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John Fleming

Museum director, curator and historian John Fleming was born on August 3, 1944 in Morganton, North Carolina. Fleming graduated from Olive Hill High School in 1962 and began attending Berea College that same year. In 1966, Fleming graduated from Berea College. He went on to attend Howard University and earned his Ph.D. degree in American history from there in 1974.

After graduating from Berea College, Fleming served as an educational specialist on the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights in 1966. From 1967 until 1969, Fleming then served in the Peace Corps in Malawi. Upon his return from Malawi, Fleming served as an analyst on the United States Civil Rights Commission. He worked on the development of the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center in Wilberforce, Ohio in 1980 as project director, and then served as its director. In 1992, Fleming was appointed to the Underground Railroad Advisory Committee, and served as the Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s director from 1998 until 2001. Following his tenure as director, Fleming was appointed to the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s Plan for Action Presidential Commission. The commission was responsible for the creation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Fleming founded JE Associates, LLC in 2007. In 2015, Fleming was hired as the museum director for the National Museum of African American Music in Nashville, Tennessee.

Fleming has won multiple awards for his work. He won the Ohioana Library’s Citation Award in 1997, the Ohio Humanities Council’s Bjornson Award in 2007, the American Association for State and Local History’s Award of Distinction in 2008, and the Zora Neale Hurston Award in 2008. Fleming has served on the board of the Columbus Area Leadership Program, on the nomination committee for the American Association for State and Local History, and on Ohio’s Bicentennial Commission. Fleming has also served on the program, executive, and honors committees for the American Association of Museums. In addition to his awards, Fleming has published three books, “The Lengthening Shadow of Slavery: Historical Justification for Affirmative Action for Blacks in High Education,” in 1976, “The Case for Affirmative Action for Blacks in Higher Education” in 1978, and “A Summer Remembered: A Memoir” in 2005.

Fleming and his wife, Barbara Fleming, have two children.

John Fleming was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 15, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.203

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/15/2017

Last Name

Fleming

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

University of California, Berkeley

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Morganton

HM ID

FLE05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

The Beach

Favorite Quote

Don't Put Off To Tomorrow What You Can Do Today.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

8/3/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbus

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Southern Fried Chicken

Short Description

Museum director, curator and historian John Fleming (1944 - ) was the director of the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center. He also served on the Plan for Action Commission for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and as the museum director of the National African American Museum of Music.

Employment

Kentucky Civil Rights Museum

U.S. Peace Corps

Howard University

National Afro American Museum

Favorite Color

Black

Kinshasha Holman Conwill

Museum director Kinshasha Holman Conwill was born on April 11, 1951 in Atlanta, Georgia to Moses Carol Holman and Mariella Ukina Ama Holman. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts as a National Achievement Scholar, and received her B.F.A degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1973, and her M.B.A. degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California in 1980.

In Los Angeles, Conwill worked as an arts educator and activities coordinator for the Frank Lloyd Wright Hollyhock House for several years. In 1980, Conwill became the deputy director of the Studio Museum in Harlem, and served in that position for eleven years. Conwill then became senior policy advisor for the Museums and Community Initiative of the American Association of Museums, and also served as the director for the New York City Creative Communities Leveraging Investments in Creativity program. She was exhibit coordinator for the Museum of the American Indian in New York City. Conwill also worked as project director for the New York City Creative Communities program of LINC (Leveraging Investments in Creativity), project director and managing editor for Culture Counts: Strategies for a More Vibrant Cultural Life for New York City (New York Foundation for the Arts), and project manager for Creative Downtown: The Role of Culture in Rebuilding Lower Manhattan (New York City Arts Coalition). In 2005, Conwill was appointed as deputy director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C. In this role, Conwill engaged in fundraising campaigns, expanded the museum’s collections, developed exhibits and programming, and supervised the museum’s publishing activities.

Conwill has also published two books; Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing: How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment co-authored by Richard Carlin, and Dream A World Anew: The African American Experience and the Shaping of America with the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Conwill served as a board member for numerous organizations, including the Provisions Library in Washington D.C., the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Municipal Art Society of New York, and the Rockefeller Foundation. She has also served on the management panel for the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage, and as an advisor for the Harvard University Program for Art Museum Directors.

Kinshasha Holman Conwill was interviewed by TheHistoryMakers on November 2, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/2/2017

Last Name

Conwill

Maker Category
Middle Name

Holman

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Kinshasha

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

CON07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York City

Favorite Quote

Every Goodbye Ain't Gone

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

4/11/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Museum director Kinshasha Holman Conwill (1951 - ) was the director of the Studio Museum in Harlem, and the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

Favorite Color

Today It's Yellow

Marita Rivero

Media and nonprofit executive Marita Rivero was born on November 25, 1943 in West Grove, Pennsylvania to Grace Beresford Hughes Rivero and Manuel Rivero. Her parents worked at Lincoln University in Chester County, Pennsylvania, where her mother taught English and Latin, and her father was the founding chairman of the university’s physical education department, as well as a coach for nearly four decades. Rivero attended Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, earning her B.S. degree in psychology in 1964.

In 1970, Rivero became a producer at WGBH, a National Public Radio member station in Boston, Massachusetts. She moved to Washington, D.C. in 1976 to work as a consultant for PBS, the National Science Foundation, and the Communications Task Force of the United States Congressional Black Caucus. Rivero returned to radio production in 1981 as general manager of WPFW Pacifica in Washington, D.C., where she was later promoted to vice president. She remained there until 1988, when she returned to Boston as general manager of WGBH Radio. In 1998, Rivero was hired as executive-in-charge of Africans in America: America’s Journey Through Slavery. She then served as executive-in-charge of This Far By Faith, which aired in 2003. Rivero was promoted to general manager of radio and television at WGBH in 2005, a position she held until 2013. In 2015, Rivero was named executive director of the Museum of African American History, Boston and Nantucket, where she had volunteered since the late 1980s.

Rivero was honored with several awards including a 2007 Pinnacle Award for Achievement in Arts & Education from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce; the first Image Award for Vision and Excellence from Women in Film and Video/New England; and induction into the YWCA's Academy of Women Achievers. She served as board chair of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, chair of the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC), and chair of the National Association of Community Broadcasters. She also served on the boards of NPR, The Partnership, the Kokrobitey School of Ghana, and the Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts, as well as the boards of the Dimock Community Health Center, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Partners Healthcare and the YWCA.

Marita Rivero was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 19, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.072

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/19/2016

Last Name

Rivero

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Schools

Oxford Area Hgh School

Lincoln University

Tufts University

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

Marita

Birth City, State, Country

Lincoln University

HM ID

RIV02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Review.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/25/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Media and nonprofit executive Marita Rivero (1943 - ) served as general manager for radio and television for WGBH for nearly a decade. She became the executive director of the Museum of African American History, Boston and Nantucket in 2015.

Employment

Museum of African American History

WGBH

WDFW-FM DC

Favorite Color

None

Thelma Golden

Museum director and curator Thelma Golden was born on September 22, 1965 in Queens, New York. In 1983, she graduated from the New Lincoln School, where she trained as a curatorial apprentice at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in her senior year. In 1987, she earned her B.A. degree in art history and African American studies from Smith College.

Golden worked first as a curatorial intern at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1987, then as a curatorial assistant at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1988. From 1989 to 1991, she worked as the visual arts director for the Jamaica Arts Center in Queens, New York, where she curated eight shows. Golden was then appointed branch director of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Philip Morris branch in 1991 and curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1996. While at the Whitney, she organized numerous groundbreaking exhibitions, including the 1993 Whitney Biennial and 1994’s Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art. She also organized Bob Thompson: A Retrospective (1998), Heart, Mind, Body, Soul: New Work from the Collection (1998), and Hindsight: Recent Work from the Permanent Collection (1999). Golden also presented projects by artists Alison Saar, Glenn Ligon, Gary Simmons, Romare Bearden, Matthew McCaslin, Suzanne McClelland, Lorna Simpson, Jacob Lawrence, and Leone & MacDonald. She also worked as the special projects curator for contemporary art collectors Peter Norton and Eileen Harris Norton from 1998 to 2000. Golden returned to the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2000, where she was named deputy director for exhibitions and programs, and director and chief curator in 2005. Golden organized numerous exhibitions at the Studio Museum, including Isaac Julien: Vagabondia (2000); Martin Puryear: The Cane Project (2000); Glenn Ligon: Stranger (2001); Freestyle (2001); Black Romantic: The Figurative Impulse in Contemporary Art (2002); harlemworld: Metropolis as Metaphor (2004); Chris Ofili: Afro Muses (2005); Frequency (2005–2006); Africa Comics (2006–2007); and Kori Newkirk: 1997–2007 (2007–2008). Golden also lectured at several institutions, including Columbia University, Yale University, and the Royal College of Art in London. In addition, she contributed essays about Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, Bill T. Jones, Kara Walker, and Glenn Ligon to various publications.

Golden received honorary degrees from Moore College of Art and Design, Smith College, and the San Francisco Art Institute. In 2008, she was a member of the advisory team of the Whitney Biennial; and in 2007, a juror for the UK Turner Prize. Golden served on the graduate committee for Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies, and on the boards of Creative Time in New York and the Institute of International Visual Arts in London. In 2016, she was awarded the Audrey Irmas Award for Curatorial Excellence.

Golden is married to London fashion designer Duro Olowu.

Thelma Golden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 9, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.006

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/09/2016

Last Name

Golden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Ann

Schools

Buckley Country Day School

New Lincoln School

Smith College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Thelma

Birth City, State, Country

St. Albans, Queens

HM ID

GOL04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Fantastic

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/22/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mangoes

Short Description

Museum director and curator Thelma Golden (1965 - ) became the director and chief curator of the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2005, having served as a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art in the 1990s.

Employment

Studio Museum in Harlem

Whitney Museum of American Art - Phillip Morris Branch

Peter Norton and Eileen Harris Norton

Jamaica Arts Center

Favorite Color

Red

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Thelma Golden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes her father's family background, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden talks about her father's parenting style

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden recalls how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Thelma Golden describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden describes her mother as a young adult

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden talks about the closeness of her mother's immediate family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden describes her neighborhood in St. Albans in Queens, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden recalls the way in which she and her brother were raised

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden describes her mother's parenting style

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden remembers the relationship between her mother and paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Thelma Golden talks about the black Presbyterian Church

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden talks about her parents' social and political ideologies

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden describes her experiences at Buckley Country Day School in Roslyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden describes the Buckley Country Day School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden talks about her favorite subjects

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes the films 'Mahogany' and 'The Wiz'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden recalls her early interest in art history

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden describes the New Lincoln School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden talks about her exposure to the art world in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Thelma Golden describes her experiences at the New Lincoln School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden describes her decision to attend Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden remembers her professor, Walter Morris-Hale, at Smith College

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden recalls her internship at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden describes her relationship with James Baldwin

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden talks about James Baldwin's influence in her life

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden recalls her summer retail jobs

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden describes her curatorial fellowship at the Studio Museum in Harlem, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden describes her curatorial fellowship at the Studio Museum in Harlem, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden remembers Harlem, New York in the 1980s and 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden recalls her interview at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden describes her role at the Whitney Museum of American Art, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes her role at the Whitney Museum of American Art, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden talks about the role of curators

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden recalls working with Kellie Jones at the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden remembers the artists exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden describes her relationship with Raymond J. McGuire

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden recalls working at the Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden recalls her role as associate curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes the retrospective exhibition of Bob Thompson's work

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden remembers the work of Lowery Stokes Sims

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden describes the ideas and influences of 'Black Male'

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden remembers the public response to her exhibition, 'Black Male'

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden recalls her parents' reactions to 'Black Male,' pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden recalls her parents' reactions to 'Black Male,' pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden remembers her colleagues' support of 'Black Male'

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden remembers the media's critique to 'Black Male'

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden talks about the importance of the 'Black Male' exhibition

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden remembers her work at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden recalls working with Lowery Stokes Sims at the Studio Museum in Harlem, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden recalls working with Lowery Stokes Sims at the Studio Museum in Harlem, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden remembers the board members at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden talks about Lowery Stokes Sims' leadership at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes the 'Freestyle' exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden recalls meeting artist Mark Bradford

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden remembers her relationship with artist Glenn Ligon

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes her relationship with artist Lorna Simpson

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden talks about her working relationship with artists

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden describes the exhibitions and programs at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden talks about the space of the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden recalls her transition to director of the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes her role as director of the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden remembers her art mentors, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden remembers her art mentors, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes her fundraising responsibilities

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden talks about presence of the Studio Museum in Harlem in the community

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden reflects upon her accomplishments at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden talks about the proposed expansion to the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden talks about her goals for the Studio Museum in Harlem

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes the post-black art movement, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden describes the post-black art movement, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden reflects upon the art world during the 2016 Presidential Election

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes how she met her husband, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Thelma Golden describes how she met her husband, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden talks about her long-distance marriage, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden talks about her long-distance marriage, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden describes her husband's cultural background

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden talks about her fellowship at the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden describes her work with the Obama Administration, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden describes her work with the Obama Administration, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden remembers attending President Barack Obama's state dinner

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Thelma Golden describes Peggy Cooper Cafritz

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Thelma Golden talks about her relationships with women in the art world

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden talks about her maternal figures

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Thelma Golden reflects upon the work of Maya Angelou

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Thelma Golden shares her goals for the future

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Thelma Golden describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Thelma Golden reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Thelma Golden narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Thelma Golden narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Thelma Golden narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$10

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Thelma Golden describes her decision to attend Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts
Thelma Golden reflects upon the art world during the 2016 Presidential Election
Transcript
--How did you end up choosing Smith [Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts]?$$I ended up at Smith because of Verne Oliver. When it came time to think about colleges, as head of school, we had a guidance counsellor, but as head of school, she also worked with the senior class, right, to ensure that every student was looking at the best range of possibilities for them. And I remember I did not necessarily have a distinct interest in women's colleges per se; I knew I wanted to go to a small school and it felt like the counsellor gave me the whole realm of some of the best small liberal arts schools on the East Coast, and so my sense of myself was, well, great; I'll apply to all of these schools. But I imagined that I would end up in a coed school, small coed liberal arts school. I knew I already wanted to major in art history, I knew I wanted to work in a museum, but I also saw college as something else besides just getting on my career track. I was excited about the possibility of leaving home and of meeting new friends, and so I just thought that college experience would be like the experience that I'd seen on TV. And Verne, in a way, Verne was very direct and stern about things. She said to me, "You are going to apply to several women's colleges." And I said, "Why?" And she says, "Because that's how the world is, and I want you to go to a women's," (background noise) sorry. I'll start that over. I, Verne was very adamant that I look at women's colleges and, you know, Verne Oliver was an educator who believed also in education; like she believed that education is what made us who we are, and believed deeply in college as not just a conveyor belt to career, but to, again, this ability to deeply dive into an academic study that one could have with them, right, their whole life, no matter what they did. And so Verne was the one who said, "You are gonna apply to women's colleges." And I remember Verne giving me the most sophisticated analysis of gender and race politics in America as she saw it, and end of that lecture ended up that she felt a woman's college would give me things that I would not get anywhere else, that she felt would be critical to my ability to actualize a life full of possibility and opportunity. And I believed her in a way, and so applied; in the end decided not to go to Smith, and sent a deposit to a coed liberal arts school that I won't name, that I went to visit, and when I was visiting this coed liberal arts, very good school that had a, a student body all proud to go there, I met a young man at that school who, so proud of his school and so, did, believed deeply, right, in its pull, said to me, "Oh, my girlfriend goes to Smith; you should meet her." And so in the weekend, it was that discovery weekend that, where after you decide where you're going you go up there, I met this young woman, and she was amazing. I mean I had never met a woman my age who had as much determination, as much focus, as much poise, I mean the first thing when I saw her, I thought, my mother [Thelma Eastmond Golden] would love her. While everyone else was at this college party, kind of, you know, in whatever they were in, she commanded space in the room, and she very calmly kind of said to me, "You know, it's great you're here; this is a great school, but did you apply to Smith?" And I said, "Yes, and I got in." I said, "But you know, I just don't know, a single sex school; I, you know, maybe I should go to a coed school." And she says, "I think you're wrong." And she gave me her phone number; she said, "Call me, let's talk," you know, "when you get home." Well, by the time I get home, and this is how the world is, it turned out her father was a very well known elected official in New York State who, when she said, "You know, I met this young woman, this is her name." He said, "Oh, that must be," again, "Artie Golden's [Arthur Golden, Sr.] daughter." And he called my dad, and she and I had spoken, and at that point my parents called Smith and said, "Listen," you know, "she made this decision, she'd like to perhaps change her decision." It was still within the timing, so I wasn't out of time, but it was more that it felt like we were done. And Smith, of course, said, "Of course you can come." And the only thing that happened is we lost the deposit for the first school. And years later, that school invited me to do a lecture and they paid me a very generous honorarium, and I was so proud of that and I told my father, and about a week later he said, "Okay, you know whose money that is." He goes, "That's my deposit with interest," you know, twenty years later (laughter). But, I then knew, I knew Smith was right. I knew it was right; I knew when I visited, but I just had a little bit of anxiety about what I imagined I wanted. It's the thing I tell now young women who are looking at Smith, that that anxiety, in the course of one's life, is so small compared to all you gain in these four years in an environment that is truly invested in you. And what it means to be in an environment with all these young women, your peers, who have an equal sense of themself was inspiring every single day. That's how it felt to be at Smith, it was inspiring every day. So that's how I got to Smith. Verne was thrilled. I mean this was sort of her choice, and I'd applied to several other women's colleges. My parents were thrilled because it was a decision they thought I was happy with, and I went off to Smith and spent four amazing years there.$What do you think about your, the concept in the days, 'cause I think really, a lot of us are fearful of the times, well, I don't know, amazed and sort of fearful of what hap- you know, what, you know, between, I'm talking about, I don't even wanna talk about him, but between Trump [President Donald John Trump] and, you know, what is sort of--$$Yeah.$$--fermenting in society right now, and, and so I was wondering what your thoughts are, or do you see beyond that.$$Well, I have always felt that I see the world through art; I see the world through art in amazing moments in the world, but I also see the world through art in hard, complicated moments. So I, right now, am deeply engaged in the work that's being made, for example, photographically, by young photographers and photojournalists who are on the front lines of the protests going on all over this country, right, in the face of all the violence that's happening, the racial violence and the violence that's happening because of the racial violence. I understand what I understand about some of that through their eyes, and through the way in which they are documenting and then capturing it, some of them not even with the idea that it's art with a big A, but it is art to me, and I'm intrigued. I know that's what will be the record of what people who will know about this moment, this complicated, awful moment, will know about it a hundred years from now; it's gonna come, right, in that work. And as a curator, I actually have the added responsibility, in some cases, of collecting that work to make sure that somebody has the opportunity to see it. So, right now, I look at what's going on by looking at the ways in which artists are responding. It always isn't direct, however. Do you know what I, like it isn't always direct; there aren't always direct manifestations in the very moment by artists; that, that's not what I mean to say, what I mean to say, however, is that art reacts to the world it's in; art reacts to the world it's in, so being someone in the world of art means that I have a way to understand some of the complexity of what's happening in the world.

Kenneth G. Rodgers

Artist and art historian Kenneth Gerald Rodgers was born on October 22, 1949 in Siler City, North Carolina to Cornelia and Johnnie Rodgers, a data entry operator and laborer, respectively. Rodgers’ uncle inspired him to begin drawing at the age of seven, and Rodgers became a young caricaturist. He graduated from Chatham High School in 1967 and received a scholarship to attend North Carolina A&T State University where he majored in art design. At North Carolina A&T State University, Rodgers learned the technical aspects of drawing, painting, design and color, and he mastered skills in still life and portraiture. Rodgers graduated from North Carolina A&T State University in 1971 with his B.S. degree in art design and, in 1972, became a graduate assistant at the Weatherspoon Art Gallery where he studied exhibition design, mounting and crafting. He received his M.F.A. degree from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro in 1973.

Rodgers’ academic career progressed in 1974 when he was named director of the art program at Voorhees College. Leaving Voorhees in 1977, he assumed the position of assistant professor of art at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In 1984, Rodgers began the "Art of the Modern World" series in Ocean City, Maryland. In 1990, he joined the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture and was charged with conserving, promoting and interpreting the history of black Marylanders and became chairman of the commission in 1993. As chairman, he supervised the Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis, Maryland. Also in 1993, Rodgers was named associate professor of African American Art History at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore and was also named Artist-in-Residence at Mesa State College in Colorado.

In 1996, Rodgers became director of the North Carolina Central University Art Museum, which houses the largest collection of African American art in the state. In this capacity, Rodgers served as organizer and curator of several high profile exhibits including Edward Mitchell Bannister: American Landscape Artist, Re-connecting Roots: The Silver Anniversary Alumni Invitational, Charles White: American Draughtsman, Elizabeth Catlett: Master Printmaker and William H. Johnson: Revisiting an African American Modernist. In 2006, Rodgers was named Professor of Art and Director of the North Carolina University Art Museum. He has published several art compilations including William H. Johnson: Revisiting an African American Modernist and Climbing Up the Mountain: The Modern Art of Malvin Gray Johnson. Rodgers painted the official portrait of the first African American member of the North Carolina Council of State and the first African American State Auditor for North Carolina, Ralph Campbell. Rodgers has received numerous research grants and awards including: a National Endowment for the Humanities for study at the Vatican Museums and the American Academy in Rome, a Fulbright-Hays Study Abroad award for research in Kenya and Tanzania, and grants from the North Carolina Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Duke-Semans Fine Arts Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation to support museum exhibitions and programs.

Rodgers is the father of two and lives in North Carolina with his wife, Shielda Glover Rodgers.

Kenneth Rodgers was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 22, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.184

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/22/2007

Last Name

Rodgers

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Jordan-Matthews High School

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Kenneth

Birth City, State, Country

Siler City

HM ID

ROD04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

Nobody's Exempt.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

10/22/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Durham

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Tacos, Fajitas

Short Description

Fine artist, curator, art history professor, and museum director Kenneth G. Rodgers (1949 - ) taught at many universities, and in 2006, was named Professor of Art and Director of the North Carolina University Art Museum. He was a part of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture and was charged with conserving, promoting and interpreting the history of black Marylanders.

Employment

North Carolina Central University

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Voorhees College

Florida A&M University

South Carolina State University

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Kenneth G. Rodgers' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers talks about his mother's education and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his childhood home

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his neighborhood in Siler City, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes himself as a student

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his early interest in art

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls the racial tensions in Siler City, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers Corinth A.M.E. Zion Church in Siler City, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes Chatham High School in Siler City, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his decision to attend North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his first week of college

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his first painting experiences in college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his art courses at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his political and social involvement in college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls the uprising after Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his decision to attend the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his first class in graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes the facilities at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Kenneth G. Rodgers talks about his artistic influences

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his experiences at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls applying to the North Carolina Museum of Art

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his position at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his experiences at Voorhees College in Denmark, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers talks about his family

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers shares his favorite memories with his children

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers exhibiting at the Orangeburg Festival of Roses

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his painting, 'Cardplayers'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers talks about his favorite artists

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his own artwork

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his position at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers his exhibition of Edward Mitchell Bannister's work

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his neighborhood in Princess Anne, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Kenneth G. Rodgers remembers the Thurgood Marshall Memorial in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his position at North Carolina Central University Art Museum

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his exhibition of Charles Wilbert White's work

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls his exhibition of Elizabeth Catlett's work

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Kenneth G. Rodgers describes the work of Malvin Gray Johnson

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Kenneth G. Rodgers recalls the exhibition 'Raising Renee and Other Themes'

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Kenneth G. Rodgers reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Kenneth G. Rodgers reflects upon his artistic inspiration

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Kenneth G. Rodgers narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

3$9

DATitle
Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his own artwork
Kenneth G. Rodgers describes his position at North Carolina Central University Art Museum
Transcript
Describe another one of your favorite paintings, one you crafted yourself.$$Some years ago, I did a piece depicting two musicians, a cornet player, who happened to be on the right side of the painting, and another African musician playing his version of the xylophone, and the actual name of the instrument escapes me at the moment, but that was a work that allowed me not only to look at physiognomy, but it allowed me to look at these musical instruments and manipulate all kinds of modeling and shading effects as well. The unfortunate thing is that I did complete it and it was able to get into a major exhibit and I looked forward to getting it back, however it was purchased. And I really have mixed feelings about it, and you know it happens a lot with artists.$$What exhibit was it a part of?$$It was an exhibit at the J.B. Speed Art Museum [J.B. Speed Memorial Museum; Speed Art Museum] in Louisville, Kentucky. An exact title escapes me at the moment. But I think frequently artists are faced with this dilemma. Works of art become a part of you and you don't want to let go, but in the case of someone like, like myself, I don't produce work to sell it. I've never thought about it that way. I produce it because I like to do it. And, well that just happened to be a unique situation.$$Do you have any art that captures life in the South, either capturing relationships between white southerners and black southerners?$$I do not. I haven't really looked at that dynamic, but it's something that I plan to do. And I think I should say that one of the reasons I haven't done so is because I'm a bit of a hybrid, in that I'm doing curatorial work while trying to become a painter, and notice my expression, I'll still learning how to paint to the extent that some things have simply fallen through the cracks to coin the expression.$When you left Maryland, what year was that?$$I came to North Carolina in 1996.$$Why?$$I came here primarily because I heard about North Carolina Central University [Durham, North Carolina] and the fact that they had an exhibition space that was larger than the one that I currently worked at [at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland]. So I came to North Carolina Central University as director of their art museum [North Carolina Central University Art Museum, Durham, North Carolina].$$And what's your first memory?$$My first memory is my meeting with my board of directors, and thinking about the challenges that I might have in terms of putting together a body of programming that would do justice to the university, of course, would satiate the board members, but that would also continue this notion that I always had of pulling these artists out from the shadows and presenting them. So that first memories was of that meeting was my first, my very first meeting of the board.$$What was your first accomplishment in that role?$$I think the first accomplishment, certainly from the board's perspective, was to ensure them that they had made the right decision in, in bringing me along, that I would be faithful to the mission of the university, of the university museum.$$What was the mission?$$To promote, conserve and present African American art.$$So what, tell me the artists and the paintings you provide.$$Well, we had already at the museum the nucleus of a broad section of African American artists that we could build on. Almost all of the major artists were there, minus one or two.$$Who were they?$$There were the 19th century icons, Edward Mitchell Bannister, Henry Tanner [Henry Ossawa Tanner], Robert Scott Duncanson. There was also a generous representation of WPA [Works Progress Administration; Work Projects Administration] era artists. There were contemporary artists, including MacArthur winners [MacArthur Fellowship]. So the notion was to use these artists as a point of departure and to develop the (unclear) exhibits around what was already there. And I think we've probably been able to do that in, in some measure.$$What was the most startling experience for you?$$Well, I think the most startling experience might have been attempting to reconcile realistic acquisitions, plan and budget against what was in place because essentially there was not very much in place for acquisition so the, the first call of order is to add to the collection, and if you have the nucleus of, of works from various periods, how do you then add to those, and where do you, more importantly, get the monies from to do it?

The Honorable Byron Rushing

Massachusetts state representative Byron Douglas Rushing was born in New York City on July 29, 1942. His father, William Rushing, worked as a janitor in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. His mother, Jamaican native Linda Turpin, migrated to New York City working as a seamstress. The family moved to Syracuse, New York, where Rushing attended Madison Junior High. He was praised for his public speaking, and entered various oratorical contests. He also attended a youth summer camp, under the direction of the Universalist Unitarian Church, which taught world peace and cultural understanding by bringing various racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious groups together. Rushing attended this camp throughout high school.

In 1960, Rushing graduated from Syracuse Central High School. Members of the Quaker church whom he met at his summer youth camp invited him to participate in another youth summer program operated by the American Friends Service Committee. Rushing was able to travel through Eastern and Western Europe. In the fall of 1960, Rushing attended Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. At the end of his junior year, Rushing decided to postpone his studies and fully dedicate his efforts to the Civil Rights Movement. He returned to Syracuse to work with the local chapter of CORE [Congress of Racial Equality] tackling issues of employment integration and police brutality.

Rushing moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1964 to work for the Northern Student Movement. He operated programs of youth tutoring, and voter education and registration. During this time, Rushing volunteered for various programs involving the Episcopalian church, his religious faith. He was hired by St. John's Church to set up a community information center. The Massachusetts Council for Churches then hired Rushing to establish a community organizing project called Roxbury Associates. It was at Roxbury Associates that Rushing met his first wife, Andrea Benton.

From 1967 to 1969, Rushing worked as an orderly at Rochester General Hospital. In 1969, Rushing returned to Boston as the Director of the Urban Change program for the Urban League. Between 1972 and 1985, he worked as president of the Museum of Afro-American History. As president, he helped raise money for the purchase and restoration of what was cited as the oldest African American church building in the United States, the African Meeting House.

In 1982, Rushing was elected as a representative of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He was the chief sponsor of the law to end discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in public schools, and an original sponsor of the gay rights bill in Massachusetts. Rushing also led the Massachusetts state pension fund to launch community development investment of poor communities of Massachusetts. Rushing is an elected deputy to the General Convention of The Episcopal Church; a founding member of the Episcopal Urban Caucus; and serves on the boards of the Episcopal Women's Caucus and the Episcopal Network for Economic Justice.

Accession Number

A2006.013

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/8/2006

Last Name

Rushing

Schools

Syracuse Central High School

Madison Junior High School

Harvard University

P.S. 2 Morrisania School

Washington Irving Elementary School

First Name

Byron

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

RUS07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Men May Not Get Everything They Pay For, But They Must Certainly Pay For Everything They Get.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/29/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pork

Short Description

Museum director and state representative The Honorable Byron Rushing (1942 - ) has sponsored civil rights and community development legislation in Massachusetts since his election in 1982. Between 1972 and 1985, he worked as president of the Museum of Afro-American History.

Employment

Massachusetts House of Representatives

Museum of Afro-American History/Museum of African American History

Congress of Racial Equality

Northern Student Movement

St. John's Episcopal Church

Massachusetts Council of Churches

Center for Inner City Change

Rochester General Hospital

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of the Honorable Byron Rushing's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes her parents' professions

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls his parents' reunion

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the neighborhood of Morrisania in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing recalls places his mother took him as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing remembers P.S. 2 Morrisania in the Bronx

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing describes his baptism in the Presbyterian church

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing describes his schools in Syracuse, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing recalls teachers and friends who influenced him

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing describes his neighborhood in Syracuse, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing recalls how his mother faced employment discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing recalls his experiences at Syracuse Central High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Bryon Rushing recalls his parents' NAACP involvement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls meeting Ralph Abernathy and Eleanor Roosevelt

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls his trip to Europe with the American Friends Service Committee

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls his decision to attend Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls how he became involved with CORE

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his work with CORE in Syracuse

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls CORE's demonstration against urban renewal

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Byron Rushing explains his work with CORE and the Northern Student Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his role at the Northern Student Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the Community Voter Registration Project

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes Blue Hill Avenue's African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his work in Episcopal organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the Lower Roxbury Community Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Byron Rushing explains how he came to work for the Center for Inner City Change

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls working with Melvin King and Hubie Jones

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the Museum of Afro-American History

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the accomplishments of the Museum of Afro-American History

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls the archeological investigation of the African Meeting House

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes the Boston African American National Historic Site

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing reflects upon his achievements at the Museum of Afro-American History

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Byron Rushing explains his role at the Roxbury Historical Society

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls running for the Massachusetts House of Representatives

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes Boston's Ninth Suffolk District

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his roles in the Massachusetts House of Representatives

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his legislative work against the apartheid

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls creating Massachusetts' Burma Law

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls his work for marriage equality in Massachusetts

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his work to alleviate homelessness

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his family life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls how Malcolm X changed his religious views

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Byron Rushing reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Byron Rushing gives advice to young African Americans

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Byron Rushing describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Byron Rushing narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

7$4

DATitle
The Honorable Byron Rushing recalls CORE's demonstration against urban renewal
The Honorable Byron Rushing describes his work to alleviate homelessness
Transcript
(Laughter) So, so we go out to find a place where they're tearing down some buildings. The only building--they're, they're not tearing down any houses on that particular day. They're tearing down a gasoline station. So we go to the gasoline station and, and we walk onto the site and we--and, and the workers just go berserk, right. They start yelling at us and start throwing things at us, and we tell 'em we have to close the whole thing down. We're, of course, nonviolent, and the police come. The police call up the urban renewal authority. The, the, the director and two or three other people of, of, of the urban renewal authority are in Washington [D.C.] because they went to the March on Washington (laughter) and so no one can get--so they--so the whole--so they tell the workers to go home and we have our big success. We close down (laughter)--and so we get all of this publicity and we have a big meeting inside CORE [Congress of Racial Equality]. There, there were a lot of people in the chapter who were mad at us. They think we didn't go about it in the right way. We didn't have enough discussion about doing this demonstration. And now we're sort of stuck 'cause we're now in the--we made the chapter be anti-urban renewal, right, and how are we gonna do all of this with just a bunch of volunteers? And when the school starts, they won't have the volunteers, right 'cause everybody will be in school. And they say--they, they turn to me and they say, "Why don't you stay instead of going down to Louisiana? Why don't you stay here, right, and you spend your year here working for us? And also, you have this big advantage, is that you won't be an outside agitator which was a big thing then, right, always accusing all the civil rights groups of being outside agitators. You're from Syracuse [New York]." So, I said okay and I spent a year working, running the chapter in Syracuse.$$Right. I see.$$I was their twenty-five dollars a week staff person.$$For the record, we should indicate what CORE stands for.$$CORE is the Congress of Racial Equality (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$--which is an early civil rights organization--$$Back in the '40s [1940s].$$--I mean, which began in the '40s [1940s]--$$Yeah, yeah.$$--in the North based on Gandhian [Mahatma Gandhi] principles. And, and actually the word congress, they took because that's the word that Gandhi used for his political organization [Indian National Congress] was--in India was the--was a--was the congress. And that--and so--and this was the Congress of Racial Equal- Equality.$Now, on a--on a day to day basis, I have to spend a lot of time with the issues that relate directly to my constituency [from the 9th Suffolk District]. Now, sometimes those issues are very interesting issues and sometime--you know, and sometimes they're--and, and apply to other people and sometimes those issues just apply to the South End [Boston, Massachusetts] and, and, and everybody else would glaze over as I talk about the fact that we have flooding problems or that a good deal of the South End is built on filled in land and we're--and we're having problems with foundations of buildings and who should be responsible for that, but I get involved in that a lot. But on the other hand, as I said earlier, I'm very concerned that we have as good housing for poor and working class people as possible in, in, in our community. Now, I want that housing, a lot of that housing, to be in my district. But when I work for improving housing for poor and working class people, when I work for a, a housing trust fund set up by the state so there'll be money available for developing that kind of housing, I, of course, not just doing work for my own constituents, I'm doing work for that whole class of people throughout the state that need--that needs that. That has drawn me, though into what I consider one of the real disgraces of the United States and the--and cities in the United States, and that is homelessness. I mean, you and I can remember when there was no such word as homeless. We could--you can--I can remember when almost everybody had some place to live. We--our--we complained about the, the conditions with which we lived in but we usually didn't complain that they didn't have a roof at all, and that is something that has only happened in the past twenty years. And we don't--and we seem to be just--buy into it, taking it for granted, assuming it's gonna be with us forever, so we set the--we--so the issue becomes, we set up shelters and we try to make sure we have enough beds available for everyone who wants to come in off the street, right, but we're not saying, no. There was a time when this didn't exist and it doesn't need to exist now. So I've been spending a lot of time trying to reframe the question around homelessness and to move it from how to we take care of people who--in shelters and how do we have decent family shelters, get 'em out of--out of hotels and motels and into some kind of shelter where they can get some services when, when, when--but to move it away from that conversation which is an important conversation to the conversation of how do we end homelessness? How do we supply enough housing so that nobody has to be homeless, right? And I find that there are not a lot of people thinking that way. And so I've been working with people here and in other parts, in other states in the country, Wisconsin, Minnesota, who are coming up with working plans, really business plans on how to end homelessness. So I have legislation to establish a commission to come up with a working plan to end homelessness in Massachusetts, a plan that has benchmarks like any business plan, had--will know how much it would cost to do this, how long it would take, spending this amount of money to have this accomplished, and that's one of the things that I've been spending a lot of time on--$$Okay.$$--most recently.$$I'm gonna follow that initiative. I wanna watch it.$$That's good.

Dan Moore, Sr.

Noted filmmaker and museum founder Dan A. Moore, Sr. was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 20, 1935. After high school, Moore worked in several jobs, but found his true calling in 1967 when he began producing films.

His first film was a documentary entitled On Patrol for God, filmed at a Christian rally he helped to organize. A few years later, Moore went to Liberia on Africa's west coast and made the film Welcome Home, which was sponsored by the Liberian government on the condition that he return and make a second film, which he did. He would return to Africa and travel to several other countries, as well. He later made films featuring Bill Cosby and Gale Sayers, among others. Moore also produced, wrote, and directed The Journey, Sweet Auburn Street of Pride, and A New Time for a New Voice.

During the early 1970s Moore spent time as president of Image 7 Inc. in Atlanta, and Omega Films in Philadelphia. In 1978, Moore founded the African American Panoramic Experience Museum (APEX) in Atlanta, which seeks to educate people about the depth and breadth of the African American experience. His inspiration for the museum came as he attended a banquet honoring Dr. Benjamin Mays, and he dedicated himself to creating a museum that celebrates the unsung heroes of the African American experience. At the time of the interview, he remains there as executive director.

Accession Number

A2004.180

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/24/2004

Last Name

Moore

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

George W. Childs School

Norris S. Barratt Middle School

Edward W. Bok Technical High School

Barratt Middle School

Bok Technical High School

G.W. Childs School

First Name

Dan

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

MOO04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jacksonville, Florida

Favorite Quote

The Lord is the strength of my life.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

11/20/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Dumplings

Short Description

Curator, film producer, and museum director Dan Moore, Sr. (1935 - ) is the founder of the African American Panoramic Museum Experience. His first film was a documentary entitled On Patrol for God, filmed at a Christian rally he helped to organize. Moore also produced, wrote, and directed The Journey, Sweet Auburn Street of Pride, and A New Time for a New Voice.

Employment

Omega Films

Image Seven

African American Panoramic Experience Museum (APEX)

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dan Moore interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dan Moore's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dan Moore talks about his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dan Moore talks about his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dan Moore discusses his family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dan Moore recalls his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dan Moore gives his siblings' names

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dan Moore remembers aspects of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dan Moore recalls his early school years and his personality as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dan Moore tells of his religious involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dan Moore recalls his aspirations and personality as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dan Moore talks about career interests during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dan Moore recounts his early experiences in filmmaking

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dan Moore discusses his documentary films about Africa

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dan Moore tells of the various films he produced

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dan Moore comments on the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dan Moore talks about inspiring films

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dan Moore comments on contemporary music

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dan Moore explains how the arts impact society

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dan Moore talks about the portayal of Africa in film

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dan Moore discusses projects his film companies produced

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dan Moore tells of his involvement in museum exhibitions

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dan Moore explains his reception into the Atlanta community

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dan Moore recalls the history of the APEX

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dan Moore details the objective of APEX

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dan Moore talks about current film projects

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dan Moore contemplates the future of the APEX

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dan Moore looks back on his career

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dan Moore comments on the importance of preserving history

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dan Moore recounts his filmmaking experiences in Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dan Moore discusses his connection to God

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dan Moore reflects on his career

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dan Moore shares his concerns for the African American communty

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dan Moore describes how he'd like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dan Moore discusses the importance of a spiritual connection

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dan Moore tells of artists he admires

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dan Moore comments on the current state of filmmaking

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dan Moore considers his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dan Moore explains the importance of his film 'The Journey'

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Dan Moore discusses his documentary films about Africa
Dan Moore talks about the portayal of Africa in film
Transcript
So with that [filmmaking] knowledge in hand, after maybe three or four months, I grabbed a camera, bought a camera, said, I want to go to Africa and film in Africa to tell the story that I feel we need to share with African Americans here. And at that time, missionaries would come back from Africa, mostly white missionaries, saying that African Americans were not welcome in Africa. I decided to find out for myself what it was all about. I took this camera and my brother, who was an engineer, he learned how to operate the, the Nagra [brand] tape recorder. We packed up our stuff and went to Africa, went to Liberia. When we arrived in Liberia, the minister of information said to me, "Is this your first time visiting Africa?" I said, "Yes." He said, "Well, welcome home." And that became the name of the first film that I did in Africa. It was called 'Welcome Home'. We filmed there for about a week or so and came back, and during those times, we had to--when you did film, it was not like today when you're doing videotape, you had to actually sit down with film physically on two different rolls and roll it out by hand and make it dissolve, have to go to a lab for two or three days to come back just to make one special effect. But when I came back from Liberia, I met the daughter of the president of Liberia [William R. Tolbert, Jr.] who was attending school in Philadelphia, Willie Mae Tolbert [later Wokie Tubman]. And she carried me to Washington [D.C.] to meet with her uncle [Stephen A. Tolbert] who was, at that time, the, the treasurer of Liberia. My purpose of going there was just to ask him to endorse the film so I could probably try to get a sponsor for it to sell it. After he saw the film, he said to me, "I will, I will buy the film from you under one condition." I said, "What is that?" "That you go back and do a second film for us." I said, "Well, I, I can handle that." So in two weeks, I was back on a plane again, going back to Africa to film the sesquicentennial celebration of Liberia. We filmed Jesse Jackson's first visit to the West Coast of Africa. We filmed [President of Guinea] Ahmed Sekou Ture's visit to Liberia. He was coming from I believe Sierra Leone visit at the time. And it was a tremendously moving experience. Just to walk down the street in Liberia and see thousands of women in white singing and chanting as they greeted Ahmed Sekou Ture from Guinea, and as he greeted President Tolbert. It was a very moving experience. President Tolbert was a very, very warm man, very--a person who had a, a real handle on his country. He spoke several dialects, and we traveled with President Tolbert to various villages throughout Liberia, some by car, some by plane. And he would meet with the people and talk their language. We went to leper, a leper village, and he was just a very warm person.$$You went to a--could you--?$$A leper village where, where they have leprosy. See, they were separated, if you had leprosy, you were separated in a village by yourself. You would not, you would not, you would not be mingling with everyone else because leprosy is contagious. So there were villages set aside just for those who had, who, who were lepers, many of whom had missing limbs, etc. And he would go mingle with the people, talk their language, and he was very sensitive because the car I was riding in--we got four cars behind his. So whenever his entourage stopped, I'd have to get out of my car, run up to where he was to show him getting out, getting out of his car and going to shake hands with all those who were in the, in the villages. So he made them put my car right behind his to make it more convenient for me to be able to get out and film him as he got out to meet all these folks. Liberia is a very great country, beautiful country, very, great experience there. And I went from there over to, to Ghana before coming home. I did a film in Ghana on sickle cell anemia before I returned to the states. So I got into film, that was the real niche for me, the whole creative process and the whole process of being able to communicate and to help change things and lives and people by exposing them to things through that medium.$You were discussing your responses to the images [of African Americans] that were being presented.$$If we don't present different images, children will grow up with one set of images in their mind, given to them by somebody else. And I refuse to sit by idly and watch our children grow up with images of beauty that don't include them. I'm not saying just black--white is also beautiful, but I must be included in that number. If you're, if you're presenting beauty, you must have some inclusion of someone of a darker hue.$$How do you think that your early films challenged stereotypes?$$Well, I'm not sure how much the--it challenged them, but my, my thing was that I had to make sure that the image that was being seen was the image being seen from a African American perspective. And that was not the case until I did some film that I, I feel that I did, that made Africa look differently than it was being shown, as I saw it, as I saw it. I recall the 'Tarzan' movies, and all you would see was this white man in loin cloth, swinging on these vines with some strange yell, and all these hundreds of, of natives running. This was the image. This was the Tarzan image. And this is portrayed--why? Why, why is this portrayed? So when I come up, my image of Africa is that Africans are below Europeans or white Americans because the image I've seen has always been this white person named Tarzan, who was in charge. He talked to the animals, talked to the chimpanzee and he ruled--when he came, if there was trouble between tribes, when he came, it was all settled. So in my mind's eye, what am I seeing? I'm seeing that there's a white male figure that comes on the scene and solves the problems. I had problems with Santa Claus. Here you are in a poor neighborhood. You can't give your children anything all year long, and then once a year, once a year--not only what they need, but what they want, they get. But who brings it to them? A jolly white man in a red suit. So the image is, what I need I can't get all year long from my single black, black mother or my black family, but once a year, here comes this white man down the chimney with his big, red suit and his jolly face. And he brings me not only what I, what I need, but what I want. So from childhood, we started getting images that this person is a savior. And if you don't have a good image of yourself, you cannot control your destiny.

Carol L. Adams

Nonprofit executive Carol L. Adams was born on May 11, 1944, in Louisville, Kentucky to William and Lora Adams. She studied music at Lincoln University in Jefferson, Missouri, for a year before transferring to Fisk University where she graduated with a B.A. degree in sociology in 1965. The following year she earned her M.A. degree in sociology from Boston University. She pursued doctoral coursework at the University of Chicago, studying under esteemed sociologist Horace R. Cayton, before leaving to complete her Ph.D. degree in sociology from the Union Graduate School in 1976. She has also studied at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and at Yale University.

In 1968, Adams began her career in academia as the research director for the Center for Inner City Studies (CICS) at Northeastern Illinois University. Over a ten-year period, she assumed greater responsibility as the CICS’s assistant director and became a tenured associate professor. She developed a number of successful programs and key community partnerships for CICS during its early years. Adams went on to spend several years as the first director of research and planning for the Neighborhood Institute, a division of South Shore Bank (later the Shorebank Institute). In just two years, Adams managed to establish several programs designed to promote community development, revitalization and self-sufficiency.

In 1981, Adams returned to academia as the director for Loyola University’s African-American studies program, a position she held until 1988. She then served as dean of adult and continuing education at Kennedy-King College in Chicago for a year. From 1989 to 1996, Adams worked for the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA). While at the CHA, Adams went from directing one department to managing thirteen departments and a $500 million budget. Adams subsequently served as the director for the International House of Blues Foundation and the founding director of Chicago’s Museums and Public Schools program before returning in 2000 to Northeastern University as Executive Director of CICS. Under her direction, the Center experienced a new surge of growth in student enrollment, technological advancement, and community programming and collaborations.

In January 2003, Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich named Adams secretary of the Department of Human Services, the state's largest government agency. During her six year tenure, the agency secured almost $250 million in new grant funding and dramatically reduced the infant mortality rate of infants born to Medicaid-eligible women. Since 2009, Adams has been the president and chief executive officer of the DuSable Museum of African American History. Adams has been the recipient of numerous research awards, grants and honors, including the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa key.

Carol Adams was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 7, 2003 and August 24, 2010.

Accession Number

A2003.066

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/7/2003 |and| 8/24/2010

Last Name

Adams

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Organizations
Schools

Albert E. Meyzeek Middle School

Louisville Central High School

Fisk University

Boston University

University of Chicago

Union Graduate School

Yale University

Harvard University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

Louisville

HM ID

ADA03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Kentucky

Favorite Vacation Destination

Brazil

Favorite Quote

Let's Cut To The Chase.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/11/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Nonprofit executive Carol L. Adams (1944 - ) was the secretary of the Illinois Department of Human Services and director of the Center for Inner City Studies at Northeastern Illinois University. She was also the president and chief executive officer of the DuSable Museum of African American History.

Employment

Neighborhood Institute

Loyola University of Chicago

Kennedy-King College

Chicago Housing Authority

International House of Blues Foundation

Museums and Public Schools

Northeastern Illinois University Center for Inner City Studies

Illinois. Department of Human Services.

DuSable Museum of African American History

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1642,31:15852,249:33840,430:34332,437:35808,483:67700,888:79920,1042:83435,1073:84019,1082:93071,1326:116656,1634:118150,1654:127031,1849:151544,2252:157165,2348:157457,2353:157749,2358:158260,2368:183762,2774:189371,2859:200817,3020:215460,3261$0,0:1110,19:1850,31:6364,128:19018,381:30592,518:30952,524:31456,532:37216,631:39232,665:65458,1185:82460,1424:87710,1505:91310,1573:105565,1739:126990,2018
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol L. Adams's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes her grandfather's death

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams talks about her experience at Booker T. Washington Elementary School and Central High School in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes her father's personality and businesses

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience at Central High School in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience at Central High School in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes enrolling at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes being arrested for a civil rights protest in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes being arrested for a civil rights protest in Nashville, Tennessee, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes the environment of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience at Boston University in Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience moving to Chicago, Illinois in 1966

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience as a member of The Catalyst in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes being inspired by HistoryMaker Abena Joan P. Brown

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes meeting Horace Cayton, Jr. at the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes working with Horace Cayton, Jr. at the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the Communiversity and the Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the Communiversity and the Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes her graduate project with the Carruthers Center for Inter City Studies and the Cook County Jail

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the Neighborhood Institute of South Shore Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience as head of the African American Studies program at Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes seeing her former students develop

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams talks about her trips to Ghana, Kenya, and Kemet

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with arts organizations in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes the programs she was involved with in the South Shore neighborhood of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes her approach to evaluating grant proposals

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol L. Adams's interview

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience as director of African American Studies at Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes her relationship to her students at Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes inviting Harold Washington to speak at Loyola University while he was running for Mayor of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the Illinois Council of Black Studies

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams reflects upon the death of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes her involvement with various political campaigns

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience at Kennedy-King College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Carol L. Adams describes her decision to work as Director of Resident Services and Programs for the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Carol L. Adams describes the administrations she worked under at the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Carol L. Adams describes the history of Chicago Housing Authority developments

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Carol L. Adams describes Chicago Housing Authority polices and how they have limited access to public housing

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Carol L. Adams describes the decline in public housing before she began working for the Chicago Housing Authority

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Carol L. Adams describes the state of public housing resident organizations when she worked for Chicago Housing Authority in 1989, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes the state of public housing resident organizations when she worked for Chicago Housing Authority in 1989, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's program to encourage resident-owned businesses

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's Midnight Basketball League, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's Midnight Basketball League, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's "Mama Said" program

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's CADRE program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes the murder of five year old Eric Morse at Ida B. Wells Homes

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes the development of Ida B. Wells Preparatory Elementary Academy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming director of the International House of Blues Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the International House of Blues Foundation

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Carol L. Adams describes moving her Chicago Housing Authority offices from downtown Chicago, Illinois to Ida B. Wells Homes

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Carol L. Adams describes the development of the Chicago Housing Authority's Project Peace, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes the development of the Chicago Housing Authority's Project Peace, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming the founding director of the Museums and Public Schools program in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming director of the Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago in 2000, pt.1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming director of the Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago in 2000, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming Secretary of Human Services for the State of Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes becoming Secretary of Human Services for the State of Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes integrating the offices of the Illinois Department of Human Services

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes how technology helped her connect to her employees at the Illinois Department of Human Services

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Carol L. Adams reflects on the administration of Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Carol L. Adams reflects upon her achievements as Secretary of the Illinois Department of Human Services

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes the Team Illinois initiative

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes the challenges of her tenure as Secretary of the Illinois Department of Human Services

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes her candidacy for president of Chicago State University in Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes her decision to leave the Illinois Department of Human Services

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams describes being selected as president of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience as president of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams describes the history of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes her plans for developing the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Carol L. Adams talks about Chicago, Illinois founder Jean Baptiste Point du Sable

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Carol L. Adams describes the community's involvement with the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Carol L. Adams describes some of the challenges faced by the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Carol L. Adams describes the collection of the DuSable Museum of African American History

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Carol L. Adams describes the challenge of getting accreditation for DuSable Museum of African American History

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Carol L. Adams describes her experience with the Paradise Group

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Carol L. Adams describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Carol L. Adams reflects upon her regrets

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Carol L. Adams reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Carol L. Adams talks about her family

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Carol L. Adams describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

6$8

DAStory

5$10

DATitle
Carol L. Adams describes the Chicago Housing Authority's "Mama Said" program
Carol L. Adams describes the community's involvement with the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, Illinois
Transcript
Yeah. The other program we had that I really was very proud of was called "Mama Said." And it was a program for young women who were mothers, and who were mentored by moms who had successfully reared their kids in public housing. And I thought of that program--the name of it--not the idea; it was a woman named Helen Fenner who was the president of the Local Advisory Council at Ida B. Wells [Homes]. And she said, "Carol, we really need to do something about these young moms. They don't know how to raise children. They're making a lot of mistakes with their kids, you know." She sort of would sit on her... outside her dwelling and see some of this. And she was very disturbed by it. So, after talking with her a little bit, it occurred to me that maybe moms like her could mentor the girls who needed to know how to be mothers. But at first, I think I thought about it in a sort of retro way. I started recruiting all of these so-called successful women to be the mentors in the Mama Said program. It was an abysmal failure. Then it dawned on me, that the distance between this was too great. But the girls thought that so and so who didn't live anywhere near their community--who had an altogether different life--who went to college who ran this and this thing or whatever--wasn't anything like them. And they thought, "Well what you're talking about is something you can do in your neighborhood, but not something that I can do here." And that's when I realized sort of the mistake in my own reasoning, that I had overlooked the successful mom right next door. So, we totally did the program over, and started looking at the moms right there. And I started realizing... because by then I had moved my office from downtown at State and Madison to Ida B. Wells. I moved all my staff there. Because I said, "If you're really actually into development, you're going to get a much better feel for what things we ought to be doing. Our ears are going to be to the ground. We're going to be talking to the residents and dealing with them in a different way." So, we went back to the drawing board. And working with Mrs. Fenner and some of the other... I call "old school moms," then we reorganized Mama Said. And it was wildly successful, because we were able to get funding and hire women who lived in the developments to have some roles, as well as the women who volunteered. And if the girls were involved in workshops and different kinds of things--if the mom lived next door or across the street--your mentoring mom--she'd get to see what you were doing. She'd get to see what was happening. She could say, "Come and sit on my porch and let's talk for a minute." You know, it was just in a different kind of environment. And that was very successful. And I see my Mama Said moms all the time; they want to have a reunion. They became mentoring moms themselves, and so forth. And in the subsequent years when other girls would come, they sort of were self-directed, self-governing. They would tell the other girls, "Don't do that. You're going to have to... you know, you shouldn't spank her." Or, "You shouldn't do this or you shouldn't that." They learned a lot of things that they passed on to other people, you know.$So, I know this is also a film series that's significant that's going on.$$We've been doing a lot of films. We're doing a film series called the "African Jubilee," which is the celebration of fifty years of independence on the part of many African countries, you know, who became independent in the sixties. And so, we've been showing African film. We have several film series, plus we make films a part of our public programming, in terms of whatever exhibition we have. So, when we have the exhibition about the Black Panther Party, in addition to the scholarly panels and the activist panels and so forth on that period, we also show films of the period and documentaries about it, and so forth. And then we do just for fun, outside on our grounds, we do the outside "Movies in the Park." So, this Saturday we did The Wiz. And over two hundred people came, and their families to watch the movie.$$This... it appears to me, and maybe I'm wrong. It seems like the community is more engaged with DuSable [Museum of African American History] now than at any other time.$$I think they're more engaged, and I think they're going to get even more engaged with some of the programs that we're going to be doing. We did an outside Gallery 37-type of program this summer called "Conversation Peace," where we brought African-American and Mexican American youth together to talk about peace, and to do an art project about that. The result of their work is going to... we're going to tour some of their schools and then serve as a conversation piece around which to have discussions about race and about non-violence, and so forth. We're doing a huge opening for our newest exhibit, "The African Presence of Mexico," that involves both cultures coming together on our grounds--dancers and elders and young people. We're going to a youth summit of African-American and Latino youth around their common issues. We think a museum has to be a living... very organic thing. And so, our slogan is "History Lives Here."

Margaret Burroughs

Artist, educator and institution-builder Margaret Burroughs was born on November 1, 1917 in Saint Rose, Louisiana. Always passionate about learning, Margaret moved north to Chicago in order to earn her Elementary Teacher's Certificate, which she received in 1937 from Chicago Normal College. She continued her education first at Chicago Teachers College, and later, at the Art Institute of Chicago, from which she earned her B.A. in Art Education in 1946 and her M.A. in 1948.

Dr. Margaret Burroughs made the first of her many contributions to African American arts and culture when she founded--at age 22--the South Side Community Art Center, a community organization that serves as a gallery and workshop studio for artists and students. Mrs. Burroughs continued to serve on the Board of Directors for the Center, which remained active more than sixty years after its formation.

During the mid-1950s Margaret Burroughs married Charles Burroughs, poet and founder of the Associated Negro Press. His organization, modeled on the Associated Press, played an important role in the coordination of African American newspapers throughout the United States. After extended travels together, the Burroughs' made the most well-known contribution to African American posterity in 1961 when they founded the DuSable Museum of African American History on the ground floor of their Chicago home. The museum, which has since moved to its own buildings in Chicago's Washington Park, has become an internationally recognized resource for African American art. DuSable Museum also hosts various educational programs and houses a permanent collection of more than thirteen thousand artifacts, artworks and books.

Although Margaret Burroughs worked in sculpture, painting, and many other artforms throughout her career, it was her exceptional skill as a printmaker that earned her a place within the history of art. For many years she worked with linoleum block prints to create images evocative of African American culture. Margaret Burroughs' work was featured in exclusive shows at the Corcoran Art Galleries in Washington D.C. and at the Studio Museum in New York. She served as art director for the Negro Hall of Fame and illustrated many books including What Shall I Tell My Children Who are Black?(1968). Mrs. Burroughs also published several volumes of her own poems, illustrated a number of children's books, and exhibited her own artwork all over the world. In 1975 she received the President's Humanitarian Award and in 1977 was distinguished as one of Chicago's Most Influential Women by the Chicago Defender. February 1, 1986 was proclaimed "Dr. Margaret Burroughs Day" in Chicago by late Mayor Harold Washington.

Burroughs passed away on November 21, 2010 at age 93.

Accession Number

A2000.012

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/12/2000

Last Name

Burroughs

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Middle Name

Taylor

Organizations
Schools

James R. Doolittle, Jr. Elementary School

William W. Carter Elementary School

Englewood High School

Chicago State University

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Teachers College, Columbia University

Illinois State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Margaret

Birth City, State, Country

Saint Rose

HM ID

BUR04

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

If first you don't succeed, try, try again.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/1/1917

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

11/21/2010

Short Description

Printmaker and museum director Margaret Burroughs (1917 - 2010 ) was a prominent artist who helped establish Chicago's South Side Community Arts Center and co-founded the DuSable Museum of African American History.

Employment

DuSable Museum of African American History

Ebony Museum of Negro History and Art

South Side Community Art Center

DuSable High School

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Margaret Burroughs Interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Margaret Burroughs lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Margaret Burroughs recalls her family background and early childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Margaret Burroughs shares memories of growing up during the Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Margaret Burroughs remembers her childhood personality and aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Margaret Burroughs recounts her high school aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Margaret Burroughs remembers those who encouraged her artistic pursuits

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Margaret Burroughs details her college experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Margaret Burroughs talks about how she inspires students to achieve

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Margaret Burroughs discusses the founding of the South Side Community Arts Center

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Interviewer reveals to Margaret Burroughs her motive for the HistoryMakers project

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Margaret Burroughs compares Chicago's arts scene to that of New York's Harlem Renaissance

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Margaret Burroughs discusses her medium in the context of her teaching

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Margaret Burroughs discusses her marriages, children and grandchildren

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Margaret Burroughs reveals the connection between her teaching and her artwork

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Margaret Burroughs explains her notion of herself as a "People's Painter"

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Margaret Burroughs talks about concept behind her children's story, 'Jasper, the Drummin' Boy'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Margaret Burroughs talks about her affiliation with Paul Robeson and the McCarthy Era

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Margaret Burroughs explains the Mexico connection, its sphere of influence, and her community of comtemporary artists.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Margaret Burroughs recalls negotiating the sales of a few of her paintings

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Margaret Burroughs discusses her late husband, Charlie Burroughs

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Margaret Burroughs discusses the precurser to the DuSable Museum

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Margaret Burroughs summarizes the origin of the DuSable Museum from its earliest years

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Margaret Burroughs details how she obtained funding to outfit the DuSable Museum of African American History

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Margaret Burroughs discusses transitions in Chicago's black arts community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Margaret Burroughs envisions a future for the DuSable Museum

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Margaret Burroughs shares her experiences traveling in Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Margaret Burroughs discusses her views on the African Diaspora

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Margaret Burroughs talks about influential persons in her life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Margaret Burroughs talks about her legacy and other African American artists who were her contemporaries

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Margaret Burroughs explains her philosophy of life, art, creativity, and teaching

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Margaret Burroughs comments on how she would like to be remembered