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Rebecca Ford Terry

Lawyer Rebecca Ford Terry was born on January 11, 1959 in Gary, Indiana to Dorothy and Frederick C. Ford, vice president and chief financial officer of Draper and Kramer. Terry graduated from Wirt High School in 1976, and received her B.A. degree in history from Harvard University in 1980. She then earned her J.D. degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1984, and clerked for Judge Harry D. Leinenweber of the Northern District of Illinois and Judge William S. White of the Illinois Appellate Court. In 2008, Terry earned her L.L.M. degree in real estate from John Marshall Law School.

From 1989 to 1994, Terry worked as an attorney at White & Case LLP; and from 1995 to 1998, she served as vice president of litigation and intellectual property at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Terry became the president of Isonford Intermedia and acting director of emerging domestic markets for the Milken Institute in 1998. In 2000, she joined Urban Entertainment, where she served as general counsel until 2002, when she became the senior vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary at Draper & Kramer. In 2010, Terry was named associate general counsel for the City Colleges of Chicago, a position she held until 2013, when she became managing attorney at the Chicago office of the Hardwick Law Firm. In 2017, Terry accepted a counsel position at Scharf Banks Marmor LLC. In addition to her legal career, Terry began writing a movie review column in the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin in 2017. Her movie, book and theater reviews have also been published in the Chicago Reporter, Chicago Tribune, The New York Law Journal, and The Milken Institute Review.

Terry served on the board of directors of numerous organizations, including the Field Museum of Natural History, the Chicago Humanities Festival and the Heartland Society as well as the advisory board of African American Legacy. She also served as co-chair of the Leadership Advisory Committee at the Art Institute of Chicago, and as a trustee of the Goodman Theater. Terry held memberships at the Chicago Bar Association, the National Association of Bond Lawyers and the National Association of Women Lawyers.

Rebecca Ford Terry is married to journalist Don Terry.

Rebecca Ford Terry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.028

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/24/2018

Last Name

Terry

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ford

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Rebecca

Birth City, State, Country

Gary

HM ID

TER09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Barts

Favorite Quote

N/A

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

1/11/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Chocolate

Short Description

Lawyer Rebecca Ford Terry (1959 - ) worked as the president of Istonford Intermedia, senior vice president and general counsel at Draper & Kramer, and associate general counsel for City Colleges of Chicago before joining Scharf Banks Marmor LLC.

Favorite Color

Sea Foam Green

Laurie Robinson Haden

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden was born on December 14, 1972 in Washington, D.C. to Frances Privott Robinson and James Robinson. Haden graduated from Oxon Hill High School in Maryland in 1990, and enrolled at North Carolina Central University, where she was named Miss NCCU. Haden received her B.A. degree in political science in 1994, and went on to earn her J.D. degree from Indiana University School of Law in 1998. She also completed a certificate in entertainment media management at the New York University School of Continuing Education.

Haden first served as a legal intern in the labor management division of the National Football League. From 1998 to 2002, she worked as a labor and employment associate at the New York City law firms of Seyfarth Shaw LLP and Epstein, Becker, and Green P.C. Haden was hired as the assistant general counsel and director of training and development for CBS Broadcasting Inc. in 2002. She was then promoted to vice president and assistant general counsel for CBS Corporation; and was named senior vice president and assistant general counsel in 2009. In 2004, Haden became the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color (CCWC), a non-profit professional organization. In 2012, Haden launched CCWC Live Blog Talk, serving as the host and executive producer. Haden authored several legal-related publications, as well as a quarterly column on diversity in Inside Counsel magazine. She also contributed to the CBS Corporation Diversity Blog. She presented at the American Bar Association, the Inside Counsel Super Conference, the National Bar Association and the Minority Corporate Counsel Association; and served on the board of directors of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Haden has received many awards for her leadership, including the Women's Venture Fund's Highest Leaf Award, the Los Angeles Black Women Lawyer's Power of One Award, the Chicago Black Women Lawyer's Diversity Visionary Award, the New York City Bar Association Diversity Champion Award, and the New York State Bar Association Diversity Trailblazer Award. She was named to the Network Journal's 40 Under Forty List, and was one of Pink magazine's Top 15 Women in Business in 2009. Haden also received the first M. Ashley Dickerson Award, given by the National Association of Women Lawyers, and was recognized as one of the "10 Up-And-Coming African-American Lawyers to Watch" by Diversity & The Bar magazine. She was the recipient of the Indiana University School of Law Distinguished Alumni Award, the Ronald H. Brown Distinguished Leadership Award from the University of the District of Columbia, the National Bar Association's Pinnacle Award, and named the Chambers and Partners 2012 In-House Counsel Up & Coming Lawyer of the Year. Haden also serves on the board of trustees of the Indiana University School of Law. 

Haden and her husband, David Patrick Haden, have one son, David Patrick Haden II. 

Laurie Robinson Haden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 13, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.149

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/13/2016

Last Name

Robinson Haden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Nicole

Schools

New York University School of Professional Studies

Indiana University Maurer School of Law

North Carolina Central University

Oxon Hill High School

Oxon Hill Middle School

Indian Queen Elementary School

First Name

Laurie

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

ROB31

Favorite Season

December

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Jesus Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

12/14/1972

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese

Short Description

Lawyer and nonprofit executive Laurie Robinson Haden (1972 - ) worked as the senior vice president and assistant general counsel of CBS Corporation. She was also the founder and CEO of Corporate Counsel Women of Color.

Employment

CBS Corporation

Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Epstein Becker & Green

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:5454,60:6060,70:6795,78:7530,87:17864,281:18684,292:19340,302:20160,313:22218,321:22574,326:23197,334:24532,347:24888,352:27000,364:28377,394:28701,399:30170,407:30446,412:30929,421:31895,446:32171,451:33137,468:33413,473:33689,478:33965,483:34448,491:34931,499:35207,504:35966,518:36242,523:36518,528:37553,546:37898,552:38450,561:38795,569:39071,574:39485,581:43280,606:46115,634:48385,664:48760,670:49585,686:53355,716:54105,727:54405,732:55080,743:55380,748:55905,757:61745,837:62420,847:62795,853:64370,879:64745,885:65045,890:65420,896:66245,910:66620,916:67670,936:69170,966:69920,978:70895,991:71345,998:72320,1015:77098,1034:77362,1039:78946,1065:79672,1078:83214,1114:83822,1123:84354,1141:84962,1150:85570,1162:85874,1167:86406,1176:87470,1194:87774,1199:89978,1259:90662,1271:92106,1293:92714,1303:93094,1310:93702,1321:94006,1326:95754,1364:96286,1373:103353,1446:104521,1472:104813,1477:108270,1513:109080,1525:110700,1557:111150,1563:112050,1575:112500,1581:114210,1616:115830,1638:116280,1644:123495,1726:125070,1769:128445,1839:128745,1844:129120,1850:130320,1879:133620,1951:135720,1981:140307,1990:141492,2007:142045,2016:147733,2133:148286,2142:148602,2147:148918,2152:150182,2171:150735,2180:151209,2186:151920,2196:152394,2204:152710,2209:153737,2223:155317,2244:156028,2255:156581,2262:161638,2299:162550,2314:163462,2328:165134,2354:165590,2365:167414,2398:167870,2406:168250,2412:168782,2421:169390,2430:171290,2456:174080,2467$0,0:618,8:922,13:2974,50:3506,59:3810,64:6394,157:13178,224:14126,237:14679,246:15232,255:15943,267:16970,283:18471,307:19498,326:21473,357:22342,371:28638,419:29368,430:30244,445:34850,480:36170,499:37050,510:37402,515:40482,563:41362,574:41714,579:43034,598:49323,669:50016,679:51017,695:51402,702:51864,709:53327,732:53635,737:56946,804:57793,817:58948,835:59487,844:59872,850:66417,984:74062,1039:74530,1047:74920,1053:76168,1074:78898,1138:79366,1145:79912,1153:80458,1166:83652,1181:83948,1187:84614,1197:85132,1206:85502,1212:86020,1221:86538,1229:88610,1303:88906,1308:89424,1316:89720,1321:92754,1423:93050,1428:93420,1437:94160,1448:95122,1463:95714,1472:97490,1502:104240,1552:104690,1558:105050,1563:105680,1571:107300,1588:108830,1604:110720,1640:115098,1674:115610,1685:115930,1691:116762,1707:117082,1713:117850,1727:119240,1735
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Laurie Robinson Haden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her mother's education background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her father's legal career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her community in Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early entrepreneurialism

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her favorite television programs

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her early aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her time at Oxon Hill High School in Oxon Hill, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her decision to improve her grades

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her transition to North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls winning the Miss North Carolina Central University pageant

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her political internships during college

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her mentors at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about Harvey Gantt's campaigns for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her internship at the White House

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her decision to attend the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her experiences at the Indiana University School of Law in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her mentors at the Indiana University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her first post-graduate position at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her experiences of discrimination at Epstein Becker and Green, PC

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her time at Seyfarth Shaw LLP

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden remembers her transition to the CBS Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the challenges for men of color in Corporate America

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the organizational structure of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes the accomplishments of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her advice to members of the Corporate Counsel Women of Color

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about generational differences among African American lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls her promotion to senior vice president of the CBS Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about the research on attrition among black female corporate lawyers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls studying media management at New York University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Laurie Robinson Haden recalls launching 'CCWC Live Blog Talk'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her board service for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Laurie Robinson Haden talks about moving to her hometown of Fort Washington, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Laurie Robinson Haden reflects upon her life

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Laurie Robinson Haden describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Laurie Robinson Haden narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Laurie Robinson Haden recalls founding the Corporate Counsel Women of Color
Laurie Robinson Haden describes her diversity requirements for the CBS Corporation's outside law firms
Transcript
I guess more importantly for you, you founded, in 2004, the Corporate Counsel Women of Color [New York, New York], right?$$Yes.$$All right. So tell us how you, or why you founded it and how you founded it, and what its structure is and, you know--$$Well, you know, as I, as I was mentioning about the challenges that we were talking about as law firm associates, everyone had kind of like the same story. They were the only one at their firm. They were not feeling that they were getting quality work assignments. They were struggling to get their billable hours. They needed mentorship. They needed sponsors, so when I went in house [at CBS Corporation], a small group of us, we started to connect people and connecting with people who were women of color, who worked in house at corporations so, you know, again it's the type of situation where people are isolated. You don't know where people are in great number, so we would just meet for dinners just to support one another, let people know you are not alone, and this is well before LinkedIn ever came about, but I decided at one of the dinners, hey, everyone just give me your business card, and I will create a directory, and in this directory, I'm going to, you know, put your name, where you went to law school, your practice areas and then I will print this directory, and I'll mail it to you so that you have it. So I emailed the template for it and I said, "You know, get it back to me in a week," so what happened was, the thirty people who went to the gathering, they forwarded it to their friends and their friends, and within a week, we had identified a total of fifty people, women of color who were in house at corporations, so it was great. And I said, "Well, look, let's do another run of this. Everyone, here's the current list. If there's anyone you know that we're missing, let them know. Get back to us in a week." Well, let me tell you, in a week's time, we had found over a hundred women of color at corporations and that was unheard of. We couldn't believe it. And, you know, that's how Corporate Counsel Women of Color got its start. And today we have over thirty six hundred women of color attorneys that we have identified in corporations around, around the United States and we have what we call CCWC friends and we have over six thousand friends, who are people who work at law firms; so we now are able to reach over ten thousand attorneys of color in the profession.$Can you talk about any of the cases or situations that you deal with as a corporate lawyer for CBS [CBS Corporation]?$$Yeah, I mean, I think what's great is that, you know, CBS law department is sort of like a law firm. We have lawyers from all over who work in our department, and everybody has different practice areas and different specialties, so with respect to my background, I do employment litigation, and our litigation department, we also do defamation law, copyright, trademark law, any litigation that comes up against CBS, one of the lawyers in our department will handle that matter based on their area of specialty. So, you know, it's been a great and rewarding experience, and what I really enjoy is, now I get to work with the law firms, and we get to say to the law firms, "You know, diversity is important, and we want our legal matters staffed with diverse attorneys," and then we can say, "We're going to look at your billing hours and we're going to make sure that the diverse attorneys that you said were going to work on these matters are actually working on the matters," so, you know, it's great to now be the client working with the law firms and, you know, requiring that our legal cases be staffed with diversity.$$So Verizon [Verizon Wireless Communications, Inc.] set a good example that you're--$$Yes.$$--you're following now.$$Verizon and Walmart [Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.]. You know, they have been the consistent leaders in the space of diversity and inclusion. And years ago, Walmart said, "If you do not staff our cases with diverse lawyers, we will cancel you from working on any of our matters," and that's unheard of. You know, but that was a great example for the legal profession in general.

Cornell Leverette Moore

Lawyer and bank executive Cornell Leverette Moore was born on September 18, 1939 in Tignall, Georgia to Jesse L. and Luetta T. Moore. Moore was raised in Statesboro, Georgia and graduated from William James High School in 1957. He received his A.B. degree from Virginia Union University in 1961 and his J.D. degree from Howard University School of Law in 1964. During law school, Moore worked as a staff attorney for the United States Department of Treasury.

After receiving his law degree, Moore worked as a trust administrator for Crocker National Bank. In 1966, Moore became a regional counsel for the Comptroller of Currency, U.S. Treasury Department. He then rejoined the commercial banking world as the assistant vice president and legal officer for the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis from 1968 to 1970. Moore continued to work in banking as the executive vice president and director of Shelter Mortgage from 1970 to 1973, a director of Shelard National Bank from 1973 to 1978 and the president of Hennepin County Bar Foundation from 1975 to 1978. He served as president and CEO of Lease More Equipment from 1977 to 1986, director of Golden Valley Bank from 1978 to 2002; and became senior vice president and general counsel of Miller & Schroeder Financial Inc. in 1986. Also in 1986, Moore became part owner of the professional baseball team, the Minnesota Twins. In 1995, he joined the law firm of Dorsey and Whitney, LLP where he has represented major energy and natural resource companies. In 2004, Moore was elected Grand Sire Archon of the Grand Boulé of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, the first African American Greek-lettered organization.

Moore has served on the boards of many organizations and universities including William Mitchell College of Law, Howard University, Virginia Union University, Minneapolis Public Housing Authority, Twin Cities Diversity in Practice, the Boy Scouts of America, Johnson C. Smith University and Dunwoody College of Technology. He is the recipient of many awards such as the Legacy Award from the Pan African Community Endowment, the Kappa Alpha Psi Distinguished Citizen Award, the Child of America Award and the Whitney M. Young Service Award from the Boy Scouts of America. Cornell Leverette Moore is married to Wenda Weekes Moore and has three children, Lynne, Jonathon and Meredith.

Cornell Leverette Moore was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 15, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.014

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/15/2012

Last Name

Moore

Maker Category
Middle Name

Leverette

Occupation
Schools

Virginia Union University

Howard University School of Law

William James High School

First Name

Cornell

Birth City, State, Country

Tignall

HM ID

MOO16

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Savannah, Georgia

Favorite Quote

If You Don't Ask Anybody For Anything, You Don't Owe Them Anything.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Minnesota

Birth Date

9/18/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Minneapolis/St. Paul

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Calf Liver

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Cornell Leverette Moore (1939 - ) was a partner in the Dorsey and Whitney, LLP law firm, and was elected Grand Sire Archon, Grand Boulé of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity in 2004.

Employment

United States Treasury Department

Northwest National Bank

Shelter Mortage Company

Shelard National Bank

Leverette Weekes and Company

Miller & Schroeder Financial Services

Dorsey and Whitney, LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:920,19:1380,24:4022,74:5117,100:10690,204:11010,209:11330,214:11890,224:12370,232:13090,253:21222,317:23090,334:23860,349:33263,537:33608,543:37058,612:43180,738:52170,941:66630,1129:78080,1427:78850,1469:82469,1542:86270,1619:86660,1626:86920,1631:87245,1637:90495,1726:91080,1738:91470,1745:99588,1866:103083,1916:114254,2094:128190,2374:129455,2428:129785,2436:130800,2455$0,0:5200,109:7920,175:8400,181:11360,279:11760,285:16880,371:17280,377:24800,576:25120,581:31570,661:39464,741:39760,750:51066,987:58514,1078:58906,1230:67308,1296:67656,1309:70535,1342:71300,1353:77760,1566:80754,1581:81066,1586:81456,1592:82236,1644:85980,1704:94411,1841:106840,2068:117210,2269:117720,2275:118536,2293:128995,2484:129970,2501:130345,2507:130945,2519:131620,2533:138835,2634:139310,2640:139785,2646:154747,3061:170003,3290:175538,3367:182669,3468:199588,3851:199903,3857:200407,3866:206450,4018
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore narrates his photographs

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of Cornell Leverette Moore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore shares a story about his maternal uncle, Lonnie Leverette

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his maternal aunts and uncles

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his early interest in music

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the integration of the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers segregation in Statesboro, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his watch collection

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his high school graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes the technological advancements during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Statesboro, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his early impressions of African American attorneys

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his aspiration to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers his classmates at Virginia Union University in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his mentors at Virginia Union University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his activism with the Richmond Improvement Association

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about The Valentine museum in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his graduation from Virginia Union University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls attending Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his influences at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his first position in the U.S. Department of the Treasury

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls passing the bar examination

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers moving to San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his interview at the Crocker-Citizens National Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his position as counsel to the national bank examiners

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his position at the Northwestern National Bank in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls campaigning for Hubert Humphrey

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his work at the Shelter Corporation of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his civic engagement in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the African American leadership in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his experiences of discrimination in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers founding the Shelard National Bank in St. Louis Park, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his clientele at Robins, Davis and Lyons in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers the film, 'How the Midwest Was Won'

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls representing professional athletes at Robins, Davis and Lyons

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his representation of the National Football League Players Association

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers meeting O.J. Simpson

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls financing the Grande Royale Hometel, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls financing the Grand Royale Hometel, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers becoming a minority owner of the Minnesota Twins

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minnesota Twins baseball team

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his work at Miller and Schroeder Financial, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers Minneapolis Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the election of Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls the changing racial demographic of Minneapolis, Minnesota in the late 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore recalls joining the law firm of Dorsey and Whitney LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his experiences at Dorsey and Whitney LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his role on charitable boards

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minneapolis Aquatennial festival

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his involvement with the Boule

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cornell Leverette Moore reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Cornell Leverette Moore remembers being profiled on 'November Magazine'

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Cornell Leverette Moore talks about his wife's career

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Cornell Leverette Moore describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

10$5

DATitle
Cornell Leverette Moore recalls his interview at the Crocker-Citizens National Bank
Cornell Leverette Moore talks about the Minnesota Twins baseball team
Transcript
The interview goes like this. Mr. Emmett Solomon was the chairman of the board of Crocker-Citizens National Bank [San Francisco, California], the fourteenth largest bank in the world in 1964. And I had done some work on a file of theirs in the [U.S.] Supreme Court--in treasury law, some underling work. And so he said, "Would you like to be the assistant to the chairman of the board of the bank? In the mornings, you'll come down to the train with Joe [ph.], the driver, and meet me. And the meetings I don't wanna go to like the audit committee of the chamber of commerce or the finance committee of the museum, I don't feel like being bothered, you go and you report back to me. And certain things I'll ask you to do around the office. Just when we go to meetings, you'll take notes and hand me stuff." I said, "You know, Mr. Solomon, I don't know how to say this to you, but I really don't wanna be in that job. I want to be a management trainee." The man said, "Are you serious?" I said, "Yes, sir. That's what I wanna be." 'Cause I hadn't passed the bar. I couldn't be a lawyer. He said, "Now, I offered you this job, and you didn't take it." And I said, "No, sir. That's what I wanna be, 'cause I heard of white boys being management trainees. That's the job I took in the trust department [U.S Department of the Treasury]." He had me sign a letter that he had offered me this big time job, and I use that in my speeches, along with my genius speech, is that if we don't tell our kids what's going on, they'll never know. Now, they can see it on TV and all kinds of things, but there's still things they don't know. But nobody ever told me, and people ridicule me and say, "Why do you keep telling people that stupid story?" I said, "Because people learn by others' mistakes." And that's a mistake that I try and tell kids all over the country. Know something about the job before you apply for it. So I took the job; turned out not to be very good at it (laughter) because it was with a computer and with a calculating stuff. But I made it through the day. I mean I made it through the training program and what not, but I could see I was going nowhere in this job, and I couldn't find another job 'cause I didn't take the California bar. I knew I couldn't pass it. It was too tough for me, and I had forgotten all the law I knew. So I called the comptroller of currencies. He said, "Come back to Washington [D.C.]."$Let me go back, back track and ask you about, now, I'm, I'm sure there are other pla- players, you know, you know, in the history of the Minnesota Twins. But, but these were World Series, I think, were particularly important. I mean Kirby Puckett was particularly important--$$Kirby Puckett, he was the man. Kirby Puckett was the man, of course, you know, and there's other guys. But as we said, "Touch 'em all," Kirby Puckett, "Touch 'em all, we'll see you tomorrow night when he hits the home run." And then the one time, he climbed the wall and got it. Kirby was the only player that knew, that asked me did I own part of the team. They'd see me, but they didn't know why I was around. In fact, the day they bought, we bought the team and announced it, my son [Jonathan Moore], who is now bigger than I am, was a little boy. And he sat on Mrs. Pohlad's [Eloise O'Rourke Pohlad] knee at the ceremony because there were no more seats available. And no one ever asked why that little boy was sitting on Ms. Pohlad's knee. They always thought that somebody--they knew that Pohlad [Carl Pohlad] had a partner. But they never knew it was me unless they--if they asked me--if they told me they knew, I'd say, yes. But if they asked me, I wasn't supposed--you know, I could fudge it. So that was the first thing. Then we took a lap around the field, Wenda [Moore's wife, HistoryMaker Wenda Weekes Moore] and I, and my friend, Sid Kaplan [ph.], who took the bar exam with me was the only guy I studied with and I took the bar exam. We stayed friends until this day. His wife loved baseball and so they took a round. So they assumed that I was there with Sidney, I guess. Nobody ever assumed that I was the other owner of the Twin [Minnesota Twins] 'cause Woolley [Robert E. Woolley] never came around. He lived in Arizona. He didn't care. See, my theory for Woolley is, he lived in Tampa [Florida] and Phoenix [Arizona], and neither one had a time. I think Pohlad was gonna try and get us to move to one of those places--$$Okay.$$--because it took 60 percent for him to keep the team here. He only had 55. So he was gonna blame it on us. That's my theory. I've never said it publicly, but that's what I'm telling you my theory was. But Kirby, the first trip to the White House [Washington, D.C.], I didn't go. Woolley went. The second trip to the White House I flew with the team--this is '91 [1991]. We're on the plane, and I'm sitting up with the owner and management up in first class. The players had a three seater, one seat between them folded down with the wife against the window or vice versa. And Chili Davis says, "Who's that ol' black guy up there with Pohlad? Is that his driver?" And that's when Kirby said, "That's Mr. C [HistoryMaker Cornell Leverette Moore]. Look at your checks sometimes. He signs the checks every now and then." And said, "Don't you see? He's already got on a ring. You haven't even gotten yours yet." And that's when it came out, the word came out then that we had a--part ownership of the team. And people started, you know, they'd see me at the game, they'd see in a box, but the company I worked for had a box. So they finally just figured that's why I was there. But I'd be in the owner's box, and I'd be in the press box, eating hot dogs with the press and all. And it was, it was a fun time; didn't go on any trips with the team, just wasn't my thing. And I didn't, I had a pass to any ballpark, and I'd go places, and I'd show off every now and then for my friends and say, let's go to the game, and stay for an inning or two and then leave, you know, right from the owner's box and what not. But it was fun, it was a fun time.$$Well, you were around during the right time. For real, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Oh, yeah, the only two they've got. There're other minority owners of teams in the country, but I don't think anybody's got two World Series rings. Somebody may have one, but I don't think anybody's got two yet.

Cheryl Blackwell Bryson

Corporate lawyer Cheryl Blackwell Bryson was born on May 28, 1950 in Baltimore, Maryland to Connie Blackwell and Clarence D. Blackwell. Bryson received her B.S. degree from Morgan State University, graduating magna cum laude in 1972. In 1977, Bryson received her J.D. degree from Ohio State University, College of Law. She was the associate editor of Ohio State University’s Law Journal in 1976.

From 1976 to 1980, Bryson worked as a labor law associate for the law firm Friedman & Koven. She was then an associate at Katten, Muchin & Zavis, in Chicago, Illinois from 1980 through 1989. Bryson also worked as the Deputy Corporation Counsel for the City of Chicago Law Department where she established the Labor Relations Division and directed contract administration and collective bargaining for the city's 35,000 unionized employees. From 1989 to 1992, Bryson was a partner at the law firm of Bell, Boyd & Lloyd, in Chicago. She was a partner at Rivkin, Radler & Kremer from 1992 to 1995 and at Holleb & Coff from 1995 to 1999. Since 1999, Bryson was a partner at Duane Morris LLP where she was head of the Chicago office's Employment Law and Management Labor Relations Practice and a former member of the firm’s board of managers. A frequent author and lecturer on labor and employment law issues, Bryson was a member of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association, the Labor and Employment Law Committee of the Chicago Bar Association and the Cook County Bar Association. She successfully defended both public and private sector employers from unfair labor practice charges and directed employer's strike planning when a union threatened to strike. Bryson also successfully defended a major bank before the Chicago Commission on Human Relations against claims of sexual discrimination. She counseled a client in the securities industry on efforts to coach senior executives on effective management strategies, reductions in force, workforce restructuring and litigation avoidance.

Bryson served on numerous boards as an advisor and trustee including The DuSable Museum of African-American History, The Neighborhood Institute Development Corporation, and the Cook County Economic Development Advisory Committee. In addition, Bryson was part of Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich’s transition team. She was the recipient of numerous awards including the Hermann Sweatt Award from the National Bar Association in 2007.

Bryson passed away on January 20, 2012 at age 61.

Accession Number

A2008.138

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/20/2008

Last Name

Bryson

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Elmer A. Henderson Elementary School

Clifton Park Junior High School

Eastern High School

Morgan State University

The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

BRY02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/28/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Death Date

1/20/2012

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Cheryl Blackwell Bryson (1950 - 2012 ) was a partner at the law firm of Duane Morris LLP, and served as the Deputy Corporation Counsel for the City of Chicago Law Department, where she directed contract administration and collective bargaining for the city's 35,000 unionized employees.

Employment

Friedman and Koven

Katten Muchin and Zavis

City of Chicago

Bell Boyd and Lloyd, LLP

Rivkin Radler LLP

Holleb and Coff

Duane Morris

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cheryl Blackwell Bryson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about interracial relationships in the 19th century

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her mother's community in Atmore, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her mother's early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her white family members

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her mother's early education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her mother's experiences of color discrimination within the black community

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her paternal great-grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her paternal family's migration to Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers her father's stories about the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls lessons from her father and grandfather about money management

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers her white neighbors in East Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell talks about segregation in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls attending an experimental elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers Matthew Henson

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her early influences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers Clifton Park Junior High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her early civil rights activities

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her experiences at Eastern High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her experience at Eastern High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her experiences at Morgan State College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers the March on Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her family's acquaintance with civil rights leaders

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls the riots after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her activism at Morgan State College in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her decision to attend The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her professors at The Ohio State University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her decision to study law

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes the racial discrimination at The Ohio State University College of Law

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her peers at The Ohio State University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers joining the law firm of Friedman and Koven

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about the field of employment law

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about discrimination casework in the public and private sectors

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls her time at Katten Muchin and Zavis

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers serving as deputy corporation counsel for the City of Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about Chicago Mayor Harold Washington and President Barack Obama

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls joining the law firm of Bell Boyd and Lloyd LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her challenges at the law firm of Katten Muchin and Zavis

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers the birth of her children

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers being passed over for a partnership at Katten Muchin and Zavis

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her compensation during her law career

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls how she came to work for Duane Morris LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers the deaths of her husband and eldest son

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her physical health issues

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers adapting to her physical illness

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her experiences at Jackies on the Reef in Negril, Jamaica

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson remembers changing her lifestyle to treat her chronic pain

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her book project on back pain

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson reflects upon her life and her charitable activities

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Cheryl Blackwell Bryson narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Cheryl Blackwell Bryson recalls attending an experimental elementary school
Cheryl Blackwell Bryson describes her challenges at the law firm of Katten Muchin and Zavis
Transcript
I remember the, you know, when integration was beginning to happen. And I remember when in 19--after Brown versus Board of Education [Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954], my parents [Connie McCreary Blackwell and Clarence Blackwell, Sr.] deciding whether we were going to go to the white school, which was down the street and around the corner, or the black school, which was a mile away. And they decided we would go to the black school, you know. And I remember I was a smart--you know, I was a really smart kid; we all were. Because we played school. We'd come home, in our house we played school. My sister [Camellia Blackwell Taffel] taught me; she was a year ahead of me. And I was really smart, but part of it was because that's what I was training on. She'd come and say, "This is what I learned in school." So, I went to school, I knew what she knew. And in summers, I read a lot. So I had, always had really high test scores. And then for many summers, I was in an experimental school over at Johns Hopkins University [Baltimore, Maryland] where they took the kids in the school with the really high test scores. And one of my earliest memories after first grade when they chose me--and then, you know, all the family came around, because it was a white environment. And they would get--telling me, you know, basically, "You're going to be with all these white people, and you're going to be fine." Basically they were saying that because everybody else I had been with in school had been black. And I remember being in that class in the summer. It was a summer program, they were--in those days, they passed kids (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) This was between first grade and second grade [at Elmer A. Henderson School, Baltimore, Maryland]?$$Between first grade and second grade.$$Okay.$$In those days, they passed kids. So they took the really bright kids and, you know, put them in this program. I don't know, you know, what the theory was. But my mother never let me pass, because my sister was a year older than I. So, she didn't think that socially that was a good thing to do to my sister, to have me in the same grade as she. But I remember, I still remember what the teacher looked like. She was a white woman with big bangs, you know, like one of those Beatles haircuts, but that was before The Beatles. And I remember that she would go around the room and pat everybody on the head, and skip me. She never touched me, and I remember trying to figure out why she wouldn't touch me. Because I knew when she passed the test grades back that I almost always had the highest test score, you know. If we had a spelling test, I had a hundred, and other people would have other scores. And I couldn't figure out--because I had come in--I had gone to the black schools for preschool, for kindergarten, and first grade, where I would go up to the teacher in first grade and she would, you know, hug me and show me the work. And I couldn't figure out why this teacher--you know, it was years later. I thought, why was there only two of us black in the room? And she didn't touch me and she didn't touch Allen [ph.], and I couldn't, I didn't make the connection about race. I knew that there was something going on, that they were preparing me to be with these white people. But I didn't--because I liked to learn, I went there and I did what I always did. And I had to figure it out, it was. You know, there were only two--it must have been. I could have been wrong, but I remember she never touched me. And I remember how bad, you know, how bad I felt that she never--that she wouldn't--that she wouldn't--I was used to the teachers acknowledging how smart I was (laughter). And she didn't acknowledge me, and she never touched me. And I knew that I was making good grades, and I couldn't figure it out. And any way, that's one of my early memories. So the discrimination that I actually experienced, you know, we didn't--I didn't experience the cross burnings. I experienced the stories about how mean black people--white people--had been to other people in the family. And we lived with them in the early days, and we lived well with them, as far as I could see, as they were moving away. But that's one of the pain- early painful memories that as a little kid finishing kinder, first grade, that lady never--would walk and touch that kid, and just go on over my head and touch everybody else.$Let's I guess go back to Katten Muchin and Zavis [Katten Muchin and Zavis; Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP, Chicago, Illinois] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) What it was like at a law firm?$$Yeah, yeah. What else was significant about Kachen--Katten and Muchin and Davis [sic.]?$$Katten Muchin.$$Katten Muchin and Davis, yeah.$$Well, I think it was--it was the--you know, before I went to the city, I'd had six years--what was it? Seventy-seven [1977], '78 [1978], '79 [1979], '80 [1980]? How many years? I finished law school [The Ohio State University College of Law; Michael E. Moritz College of Law, Columbus, Ohio] in '77 [1977], and I went to the city in '86 [1986], I think. And during that time, I'd spent all my time in a law firm. I was married, had had two kids [Bradley Bryson and Blake Bryson]. And this was a time when blacks were just beginning to join law firms. And when I first started, the pattern was for the firms to hire blacks--some women--but I'm talking about blacks now, African Americans--hire us, not give us work, and fire us at the end of the year, and say they didn't, that our hours were low. And it was not a pretty sight, because many people came and left, in short order. It was not a welcoming environment; the law firm world was not. People say it's still not. The percentages of African Americans in law firms is relatively low. So, it was a, it was a, it was a tough environment where you--you know, for me, I was always the only one, the first and the only. And I--there was no comfort in that. But we had created (background noise) sort of a network throughout the city, so that many of us at the firms knew each other, and we would call each other up. We were still dropping like flies, but it worked for me, because there were things I liked about practicing law--I'm entrepreneurial. And I liked even--I liked working with the partners to develop the work that I did for myself, and I think it was my entrepreneurial skills. Of course, you're a good lawyer. Everybody's a good lawyer, but can you survive if you're, you know, just being a good lawyer? It was my entrepreneurial skills that allowed me to work with other partners and do what they call bring in business. So, and it was a tough time. Women, there were very few women. And a lot of women who--they didn't--there was a belief that women couldn't have kids and practice law. This was in the, in, you know, this was all cutting edge stuff. In my law school graduating class, I think 15 percent of the class may have been females, and the classes ahead of me would have had fewer females. So, the women came behind me. I was on the cutting edge of those people who, when I came along, there were no maternity leave policies. I helped create one. I just took the work, went home, had the baby and kept working from home until they figured out that I needed to get paid in some way that made sense. I suggested that I get paid by the hour. So, I was one of the pioneers for creating a maternity leave policy. And I, they say that I was one of the first lawyers to show that mothers could practice law. I had to figure out how to play the game of, you know, not working like crazy and going home and taking care of your kid. And then I was the first African American woman to rise up through the ranks in a major law firm to make partner, which is a scary experience. Because as an associate, people give you work, so you have--you make your living by how many, how much work you do. And then you make partner, and it's this fear that you're going to run out of work. So, there were--a lot of people had already left the firm by the time I made partner. And that's not to say that they made decisions, they, bad decisions. They chose other career paths, and my choice was to, to, to go the law firm route.

Michele Coleman Mayes

Michele Coleman Mayes was born on July 9, 1949 in Los Angeles, California to Geraldine and Wilbert Coleman. Mayes graduated from MacKinzie High School in Detroit, Michigan in 1967. She received her B.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1971 and her J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1974.

Mayes taught as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois for two years and then as an Adjunct Professor of Civil Trial Advocacy at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan from 1981 to 1987. Mayes served in the United States Department of Justice from 1976 to 1982 as Assistant United States Attorney in Detroit and Brooklyn. Mayes eventually assumed the role of Chief of the Civil Division in Detroit. In 1982, Mayes entered the corporate sector as managing attorney of the Burroughs Corporation. Her career continued to evolve as the Burroughs Corporation and the Sperry Corporation merged, creating Unisys Corporation, for which she was appointed staff vice president and associate general counsel for Worldwide Litigation. In 1992, Mayes joined the Colgate-Palmolive Company as vice president and associate general counsel. One year later, she was promoted to vice president of Human Resources and their Legal Division for North America. In May 2001, Mayes was promoted to vice president, legal and assistant secretary, and elected a corporate officer. Two years later, she accepted the position of senior vice president and general counsel at Pitney Bowes. In 2007, Mayes was named vice president and general counsel of The Allstate Corporation and senior vice president and general counsel for Allstate Insurance Company.

Mayes is the recipient of numerous awards, including The Margaret Brent Award and
The Trailblazer Award. She was also named one of America's top black lawyers by Black Enterprise Magazine in 2003.

Mayes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 6, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.126

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/6/2008 |and| 12/19/2008

Last Name

Mayes

Maker Category
Marital Status

divorced

Middle Name

Coleman

Occupation
Schools

MacKinzie High School

Thirkell Elementary School

Macculloch Elementary School

Tappan Junior High School

University of Michigan

University of Michigan Law School

First Name

Michele

Birth City, State, Country

Los Angeles

HM ID

MAY04

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Be Yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/9/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Popcorn

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Michele Coleman Mayes (1949 - ) was appointed as vice president and general counsel of The Allstate Corporation, and senior vice president and general counsel for the Allstate Insurance Company.

Employment

Illinois State University

U.S. Attorney's office, Detroit

Unisys Corporation

Colgate Palmolive Company

Pitney Bowes, Inc.

Allstate Insurance

Favorite Color

Amber

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michele Coleman Mayes' interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her mother's parenting style

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her father's profession

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls visiting her relatives in the South

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her likeness to her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her first home in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her household

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her neighbors in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes the sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her personality as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her sister's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her closest childhood friend

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her mother's place of employment

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her family's medical history

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers two of her childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls moving Kendall Street in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers influential teachers from her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her social life

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her family's holiday traditions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls attending David Mackenzie High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her early career aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers the Detroit riots in 1967

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her decision to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers an early experience of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her first semester at the University of Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes the African American community at the University of Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her academic experiences at the University of Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers giving a speech on the 1967 Detroit Riots

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her course load at the University of Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers working at the University of Michigan's dental school

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls working at the University of Michigan Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls attending the University of Michigan Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her brief hiatus from the University of Michigan Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her wedding ceremony

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls teaching at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her position as assistant U.S. Attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her challenges in the criminal division at the U.S. Attorney's Office

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about moving to Dearborn, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls living in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers moving to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls returning to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers the air traffic controllers strike

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her long distance marriage

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about the small African American legal community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls a case she tried as chief of the civil division at the U.S. Attorney's Office

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her experiences as a woman attorney

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her decision to leave the U.S. Attorney's Office

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her decision to practice corporate law

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her first impressions of Burroughs Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls the advice of her African American coworkers

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers Detroit's African American corporate lawyers

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about joining Burroughs Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls the merger of Sperry Corporation and Burroughs Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her challenges at Unisys Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her aspiration to become general counsel

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her decision to join the Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her working relationship with Reuben Mark

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls what she learned at the Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her promotion to vice president of the human resources department

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes shares her advice about leadership

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her mentor Andrew D. Hendry

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls becoming deputy general counsel at Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her international travels with Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about settling Colgate Palmolive Company's legal case in Ecuador

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls mediating a conflict with Colgate Palmolive Company's plant in Nigeria, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls mediating a conflict with Colgate Palmolive Company's plant in Nigeria, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers working with a Nigerian law firm

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about Colgate Palmolive Company's limited success in Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls traveling for the Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about working with patent law at Colgate Palmolive Company

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers Sara Moss's career advice

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls being hired by Pitney Bowes Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls interviewing at Pitney Bowes Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes Pitney Bowes Inc.'s legal department

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about the racial demographics of Fortune 500 company's general counsels

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers her challenges at Pitney Bowes Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her interactions with her staff at Pitney Bowes Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about how she divided legal work at Pitney Bowes Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes Allstate Corporation's legal department

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls chairing a special committee board at Assurant, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers interviewing with the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers Allstate Corporation's CEO, Thomas J. Wilson

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Slating of Michele Coleman Mayes's interview, session 2

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her first impressions of Thomas J. Wilson

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers encountering a weather delay during her interview with the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes the Allstate Corporation offices

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls Michael McCabe's job advice

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her challenges at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes remembers the Allstate Corporation's executives

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls Thomas J. Wilson's description of a photograph

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes the aftermath of her interview with the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her decision to join the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her leadership style

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her hopes for her staff at Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about the role of general counsel

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her goals at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her legal staff at Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about diversity at the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about the insurance industry's regulations

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her first impressions of the Allstate Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her hopes for Allstate Corporation's growth

Tape: 10 Story: 10 - Michele Coleman Mayes talks about her board memberships

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Michele Coleman Mayes recalls changing her outlook on life

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her plan for the future

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Michele Coleman Mayes shares advice for aspiring lawyers

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Michele Coleman Mayes describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Michele Coleman Mayes reflects upon race in America

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Michele Coleman Mayes reflects upon her legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

3$10

DATitle
Michele Coleman Mayes recalls her early career aspirations
Michele Coleman Mayes remembers Sara Moss's career advice
Transcript
In terms of who influenced me, I don't know. My mother [Geraldine Coleman], again, very, very big presence because I announced when I was eleven that I was going to be a lawyer. I announced it to the world. It's very good when you say things out loud because it's hard to go back, and that made me and if you say something stupid, you may do it. But I announced when I was eleven years old and in junior high school [Tappan Junior High School, Detroit, Michigan], I am going to law school. In this order, however. First, I will be a, I will be a stewardess. They were called stewardesses then because there were no flight attendants, so I can fly around and see the world. And as soon as I do that and get that out of my system, mom, I'm going to go to law school. That sounds good to me. So, my mother said I stuck with that plan (laughter) until a huge airline crash happened, and I never talked about it again (laughter). But I went to law school [University of Michigan Law School, Ann Arbor, Michigan]. And I have to laugh. Several years ago, I was interviewing a candidate who'd been a flight attendant and gone to law school. I said, "You're my role model" (laughter). But in any event, that's what I'd set my sights on. People ask, did I have any lawyers in my family? Nope, nobody I knew, although my mother tells me, and I don't--he's in a book somewhere that very early on, one of my relatives in Memphis [Tennessee], a gentleman, was a lawyer. But it's not anybody I ever met, so how could he have influenced me. But who, I think, influenced me the most are two people. One was Perry Mason, don't know him either, but the other was a judge. Go back to my aunt [Katherine Coleman House (ph.)], she's sort--her circle of friends are very professional people. And one of the individuals that I always was around, particularly all the way through high school [David Mackenzie High School, Detroit, Michigan], he eventually acted as the person who married me, was a black Republican which was also a bit unusual back then. He was very much a black Republican. So, he didn't exactly mingle with everyone in the black community because he was dubbed a bit odd for being a Republican, but because he was, he got a lot of appointments, different things, because he was one in the few. He was competent and good, but still, he was one of the few. So, he got appointed to the bench and was a judge for--well, for--until he died, and he didn't die until not that long ago. So, I was around him. When I announced I wanted to go to law school, my aunt, the one, again, that had all these friends, helped me get jobs. She knew who ran the different legal aid offices and the law firms, and she knew all of these black folks in the profession. And she would say, "You know, my niece wants to go to law school. Why don't you let her work in your law firm?" I hadn't even gone to college [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan]. I was just getting into college, and they, they let me do it. So, I was running errands, doing very pedestrian things since I was not hardly qualified to render anybody any advice--didn't have any training. But thanks to her, she was constantly opening doors for me like that, that I took for granted. It was like, "You know I'm down, you call them up and see if you can get me a job." And she would say, "Well, let me see what I can do."$Did Pitney Bowes [Pitney Bowes Inc.] come calling?$$Well, that's a very interesting story. I met, I had lunch with Sara Moss, who was my predecessor at Pitney Bowes, about what--when the marathon was here, for three or four weeks ago, she came to Chicago [Illinois]. And Sara Moss, I met through networking. I think networking is critical. I tell people to network when you don't need to.$$That's true.$$You know, people hate for you to network when they know all you want to do is ask them for something.$$That's true.$$And so, Sara and I met because I was networking with a group of lawyers, all women, most of whom were general counsel. I was deputy general counsel at Colgate [Colgate Palmolive Company]. I was not top dog. But the headhunters knew and thought I was ready to move. As I said to somebody, if I go through one more chair at Colgate, it will be a tomb. I, you know, how many more chairs can I go through? I've done enough. I've trained long enough now, I've over trained. So, the headhunters had me on their rolodex, their Blackberry now, whatever. And so one of the headhunters, she was very clever. All the lawyers she was either thinking about placing, or had placed, she would get together for a day and a half. She'd keep her hand on the pulse, "So how's it going, what are you doing?" And I met Sara, or really--I'd met her once before. I got to know Sara through that networking, and we just had good chemistry. We never worked together. We would just chitchat at these informal gatherings. I get a phone call--I'll never forget this--I get a phone call, a voicemail message in January of '02 [2002]--no. Right? January of '02 [2002]. It's Sara. "Michele [HistoryMaker Michele Coleman Mayes], it's Sara, give me a call." Okay, I give her a call, I get her voicemail. This went on until March. I finally say, "Sara, if you want me to be on a panel, just tell me. I'm tired of playing telephone tag." 'Cause I can never get her on her phone. Finally, in March, I answer my phone and she's on the other end. She said, "Well, I'll be darn, you do exist." I said, "All you had to do was leave a voicemail message telling me what you wanted, Sara." I said, "This has been going on for weeks!" She then says to me, "I have a great job. It is with one of the best jobs I have ever had." I said, "Sara, I'm not much interested." (Laughter) Here goes my big mouth. She said, "Well, I intend to leave it." And then my light goes off. I'm not as slow this time--or maybe I am. She says, "Would you like to be considered?" And that was the beginning of the discussion. And I don't think--Mike Critelli [Michael J. Critelli], the CEOs that I've worked with, have always been very open minded, and I've been really, really lucky. That's Reuben [Reuben Mark], Mike [W. Michael Blumenthal], and now Tom [Thomas J. Wilson] because I don't think I appeal to a certain person or I might--I'm not as radical as I sometimes look. People think I'm radical, and I don't think I am. I'm a little bit outside the box, but I don't consider that being radical, but some people would be somewhere put off by me. So, when Sara mentioned that she was putting the slate together with no outside search firm, she said, "I'm resigning this job." 9/11 [September 11, 2001] had happened. Sara has four kids, they were all at home, except for one. And she was commuting from New York [New York] to Stamford, Connecticut, and it was a real drain on her. And so, she was really reassessing what she needed to do personally. She wanted to find a job in the city, which she subsequently did. She's general counsel for Estee Lauder [The Estee lauder Companies Inc.]--$$Okay.$$--but she quit with no job. So, when she called me and told me that, she said, "I think you are ready, and I'm putting you at the top of the list. I told Mike, why doesn't he save the fees of an outside search firm? If he doesn't like the candidates that I've put in front of him, then hire the search firm, but why doesn't he see what candidates I can bring in on my own?" And then, she coached me through the entire process. We talk on the phone. We would meet. She'd tell me how he was as a CEO, what the company's issues were. She coached me.

Demetrius Carney

Corporate lawyer and Chicago police board president Demetrius Edward Carney was born on April 29, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois to James and Jessie Carney. Carney attended Chicago’s Holy Angels Catholic School and Joachim Junior High School. He went on to graduate in 1969 from De La Salle High School. Afterwards, Carney attended Loyola University where he initially pursued a degree in mathematics, but decided to change his major to psychology.

Carney graduated from Loyola University in 1972 and went on to work as a teacher at Chicago’s St. Ignatius College Preparatory High School. While working as a teacher, Carney was encouraged by a colleague to pursue a law degree. He then enrolled at DePaul University and graduated with his J.D. degree in 1974.

Also in 1974, Carney joined the law firm of Butler, Todd & Tucker. He left the firm in 1977 and partnered with Jerome Butler and formed the private practice of Butler & Carney. Then in 1978, he was hired by Lafontant, Wilkins & Butler and represented several organizations including Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Carney went on to form Carney & Brothers in 1985. He worked there until 1995 when he began working at the law firm of Wildman, Harold, Allen & Dixon, focusing his practice in the areas of real estate development. In 2003, Carney joined the Seattle based-firm, Perkins Coie, where he began specializing in the areas of government relations and lobbying issues.

Carney became the chairman of the Chicago police board. His other affiliations include the Cook County Bar Association, the American Bar Association and the National Bar Association. He serves on the board of trustees at St. Ignatius College Preparatory High School and on the board of directors at the Chicago Culture Center Foundation. Carney is a former commissioner and planning commissioner for the City of Chicago.

Carney lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Carney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 5, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.009

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/5/2008 |and| 4/17/2012

Last Name

Carney

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

De La Salle Institute

Joachim Junior High School

Holy Angels Catholic School

Loyola University Chicago

DePaul University College of Law

First Name

Demetrius

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

CAR15

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Ski The Mountain In Front Of You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

4/29/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Vegetables, Sushi

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Demetrius Carney (1947 - ) was a Commissioner and Planning Commissioner for the City of Chicago, who worked for several law firms including the Seattle based-firm, Perkins Coie, where he specialized in the areas of government relations and lobbying issues.

Employment

St. Ignatius College Prep

Chicago Title and Trust Company

Tucker, Watson, Butler and Todd

Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler

Butler and Carney

Carney and Brothers

Wildman, Harrold, Allen and Dixon LLP

Perkins Coie LLP

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:14801,332:21989,517:22427,524:26223,616:26515,621:28340,672:34618,808:36735,846:37173,853:53990,1149:54310,1154:57750,1220:59990,1276:63830,1369:64470,1378:65030,1438:65510,1445:66630,1462:74515,1515:74965,1522:75715,1534:77515,1582:78340,1639:91990,1923:92890,1941:106262,2051:110277,2157:116117,2271:118526,2323:119037,2332:121300,2384:121592,2389:125023,2445:132025,2508:137200,2615:138175,2631:138625,2638:139300,2650:152170,2819:155400,2876:155910,2883:158460,2925:159480,2941:164240,3054:165090,3065:166875,3113:172822,3157:174736,3210:178310,3272$0,0:4320,77:7120,188:11120,347:11760,356:13760,451:30894,626:31830,639:40098,854:43140,920:49122,1035:49666,1047:50210,1057:50482,1062:57010,1251:58982,1302:59934,1326:60614,1343:61906,1378:67482,1493:74422,1527:76380,1557:78993,1617:80001,1644:83592,1713:84474,1732:84726,1737:84978,1742:86679,1794:87057,1801:87498,1809:90030,1814
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Demetrius Carney's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney describes his father's craftwork

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney remembers moving with his family

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney describes the sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Demetrius Carney recalls the Holy Angels Catholic School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes the sounds of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Holy Angels Catholic School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney describes the racial demographics at the Holy Angels Catholic School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls camping at the Abraham Lincoln Center in Janesville, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney remembers his penmanship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his early interest of reading

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers his family's gatherings

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney recalls moving to a white neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes the Chatham neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his experiences at the St. Joachim School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to attend the De La Salle Institute in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney remembers the De La Salle Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney remembers his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to attend Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney remembers his first teaching position

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney recalls his activism at Loyola University Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney talks about his work ethic

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney recalls teaching at St. Ignatius College Prep in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his admission to the DePaul University College of Law, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his admission to the DePaul University College of Law, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney describes his law school experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers his early legal career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls joining the law firm of Tucker, Watson, Butler and Todd

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls founding a law firm

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney recalls joining the law firm of Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney remembers his legal work for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney remembers his legal work for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his challenges while working for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls founding the Carney and Brothers law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the clientele of his law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney remembers the American Lawyers Consortium, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls the success of his law firm

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney describes his public finance work

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney remembers his mentor, Earl Neal

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Demetrius Carney talks about his medical condition

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes his medical condition, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his medical condition, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to leave Carney and Brothers

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the return of his brain tumor

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls his experience at Wildman, Harold and Dixon LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney recalls his clientele at Wildman, Harold and Dixon

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney recalls his decision to join Perkins Coie LLP

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney talks about diversity in law practice

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney describes his law practice at Perkins Coie LLP

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney recalls his role on the City of Chicago Plan Commission

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his appointment to the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney recalls the fatal shooting of LaTanya Haggerty

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Slating of Demetrius Carney's interview, session 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his tenure on the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney recalls his challenges on the Chicago Police Board

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his career

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney recalls how he began working with airport concessionaires

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney describes his legal work with airport concessionaires

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the history of African American law firms

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney talks about the future of minority law firms

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his legal career

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his career

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Demetrius Carney describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the legacy of his generation

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Demetrius Carney describes his mentorship of young lawyers

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Demetrius Carney talks about racial discrimination in the United States

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon the political history of Chicago

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Demetrius Carney talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Demetrius Carney reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Demetrius Carney describes his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Demetrius Carney recalls founding the Carney and Brothers law firm
Demetrius Carney recalls the success of his law firm
Transcript
(Simultaneous) So now how do you go from Lafontant--to Wilkins and Butler [Lafontant, Wilkins and Butler, Chicago, Illinois], to Carney and Brothers [Carney and Brothers, Ltd., Chicago, Illinois], and where does brothers come into it?$$Okay. When I--are we on film now?$$Um-hm (laughter).$$Oh okay (laughter). Were we on film all that time?$$Yeah we were, but that's fine (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) When--when I--Jewel Lafontant [HistoryMaker Jewel Lafontant-MANkarious] wanted--it was really a firm where you shared space, it's really what it was. Yeah, that's how black lawyers practiced. And I was doing very well on my own. And Jewel wanted to really form a firm, and I didn't wanna--I didn't wanna do that. I just didn't like the economics that they were proposing, you know, in terms of the work I was doing and my clients would become part of the firm. I said, "No my clients are my clients, I developed these clients," you know, I had AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.] then, and you know, they said, "Wherever you go, we go." And so it was just a typical bartering at the time. And so I left with Jerome Butler to form a once again, form Butler and Carney. And I really had a good--had, had really good clients at the time.$$Who were some of your clients (unclear) (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) AKAs, I was starting to do work for Seaway National Bank [Seaway Bank and Trust Company, Chicago, Illinois]. I really developed a very significant real estate practice. I had picked up a couple savings and loans that I was doing--starting to do a little foreclosure work for, started to do a little real estate work. So I was developing a nice little client. You know, I was working really tough, but the, the clients are really starting to come. So I, you know, I didn't want my clients to become clients of her firm and you know, it was just probably more ego, probably would've been to my benefit as I look back, but I didn't wanna do it. So either you join the firm or you had to leave. And so Jerome and I talked about it and we decided that we're gonna leave and form our own firm. And so there was some space in the building with Tom Boodell [Thomas J. Boodell, Jr.], his--he had a firm and they had some space that they were not using on like the sixth floor. So we red- rented a suite of offices there and we started to grow the firm. And what happened was, Jerome Butler, his brother-in-law is Alan Brothers [Alan W. Brothers], so they were related. Jerome was married to Alan's sister. And so Alan was leaving Montgomery Ward and he wanted to come back into private practice, so he became part of the firm. And then right after we started the fi- growing the firm, Jerome became involved in the family-owned business that, you know, was Butler's restaurant. And so he left the practice of law to go ru- to be involved in his family business and Alan Brothers and I were the survivors. So, therefore, it became Carney and Brothers. And so we really--really started to develop the practice. Alan was a tremendous litigator and I had the skill set of developing business. And Alan said, "You just get the business and we'll handle it." So we hired a couple lawyers and I was just very good at--at--at securing business.$And you were blowing up, I'm telling you, you were like the model for, for a minority law firm (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I was, I was--and that--and that's how I grew it. I grew it with the AKAs [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.]--I meant excuse me, the ABA [American Bar Association], I still had the AKAs as a client. I still had Seaway National Bank [Seaway Bank and Trust Company, Chicago, Illinois] as a client. I mean it's just through these contacts that I've made along the way. And for some reason I had the knack to be able to attract business and keep business. I knew--I knew how to sell. We picked up Metropolitan Life Insurance [Metropolitan Life Insurance Company] in New York [New York]. I got on a plane and went out to New York, made a pitch on our firm and bought ba- brought back the business. I mean I just--I just had this knack in order to sell. And so that's how I grew Carney and Brothers [Carney and Brothers, Ltd., Chicago, Illinois]. When Daley [Richard M. Daley] became mayor, he liked our firm, so we picked up more business from--from--through the Daley administration.$$So during the Sawyer [HistoryMaker Eugene Sawyer] years you didn't really do any more city business?$$You know, I started to do more city business at the end. Especially after Harold Washington and then you know you have to transition to Gene Sawyer and, and Rich Daley came in. And so Rich Daley really picked up the Harold Washington executive order and so he was really trying to use, you know, increase minority business. And so we were, of course it was [HistoryMaker] Earl Neal, it was our firm and I think there was probably Garland Watt too, he was very much involved. And so we, we started picking up more city business and we're really becoming very good in the public finance area.

Deborah Lathen

Attorney and former Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Cable Bureau Chief, Deborah Ann Lathen was born on March 28, 1953, in St. Louis, Missouri. After graduating from Cornell University with her B.A. degree in 1975, Lathen went on to earn her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1978.

Lathen then practiced law at the law offices of Foley and Lardner LLP, and of Keck, Mahin & Cate. In 1982, she became a litigation attorney at The Quaker Oats Company where she was honored with the Quaker Oats Chairman’s Award in 1988. That same year, Lathen was hired as the Senior Counsel for TRW, Inc.

In 1991, Lathen began working as managing counsel for the Nissan Motor Corporation and specialized in the provision of legal services in the areas of general corporate law, logistics, finance, environmental compliance and other general business matters. Lathen worked for the Nissan Corporation until 1998, when she was hired at the FCC as bureau chief of the Cable Services Bureau. In addition to advising the chairman and commissioners on issues related to internet industries, broadband and cable, as bureau chief, Lathen oversaw some significant changes in the communications industry such as the America Online and Time Warner merger, the implementation of the Satellite Home Viewer Improvement Act (SHIVA) and the federal regulation of instant messaging.

In 2001, Lathen founded Lathen Consulting in Washington, D.C. and began providing consulting services to telecommunications and media companies. In 2007, she was asked to serve as a board member for British Telecommunications (BT), where she serves on the Remuneration Committee.

Accession Number

A2008.003

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/30/2008 |and| 1/30/2008

Last Name

Lathen

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Mckinley Elem School

Larsen Middle School

Elgin High School

Cornell University

Harvard Law School

First Name

Deborah

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

LAT03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Nobody Gets It All.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

3/28/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Bananas

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Deborah Lathen (1953 - ) was the former Federal Communications Commission Cable Bureau Chief. She also founded Lathen Consulting, which provides consulting services to telecommunications and media companies.

Employment

Foley and Lardner

Quaker Oats Company

TRW (Northrop Grumman)

Nissan

Federal Communications Commission

British Telecom

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
70,0:32142,439:36630,508:52175,588:91804,1115:111095,1321:136586,1740:159937,1908:166178,2009:212950,3968$0,0:5775,122:9009,169:28761,505:29230,514:48817,888:49547,900:51372,929:55533,1023:77996,1347:81326,1420:82658,1442:90132,1617:90502,1623:100013,1721:100378,1727:103663,1807:104393,1818:114175,1991:125901,2248:128640,2296:131047,2334:131379,2339:131877,2346:146585,2562:147935,2589:148460,2601:166850,2738:167660,2878:171467,2955:187140,3217:188700,3257:188940,3262:189360,3296:208260,3488:213371,3542:218684,3838:237580,4016:237900,4023:255907,4297:259441,4357:272813,4599:291070,4941
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Deborah Lathen's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Deborah Lathen lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Deborah Lathen describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Deborah Lathen talks about her mother's upbringing in Council Bluffs, Iowa

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Deborah Lathen describes her mother's later adolescence in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Deborah Lathen describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Deborah Lathen talks about her father's childhood in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Deborah Lathen talks about her father's education at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri, and his teaching career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Deborah Lathen recounts how her parents met and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Deborah Lathen recalls her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Deborah Lathen remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Deborah Lathen talks about her earliest school years in Momence, Illinois, Kankakee, Illinois, and Ypsilanti, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Deborah Lathen recalls her hobbies and interests during her childhood in Elgin, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Deborah Lathen reflects upon her family's engagement with the Civil Rights Movement during her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Deborah Lathen talks about her determination, from an early age, to attend Harvard University Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Deborah Lathen describes her years at Larsen Middle School and Elgin High School in Elgin, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Deborah Lathen recounts her decision to attend Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Deborah Lathen describes her parents' response to her 1970 decision to attend Cornell University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Deborah Lathen recalls her discouraging guidance counselor at Elgin High School in Elgin, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Deborah Lathen describes her teachers at McKinley Elementary School and Elgin High School in Elgin, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Deborah Lathen recalls her professors and classmates at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, including HistoryMaker Yosef Ben-Jochannan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Deborah Lathen describes Ujamaa, the black residential community at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Deborah Lathen talks about studying abroad in Europe and Africa during her years at Cornell University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Deborah Lathen recalls her acceptance into Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Deborah Lathen recalls her professors and classmates at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Deborah Lathen describes her coursework at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Deborah Lathen talks about how she worked in corporate law at Foley & Larnder in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1978

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Deborah Lathen describes working for the Quaker Oats Company in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Deborah Lathen talks about living in Chicago, Illinois from 1980 to 1988

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Deborah Lathen describes working for TRW, Inc. and Nissan in Long Beach, California

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Deborah Lathen describes negotiating a contract between Nissan and the Ford Motor Company

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Deborah Lathen describes her relief efforts with HistoryMaker Cecil L. "Chip" Murray's First A.M.E. Church during the 1992 Rodney King Riots in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Deborah Lathen recounts how she became head of the FCC's cable bureau in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Deborah Lathen describes working at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Deborah Lathen talks about FCC regulation in the early years of high-speed Internet

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Deborah Lathen talks about leaving the FCC in 2001 and reentering the private sector

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Deborah Lathen describes working for British Telecom and her service with Rails to Trails

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Deborah Lathen talks about her hopes for HistoryMaker Barack Obama and the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Deborah Lathen reflects upon her life and legacy

DASession

2$2

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$7

DATitle
Deborah Lathen recalls her acceptance into Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Deborah Lathen describes negotiating a contract between Nissan and the Ford Motor Company
Transcript
What else before--well, now you, we know you went to Harvard [Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. Now, how, how, how did you finally arrange to--$$I just--$$--go to Harvard Law School?$$Well, I had to cur, I found my courage.$$Okay.$$And I had done very well at Cornell [University, Ithaca, New York]. And so I applied, and I was accepted, and, but--and I was accepted and which was great. I mean I was, I was making everybody crazy because I was just so nervous about it. There were five, five of us that lived together, five of us. We had a house, and we lived off campus. And that poor mailman, he, we would all be hovering, waiting for him to come with the mail. And he knew where everybody had applied in the house. He says, "Nothing from Harvard today," or he'd say to my girlfriend, Myra, "Nothing from the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois] today, but I got something from Princeton [University, Princeton, New Jersey] for you" (laughter), 'cause he knew where we wanted to go. And so when the Harvard letter came he handed it to me, and I went it's thin, it's thin. He goes, "Now, now, that doesn't, it doesn't necessarily mean"--'cause you know, in the old days if it was thin it meant you didn't get in, 'cause if it was thick they would give you all the information you thought, you know, with it. I'm like, oh, my God, it's thin. I didn't get in. And I'd been waitlisted at Yale [University, New Haven, Connecticut]. And the day I got wait, waitlisted at Yale, my girlfriend, my roommate got into Yale. So I was all, you know. So, I opened the Harvard letter, and it said, "You've been accepted." And I was like, wow. And it was like, like, but the paper is supposed to be different. I mean it was like just, it was almost like they had just xeroxed the paper and just written your name in it, 'cause it's the same acceptance letter. But you're expecting something like, you know, really special 'cause you got in. And it was April. I think it was April, whenever that stuff comes out. And I called Big Granny, my grandmother in Missouri. And my great-grandfather, Knox, Sullivan Knox, was living was her then and my grandfather, Granddaddy DeWitt. They were all at home. And I said, "Big Granny, Big Granny, Big Granny, I got into Harvard, I got into Harvard." 'Cause for me, Harvard was this--I was still this competitive--it's number one and the whole ego, all that stuff was wrapped up in it. "I got into Harvard, I got into Harvard, I got into Harvard. I'm so excited, I'm so excited." And I--she, she said, "Baby, that's really great, that's really great." I hear her scream. She screamed in the background to my grandfathers: "Debbie got into Howard [University, Washington, D.C.; Debbie got into Howard Law School." And I said, "No, grandma, it's Harvard not Howard." And then she paused, and then she said, "Well, that's okay, baby, we're still mighty proud of you, okay." And you know what? I, I tell that story because it tells me what's important in life. Because I know why she was proud about Howard, 'cause Howard was our school. She knew Howard. We used to have a collection in church that you'd put money in for the different Historically Black Colleges and stuff. But it also reminded me of, you know, of where I came from and what was important. And yes, it was great that I had gotten into Harvard. And she would go to church and tell everybody Debbie's at Howard, Debbie's at Howard (laughter).$$That's a great story. So, well, did, did, did you work the summer before you went to Harvard?$$Oh yeah, I worked every summer (laughter). I had to work every--there are six kids in my family, remember? And plus I had to work 'cause we--if I didn't work, my mother was gonna have me cleaning that house, 'cause boy, she didn't--idle minds, you didn't get to lay around Olean Lathen's house. She would have you--we, we did spring cleaning four seasons out of the year, okay (laughter).$And I'm sort of getting off track here, but let me, let me sort of move back. At Nissan I was assigned by default a very large project, and it required me to work with Japanese businessmen directly from Tokyo [Japan]. It was a project that nobody wanted 'cause it was just in shambles. And it was a joint venture between the Ford Motor Company and Nissan. And things had just gone awry in terms of negotiations between Nissan and the Ford Motor Company, in terms of cost-sharing for the product. All kinds of things were--$$It was the van project.$$Exactly.$$Nissan Quest and the--$$It was the Nissan Quest--$$--Ford--$$Villager.$$Villager, okay--$$Okay.$$--the Mercury Villager.$$Yeah, exactly. And this was I think the first joint venture between Nissan and Ford in this country. And it was a joint product development. It wasn't a legal joint venture. And so we got called in because the contracts were, there either were no contracts, or the contracts were in disarray. And so the called us in to help us--to help out the Japanese negotiation team from Tokyo. And so I was a lawyer assigned to the case 'cause, I mean, pretty much a lot of the contracts that had been entered into hadn't been reviewed by Nissan. And we were kind of stuck, so how are we gonna fix this mess? And I always like challenges. So, I was brought in to work on that. And it took a very long time for me, you know, to build a relationship with the Japanese businessmen who aren't used to working with women period, let alone a black American woman. They don't work with women in, in those days. But, you know, I tell the story about we'd go to these negotiations with Ford, and Ford would have their cadre of lawyers sitting right next to the, the negotiator. And I'd be sitting somewhere way off to the side, because in Japanese culture it is, you know, it's bad form; you're seen as being weak if you had to show up with your lawyer. I mean, it's like, you can't negotiate. You got to have your lawyer. So I'd be off, and so it was very frustrating for me to try to figure out, well, how am I going to help out my client when I'm over here and he's over there. And over time I inched my way over to the point where I was actually sitting, yeah, next to the negotiator, and they were asking my thoughts and opinions and developed a very strong bond with the men that I worked with, you know, Mr. Yurabe (ph.) and just the guys from, from, from Tokyo, from--we developed a very strong bond. And they, they had a nickname for me, which I didn't learn till much later. They, they used to call me the tornado. I said, "Well, why they call me the tornado?" They said, "'Cause when you come in the room, there's nothing left on the table when you negotiate. You just wipe it all off" (laughter). And so, I guess what I'm saying what I was learning is, and what I would say to people is don't believe in stereotypes. People will say oh, "Japanese don't like black people"; Japanese this, "They don't deal with women." They dealt with me, and I learned a lot about them, their culture, and I think they learned a lot from me. And it was probably one of, one of the most rewarding experiences of, of my career, was working for almost a year and a half on that project with working very closely with members from Tokyo.$$Okay, all right, so, so you, you were with Nissan for--$$About eight years, eight--$$About eight years--$$--seems to be my number (laughter).$$Any other stories from that relationship with the--$$Oh, I remember we were, before we go into, into negotiations, there was Mr. Yurabe, who was head of the project, and we were in Michigan--that's where the project was based--and I had said something. This is after we, he'd finally gotten to know me. And, and I said--he was talking about a negotiating strategy, and I said, "That's not gonna work. I'mma tell you, this is what Ford's gonna say. You're gonna say this, and they're gonna say that." And he says, "No, no, no, they would never do that. That is not honorable." I'm like, "Mr. Yurabe, this is not about honor. This is about money. And so, trust me, you don't wanna follow that strategy because this is how Ford's gonna react." We're in the meeting, and he followed his strategy, and they said exactly what I said they were gonna say. So afterwards, we go back and he says: "You are very smart." (Laughter), I'm like, "We've only been doing this for a year." Finally I have some credibility, finally I have some credibility. And you know, you know, never wish for something. You just might get it, because after that, they only wanted to deal with me as their lawyer, you know, it was a lot of work. And I, you know, because with the time difference between Tokyo and here, I'd be getting faxes and phone calls at all kinds of strange hours and stuff. But it was, it was a feeling of accomplishment. But when the "you are very smart" (laughter).

John W. Daniels, Jr.

Noted corporate lawyer and civic leader John Windom Daniels, Jr. was born the second-oldest of eight children to John and Kathryn Townsel Daniels on June 11, 1948 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Daniels graduated from North Central College in Illinois with his B.A. degree in 1969 as the recipient of a National Science Foundation Fellowship. In 1970, at the age of twenty-one, Daniels became a Ford Foundation Fellow, and two years later, graduated from the University of Wisconsin with his M.S. degree.

Daniels then attended Harvard Law School, graduating with his J.D. degree in 1974. Soon after graduation, Daniels passed the bar exam, and began working for Quarles & Brady L.L.P., a full-service law firm with offices in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Madison, Wisconsin; Chicago, Illinois and Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona. Daniels was the first African American hired by the firm. In 1980, Daniels was elected to the American College of Real Estate Attorneys. The following year, Daniels became partner at Quarles & Brady. In 1983, Daniels was appointed Bar Examiner of the Wisconsin Board of Professional Competency by Wisconsin’s governor. Daniels was named to the State of Wisconsin’s Strategic Planning Council in 1987, and the following year, the Wisconsin Supreme Court appointed him to the Children’s Hospital Foundation Review Committee for the Child Abuse Prevention Fund.

Daniels was listed as one of the best lawyers in America by Real Estate Law in 1993. In 1994, he became a partner and a member of the management committee of his firm. Daniels joined the Greater Milwaukee Foundation Board of Directors in 2004, one of the oldest and largest community foundations in the United States. 2007 marked a new milestone for Daniels, as he became the first African American appointed to lead a major law firm in Wisconsin when he was named chairman and managing partner of Quarles & Brady L.L.P.

Accession Number

A2007.330

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/26/2007

Last Name

Daniels

Maker Category
Middle Name

Windom

Occupation
Schools

Grayton Elementary School

McKinley School

Custer High School

Wells Junior High School

North Central College

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Harvard Law School

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Birmingham

HM ID

DAN04

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

France

Favorite Quote

It Is Rough Out There.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Birth Date

6/11/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate lawyer John W. Daniels, Jr. (1948 - ) was the first African American appointed to lead a major law firm in Wisconsin when he was named chairman of Quarles & Brady L.L.P. in 2007.

Employment

Quarles and Brady, LLP

V and J Foods, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John W. Daniels, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his mother's role in the community

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his father's educational background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his father's occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his parents' relationship and personalities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes the role of religion in his family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about the Church of God in Christ

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers his early interests

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his leg disability

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about segregation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers Custer High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers his introduction to civil rights activism

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his high school homecoming

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers joining the National Honors Society

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers North Central College in Naperville, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his friends at North Central College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls a talented classmate at North Central College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his decision to attend Harvard Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his decision to attend Harvard Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his initial impressions of Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his experiences at Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his wife's work in the Boston public schools

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. remembers his role at the American Bar Association Law Student Division

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his mentors at Harvard Law School, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his mentors at Harvard Law School, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. reflects upon his experiences at Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls being recruited to law firms, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls being recruited to law firms, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls joining the law firm of Quarles and Brady LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his projects at Quarles and Brady LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about the law firm of Quarles and Brady LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his role as chairman of Quarles and Brady LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. reflects upon his chairmanship of Quarles and Brady LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his legal philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his civic duties as a lawyer

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his relationship with T. Michael Bolger

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his restaurant franchise business, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his restaurant franchise business, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about the Fellowship Open

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - John W. Daniels, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - John W. Daniels, Jr. talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - John W. Daniels, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes his advice to young lawyers

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - John W. Daniels, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - John W. Daniels, Jr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

4$2

DATitle
John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls his high school homecoming
John W. Daniels, Jr. recalls being recruited to law firms, pt. 1
Transcript
Had a very good friend of mines who was the captain of the football team, he was an African American guy, one of these families that grew up in the neighborhood, and he was a very nice guy, so everybody liked him, that's how he got to be the captain of the football team, you know, he was a good player, everybody liked him, he was a good student. And the tradition in that high school [Custer High School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] was that the captain of the football team was the king of the homecoming court. That was automatic. So if you were the captain of the football team, that's what, you were automatically the king who escorted the homecoming queen. The homecoming queen was picked by, you know, the kids in the high school. And so the, they vote, there were no, well, I shouldn't say no, there were very few black girls, 'cause there, you know, who were seniors, let's say five out of, you know, I don't know, six hundred or whatever it was, you know. And so they voted and the girls who won were the girls who were popular, I mean, you know, the girls you would expect to win. So obviously there are no, there were no minority girls on the homecoming court of five or six girls. And so I was walking home with, you know, my friend, he would, you know, I would be in, I don't know, debate club and he would be in football and then we'd, we'd get together and walk home together after school. And the, so we're walking home and, and he said something to me like, you know, "What do you think?" And I said, "Think about what?" And he said, "Well, you know, the coach of the football team called me in today and he told me that, you know, you know, we've traditionally done it this way but this year we're gonna do it a different way." And the, and it was an, it, it, it was an explanation, he didn't really tell my friend exactly what was going on, he made it seem like, you know, we're doing it this way because of, I don't know, you know, whatever the explanation was. And so we were walking home and we're trying to figure out what is the real reason. So you're trying to tell your friend, you know, the real reason is not because of race, but he's saying well, "How could that not be?" You know, you know, it's been, you know, it's been done that way for, forever. And that was really the first time, you know, I must have been a senior. That was the first time it really sort of in a real live way, in a personal way that, you know, I observed it. Because before I mean, I was like, captain of the debate team, I was on the student council, you know, I was president of the Latin club, you know, you know, a lot of my friends, you know, were white, you know, and, you know, it didn't really, it had never really sort of hit me in a direct way, and that was the first time.$$Now, was there any interracial dating when you were in high school? Did, did--$$There was some but it was sort of, you know, looked down on. I mean, you know, it was discouraged. And I think the, I think the football coach's concern was, you know, he didn't want to create a controversy. So he was trying to find a way to avoid a controversy. And, you know, my friend was very accepting of it, you know, what could he do, I mean really but, you know, was very accepting of it. But that was sort of like the first time, and I said, "Oh, boy, you know, I really do need to, you know, step back and take a look at this."$I remember when I came out of school in '74 [1974] the, there was a real push 'cause law firms really had, big law firms had not really had a long history of having African American lawyers in those firms. So I came out, when I was recruited in 1973, I had done pretty well at Harvard [Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts] and so I was being recruited by law firms and they, it was sort of one of the most interesting times at least in my career because you the, you'd go to a city like Richmond, Virginia, 'cause I wanted to go to, I did not wanna go to Wall Street, I wanted to either go to Atlanta [Georgia] or Richmond or Indianapolis [Indiana] or Milwaukee [Wisconsin] or Chicago [Illinois], I did not wanna go, I just didn't want the lifestyle of New York [New York]. And the, so I was being recruited by these firms, and the, you would go to this city and they, and they were trying to sort of assess how you would perform in these law firms. And when I was being recruited I think every law firm that I was recruited to with the exception of one in Atlanta, they really didn't have any African American lawyers. And I don't think any of 'em had any African American partners that I, the firms I was looking at, and these were good firms. And I remember going to Richmond and Richmond had some great firms. And the, there was a guy down there who really wanted to integrate the Richmond law firms and he was from Harvard. And so he came up to Harvard and, you know, he sat down and he said, you know, "I want you to come down there." And so I get down there, I go down to Richmond and the law firm was clearly an excellent law firm, excellent people. And then they want to sort of feel me out, see what kind of guy I was, you know, would I, you know, would I pass the Jackie Robinson test, I mean, that's what I call it, you know, you know, would I, you know, would I have enough tolerance to take, you know, what I might have to deal with. And, you know, (laughter) I needed a job so the, I knew that wasn't a particular issue.

Robert Lewis Harris

Lawyer, activist, and business executive Robert Lewis Harris was born to Lucy and Benjamin Harris on March 4, 1944, in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. After moving to California in 1960, Harris, a 1961 graduate of Oakland Technical High School, received his A.A. degree from Merritt College in Oakland in 1963 and his B.A. degree from San Francisco State University in 1965 (in 2007 he was inducted into the university’s Hall of Fame). Harris worked as a probation officer for four years before entering the University of California Berkeley Law School (Boalt Hall). Shortly after Harris’s receipt of his J.D. degree in 1972, he joined the legal staff at Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E) where he spent thirty-four years as an attorney and business executive, retiring in January 2007.

In 1973, Harris became active with his local bar associations, serving in 1976 as President of the Charles Houston Bar Association (CHBA), an association of Black lawyers in Northern California. He made a name for himself in the legal community by leading a team of Black lawyers who successfully defended the NAACP against libel and slander charges in 1978. A year later, he made history by becoming the first lawyer from the West Coast to ever serve as President of the National Bar Association (NBA). A Founder of the California Association of Black Lawyers in 1977, Harris in 1982 served as a founding member of the board of the National Bar Institute, the funding component of the NBA. Later that year, he became the first President of the Wiley Manuel Law Foundation, the funding component of CHBA. In 1983, he became Chairman of the Legal Redress Committee of Oakland branch of the NAACP, and in 1986, he received the NAACP’s highest legal honor, the W. Robert Ming Award for his advocacy on behalf of the NAACP. Harris has also received the highest honors of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity (Laurel Wreath Award) and the NBA (C. Francis Stradford Award).

In 1985, Harris argued and won a landmark corporate free speech case in the U.S. Supreme Court protecting PG&E’s First Amendment rights. In 1987, Harris married Glenda Newell, with whom he had two children. After completing the Harvard Business School’s Advance Management Program in 1988, he began his ascension through the corporate ranks at PG&E, first as Vice President of Community Relations and later as Vice President of Environmental Affairs. In the latter position, Harris expanded and led PG&E’s environmental stewardship endeavors to a new level. Harris has continued his involvement in community issues by serving in the highest ranking positions in Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity (Grand Polemarch) and in Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity (the Boulé) as Grand Sire Archon-Elect; serving on the board of the Port of Oakland; being involved with the United Negro College Fund of the Bay Area; working with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area (Co-Chair); working with the California League of Conservation Voters; working with the American Association of Blacks in Energy (General Counsel); being involved with the African American Experience Fund of the National Parks Foundation; serving on the U.S. EPA National Environmental Justice Advisory Council; working with the California EPA Environmental Justice Advisory Committee; serving on the National Environmental Policy Commission; and being involved with the Oakland African American Chamber of Commerce, among many others.

Accession Number

A2007.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/6/2007

Last Name

Harris

Maker Category
Middle Name

Lewis

Schools

Williams Elementary School

Peake High School

Oakland Technical High School

Merritt College

San Francisco State University

University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Harvard Business School

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Arkadelphia

HM ID

HAR25

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

If You Have No Confidence In Self, You're Twice Defeated In The Race Of Life. With Confidence, You Have Won Before You Even Started.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/4/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Ithaca

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Energy executive and civil rights lawyer Robert Lewis Harris (1944 - ) worked for the Pacific Gas & Electric Company for over three decades. Throughout his career in the legal profession, Harris was involved with a wide variety of free speech, environmental, and community advocacy issues.

Employment

Alameda County Probation Department

Pacifica Police Department

Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Lewis Harris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers the Williams School in Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his father's start as a minister

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers the influence of his elementary school teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the community of Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about his father's churches in Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers Peake High School in Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls his teachers and classmates at Peake High School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his decision to move to California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers school integration in Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers his move to Oakland, California

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the student body of Oakland Technical High School in Oakland, California

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers enrolling in classes at Oakland Technical High School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his experiences at Oakland Technical High School in Oakland, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his experiences at Oakland Junior College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the demographics of Oakland, California

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers transferring to San Francisco State College in San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his role as an officer of the Alameda County Probation Department

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the juvenile probation system in Alameda County, California

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his decision to attend law school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the culture of the San Francisco Bay Area

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls his first year at the University of California Berkeley School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his experiences at the University of California Berkeley School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about his position on the California Law Review

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls his second year at the University of California Berkeley School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers his summer work experiences during law school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls joining the legal department of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers Frederick Searls and Richard Clarke

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls his first legal case at the Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his first legal case on corporate free speech

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the case of Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris describes Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers the decision of Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the energy crisis

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his legal work for the NAACP

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls how he was chosen to argue the case of Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the precedent set by Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the Charles Houston Bar Association

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris describes the creation of the Charles Houston Bar Association Foundation, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers Benjamin Travis

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris remembers Earl B. Dickerson

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about his time management skills

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his role in the National Bar Association

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the past presidents of the National Bar Association

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the history of the National Bar Association

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his role in funding African American bar associations

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris reflects upon his leadership skills

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his concerns for African American organizations

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls the history of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about W.E.B. Du Bois' involvement with the Boule

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris reflects upon the state of education in the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his transition to the operating division of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his role as the central division manager of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls the Oakland firestorm of 1991, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Robert Lewis Harris recalls the Oakland firestorm of 1991, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the contamination of the water supply in Hinkley, California

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his career at the Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about the blackouts of 2001 in California

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Robert Lewis Harris talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Robert Lewis Harris describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Robert Lewis Harris describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Robert Lewis Harris reflects upon the importance of history

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
Robert Lewis Harris remembers enrolling in classes at Oakland Technical High School
Robert Lewis Harris remembers the decision of Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California
Transcript
Was that difficult though, that being your senior year, I mean besides the--you know, 'cause it's all new. You--$$Yeah, it was quite different. I--you have to go to your counselor and get your classes. So I went to the counselor, a person I'll never forget as long as I live. Her name was Mrs. Hillegas, H-I-L-L-E-G-A-S [Miriam Hillegas], and saw all the courses that could be taken. And you had choices between college prep and non-college prep, what they call workshop and all that other stuff. And of course, having believed all along that I was bright and would go to college, so I signed up for all college prep courses and gave her the slip.$$And, and so that worked out--$$No.$$Okay.$$She properly denied it (laughter).$$So tell me what happened. Let's talk about--$$Well, she was very kind. She looked at it, and I recall she looked back up at me like I wonder what's his problem. And either I brought with me or had my transcript from my prior--or my grades. It was my grades from my eleventh grade, having been finished eleventh grade at Peake High School [Arkadelphia, Arkansas]. And I presented those to her, which was essentially an A minus average, and she sort of frowned and smiled at the same time, as though this poor kid doesn't know. And she said, "We can't enroll you in college prep courses." "You can't enroll me in college prep courses?" She said, "No. You wouldn't be able to compete because you're coming from this school," and, she was trying to be helpful, I guess, "in Arkansas, and the kids in college prep are very smart students, and you just wouldn't be able to keep up with them." And I did not believe that. I, I mean, I just couldn't believe it. It was the first time in my life anybody had ever told me that I could not compete educationally. I'd never heard that concept before. And of course, she was the first white teacher, or counselor, that I had ever seen face to face. So, that was disappointing obviously. And I went back home that evening and gave the news to my sister [Jean Harris Blacksher], who went berserk and insisted that the next day that her husband, Artis [Artis Blacksher], who is 6'5", at that time at least 250 plus [pounds], today a little bit larger, who was instructed by her to go with me back to school. And Artis was high school graduation, truck driver; he was a member of the Teamsters [International Brotherhood of Teamsters]. And he went back with me the next morning to school to see Mrs. Hillegas. And I will always remember that morning because he was not diplomatic. He just went in and started raving at her. And of course, it scared the hell out of her, and she just said any course he wants he gets, any course he want and just, you know, like get out of here. This man is crazy (laughter). And so she signed, and I was able to get all of my college prep courses. And then I went to those courses, which was odd to me. I'd never seen this before, coming from an integrated--a segregated school into my first class in an integrated school. It looked--I'd seen black students at school, and population was about 10 percent or so, so you seen them. But when I got in the class, I think in any class I didn't see more than one black student outside of myself, and I thought that was strange. But then it dawned on me, ultimately, wait a minute; those students probably went through the same thing that I went through that my brother-in-law just went berserk on, and they weren't into the college prep courses because of the belief that they could not compete. And so I, in, in, at Oakland Tech [Oakland Technical High School, Oakland, California] I was usually one or two, three at the most, of blacks students in any of those college prep courses.$So describe the experience and the result.$$The experience was great. It never dawned on me that I was gonna lose the case [Pacific Gas and Electric Company v. Public Utilities Commission of California, 1986]. I was convinced that I would win, and I was convinced--and some people say you were lucky; it was you were cocky, or whatever. I had done so much research on every single justice, how they think, what they wrote about the subject, and even before I argued the case, I had predicted who would vote for it and who would vote against it, who would be in my favor and who would not be in my favor. As the appellate, we had lost in California, so we had to go first, and so I went. The, if you look at the transcript, the first question asked of me was from Justice Rehnquist [William Rehnquist], who was not the chief justice at the time because Burger [Warren E. Burger] was. Rehnquist, with his bad back, leans up and say, "Mr. Harris [HistoryMaker Robert Lewis Harris], where did you get this notion that a corporation, like an individual, is entitled to negative First Amendment rights, the right not to speak? We know we've granted them the right to speak, but going so far as giving them right not to speak is, you know, somehow absurd." I smiled. I said, "I got it from Justice Powell [Lewis F. Powell, Jr.], of course," (laughter), and then went on to explain why. And Justice Powell is just sitting there grinning. I knew then he would write the, the, the opinion, and he did write the opinion. The, the, the other justices, with the exception of Marshall [Thurgood Marshall], was pretty much engaged in the--Marshall didn't ask a single question. But they were really engaged in it, the (unclear). As you look at the news articles, all you see is Associated Press said it was one of the most animated [U.S.] Supreme Court arguments in long time before the Supreme Court. I needed, in particular, Sandra Day O'Connor, who was the first woman on the Supreme Court and hadn't been there too long. I knew I needed her vote, and I became convinced I had it when my opponent came up to argue, said I'll go first; he came second. And when she started cross examining him and calling him by my name, I said ah, I must have made a hell of an impression. And I knew he was in trouble, and primary because of the questions that she was asking of him, and he couldn't really respond. So I figured I had her vote as well, so I--and I, and I knew I had Marshall and Brennan [William J. Brennan, Jr.] because of the way that I had argued the case and had set out the briefs, so that government--and, and this shocked a lot of people. A lot of the corporate lawyers and so called experts in constitutional law--you notice I said so called--they knew Brennan and Marshall, the two most liberal justices, would never vote for a corporation. They're, they're probably right if you framed it that way. But I framed the, the issue that they had to answer the question whether or not you were gonna allow government to pick and choose who can speak. Because the only way you can enforce this statute or this order, since the envelope is very tiny, and only so many voices can be heard, which means that the state has to decide who speaks this month, who speaks next month. And then I just, just had fun quoting Brennan and Marshall the case after case after case where they said government has no business picking and choosing who can speak. And the only way that you can rule in favor of the state in this instance is for the state to pick and choose who speaks (laughter). And that was absolutely correct. And, and, and that was what the fatal flaw that most constitutional lawyers didn't quite understand, that Brennan and Marshall were tied to that notion; they were consistent. They couldn't now say, "Well, if it's a corporation, the state can pick and choose." No, they have been consistent. They don't want government picking and choosing who can speak, and you shouldn't. And, and the other thing I said, you--, "If free speech is about free speech, you really shouldn't have to decide," and if you look in the transcript, you'll see this, "you have to look and see who's speaking to determine whether or not that speech is permissible." Speech is a permissible or it is not. So you don't need to look and say oh, that's John Jones speaking; oh no, that's a corporation speaking. You're gonna let John Jones speak but not the corporation. So anyway, they brought in a 5-4, 5-3 decision. Justice Blackmun [Harry Blackmun] recused himself apparently because he owned utilities stock, because when the case was called, he got up and walked out. The opinion was written by Justice Powell and concurred in by Marshall, Brennan, Sandra Day O'Connor, and the chief justice, not Rehnquist, of course, but Burger.$$Now how much time passed between your argument and the decision?$$It was October the 8th [1985]; the decision came out in February [1986].

Karen Hastie Williams

Karen Hastie Williams was born on September 30, 1944 in Washington, D.C. to Beryl and William H. Hastie, Jr. Her father was the first African American federal judge appointed to the bench of the Federal District Court in the U.S. Virgin Islands and became the first African American Governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands in 1946. In 1949, he was appointed to the Third United States Circuit Court of Appeals, where he would serve for twenty-one years. Judge William H. Hastie along with Charles Hamilton Houston, Thurgood Marshall, and others worked on the cases that led to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

Williams graduated from Girls’ High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. degree from Bates College in 1966 and her M.A. degree from Tufts University in 1967. In 1973, she received her J.D. degree from Catholic University of America. She was then hired as a law clerk for Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Judge Spottswood W. Robinson, III of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Williams served as Chief Counsel of the Senate Committee on the Budget from 1977 until 1980. She also served as Administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy. In 1982, she was the first African American to joined Crowell & Moring LLP, where she made partner in two years. As a retired partner, she has taken on a new area of expertise, seeking compensation for victims of terrorism.

From 1992 to 1993, Williams served as Chair of the ABA Section of Public Contract Law and became Director of Washington Gas & Light. Williams was appointed by President George W. Bush and served with distinction as a Public Life Member of the Internal Revenue Oversight Board from 2000 to 2003 and was Chair of the Red Cross Governance Advisory Committee.

Williams is a member of the National Contract Management Association, the Black Women Lawyers Association, the National Bar Association and the Women’s Forum of Washington, D.C. Her community activities include service on the Board of Directors of the Lawyer’s Committee for Civil Rights under the Law. She is a member of the Board of Trustees for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund at Amherst College and formerly of the National Cathedral School.

Williams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 27, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.167

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/27/2007

Last Name

Williams

Maker Category
Middle Name

Hastie

Occupation
Schools

Philadelphia High School for Girls

Ellwood Sch

Saints Peter and Paul School

Columbus Law School

Wagner Gen Louis Ms

Bates College

The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

First Name

Karen

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WIL39

Favorite Season

Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Warm

Favorite Quote

It Is Not Important To Be The First If You Can't Open The Door For A Second Or Third In Whatever You Do.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/30/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mangoes

Short Description

Corporate lawyer Karen Hastie Williams (1944 - ) was the former director of Washington Gas, and was the first African American to join the law firm Crowell & Moring, LLP, and be made partner.

Employment

Crowell and Moring LLP

Mobil Oil Company

Thurgood Marshall

Spottswood W. Robinson III

Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver and Jacobson LLP

U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget

Office of Management and Budget

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Karen Hastie Williams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Karen Hastie Williams lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her maternal grandfather's career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's work under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's roles in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Karen Hastie Williams describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Karen Hastie Williams talks about her father's civil rights activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Karen Hastie Williams remembers Thurgood Marshall

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Karen Hastie Williams recalls her father's civil rights casework

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Karen Hastie Williams describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her transition to public schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Karen Hastie Williams describes General Louis Wagner Junior High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Karen Hastie Williams remembers the Philadelphia High School for Girls in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Karen Hastie Williams describes the East Oak Lane neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her experiences at the Philadelphia High School for Girls

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Karen Hastie Williams recalls her decision to attend Bates College in Lewiston, Maine

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her experiences at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her undergraduate thesis and graduate studies

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Karen Hastie Williams remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her position at the Mobil Oil Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Karen Hastie Williams talks about her husband and children

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Karen Hastie Williams recalls her decision to attend the Columbus School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Karen Hastie Williams remembers the Columbus School of Law in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Karen Hastie Williams recalls her judicial clerkships

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Karen Hastie Williams talks about her father and Thurgood Marshall

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her career in government

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Karen Hastie Williams recalls her role at the Office of Management and Budget

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Karen Hastie Williams describes the law firm of Crowell and Moring LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Karen Hastie Williams talks about her organizational involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her work with the American Red Cross

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Karen Hastie Williams talks about the leadership of the American Red Cross

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Karen Hastie Williams describes her terrorism casework at Crowell and Moring LLP

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Karen Hastie Williams reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Karen Hastie Williams shares a message to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

1$5

DATitle
Karen Hastie Williams describes her father's roles in the U.S. Virgin Islands
Karen Hastie Williams recalls her role at the Office of Management and Budget
Transcript
Let's step back a little bit and talk more about your father as governor of the [U.S.] Virgin Islands. Did he share stories about his work there at that time?$$Yes, he was, when he was governor of the Virgin Islands I was five years old, my brother [William H. Hastie III] was born in Government House [Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands]. I went to elementary school at the local Catholic school.$$Do you remember the name of it?$$Saint Peter's and Paul [Saints Peter and Paul Catholic School, Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands].$$Okay.$$Catholic school and stayed there through the fifth grade. When Dad came, this would be back to the islands because as you recall he had been there as a judge before he went to teach at Howard [Howard University School of Law, Washington, D.C.]. And he was fairly controversial in the sense that he established the terms or had the legislature approve the terms of the Organic Act [Organic Act of 1936] which was the first major overall of the legislation that really guided the way things were going to be done within the government structure within the tax structure. And there were those particularly the editor then of the largest newspaper who many years later became his brother-in-law, were attacking him in stories saying you know, "Hastie's [William H. Hastie] trying to bring his stateside ideas to our little island. And you know wants to change the way things were done." Well his concern was that the laws were not clear, they were being interpreted by local judges giving favoritism to a lot of the big property owners. And the work force the, the men and women who were conducting their lives responsibly, were in many ways not being supported by the way the laws were being interpreted. So this went on for probably close two years, legislature ultimately passed his recommendations. And that is still the law in the Virgin Islands now. He was I think the first civilian governor after a string of [U.S.] Navy governors were the, the leader of the, of the islands. They, they were presidential appointees most of them were white naval officers. But, he had a very successful term, Truman [President Harry S. Truman] came down to the Virgin Islands and it was the first time that a president had visited the islands and this would have been probably in 1947 or '48 [1948] I believe. And my brother was born in Government House on St. Thomas [U.S. Virgin Islands] in 1947.$$Okay.$$I think that in retrospect most Virgin Islanders feel that his tenure as governor was good for the islands.$So I went down to the White House to OMB [Office of Management and Budget] and spent a year and a half down there working as the head of the Office of Federal Procurement and Policy [Office of Federal Procurement Policy], which is an executive office located within OMB.$$And tell me what that experience was like?$$That was a very interesting experience because my, my job was really to put pressure on the federal--the major federal cabinet offices to do more with contracting out to women, to people of color. That was a real agenda item. And this was the Carter [President James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr.] administration. And so I did that and I remember having a conver- a meeting with Colin Powell [HistoryMaker General Colin L. Powell], who was then the, I guess it's called the special assistant to the secretary of defense. And he said to me and I had not known him before, but I walked in, and he said, "Before we have a conversation I have to tell you that your father [William H. Hastie] changed my life." I said, "Oh my, how did he do that?" He said, "Well, he was the chairman of the Commission on White House Fellows [President's Commission on White House Fellowships] and he picked me out of a group of thirty candidates to be one of the people who was a White House Fellow. And I choose to come over and work with the secretary of defense," and here he is now back again on another tour. And he said, "I really want to help you, I know that the [U.S.] military should be doing better. But, I've gotta tell you when I run up against these three stars and four stars [four star general]," this was before he had all of his stars, "it's very difficult." I said, "Well I'm just looking for--I realize you can't change everything overnight, I'd like to just see some progress." And I, we talked about strategies that he might use. And I told him, I'd provide him some additional information as to what was going on in other agencies. So that was a particularly interesting time when I was in OMB, because I was interacting with a lot of senior people in government. And working also with people up on Capitol Hill [Washington, D.C.]. So I think that the two governmental experiences both at the budget committee [U.S. Senate Committee on the Budget] and at OMB were very instructive. In terms of building my experience level to be able when I went back into private practice, to be able to help clients negotiate within the federal structures.$$So you leave there in 1981?$$Right.