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Willie L. Hill, Jr.

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. was born on July 29, 1946 in Mobile, Alabama to Rennetta and Willie Hill, Sr. After graduating from Williamson High School in Mobile, Alabama, Hill received his B.S. degree in music education from Grambling State College in Grambling, Louisiana in 1968. He went on to receive both his M.M. degree and Ph.D. degree in music education from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1972 and 1987, respectively.

In 1968, Hill began teaching instrumental music in the Denver Public Schools, where he remained for sixteen years and was an instrumental music supervisor for four years. He then joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder College of Music, where he served as assistant dean and professor of music for eleven years from 1988 to 1999. During that period, he also served as the director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los Angeles, California. In 1999, Hill was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

As a woodwind specialist, he was a faculty member of the Clark Terry Great Plains Jazz Camp. He also founded and served as co-director of the Rich Matteson-Telluride Jazz Academy, and later founded the Mile High Jazz Camp in Boulder, Colorado. In 1984, Hill was a member of The Colorado Clarinet Choir touring organization, which represented the United States in London, England at the International Clarinet Symposium. His experiences as a conductor include numerous citywide honor performances, All-State Jazz Ensembles, All-County Bands, and as musical director at The Schwayder and Bonfils Theaters.

Hill was a former member of the Denver Broncos Jazz Ensemble and a regular performer at the Denver Auditorium Theater, Paramount Theater, and Boettcher Concert Hall. Hill also performed with George Burns, Liza Minnelli, Lena Horne, Lou Rawls, Ben Vereen, Lola Falana, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis Jr., Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Jon Faddis, and many others.

He served as president of The National Association for Music Education (MENC) and the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE). He was also a member of the writing team for MENC's Vision 2020 program and a member of the national board of directors for Young Audiences, Inc. Hill later served as president of the Colorado Music Educators Association and Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society.

In 1998, he was inducted into the Colorado Music Educators Hall of Fame. In 2001, Hill was the recipient of the Lawrence Berk Leadership Award presented by the IAJE. Hill co-authored Learning to Sight-Read Jazz, Rock, Latin, and Classical Styles, and was the author of The Instrumental History of Jazz, Approaching the Standards, and Jazz Pedagogy: The Jazz Educator's Handbook and Resource Guide. Hill is listed in the first edition of Who's Who among Black Americans, Who's Who among International Musicians and was a 2003 Lowell Mason Fellow.

Willie L. Hill, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.221

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/5/2018

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Willie

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

HIL19

Favorite Season

October

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribean

Favorite Quote

Never Put Off for Tomorrow What You Can Do Today

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/29/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Favorite Food

Fried Fish

Short Description

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. (1946- ) served as assistant dean and professor of music at the University of Colorado, Boulder and was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Favorite Color

Purple

Marcheta Evans

Academic administrator Marcheta Evans was born on July 10, 1959 in Mobile, Alabama to Sylvia Porter and James Luter. She graduated from H.D. Woodson High School in Washington, D.C. in 1976 and attended Oakwood University in Huntsville, Alabama and received her B.S. in psychology with a minor in history, a M.A. degree in rehabilitation counseling and her Ph.D. degree from the University of Alabama and M.A.Ed. degree in elementary education from the University of Alabama in Birmingham.

Evans joined the faculty at Auburn University in Montgomery, Alabama in 1993 and worked there until 1998, at which point she joined the University of Texas System. A year later, she became the program coordinator and graduate advisor for the counseling program at the University of Texas San Antonio (UTSA). In 2002, she founded the Women’s Resource Center at UTSA; and, in 2004, she was named chair of the counseling, educational psychology and adult and higher education department. During her time at UTSA, Evans contributed to the response to Hurricane Katrina and co-led an annual student re-enactment of the Freedom Rides. In 2008, she became provost fellow for the UT system. In 2013, Evans was appointed dean of the School of Professional Studies and the Worden School of Social Service at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas. She also began serving as vice president of academic affairs at the institution. After three years in these positions, Evans was promoted to the position of provost of Our Lady of the Lake University.

In 2009, Evans was elected as the fifty-ninth president of the American Counseling Association. She has consulted for organizations such as the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and has served on the development board for the Carver Community Cultural Center. Evans worked with USAID in Malawi and has served as a consultant for various United Way agencies focused on issues of diversity, inclusion and leadership. She has also chaired and served as a committee member of San Antonio’s MLK Scholarship Committee. In 2016, she was awarded the ACA Presidential Award from the American Counseling Association. Evans also served as past president of the Association for Creativity in Counseling, chair of the Carver Cultural Community Development Board, fellow for the American Counseling Association, and past president of the Alabama Counseling Association.

Marcheta Evans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 9, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.131

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/9/2018

Last Name

Evans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

University of Alabama

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Howard D. Woodson Senior High School

First Name

Marcheta

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

EVA10

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Attitude Determines Altitude.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/10/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

San Antonio

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Beef Enchiladas

Short Description

Academic administrator Marcheta Evans (1959- ) was selected provost of Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio in 2016. She also was the 59th president of the American Counseling Association.

Employment

Our Lady of the Lake University

UTSA

Auburn University - Montgomery

University of Alabama

Private Practice

Favorite Color

N/A

Charles Hunter

Lawyer Charles Hunter was born on March 19, 1945 in Mobile, Alabama to Maude Williams Hunter and Judge Hunter. He graduated from Central High School in 1962, and received his B.S. degree in chemistry from Tennessee State University in 1966. He also earned his M.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Chicago.

Hunter began his career in 1966 as an analytical chemist at the International Harvester Company. In 1968, he worked briefly as a substitute teacher with Chicago Public Schools. Later that year, he was hired as a customer service chemist at Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation, where he worked until 1971. Hunter joined the chemical sales department at 3M Company in 1972, where he covered thirteen states. After receiving his J.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1974, he worked as an attorney at The Quaker Oats Company, specializing in patent, real estate, and mergers and acquisitions law. He later became the general counsel for The Quaker Oats Company’s restaurant division. He began working with Harold Washington during his mayoral campaign in Chicago, Illinois, becoming his assistant when Washington was elected in 1983. In this role, Hunter managed the offices of Cable TV, Purchasing, Personnel, the Mayor’s Office of Employment and Training, Inspectional Services, Zoning, Aviation, among others. He was also responsible for recruiting, vetting, and recommending all appoints to all boards and commissions in the City of Chicago. He left the administration in 1986 to join the law firm of Jones, Ware & Grenard. In 1988, Hunter was recruited by Dupont de Nemours, where he specialized in patent and environmental law as well as mergers and acquisitions. In 1993, he became the director of governmental affairs for Ascom Timeplex, a position he held until the company closed in 1996. Hunter then became part owner of a small janitorial company, which he helped expand to over 900 contracted positions throughout the Chicagoland area. He retired from the company in 2012.

Hunter has served on the board of Townsend & Associates, The Latin School of Chicago, HighJump software company, and NBU Athletics.

Hunter and his wife, Karen Ayd Hunter, have two sons.

Hunter passed away on December 26, 2018.

Charles Hunter was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.105

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/5/2018

Last Name

Hunter

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Central High School

Tennessee State University

University of Chicago

University of Wisconsin Law School

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

HUN12

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

British Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

Hard Work Out Does Talent When Talent Doesn't Work Hard.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

3/19/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Death Date

12/26/2018

Short Description

Lawyer Charles Hunter (1945 - 2018) worked as an assistant to Chicago Mayor Harold Washington from 1983 to 1986, and as an attorney at The Quaker Oats Company, the law firm of Jones, Ware & Grenard and Dupont de Nemours.

Employment

Kaiser Chemical

3M Company

Quaker Oats Company

City of Chicago Mayor's Office

Jones, Ware & Grenard

DuPont de Nemours

Favorite Color

Blue

Margie M. Tuckson

Corporate executive Margie M. Tuckson was born on March 20, 1952 in Mobile, Alabama. Graduating from Murphy High School in Mobile, Alabama in 1969, Tuckson enrolled at the University of South Alabama, Mitchell College of Business in Mobile, Alabama where she was a founding member of the Delta Sigma Theta Iota Nu Chapter. She received her B.S. degree in marketing and accounting from the University of South Alabama in 1973.

After graduation, she went to work for International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) in Mobile as product administrator, where she specialized in market analysis, product placement, internal and external executive training and product development. There, she was integral in the automation of the State of Georgia’s Department of Human Services-Child Support Services Program. She served in several management roles at IBM, and retired from the company after over eighteen years of service in 1991. Tuckson then worked as a consultant for a global aerospace and defense technology company Northrup Grumman in Los Angeles, California from 1991 to 1997. She also became the program manager for the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs from 1997 to 2000. In 2013, Tuckson served as chief financial officer and manager for Tuckson Health Connections in Atlanta, Georgia.

Tuckson was a member of the University of South Alabama National Alumni Association board of directors and served on the finance committee. She was also active with numerous organizations including Hope Chest for Breast Cancer, Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science, Penumbra Theater in St. Paul, Minnesota, Morehouse School of Medicine, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, National Council of Negro Women, Georgia CHARLEE, United Negro College Fund, Iota Nu Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, The LINKS Incorporated, Hank and Billye Aaron Scholarship Fund, Leadership Mobile, Pre-School for the Deaf, Daniel Freeman Hospital, American Cancer Society and Tuckson Health Connections Community Outreach Programs. Tuckson was appointed to the University of South Alabama Board of Trustees by Governor Kay Ivey in 2017, and confirmed by the Alabama Legislature on January 16, 2018.

Margie and her husband Reed V. Tuckson have four children; Kobi, Nia, Dominic and Lance.

Margie Tuckson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.031

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/5/2018

Last Name

Tuckson

Maker Category
Middle Name

M.

Occupation
Schools

Caldwell School

Central High School

Alabama A&M University

University of South Alabama

First Name

Margie

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

TUC33

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

Life is Short.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/30/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Corporate executive Margie M. Tuckson (1952 - ) worked at IBM for over eighteen years and served as chief financial officer and manager for Tuckson Health Connections.

Employment

Tuckson Health Connections

City of Chicago

Charles Drew University of Science and Medicine

IBM

Favorite Color

White

Jo Ann Jenkins

Nonprofit executive and government administrator Jo Ann Jenkins was born on February 8, 1958 in Mobile, Alabama to Thelma Jenkins and Leroy Jenkins. Jenkins graduated from Theodore High School in Theodore, Alabama in 1976, and earned her B.S. degree in political science and government from Spring Hill College in Mobile, Alabama in 1980. Jenkins also completed the executive program at Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Jenkins began her career as an executive assistant in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1981. She then became a special assistant at the U.S. Department of Transportation in 1985, a position she held until 1987. Jenkins left the Department of Transportation, and became partner at Quality Management Services. She then joined the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1990 as the director of the Office of Advocacy and Enterprise. In 1994, Jenkins became chief of staff at the Library of Congress, and was later appointed as the chief operating officer in 2007. Jenkins remained at the Library of Congress until 2010, when she was named president of the AARP Foundation. Jenkins then served as chief operating officer of AARP from 2013 to 2014, and was appointed as its chief executive officer in 2014, becoming the first African American woman to assume the role. In 2016, Jenkins released her book, Disrupt Aging: A Bold New Path to Living Your Best Life at Every Age, which became a national bestseller.

Jenkins was named as the “Non-Profit Influencer of the Year” in 2015, as one of “Washington’s Most Influential People” in 2015 and 2016, and was on the Non-Profit Times’ “Power and Influence Top 50” list from 2013 through 2016. Jenkins also received the Women in Technology Leadership Award in 2010, the Director’s Award from the Peace Crops in 2014, and became a Malcolm Baldrige Fellow in 2013.

Jenkins was actively involved with the Congressional Hunger Center, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, the U.S. Small Business Administration Council on Underserved Communities, Living Cities, and Caring for Military Families. She was also appointed to the board of directors for AARP Services.

Jenkins and her husband, Frank G. Jenkins, have two children, Christian and Nicole.

Jo Ann Jenkins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 2, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.122

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/02/2017

Last Name

Jenkins

Maker Category
Middle Name

C.

Organizations
Schools

Theodore High School

Spring Hill College

First Name

Jo Ann

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

JEN10

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

On the beach.

Favorite Quote

Be The Person You Want Others To Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/8/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pork chops and mac and cheese.

Short Description

Nonprofit executive and government administrator Jo Ann Jenkins (1958 – ) held positions as chief operating officer of the Library of Congress and president of the AARP Foundation, before becoming the chief executive officer of AARP in 2014.

Employment

AARP

AARP Foundation

Library of Congress

Favorite Color

Purple

Hank Aaron

Baseball player Hank Aaron was born on February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama to Estella Aaron and Herbert Aaron. He attended Central High School in Mobile, Alabama and transferred to the private Josephine Allen Institute, where he graduated in 1951. While finishing high school, Aaron played for the Mobile Black Bears, a semi-professional Negro league baseball team.

In 1951, Aaron signed with the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro American League, where he played for three months before his contract was purchased by the Boston Braves. Aaron was assigned to the Eau Claire Braves, the Class-C minor league affiliate for the Boston Braves and was named Rookie of the Year in 1952. The next season, Aaron was promoted to the Jacksonville Braves, the Class-A affiliate in the South Atlantic League. The following year, Aaron was invited to spring training for the newly relocated Milwaukee Braves and was offered a major league contract. In 1954, he made his major league debut with the Milwaukee Braves. By 1955, Aaron was named to the National League All-Star roster and captured his first National League batting title in 1956. The following season, Aaron won the National League MVP Award and led the Braves to win the 1957 World Series. Aaron went on to lead the Braves to another pennant championship in 1958, and received his first Golden Glove Award. In 1965, the Milwaukee Braves moved to Atlanta, where he became the first franchise player to hit his 500th career home run; and in 1970, he was the first Brave to reach 3,000 career hits. On April 8, 1974 Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s all-time homerun record with 715. Aaron was then traded to the Milwaukee Brewers for the 1975-1976 season, when he broke the all-time RBI record. After the 1976 season, Aaron retired from professional baseball and returned to the Atlanta Braves organization as an executive. In 1982, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame and was then named the Braves’ vice president and director of player development. Aaron continued to serve as vice president of the Braves. He also owned several car dealerships in Georgia and owned over thirty restaurant chains throughout the country. In 1990, he published his memoir I Had a Hammer.

Aaron was awarded the Spingarn Medal in 1976, from the NAACP. In 1999, Major League Baseball announced the introduction of the Hank Aaron Award to honor the best overall offensive performer in the American and National League. Later that year, Aaron was ranked fifth on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. In 2001, Aaron was presented with the Presidential Citizens Medal by President Bill Clinton. He also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, from President George W. Bush in June 2002.

Hank Aaron was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 1, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.064

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/1/2016

Last Name

Aaron

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Louis

Occupation
Schools

Central High School

Josephine Allen Institute

First Name

Henry

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

AAR01

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Laura and George Bilicic

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cruises

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/5/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lamb Chops

Short Description

Baseball player Hank Aaron (1934 - ) began his career in the Negro Leagues with the Indianapolis Clowns. He led the Milwaukee Braves to a 1957 World Series title, and broke Babe Ruth’s home run record in 1974.

Employment

Indianapolis Clowns

Eau Claire Bears (Boston Braves)

Jacksonville Braves (Boston Braves)

Milwaukee Braves

Atlanta Braves

Milwaukee Brewers

Turner Broadcasting, Inc.

Hank Aaron BMW

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Gray And Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hank Aaron's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron talks about his parents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron describes the Toulminville neighborhood of Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron describes his early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hank Aaron recalls his early interest in baseball

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hank Aaron remembers Jackie Robinson and Joe Louis

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Hank Aaron talks about the limited resources for sports in his community

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Hank Aaron describes his experiences as a Boy Scout

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Haqnk Aaron recalls his early experiences of religion

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Hank Aaron talks about the lack of African American athletes in the South

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hank Aaron recalls enrolling at the Josephine Allen Institute in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron remembers joining the Indianapolis Clowns

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron talks about the prominent baseball players of his time

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron remembers the conditions on the Indianapolis Clowns team

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron describes his batting technique

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron talks about the limited opportunities for African American athletes

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron recalls the prejudice he experienced while playing for the Jacksonville Braves, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hank Aaron recalls the prejudice he experienced while playing for the Jacksonville Braves, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hank Aaron remembers the manager of the Jacksonville Braves

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hank Aaron remembers joining the Milwaukee Braves

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron talks about his positions with the Milwaukee Braves

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron describes the different styles of pitching

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron remembers the pitchers in the National League

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron talks about the lack of diversity in the American League

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron remembers his teammates on the Milwaukee Braves

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron talks about white baseball players from the South

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hank Aaron remembers winning the 1957 World Series

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Hank Aaron talks about his approach to playing baseball

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hank Aaron recalls appearing on 'Home Run Derby'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron remembers his experiences with segregation while traveling with the Milwaukee Braves

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron recalls the Braves' move to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron talks about living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron recalls the 1967 season with the Atlanta Braves

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron remembers his three thousandth career hit

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron talks about the camaraderie between baseball players

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hank Aaron reflects upon his career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Hank Aaron talks about approaching Babe Ruth's home run record

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Hank Aaron talks about the public response to his home run record

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron describes the home run that broke Babe Ruth's record

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron talks about the popular batters of his time

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron talks about Barry Bonds' baseball career

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron reflects upon the current gameplay in Major League Baseball

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron shares his views on Little League coaching

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron talks about baseball in the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hank Aaron talks about the need for outreach to black youth in Major League Baseball

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hank Aaron recalls working as a farm director for the Atlanta Braves

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hank Aaron remembers being inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hank Aaron talks about his businesses and autobiography

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hank Aaron shares his advice to aspiring baseball players

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hank Aaron describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hank Aaron talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Hank Aaron describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

4$2

DATitle
Hank Aaron remembers the conditions on the Indianapolis Clowns team
Hank Aaron describes the home run that broke Babe Ruth's record
Transcript
So, now tell us about James Jenkins. I hear, I hear that he played a pivotal role in your life with the Clowns?$$That was my seatmate, well you know we only got two dollars a day, meal money and I made two hundred dollars a month. That was my salary. Well, most of the money that I made, the little money that I made, I sent, I sent it home to my mother [Estella Pritchett Aaron] and Jenkins was a seatmate of mine and back then we would travel, Indianapolis Clowns. We would play in Atlanta [Georgia] today, and play in a city that was a hundred miles away at night, and we never did stop at a restaurant. We slept on the bus and it just so happened that I was young enough and I say this with no pun intended, but I was playing with older guys and I felt--really felt sorry for 'em because me being young, I could go through a lot more than--my body would take a lot more than they--their body could take and we got two dollars a day meal money and he and I use to take his two dollars and my two dollars and we would buy a big jar of peanut butter, about that (demonstrates) so size, and we'd buy a loaf of bread. Now, we didn't care about whether the bread was--we'd eat half of it today and then half of it tomorrow you know, but that's what we would eat off of, peanut butter and jelly, not jelly but just peanut butter, and this is real and I tell a lot of people, this is real peanut butter. This is not peanut butter with oil on top where you can mix it up. This stuff is, it gets in your throat right and if you don't have the right thing to digest it, it would choke you. So, he would--he and I, he and I were seatmates and he would ta- he would help me understand that life is gonna get better, you know. Things gonna get better you know, just hang in there a long time you know, and he was much older than I was and he was my seatmate. Seatmate, and that's what we called, we didn't call 'em roommates, we called 'em seatmates because (simultaneous)--.$$(Simultaneous) Y'all didn't have a room (laughter)?$$No, we never stayed in a hotel, we never stayed in a hotel so, I just, I would say that the little I learned from him, I mean I learned an awful lot from him, that he helped me in so many ways that he probably don't even remember.$$Now, did he help you with your grip on the--?$$No, he never helped me with anything at the bat or baseball, but he helped me with just trying to live life, trying to be understanding that things going to get better with life, you know but he never did--he never bothered me with, with telling me how to grip (gestures) the bat or run the bases or anything like that.$Okay, now tell us about--if you can put us in the moment. You hit the home run against who?$$Al Downing.$$Al Downing, okay, so this is the day--it was a day game, right?$$It was an evening game, yes, yes.$$Right, evening game, all right, so you're at the plate and what did he pitch you?$$Al had, you know I never had good luck against him really to be honest with you, although I hit the home run to, to beat the Babe's [Babe Ruth] record off him, but I never really had good luck with him. He was--I remember when he was with the Yankees [New York Yankees], for a little fellow his size, he threw very good, had very good control and was a very good pitcher. He hurt his arm and of course they traded him to the Dodgers [Los Angeles Dodgers], and what he threw me that night, he had a very good screwball, you know and he couldn't--at the beginning I could understand it. He couldn't get his screwball over you know and he tried to throw me a fast ball and that was not his pitch, that was his second pitch. Well, I say second pitch, that's the second pitch that he usually gets you out on, and I hit the ball out of the ballpark [Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia], but in all fairness to him, it was a, it was a--as I mentioned before, the second pitch, but he was a very, a very good pitcher. He was not one of these yo-yos that come along, he could pitch and he knew how to pitch. I think right now I think he's teaching school in, in New York somewhere.$$Okay, so were there charges that he just lobbed you one up there or something?$$No, I never heard that part, never heard somebody say that, but I think I've heard people say well you know he was a secondary pitcher, and that was not true.$$Yeah, you're right.$$He, he wasn't, he was a starter for the Dodgers and the Dodgers thought a lot of him and I thought a lot of him 'cause I had faced him once before or maybe two or three times before with the Yankees and he was not easy pickings, you know he was somebody to be reckoned with, but he just happened to have an off day like anybody could you know.$$Right, Al Downing was a respected pitcher in the Minor League [Minor League Baseball], right (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, right.$$So, how did you feel when the ball was going out of the park, did you feel relieved it finally (unclear) (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) I felt good and I felt I had hit enough home runs to realize when I hit it that it was gonna go out the ballpark because I had hit enough of 'em, you know really, and I felt, I felt very good. I felt like it was over with, done with and that was it.

Dr. Sharon Malone

Obstetrician, gynecologist and public figure Sharon Malone was born in 1959 in Mobile, Alabama to a domestic servant and a maintenance worker for Brookley Air Force Base. Malone is the youngest of eight siblings and the sister of Vivian Malone Jones, who, in 1963, became one of the first African American students to enroll at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. In 1981, Malone received her B.A. degree in psychology from Harvard University.

Upon graduation, she pursued a career as a systems engineer with the IBM Corporation, but soon decided to attend medical school at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, where she earned her M.D. degree in 1988. That same year, Malone moved to Washington, D.C. to complete her medical residency at George Washington University. Then, in 1992, she went into private practice with the renowned Foxhall OB/GYN in Washington, D.C. Malone has also served as an associate clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the George Washington University, and presented the 2012 PBS documentary, Slavery by Another Name, which charts the violent transition in 1865 from chattel slavery to forced prison labor.

Malone serves on the boards of the D.C. Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and Historic Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. She also serves on the regional panel for the selection of White House Fellows Program and was appointed to the selection committee for the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction awarded by the University of Alabama School of Law. In addition, Malone has consistently been voted one of Washingtonian magazine’s “Best Doctors.”

Malone is married to Eric Holder, the first African American Attorney General of the United States. They live in Washington, D.C. with their three children, Maya, Brooke, and Eric III.

Sharon Malone was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 23, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.110

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/23/2014

Last Name

Malone

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Harvard University

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

St. Joseph's School

Most Pure Heart of Mary School

Emory University

W. P. Davidson High School

Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic School

First Name

Sharon

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

MAL08

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Turks and Caicos

Favorite Quote

There Are No Accidents In The Universe.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/30/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp Creole

Short Description

Obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Sharon Malone (1959 - ) practiced in the Washington, D.C. area for over twenty years.

Employment

IBM

George Washington University

Foxhall OB/GYN

Favorite Color

Peach

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Sharon Malone's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her maternal ancestor, William J. Edwards, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her maternal ancestor, William J. Edwards, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her light complexion

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her experiences at a black Catholic school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her early awareness of color discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her sister's admission to the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her sister's first day at the University of Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her sister's experiences at the University of Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her home life

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone remembers her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her family's holiday celebrations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes the sights, smells and sounds of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her mother's employment

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls the death of her mother

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone remembers living with her sister after her mother's death

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls living with her brother in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone remembers returning to her father's home in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her experiences at W.P. Davidson High School in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her experiences at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her decision to transfer to Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her preparation for college

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her experiences at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her early aspirations to become a doctor

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about majoring in psychology at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her first job in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls her decision to attend the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her experiences at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes her experiences at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone remembers moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone recalls the start of her relationship with Eric H. Holder, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about balancing her family and career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Sharon Malone remembers raising her children

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her social life in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her medical practice, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her focus on patient care

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her medical practice, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone reflects upon her medical career

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about the changes in obstetrics and gynecology

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about the challenges of practicing medicine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about medical malpractice lawsuits

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her husband's appointment as U.S. attorney general, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her husband's appointment as U.S. attorney general, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Sharon Malone describes the challenges of her husband's role as U.S. attorney general

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about coping with having a public life

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone reflects upon the Obama administration

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about the book 'Slavery By Another Name'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her paternal uncle

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about the post-Reconstruction era

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Sharon Malone talks about researching her genealogy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Sharon Malone reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Sharon Malone reflects upon the legacy of her generation

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. Sharon Malone narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. Sharon Malone narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Dr. Sharon Malone describes her sister's first day at the University of Alabama
Dr. Sharon Malone talks about her paternal uncle
Transcript
Vivian [Vivian Malone Jones] was an amazingly courageous woman, young woman. And I think about that, and I think about that a lot now, because was--I have a daughter [Maya Holder] who is the age that Vivian was when she went to the University of Alabama [Tuscaloosa, Alabama]. And I think as a parent--and I think about my parents [Bertha Davis Malone and Willie Malone], I said, now, it's 1963, and 1963 was, was a particularly violent year in Alabama. We had had, you know, Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] had written a 'Letter from Birmingham Jail,' you know, the children's march [Children's Crusade] with all those iconic pictures of dogs being, you know, put on children and the fire hoses. This all happened the month before she was to challenge, you know, had to go and register at the University of Alabama. And so that June 11th with all of that in mind, she had to go and my parents couldn't go with her. The lawyers from the justice department [U.S. Department of Justice] said--they came and got Vivian and James [James Hood], and they were trying to--because they really had to rehearse, they had to prepare, you know, "What are you going to do if they spit on you, if they yell," whatever. You know, to kind of get them to settle down. You know, they'd never been in front of cameras before, and they were trying to, you know, walk them through that process, and they said, my parent, my parents shouldn't come. So that first week before the challenge actually took place, they had Vivian and James--they were staying at, literally, an undisclosed location, because the--two weeks before that the only hotel that they could have stayed at in Birmingham [Alabama], the Gaston hotel [A.G. Gaston Motel], was bombed. So they didn't want people to know where they were, and they were staying in private homes. They were staying at one of her lawyer's. They had a local counsel, Arthur Shores, who is a civil rights lawyer now in Birmingham. And Vivian stayed with his secretary, and James stayed with someone else, so if anybody wanted to get to them, they wouldn't know where they were. And they didn't surface until this actual--this confrontation, the day on June 11th. And my parents couldn't be there. And they didn't know--and as this whole thing was unfolding, this is before twenty-four hours news cycle and cell phones, my parents literally didn't know what happened. And I can't imagine it. That your daughter is--and you know what people are capable of doing. They've done it. And so they confront the governor [George Wallace]. There was no coverage in the press in Mobile [Alabama], my hometown. They didn't, they didn't mention it, because--I don't know why they didn't. They just didn't. They didn't cover it, so my parents had to wait, you know, wait that evening to get a phone call to see if everything was okay. And, you know, after confronting the governor and she made it through, and she got to her dorm, she thought, okay, I made it, you know. No one shot me on the way in or did anything. And that night, she went to bed and woke up the next morning, and that was the night that Medgar Evers was shot and killed in his driveway on that, after midnight, that same day. And that was also the day that John F. Kennedy [President John Fitzgerald Kennedy] made his--the president made his famous speech on race. The governor, they confronted the governor in the afternoon, Nick Katzenbach [Nicholas Katzenbach] was down there with her, the president made his famous speech on race; Medgar Evers was shot and killed. This is all in less than twelve hours on June 11th.$$That's amazing. And your par- you're right about parents back then, but, you know, there was--it was surprising, and that's not everyone 'cause we hear about the courage- you know, the ones that went forward. But there were a lot of people not, you know, that didn't have that courage, but there was--there was this belief that you, you know, to be the first to, to go ahead to try to make change. You know, there was a lot that.$But how did you unearth the story? That's what--okay. So I understa- is it through genea- so you, you described that, you know, you knew your uncle. He was crotchety or--$$Right.$$--you know.$$Right.$$But how do you unearth the story?$$Because, you know, it, it requires a little detective work, and my uncle, you know--this is my dad's older brother. So there was this family story about Uncle Henry [Henry Malone], and you know, how you--you always hear it, but you--it doesn't make any sense to you. Uncle Henry--so when you're talking about now, it can't be any more than the 1920s, early 1920s. And Uncle Henry used to always tell his grandkids and talk about--he said, that he had, that he had to serve a year and a day; a year and a day. And, you know, and we never understood. It was, like, that was a story I didn't hear probably until, you know, ten years ago. And it never dawned on me. When you serve a year and a day, and it's 1920 and you're black in Alabama. Where do you go? You know, there is no, there is no prison. There were no long term prison facilities for anybody to be put away. You have jail, and then from jail, from there you were parceled out to, you know, work. You were on a farm, you're on a chain gang. You were doing something, but you were not sitting around lifting weights in prison. And that's when the first time, you know, I had that aha moment. It's like, that explains a lot of Uncle Henry's behavior. You know, the fact that, you know, that he drank. That he was churlish and he was whatever. And he was just a, you know, and that's the only man I knew. Now, if you can imagine. I only knew my dad [Willie Malone] as an old man. I knew my dad's older brother as a very old man, and I, I never understood him. Never understood him. And, you know, when I found that story, I--it made a little bit more sense to me.$$So you were actually interviewed (cough), you know, for--so after Doug [Douglas A. Blackmon]--I'm sorry, did the book ['Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II'] and then you were actually--then there was the documentary ['Slavery by Another Name'].$$(Nods head).$$And so can you talk about that then?$$Yeah. The documentary actually came up, probably three years--three or four years after the--after he wrote the book. So he and I had been in contact, you know, for all that time. And every time I would find something out about my family history, you know, Doug and I would talk about it. He's a fascinating guy. So, and again, that's how we were in lockstep. And then when he was going back to try to find people, he said, "Would you mind telling your story, you know, about your uncle?" And that's how I got into that. But that was a good--a good three years after we'd established contact, and I read his book.

Artis Hampshire-Cowan

Academic administrator Artis Hampshire-Cowan was born in Mobile, Alabama on February 5, 1955. In 1976, she graduated with honors from Morris Brown College with her B.A. degree in Business Management. Three years later, she received her J.D. degree from Temple University Law School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. After graduation, she served as Assistant District Attorney in Philadelphia, whereupon she moved to Washington, D.C. For twelve years, Hampshire-Cowan worked with the government of the District of Columbia. She held such positions as Congressional lobbyist with the Office of Intergovernmental Relations; Chief of the Office of Compliance at the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs; Historic Preservation Development Expert; and Senior Advisor/Attorney Advisor to the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and City Administrator. Hampshire-Cowan also served as General Counsel at RFK Stadium; she served as in-house counsel and the chief negotiator for several sports initiatives including the Redskins/District proposal to construct a new Redskins stadium in the District of Columbia and subsequently served as Special Counsel to County Executive Wayne Curry’s successful construction of the Redskins Stadium in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

In 1991, Hampshire-Cowan co-founded and later served as president of Bright Beginnings, an organization that aims to meet the needs of
homeless children by providing families with childcare and on-site therapeutic and family support services. In 1994, Hampshire-Cowan joined the Board and also served as president (2005-2007) of the Prince George’s Community Foundation, which supports and grants funds to the County’s nonprofit organizations. Hampshire-Cowan, a graduate from the Stephen Covey Leadership Center, is a certified trainer for the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Principle Centered Leadership, and First Things First. She has provided training for boards of directors and executive management in higher education, business, government, and nonprofit community-based organizations. Currently, Hampshire-Cowan is Senior Vice President and Secretary of Howard University. In this role, she serves as corporate secretary of the University; manages the affairs of Howard's Board of Trustees; and plans and manages all official functions of the University, including Opening Convocation, Charter Day, and Commencement.

In 1993, Hampshire-Cowan served as Prince George's County Executive appointee on Superintendent Selection Committee. In 1994 and 1998, she Co-Chaired Prince George's County Executive's 1994 Education Transition Committee. In 1998, Hampshire-Cowan was appointed by Governor Glendening as Chairperson, Management Oversight Panel, Prince George’s County Public Schools. Hampshire-Cowan was granted the Power 150—People Who Make Things Happen Award by the Washingtonian Magazine in 2007 and the Women Who
Mean Business Award by the Washington Business Journal in 2008. In 2009, Hampshire-Cowan was featured in the Washingtonian Magazine’s 100 Most Powerful Women, and in 2010, she was named to the 2010 Prince George’s Suite Top 100
“Who’s Who of Prince George’s County and Who’s Who in Black Metropolitan Washington, DC.” Hampshire-Cowan currently resides in Mitchellville, Maryland, with her husband, Ernest. They have
two children, Carri and Ernest, Jr.

Artis Hampshire-Cowan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 27, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.060

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/27/2010

Last Name

Hampshire-Cowan

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Temple University Beasley School of Law

Morris Brown College

Mattie T. Blount High School

Trinity Gardens Middle School

Trinity Evangelical Lutheran School

First Name

Artis

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

COW02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Gulf Shores, Alabama

Favorite Quote

Your Word Is Your Bond.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/5/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens (Collard)

Short Description

Academic administrator Artis Hampshire-Cowan (1955 - ) served as vice president for human resource management, senior vice president and acting president at Howard University in Washington, D.C. She also acted as general counsel of the RFK Stadium authority, and special counsel to Wayne Curry.

Employment

Office of the District Attorney of Philadelphia

District of Columbia

Howard University

Leverage Leadership Group LLC

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Artist Hampshire-Cowan's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Artis Cowan-Hampshire talks about her paternal family's land ownership

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her father's upbringing and employment

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers baseball games with her father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her mother's civic involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about Mardi Gras in Mobile, Alabama, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about Mardi Gras in Mobile, Alabama, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her family's Sunday routine

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers the summers

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls the start of her schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan reflects upon her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her education at Lutheran schools

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers her family's activism against segregation

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her paternal uncle's police assault

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan reflects upon her experiences of segregation in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers judging the Azalea Trail Maids contest in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about the political influences in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers school integration in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her activities at Mattie T. Blount High School in Eight Mile, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her summer program in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers her decision to study business

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her start at Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her experiences at Morris Brown College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her hairstyle

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers her introduction to African American history

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her decision to study law at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her undergraduate and law school classmates

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes Temple University Law School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers her law school professors

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers her attempt to visit Ghana

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her early law career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls serving as an assistant district attorney in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about Reverend Dr. W. Wilson Goode, Sr.'s mayoral administration

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her role in Mayor Marion Barry's administration

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan reflects upon Mayor Marion Barry's achievements

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about the responsibilities of elected officials

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about the importance of workplace relationships

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes the founding of Bright Beginnings

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls Wayne Curry's leadership in Prince George's County, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about the impact of Bright Beginnings in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her career at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan remembers Joyce Ladner's leadership of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her work in the Prince George's County Public Schools

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan reflects upon her work at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her experiences as Howard University's social events coordinator

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her motivational speaking career

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her board service

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her community in Prince George's County, Maryland

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan talks about her children

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes her father's support

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan shares her advice to young female professionals

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Artis Hampshire-Cowan narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Artis Hampshire-Cowan recalls her role in Mayor Marion Barry's administration
Artis Hampshire-Cowan describes the founding of Bright Beginnings
Transcript
So, you, you really wanted to get out of Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] at a certain point. You thought that it was maybe the best--?$$Yeah, and I think the other thing is that in one of my summer internships while in law school [Temple University Law School; Temple University Beasley School of Law, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] was at the Federal Trade Commission and I met this guy named Ernest Cowan [Ernest Cowan, Sr.], who was working there as an accountant. And he was smart and fun and, and we dated and so we had this weekend relationship and I was curious, you know, whether it was just the weekend or what, and what can I tell you, thirty years later (laughter) we're together and two kids [Carri Cowan and Ernest Cowan, Jr.] later. So, it was, it was--clearly I did not want to be a prosecutor anymore, and Philadelphia was not a place I wanted to live. I really do like a more southern lifestyle, single family detached homes and a place you raise your kids, so Washington [D.C.] was more the kind of city I wanted to live in and so I sought employment opportunities and was in district government for twelve years and had a phenomenal career in the Barry administration.$$So, so, when did you arrive in, in D.C.?$$Nineteen eighty [1980].$$Okay, 1980, okay. So, Barry [HistoryMaker Marion Barry] was elected about what?$$Nineteen seventy-nine [1979]. He's, his--$$Okay, so he was fresh.$$Yeah.$$Okay. All right.$$His administration was one year old when I came, and I have to tell you I met some of the brightest people ever. I know people look at Mayor Barry now and make jokes about it but at the height of his game in the first Barry administrations, it was really a role model. I mean, he recruited outstanding African Americans from all over the country; gave them responsible jobs and great opportunity. I came in 1980 and did legislative work. I eventually became part of a team with Carol Thompson Cole to redo the regulatory functions in the city, I directed compliance, became her attorney as deputy mayor and then she was city administrator. I was her attorney and chief of staff. When the Redskins [Washington Redskins] were at the height of their dominance in the NFL [National Football League], we needed to build a new stadium and I was given the responsibility to represent the city in negotiating a new Redskins stadium. That was an unbelievable experience. Dealing with Jack Kent Cooke, you know, day to day, up close. And then when the deal did not work in D.C., because Mayor Barry left office and Sharon Pratt Kelly [HistoryMaker Sharon Pratt] came in, then there was talk of coming out here to Prince George's County [Maryland] and I had become politically involved and living in Prince George's County and [HistoryMaker] Wayne Curry retained me as his special counsel on negotiating the Redskins stadium deal here. So I still got to work on the Redskins deal even though it didn't happen in--$$So the stadium was actually here in P.G. County?$$Yes, it is. Yes, it's now called FedExField, it was Jack Cooke Stadium [Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover, Maryland] when it was constructed. And we had really exceptional--again, this was a Barry attribute, I believe, because I grew up professionally and the Barry administration had been involved in ensuring that there was minority participation in major deals in the District, I was able to write a similar plan here in Prince George's County that proved to be successful in the construction of the stadium in terms of job opportunities, training, apprenticeships, as well as contracting opportunities for minority business.$Talked about some of the activities, but you've done a lot of things. You did, did a lot of things for the city, and you worked for the, the District of Columbia f- until--from I guess 1980 until 1992?$$Let's see. I left the District in '92 [1992]. I did, I left the stadium authority in '92 [1992] and I came to Howard University [Washington, D.C.], and--$$Now, before you, you came to Howard, though, you founded Bright Beginnings [Washington, D.C.].$$Yes$$So maybe we should talk about that.$$Yes. Yes. Well, you know the '80s [1980s] was the height of homelessness in Washington and, and sort of an area that had not gotten a lot of attention was children. Children are impacted by homelessness.$$Now, to tell the truth, now Washington, D.C. was home to a couple of big crises in the '80s [1980s]: the first big crack [crack cocaine]--$$Right.$$--epidemic to hit the nation was here--$$Right. That's true.$$--in the '80s [1980s] with these--$$It's true.$$--skyrocketing--$$It's true.$$--killings and, and murders, you know.$$Yep. Yep. It was a terrible time. And, you know drugs were many times part of the equation in homelessness as well. But there was a woman I met in a program, Leadership Washington [Leadership Greater Washington, Washington, D.C.], Marti Kipner [ph.]. She's a lawyer at par- Patton, Boggs and Blow [Squire Patton Boggs]. She was president of the Junior League and she actually approached me about joining the Junior League because she said she really wanted to bring diversity to the Washington Junior League and--$$Can you describe what the Junior League is for those watching this who have no idea?$$Okay. The Junior League of Washington [Washington, D.C.]--all over the country, they're all over the country. It is an organization that is focused on getting young women, actually under forty, involved in doing volunteer work to improve the community. But the Junior League is also thought to be the elite, the blue bloods of the Mayflower [Mayflower Society]. I mean, it's sort of their, you know, reputation. And so when I was first approached by this, it certainly wasn't an organization I had any interest in joining or saw me spending my volunteer time in their activities, but when Marti approached me as she was coming into the presidency, about how she wanted to truly make it a diverse organization and figure out a way to attract more African American women, I also didn't see my time and energy in being a part of an organization that helped white folks understand black people; that just wasn't where I was at the time. But we enjoyed a good relationship, and about a year and a-half later she called me and said that they were applying for a demonstration grant to start a daycare center for homeless children and needed my help with the city in terms of navigating the building permit, zoning process facilities and that's the way I became involved. I was then asked to be a member of the founding board for Bright Beginnings, the daycare center and I had to join the Junior League to be a board member because they wanted all the board members to be Junior League members. But as a result of that, I really got up close to understand all of the issues in homelessness because the city's policy, of course they housed them in apart- in hotel rooms, basically, but they were required to leave by nine o'clock each morning and could not return until five in the afternoon. So basically, during the middle of the day they were just out and about, and they were out and about with their children. Now, they were--of course, were supposed to be out looking for employment or trying to find resources, and so there was an acute need for a daycare center for homeless children and we you know established it, the demand was unbelievable. I mean, we were, you know, the only facility at the time so there was lots of demands, lots of requirements. And at one point I ended up being chair of the board and the executive director was in a car accident, so I actually had to take on the role of running the center, so I got up close the experience of running a service delivery nonprofit: making a payroll, delivering services based on limited contracts and reimbursement we got from the city, but basically relying on the good will of people to help support, you know, meeting an important cause and demand.$$So, you were the founding I think--$$I was on the founding board of Bright Beginnings (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) You were board president. Right, okay.

Moni T. Law

Activist attorney, Moni T. Law was born on February 11, 1960 in Mobile, Alabama to Norma and Moody Law. Law grew up in Inglewood, Pomona and Claremont, California, attending Condit Public Elementary School in Claremont. Law graduated from Claremont High School in 1978 and attended the University of California at Berkeley. There, Law was very active, organizing rallies and protests against apartheid and nuclear weapons development and running for student body representative.

Law earned her B.S. degree in 1982, and the following year, began working as a clerk in the law offices of Nathan A. Richardson & Associates in Oakland, California. Law also worked as director of Unitas’ Campus Ministry’s Hunger Action and Education Center, organizing clothing and food drives. In 1985, Law took a job with the San Francisco Lawyers’ Committee for Urban Affairs, then with the city attorney’s office as a law clerk. Law earned her J.D. degree in 1986 from the University of San Francisco and worked for Yakima, Washington’s Evergreen Legal Services.

In 1991, Law was awarded the YWCA’s Women of Achievement in the Professions Award. Law began working for the law firm of Blaine Tamaki & Associates in 1995, while serving as a pro tem judge in Yakima’s juvenile court system. Law taught as an adjunct professor with Heritage College in 1996. Law was named a “Rising Star” in Washington Law and Politics magazine in 2000, the same year she began working for Levinson Friedman, P.S. of Seattle and represented clients in a variety of cases that included sexual harassment suits and wage claims.

In 2002, Law established her own law office, which specializes in personal injury and employment cases, particularly with regard to sexual harassment, discrimination and disability. In 2003, Law became a film producer after the start of the Iraq War, creating a documentary film, Female Faces of War, that focused on women’s roles in the conflict in Iraq. Law was the Legal Redress Chair for the Alaska/Oregon/Washington State Conference for the NAACP, is an active member of the Washington State Trial Lawyers Association and the Loren Miller Bar Association. Law joined the King County Washington Women Lawyers Board of Directors in 2007. In October of 2007, Law became Bar Leaders Program Manager with the Washington State Bar Association.

Law was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 28, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.311

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/28/2007

Last Name

Law

Maker Category
Middle Name

T.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Claremont High School

Condit Elementary School

First Name

Moni

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

LAW01

State

Alabama

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

2/11/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Short Description

Employment lawyer Moni T. Law (1960 - ) established her own law office, which specializes in personal injury and employment cases, particularly with regard to sexual harassment, discrimination and disability.

A. J. Cooper, Jr.

Attorney and founder of the National Black Law Students Association, Inc., and the National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc., Algernon (‘Jay’) Johnson Cooper, Jr. was born on May 30, 1944, in Mobile, Alabama. Cooper’s parents were Gladys Catherine Mouton Cooper and Algernon Johnson Cooper, Sr., both graduates of Hampton University; he was also a descendent of the Seminole Chief Osceola. Cooper’s father ran the family-owned Christian Burial Insurance Company. Cooper attended St. Peter Claver Elementary School in Mobile and subsequently went on to the Marmion Military Academy in Aurora, Illinois, in 1958, where he was the first African American student to attend. Cooper graduated in 1962 and followed his two older brothers to the University of Notre Dame to continue his education; there, he majored in Latin American history and earned his B.A. degree. In 1966, Cooper was accepted into New York University’s Law School, at a time where there were only nine African American students enrolled out of six hundred. In the summers, Cooper worked as a summer associate at the law firm of Strasser, Spiegelburg, Freid & Frank. While at New York University Law School, Cooper founded the National Black Law Students Association in 1967.

In late 1967, Cooper joined Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s U.S. Senate staff as an aide in New York. One year later, Cooper joined Senator Kennedy’s presidential campaign, managed the Watts campaign headquarters, and was with Kennedy when he was assassinated. Cooper escorted Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Mays to the funeral ceremony at St. Patrick’s Cathedral and later escorted Coretta Scott King on the funeral train from New York to Washington, D.C. for the senator’s burial at Arlington Cemetery. After earning his law degree in 1969, Cooper moved to Alabama where he became a successful civil rights lawyer and litigator. In 1972, Cooper was elected mayor of Prichard, Alabama, a city of some 50,000 citizens; he was the first African American to defeat a white incumbent in the state of Alabama. As mayor, Cooper founded and served as the first president of the National Conference of Black Mayors.

After serving two terms as mayor, Cooper joined the staff of Moon Landrieu, the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, as Director of the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business. After that, Cooper became executive director of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Cooper became a member of the professional staff of the House Ways and Means Committee, and then subsequently became the Chief of Staff and Tax Counsel to Congressman Harold Ford, Sr. In 1988, Cooper left the Hill and became a partner at the Washington, D.C. firm of Ginsburg, Feldman, and Bress, Chartered. Cooper’s legal specialties included litigation, legislative and administrative law, tax policy, and finance. Cooper was a member of the bars of Alabama and the District of Columbia and resided in Atlanta, Georgia.

Accession Number

A2005.140

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/21/2005

Last Name

Cooper

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Johnson

Schools

Marmion Military Academy

St. Peter Claver Elementary School

University of Notre Dame

New York University

First Name

Algernon "A.J."

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

COO09

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Fairhope, Alabama

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

5/30/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue Ribs

Short Description

Association chief executive, lawyer, mayor, and nonprofit chief executive A. J. Cooper, Jr. (1944 - ) founded the National Black Law Students Association, Inc. and the National Conference of Black Mayors, Inc.

Employment

Strasser, Spiegelburg, Freid & Frank

Senator Robert Kennedy

NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund

Crawford, Fields and Cooper

Prichard, Alabama

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Congressional Black Caucus

Congressman Harold Ford, Sr.

Ginsburg, Feldman and Bress

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of A. J. Cooper, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes religious and racial conflicts in the American South

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing in Lafayette, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his father's career in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his childhood neighborhood in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his childhood activities in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls choosing to attend Marmion Military Academy

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes school desegregation in Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. reflects on civil rights struggles in Mobile, Alabama, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. reflects on civil rights struggles in Mobile, Alabama, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his experiences at Marmion Military Academy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls choosing to attend the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his experiences at the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. reflects on racism within the Catholic Church

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his political activities at the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his studies at the University of Notre Dame

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls his interest in civil rights during the early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his experiences at New York University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes founding the National Black Law Students Association

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes civil rights work at NYU School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes the activities of the National Black Law Students Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls political battles at New York University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his law practice in Mobile, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recounts becoming mayor of Prichard, Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. recalls founding the National Conference of Black Mayors

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. reflects on the work of the National Conference of Black Mayors

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. talks about political concerns in the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his tenure as mayor of Prichard, Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes receiving an award from the National Conference of Black Mayors

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his government work in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his future plans

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his battle with acute depression

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. reflects upon his life and legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - A. J. Cooper, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered