Development program, the M.D./J.D. joint degree program with the University of Houston Law Center and serves on the faculty of the Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Management. He was the first African American corporate officer in Baylor’s one hundred plus year history. In 2004, Riley was named host of Baylor’s TV Healthline, which is distributed to more than 80 television markets. In 2005, Riley was elected to the American College of Physicians’ Board of Governors as Governor-elect for the Texas Southern region of the ACP (American College of Physicians). In 2006, Riley was named the tenth President and CEO of Meharry Medical College, his father’s alma mater and the nation’s largest private, historically black institution dedicated to educating healthcare professionals. As president, he manages an alliance with Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the funding of Nashville General Hospital. Riley, the recipient of many honors, received the 2006, National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Riley is married to Dr. Charlene M. Dewey, and they have two children.

Riley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 16, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.092

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/16/2007

Last Name

Riley

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Brother Martin High School

St. Gabriel the Archangel School

Yale University

St. Frances Cabrini Xavier School

Morehouse School of Medicine

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

First Name

Wayne

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

RIL01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

One Should Always Try To Live Their Life And Try To Avoid Saying I Wish I Woulda, Shoulda.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

5/3/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mexican Food

Short Description

College president Wayne Riley (1959 - ) was the president and CEO of Meharry Medical College.

Employment

New Orleans City Hall

Baylor College of Medicine

Meharry Medical College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:219,27:1241,43:1533,55:3139,82:3796,93:4307,101:5402,140:9928,205:10293,211:10658,217:11388,232:12118,242:12556,249:12994,300:13432,307:13870,314:15476,334:16133,350:16717,360:17009,365:25779,477:27606,510:28563,522:31260,560:32043,570:32391,575:39124,663:42692,711:45500,739:50538,865:51374,877:61786,1183:71514,1281:73364,1328:75066,1363:77360,1415:77878,1423:79506,1465:79876,1471:85872,1535:86212,1541:89136,1617:98913,1834:99862,1849:105435,1909:105948,1921:106233,1927:106632,1935:107088,1945:110482,1989:110822,1999:111434,2012:111706,2017:113370,2023:116688,2072:117023,2078:119100,2129:120909,2171:121177,2176:128011,2318:128480,2326:128882,2341:133090,2348:136422,2427:136762,2433:137782,2453:138258,2464:140706,2530:141046,2536:150465,2759:151842,2781:152247,2787:152733,2794:158940,2870$0,0:1314,26:7811,174:13286,268:17374,357:17885,365:18177,374:27488,462:28076,469:31905,510:33219,534:33803,551:38844,645:41768,703:60284,974:72260,1145:76270,1159:76510,1179:77290,1192:77590,1199:78850,1236:80290,1274:85630,1409:86050,1420:89422,1426:94970,1503:97754,1535:110648,1827:111110,1836:111374,1841:111968,1854:121340,1909:128500,1948:130736,1973:133746,2014:137656,2048:145458,2131:152910,2215
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Wayne Riley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley describes his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley talks about his father's athletic career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley describes his father's experience at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Wayne Riley describes his father's medical education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Wayne Riley talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley talks about color discrimination in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley describes the community of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley describes how he takes after his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley describes his earliest childhood memories, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley remembers his family's return to New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley remembers his childhood in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley remembers Mardi Gras festivals in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Wayne Riley remembers his early activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Wayne Riley describes his early musical interests

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley remembers the music community of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley recalls his early interest in science and medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley remembers Brother Martin High School in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley recalls his decision to attend Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley remembers Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley recalls joining the staff of New Orleans Mayor Ernest Morial

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley recalls his work for Ernest Morial's reelection campaign

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley recalls becoming Ernest Morial's public liaison assistant

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley remembers meeting African American civil rights leaders

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley recalls serving as the deputy mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley reflects upon his time in Ernest Morial's administration

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley remembers the death of Ernest Morial

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley remembers Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley describes the founding of Morehouse School of Medicine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley recalls his career at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley reflects upon his appointment to the senior staff of Baylor College of Medicine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley recalls his work for Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley talks about his marriage

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley remembers the forewarning of Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley talks about the flood control system in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley recalls the impact of Hurricane Katrina on his family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley describes the impact of Hurricane Katrina on the City of New Orleans

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley recalls the presidential search at Meharry Medical College

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley recalls his decision to interview for the Meharry Medical College presidency

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Wayne Riley recalls his presidential appointment at Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley describes the history of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Wayne Riley talks about the mission of Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Wayne Riley talks about his presidency of Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Wayne Riley describes his hopes for Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Wayne Riley describes the research conducted at Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Wayne Riley describes the funding and accreditation of Meharry Medical College

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Wayne Riley describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Wayne Riley reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Wayne Riley reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Wayne Riley talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Wayne Riley narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$9

DATitle
Wayne Riley remembers meeting African American civil rights leaders
Wayne Riley recalls his presidential appointment at Meharry Medical College
Transcript
(Simultaneous) Yeah, I was just recounting some of the people I met as I traveled around the country with Mayor Morial [Ernest Morial], you know, just a number of, of the civil rights giants and, and, and major black lawyers in the country. Vernon Jordan [HistoryMaker Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.]--I met Vernon Jordan with Dutch, met, of course, all the other big city mayors: Maynard Jackson, [HistoryMaker] Andrew Young, of course who, who was a fellow New Orleanian, and it was just a--it was, it was, it was a fascinating time in my life where I, I got to rub shoulders with people that I had read about or who had worked with people I read about, you know. For example, you know, one of my heroes is Thurgood Marshall, and I even keep a picture of Thurgood Marshall in my office here at Meharry [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee], but Thurgood was a fascinating character, and Dutch had worked for A.P. Tureaud who was a major civil rights lawyer in Louisiana and who, who Thurgood worked on many of the Louisiana desegregation cases, and Dutch was a young lawyer (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Is that the father of the Tureaud that you were in--$$Right, no, their cousin--$$--cousin--$$--they were related, right. But A.P. Tureaud was sort of the dean of civil rights lawyers in New Orleans [Louisiana] that Dutch worked for, that was Dutch's mentor. And, you know, Dutch used to tell us these stories about when Thurgood would come to town to argue cases and, and, you know, they--people who worked with Thurgood still think he was the hardest working, smartest lawyer that they had ever worked with, and Thurgood was a--those folks who know Marshall and (unclear) read two books--I read [HistoryMaker] Juan Williams' book on him ['Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary'] and then I read another biography. Marshall was a interesting, colorful guy, he was the type of guy who could stay up all night playing cards and drinking bourbon, and then he would go into court the next day and just argue flawlessly, and he--Thurgood loved a good time. Those people who know Thurgood knew that he loved a good time, liked his, his bourbon and liked to play poker and he gambled and, you know, he cussed and he--you know--but he was a very colorful character. But, but Dutch would always tell these stories about how, how just a supremely well-prepared lawyer Thurgood always was. And so that's why the law thing really kind of came back at me because I was around Dutch all the time, he'd been judge, and the first black graduate of the law center [Louisiana State University Law School; Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana], and so again, I was struggling with the law and medicine thing, and then when I started traveling with him, meeting all these famous folks and intersecting, I then kind of wavered a little bit in, in medicine.$I had my interview on Au- August 18, 2006, the reason why I remember the date, it happened to be my parents' [Jacqueline Cerf Riley and Emile Riley, Jr.] anniversary, and it would have been my parents' forty-ninth anniversary had my dad still been living, so it was a special day for my mother--very emotional day for her, and so I was in Atlanta [Georgia] meeting with the search committee, and we had a good two and a half hour conversation and I gave them my candid assessment of, of what I thought I could bring to the job if, if they wanted, but also a candid assessment of, of, of Meharry's [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee] situation from my due diligence--that I had done a lot of work to see where Meharry was from a financial point of view, from a programmatic point of view, education point of view, and so forth. So, I thought it was a good two-hour conversation and I, I made it very clear to 'em that if, if you're looking for a president who's just gonna come to Nashville [Tennessee] and, you know, look nice and go to cocktail parties, I'm not it, I'm not gonna leave a great job in a great city to go into a job where I can't make it. If I feel that I can't make a difference, and I won't be given the support to make a difference to build programs and to advance the institution, then I don't--you know, I wouldn't do myself a favor--I wouldn't be doing myself a favor, nor would I be doing good for the institution. So, we had a very good two-hour conversation, and this was August 18, and then on September 28, my wife [Charlene M. Dewey] and I were in Colorado--first vacation we had taken alone in two years, we were at The Broadmoor resort [Colorado Springs, Colorado], and I got the call at six a.m., I guess they forgot that Colorado was earlier time zone, but they, they awakened me with the news that I was a finalist, that we had gone from eight down to two, and that my wife and I would be invited to come to Nashville for an official visit, and we did on October--I think 26 and 27, we had a two-day visit, as a couple, to Nashville and to Meharry, and, and then my announcement was announced on November 3, my appointment as president designate was November 3, 2006.

Dr. Lloyd C. Elam

Founder of Meharry Medical College’s Psychiatry Department and retired college president Dr. Lloyd C. Elam was born on October 27, 1928 in Little Rock, Arkansas. His parents, Ruth Davis Elam and Harry Penoy Elam met in church in Little Rock. Elam attended Stephens School and graduated from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in 1944 at age fifteen. He went to junior college in Little Rock before moving to Harvey, Illinois. There, Elam worked for the Maremont Automobile Plant and commuted to Chicago to attend classes at Roosevelt University where he graduated with his B.S. degree in zoology in 1950. After a stint in the United States Army, Elam earned his M.D. degree from the University of Washington School of Medicine in 1957. From 1957 to 1958, Elam completed an internship at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago, and from 1958 to 1961, he served as a resident in psychiatry at the University of Chicago Hospital.

Elam joined Chicago’s Billings Hospital as staff psychiatrist and instructor of psychiatry in 1961. From 1961 to 1963, he served as assistant professor and chairman of the Psychiatry Department of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. Becoming a full professor in 1963, Elam was appointed interim dean of the college in 1966. In 1968, he was selected president of Meharry Medical College and supervised the school’s growth in that capacity until 1981. From 1981 to 1982, Elam was college chancellor. He served as Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry from 1982 to 1995 when he retired to serve as a volunteer faculty member. Elam served as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, California in 1982. He was made Professor Emeritus of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in 1996 and Chairman Emeritus in 1997. Elam is a member of the Tennessee Psychiatric Association, Tennessee Medical Association, American Medical Association, National Medical Association, American Psychiatric Association, American College of Psychiatrists, Black Psychiatrists of America, R.F. Boyd Medical Society and the American College of Forensic Examiners.

In 1973, Elam was presented an honorary Doctor of Laws from Harvard University. His other awards include honorary degrees from Meharry Medical College and St. Lawrence University; the 1988 National Board of Medical Examiners Distinguished Service Award; induction into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society; the 1972 Nashville Club Man of the Year Award; the 1976 Human Relations Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews and the 1988 Eleanor Roosevelt Key, Roosevelt University’s highest alumni award. Meharry Medical College established the Lloyd C. Elam Mental Health Center in his honor and that building now bares his name.

Elam and his wife, Clara Elam, R.N., have two daughters: Dr. Gloria Elam-Norris of Chicago and Dr. Laurie Elam-Evans of Atlanta. Elam passed away on October 4, 2008.

Elam was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 14, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.089

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/14/2007

Last Name

Elam

Middle Name

Charles

Schools

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

University of Washington

Stephens Elementary School

Roosevelt University

University of Chicago

First Name

Lloyd

Birth City, State, Country

Little Rock

HM ID

ELA02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

10/27/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Peas (Black-Eyed)

Death Date

10/4/2008

Short Description

College president, psychiatrist, and psychiatry professor Dr. Lloyd C. Elam (1928 - 2008 ) founded Meharry Medical College’s Psychiatry Department, and served as the college's president until 1981.

Employment

Meharry Medical College

Dupont Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:791,12:5650,140:6102,145:30696,395:31860,409:34382,445:50022,646:61102,735:62510,753:74602,924:77122,960:78550,985:108414,1291:110898,1326:111634,1338:173850,2051$0,0:418,5:786,10:1522,20:2166,25:6950,98:8330,115:9250,129:12194,165:12654,171:13298,179:18562,205:25321,275:26926,295:36312,362:38063,367:38973,378:40429,394:41248,406:42249,418:46981,475:51258,511:65404,685:68060,726:69637,750:78069,816:78818,824:86000,847:86658,855:90418,908:91546,921:92016,927:96460,1013:102080,1052:103250,1066:103700,1072:104060,1077:104780,1086:121683,1244:128958,1339:129734,1348:130122,1353:130510,1358:131577,1372:143411,1472:156529,1610:214180,2006:251253,2276:254050,2284
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Lloyd C. Elam's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his mother's community in Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's education and occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's lumber business

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about race relations in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his paternal grandfather's career as a stagecoach racer

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his household

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his refusal to eat meat

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his childhood diet

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his transportation to school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his family's road trips to Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his experiences as a migrant farmworker

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls attending Stephens Elementary School in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his family's daily prayers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls selling newspapers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his teacher, Leroy Christopher

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers an influential teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his community's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his early interest in medicine and psychology

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his early understanding of mental health

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the popular ideas about mental illness during his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the beliefs about mental illness in rural Arkansas

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his decision to attend Roosevelt College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his high school graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his experiences at Roosevelt College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers serving in the U.S. Army's Medical Service Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls race relations at the University of Washington School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the findings of his medical study of stress

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the psychiatry program at the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his influential professors

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about the treatments for mental illness

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the perceptions of psychiatry in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls founding the Department of Psychiatry at Meharry Medical College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the changes in the cost of psychiatric care

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls establishing a day hospital in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his presidency of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his challenges as the president of Meharry Medical College

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes Meharry Medical College's contributions to Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his community health concerns

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the increase in African Americans seeking psychiatric care

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about the underrepresentation of African Americans in the medical field

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon the psychological effects of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his involvement at the First Baptist Church in Nashville, Tenneesee

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his civic activities

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

11$7

DATitle
Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his early interest in medicine and psychology
Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his presidency of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee
Transcript
Now how was high school [Paul Laurence Dunbar High School; Dunbar Magnet Middle School, Little Rock, Arkansas]? Were you active in clubs in high school or student government or sports or anything like that?$$I went to all the football games but most of the people in my--most of the guys in my class were active and I was not. I enjoyed studying (laughter). As a matter of fact, the way I got interested in medicine I was thirteen and kind of browsing in the library one day and saw a little book and the title of it was 'Physique and Personality' [ph.] and I said, oh, that sounds interesting. I read it, it was fascinating and it went on to show how whatever kind of physique you has, you have determines what kinds of adjustment possibilities are open to you. If you're a little athletic boy and somebody does something on the playground, you might hit him or push him or something and he stops doing it. And so you figure that works and so you become that kind of an outgoing person. If you are a little thin, scrawny guy and you try that, the guy will hit you back and say that, that won't work. So you decide to go to the library, (laughter) read books and so that determines your--another little boy on the playground tries pushing, gets hit, tries studying, reading, he's not smart so that doesn't work. So he becomes the jokester and so the little fat boy becomes a jokester. And so it was fascinating the way he wrote the book but it has some motivational kind of lesson. And his students really tried to, to do a scientific study of all of this but they went too far. But as you know, your physical does affect your personality. But that's how I got interested in psychology and then found out, if you're gonna do research in psychology, you should go on and be a psychiatrist so you can do all kinds of research. And that's how I got interested in that.$$Okay, so at age thirteen you were aware of what a psychologist was and--$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) in terms of that--$$Yeah.$$--because of that study?$$Yeah.$Now, just about the time that I got all of that going the--there was progress in civil rights and desegregation of schools. And people had the idea that all of the black schools were gonna merge into the others and you wouldn't need them so we had that kind of crisis. And that's when I moved into administration and bunch of us met every Saturday night for a year struggling with what, what would be an appropriate approach to this problem. It was a problem for us.$$The funding began to dry up or--for the black institutions?$$No, probably, I don't know but you know, black institutions have always had funding problems so I don't know if it was drying up or not. I was--this is before I was in administration. But the question is, why do you need two whatever kinds of institutions, you know, and so what we decided after that year of, of talking about the problem is that, sure enough, you did need historically black institutions [HBCUs]. If, if Meharry [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee] stopped it's existence, then number of black persons going into medicine would drastically decrease and so that we did, indeed, need to continue this institution. And that's when I went into administration and decided that, if we were going to, we needed to be a niche institution. And we should address those illnesses and problems that were unique to the population that we served. And, in order to do this, we had to do a number of things. One, was to build a campus and that's what a good number of years of my administration was involved. But the other was to establish a Ph.D. program, research programs, and so on. And we did that. And it's--and they are going very well in addition to medicine and dentistry.$$How long did it take to establish those?$$I, let's see, I became president in '68 [1968] so we started building campus in '69 [1969] and we started the research in, in graduate studies in about '75 [1975] somewhere in there, middle '70s [1970s]. And then it became a school of graduate studies and research in about '76 [1976]. So--excuse me, let me see, '76 [1976], yep, that's right in '76 [1976]. And now we will graduate a significant percentage of black Ph.D.'s. in the biomedical sciences and of course we still have the medical program.