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Don Terry

Journalist Don Terry was born on July 30, 1957 in Evanston, Illinois to Jeanne Katherine Ober and Bill Terry. Terry graduated from St. Mary's High School in 1975, and received his B.A. degree in American history from Oberlin College in 1979. He then earned his M.A. degree in magazine journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in 1980.

Terry began his journalism career at the Chicago Defender, where he worked as a staff writer. He went on to write for several newspapers in the Midwest, including the St. Paul Pioneer Press and the St. Paul Dispatch. In 1988, Terry joined The New York Times as a staff writer in the metro section. Over time, Terry became a national correspondent, and many of his articles focused on legal and social injustice issues. He also covered subjects ranging from the El Rukns Chicago gang convictions in 1991 to the Los Angeles riots in 1992 to serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer’s conviction. In 2000, Terry’s article, “Getting Under My Skin: A White Mother and A Black Father Left Him This Legacy” was published as part of a New York Times series called “How Race is Lived in America,” garnering Terry and the other reporters the 2001 Pulitzer Prize. From 2001 to 2009, Terry worked as a reporter at the Chicago Tribune. He also contributed to the Chicago News Cooperative and the Columbia Journalism Review; and wrote a weekly column for the Chicago Sun-Times for many years. From 2012 to 2015, Terry worked as a senior writer at the Southern Poverty Law Center. Terry became the national press secretary and communications director at the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition in 2016, working closely with Reverend Jesse L. Jackson.

Terry received several awards over his journalism career, including the Studs Terkel Media Award in 1997 as well as the Chicago Tribune’s Writing Award and the Peter Lisagor Award, both in 2003. In 2009, Terry received an Encore fellowship from the Columbia Journalism Review.

Terry is married to attorney Rebecca Ford Terry.

Don Terry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 23, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.027

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/23/2018

Last Name

Terry

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Don

Birth City, State, Country

Evanston

HM ID

TER08

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Province Town, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

It’s Time For Dinner.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/30/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salmon Croquettes

Short Description

Journalist Don Terry (1957 - ) was a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for The New York Times and The Chicago Tribune. He also worked with the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition.

Favorite Color

Green

Ralph G. Moore

Minority business consultant Ralph G. Moore was born in Evanston, Illinois on July 4, 1949. His mother, Alberta, worked in the post office, while his father, William, was a railroad worker. After graduating from Evanston Township High School in 1967, Moore attended Southern Illinois University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1971. The following year, he was awarded his CPA license.

After earning his bachelor’s degree, Moore took a position with accounting firm Arthur Andersen, where he remained until 1973. From there, he served as vice president for the Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company and was controller for the Parker House Sausage Company. In 1979, Moore founded Ralph G. Moore & Associates (RGMA). Today, RGMA is one of the premier consulting firms for helping employers to diversify their suppliers. In addition, they consult government agencies with the development and implementation of Affirmative Action programs and help entrepreneurs raise capital.

In addition to his consulting work, Moore serves on the board of directors of several firms. He has also been a contributor to the Harvard Business Review and MBE Magazine. He is also a co-founder and the president of the Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs. Since 1994, Moore has served as a trustee of the City Colleges of Chicago, and he is also a trustee of the University of Chicago Hospitals & Health System.

Moore’s numerous awards over the years include “Entrepreneur of the Year” from Inc. Magazine and Enrst & Young and the Governor’s Minority Small Business Advocate of the Year Award from former Illinois Governor George Ryan.

Accession Number

A2004.121

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/9/2004

Last Name

Moore

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

G.

Schools

Evanston Township High School

Southern Illinois University

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Evanston

HM ID

MOO03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

We're All In This Together.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/4/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Business consultant and business consulting chief executive Ralph G. Moore (1949 - ) founded Ralph G. Moore & Associates (RGMA) in 1979. Over the years, RGMA became one of the premier consulting firms for helping corporations diversify their supply chain.

Employment

Arthur Andersen

Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company

Parker House Sausage Company

Ralph G. Moore & Associates

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph G. Moore's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his mother's move north to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore describes his mother's life in Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the lack of family conversation about racism during his childhood visits to Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore lists his mother's jobs in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore explains his father's reasons for leaving the South

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore recalls stories about his paternal aunt and father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ralph G. Moore describes the racial dynamics of his childhood neighborhood and elementary schools in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his frustrations with his Evanston Township High School's academic expectations

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore describes his personality during the time he attended Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore recalls the impact of his teachers at Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore comments on the racial and ethnic demographics of Evanston, Illinois in the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore compares the histories of the African American community and Jewish community

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore explains his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about black student body at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his social activities and interests during his teenage years

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his older brother's influence on his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his initial experience at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore recalls challenging an accounting professor at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his activities as a member of the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore recalls organizing a black arts festival in Marion prison in Marion, Illinois with his fraternity, Kappa Alpha Psi

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about how he managed to finance his college education at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore recalls his initial experiences working at Arthur Andersen

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore explains how he was able to advance despite initial discrimination at Arthur Andersen

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore recalls leaving the Chicago Board of Trade to work for the Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company in 1947

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his experience working at Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Company

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his involvement with various community and business organizations in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about Habilitative Systems, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his trusteeship at the University of Chicago Medical Center

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore talks about black accountants in Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his business, Ralph G. Moore & Associates

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the personal significance of his company's work with baseball

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter's affinity for history

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his relationship with his daughter's mother and becoming a father

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his daughter's influences and aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore talks about Ralph G. Moore & Associates' role in promoting supplier diversity and minority business development

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the National Minority Supplier Development Council

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore gives examples of what suppliers do within the business world

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore explains the importance of supplier diversity and its implications for minority businesses

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of buying from companies that work with minority vendors

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph G. Moore describes his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph G. Moore talks about racial disparities he encountered at Arthur Andersen and witnesses in corporate America

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph G. Moore reflects on the importance of teaching black youth their history

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of remembering the history of African American struggle

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph G. Moore reflects on opportunities he has been given and his hope for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph G. Moore reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph G. Moore talks about his family's reactions to his accomplishments and his mother's struggle with Alzheimer's disease

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph G. Moore describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph G. Moore narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph G. Moore narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Ralph G. Moore talks about black accountants in Illinois
Ralph G. Moore talks about the importance of buying from companies that work with minority vendors
Transcript
So, I'm involved; also, the Cosmopolitan Chamber of Commerce [Chicago, Illinois], and this is where the clock kind of swings around. In 1972, I passed the CPA [certified public accountant] exam. That's another, I'm one of those stories. It's hard to imagine and it just speaks to how we've been denied opportunity, but in 1972, I passed the CPA exam, November. I was the 68th black CPA in the state, in the history of the State of Illinois. Now, I mean you can celebrate that, but it means, to me it's a tragedy. Now there are hundreds of black CPAs, but at the time we were less than 100, and you know Lester, and [HistoryMaker] Jim [James] Hill [Jr.], they came before--[HistoryMaker] Lester McKeever, they all came before me, but in the history of the state, to be number sixty-eight tells me that there's a problem. But, what happened, and even there it speaks to the whole issue of race, again about Arthur Andersen [Chicago, Illinois], and there's another brother there, Reggie Burton [ph.], who was another black person who started the same as me, University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois], M.B.A., Roosevelt [University, Chicago, Illinois] undergraduate, very--I wouldn't call it arrogant, but very full of himself. Well, [HistoryMaker] Ralph [G. Moore], he went to SIU [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois]. That exam should be pretty tough for a year but, you know, you should do, you know, study hard, you might do okay. You might make it through. So, we took the same exam, right. Long story short, the results came out. I passed it the first time and, a matter of fact, it was one of those tests November '72 [1972] test, I look back and look at the statistics, only 12 percent of the people who took it the first time passed it. Reggie Burton, who was, needless to say he didn't pass it, not only did he not pass it that time, he took it another seven times before he passed it, so I was very, that was one of those moments. I said, we partied, but we got a couple things done.$$You said accounting is an exact science, so you know it or you don't.$$You either know it or you don't. But I think the other issue, I mean the reason I go back and tell that story is that just to be an accountant, you know, not to, to be able to use these tools for the betterment of the community really is what makes it so good for me. So, I volunteered, I've done work with the National Association of Black Accountants [NABA]. We formed a group called the National CPA Society [ph.], which were the first CPAs, and is trying to help other accounting students come through the program, accounting programs. So, it's been a number, I've done a number of things in the community.$One of the stories I tell in our training, we talk about the value proposition. We [Moore and his daughter, Avery Moore] were in a grocery store. She's nine years old. Now, your daughter is fourteen. When she was nine, when you turned into the cereal aisle of the grocery store, you lose control. Whatever is going to go in that cart, she's, she already knows what she wants. She, some Co-Co this or something she saw on TV. So, when we got to the, she reached for her favorite cereal, which was from a company that was not doing that much with supplier diversity at the time. I said, "Well Avery, let's look at this. This company doesn't do much with minority vendors. So, if we give them our money, that money's gonna go straight outside the community. None of it will ever come back into the community." Now here's the--Cap'n Crunch. I always thought it was Captain but it's Cap'n, Quaker Oats. "Cap'n Crunch--now here's a product that you love. I've seen you eat it, Quaker Oats does a lot of work in the community and when we give them our money, that money, they give money back to our community and that money floats around and some of that money ends up in my checking account, and that's the money I take you to [Walt] Disney World [Orlando, Florida] with." And she looked like wait a minute! No Disney World, Disney World??? Why didn't you tell me?? She was mad that I hadn't told her before that if we buy products from, in our house there's only good companies or bad companies. The good companies work with minority vendors, the bad companies don't. So, the good companies are the ones we support. Same thing when she goes shopping. Now, you've heard about the Tommy Hilfiger problem, true or false, Tommy Hilfiger doesn't seem to do a lot in my community. So, we don't buy Tommy Hilfiger. That was a tough lesson for her because she was, you know, it was a big thing for her. My only point to her was we have to shop with companies that have, that are members, that are national members of the national supplier, the NMSDC, the National Minority Supplier Development Council [New York, New York]. Nordstrom's is a member, Express is a member, Limited is a member, which owns Express, Bloomingdale's is a member (unclear) stores, so it turned out that all of the stores that she would like to shop at are members. So, now, what's the one that had a Ghettopoly game, Urban Outfitters, they're not a member, and they, and plus after that Ghettopoly mess, we don't give 'em any of our money. But the reality is there's enough good companies out there that we can support, and the things I tell her, if you can't buy from a black company, buy from a black salesman in a white company. And if you can't buy from a black salesman in a white company, buy from a company that at least works with black businesses and minority businesses. So, she's armed and ready. Again, if we could get more people thinking like her, we could turn this around. You have companies like SONY records [Sony Music Entertainment, Inc., New York, New York], and my lawyer told me to stop calling names, probably because it's amazing how people hear what I say, 'cause I speak a lot around the country. But, you have companies like SONY records, who don't do anything with supplier diversity. How dare you take all that money out of our community with rap music and not do anything with minority and black vendors! It's crazy. So, there's another point in my career, after I get to this plateau where everything's working fine. I get the book written, I'm going on a one-man crusade to help educate black consumers, minority consumers, so we can start buying from companies that do business with us. And that's really been, that would be the final chapter of my career; that I've done very well in creating the strategies for companies who get it to do well, but now we have to go after those companies who don't get it.

Morris Butch Stewart

Musician Morris "Butch" Stewart, Jr., was born in Chicago, Illinois, on January 13, 1953. The third of four children, Stewart earned his high school diploma in Harvey, Illinois, and went on to attend DePaul University in Chicago.

At the age of twenty-two, Stewart and his future wife, Brenda Mitchell, began working as background vocalists for Ramsey Louis. That same year, 1975, Stewart performed in several shows with Earth, Wind, and Fire, with whom he later worked on other projects. In 1978, Stewart formed JoyArtMusic, his musical jingle production company. JoyArtMusic was hailed as one of Chicago's premiere creative houses for television and radio theme song creation, as well as advertising. Some of JoyArtMusic's more recognizable tunes include the theme song to the Oprah Winfrey Show, and the Tom Joyner Morning Show. By 1985, Stewart was producing records, as well as writing music and lyrics. In 1990, Stewart teamed up with Earth, Wind, and Fire to write "King of Groove;" throughout his career, he wrote numerous other songs for various artists.

Stewart created music for exercise videos and collaborated on a children's project, Home, with the purpose of teaching children about the importance of friendship, generosity, and family. Stewart was the owner and founder of Copia Records. Stewart and his wife also established the Art of Making Music Foundation, a nonprofit organization that raised money for music education in schools; the couple also raised two children.

Accession Number

A2003.068

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/8/2003

Last Name

Stewart

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Butch

Organizations
First Name

Morris

Birth City, State, Country

Evanston

HM ID

STE04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/13/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Indian Food

Death Date

5/19/2017

Short Description

Music producer and songwriter Morris Butch Stewart (1953 - 2017 ) is the president and founder of Joy Art Music.

Employment

JoyArtMusic

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Morris Stewart interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Morris Stewart lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Morris Stewart recalls his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Morris Stewart talks about his mother and father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Morris Stewart describes his childhood community

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Morris Stewart remembers his elementary school

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Morris Stewart recalls his childhood personality and interests

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Morris Stewart remembers his music collection as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Morris Stewart recalls his high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Morris Stewart recounts his entry in the music business

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Morris Stewart remembers his mentor, Charles Stepney

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Morris Stewart recalls his advertising composing work

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Morris Stewart remembers starting his own production company, JoyArtMusic

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Morris Stewart recounts his courtship and marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Morris Stewart recalls some highlights from his career

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Morris Stewart discusses some of the challenges of his career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Morris Stewart explains some of his current projects

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Morris Stewart shares his regrets

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Morris Stewart discusses his composing work for the Oprah Winfrey Show' and the dearth of quality in music

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Morris Stewart details his favorite musicians

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Morris Stewart describes his composing work for Tom Joyner

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Morris Stewart discusses some of his current business ventures

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Morris Stewart shares his hopes that the black community will learn to nuture and love itself

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Morris Stewart reflects on his life and career

Barbara Boyd

Barbara Boyd was born in Evanston, Illinois on April 27, 1929. A precocious child, she was educated at Evanston Township High School, where she excelled in literature and the humanities. She continued her studies at Roosevelt University and Columbia College's School of Radio and Television, where she was introduced to the world of broadcast journalism. She later went on to Indiana University and settled in Indianapolis, after graduation. In 1969, Barbara Boyd joined the WRTV 6 News Staff as a consumer reporter at age forty. Her early broadcasts of social and economic events quickly earned her a devoted following. As her audience grew, her range of subjects likewise grew.

Among Barbara Boyd's groundbreaking features was her piece on breast cancer. During the broadcast, Mrs. Boyd addressed her TV audience from her hospital bed one week after her own mastectomy operation. She urged viewers to become more aware of the symptoms of the disease and made note of resource centers in the area that would provide information and testing. The highly acclaimed, award-winning feature was crucial in the reduction of the number of breast cancer cases that year.

An active community leader, Barbara Boyd has been a member of the National Conference of Christians and Jews for many years. She holds membership at the Indianapolis Association of Black Journalists, the NAACP, and the March of Dimes Association. In addition to these activities, Mrs. Boyd has been a fundraiser and board member for the Indiana Make-A-Wish Foundation since 1996.

Barbara Boyd has been profiled in Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, Indianapolis Woman Magazine, and a book entitled In The Public Interest. She has received four CASPER broadcasting awards from the Community Service Council of Indianapolis and has been named "Woman of the Year" by the American Cancer Society for her daring feature on breast cancer. She has also received awards from the Indianapolis Press Club, the Indiana State Medical Association, and the Cystic Fibrosis Research Foundation. For three consecutive years she was named one of Indianapolis' Top Ten Women by the Indianapolis Star. She is also a recipient of the prestigious Martin Luther King Freedom Award. In March, 2000, Barbara Boyd was inducted into the Indianapolis Hall of Fame.

Boyd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 11, 2000.

Accession Number

A2000.006

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/11/2000

Last Name

Boyd

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Evanston Township High School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Evanston

HM ID

BOY01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Depends on audience - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Angola, Indiana

Favorite Quote

Do What You Got To Do.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Interview Description
Birth Date

4/27/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Indianapolis

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Steak, Potatoes, Salad

Short Description

Television reporter Barbara Boyd (1929 - ) was a groundbreaking broadcast journalist, who was most known for her feature on breast cancer awareness, on which she reported one week after having a mastectomy.

Employment

Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company

National Conference of Christians and Jews

Indianapolis Headstart

WRTV-6 (Television station: Indianapolis, Ind.)

WRTV TV

Favorite Color

All Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:930,37:7161,89:12741,253:13671,268:14136,274:14787,287:15438,298:16275,310:21380,317:21735,323:24433,375:25782,402:28246,416:29158,425:29956,434:33190,456:39490,567:53384,716:54000,733:54224,738:56170,749:56635,755:60154,793:60874,806:61450,815:62026,824:62386,830:65729,864:67731,912:68732,932:69194,941:69887,953:70426,970:71119,982:71427,987:71812,993:72197,1000:72505,1005:74969,1043:81234,1103:83330,1113:83953,1121:85911,1155:86445,1162:87157,1171:91618,1193:92170,1203:93412,1224:102302,1303:102822,1309:108310,1339:111480,1369:111820,1377:112160,1384:112500,1390:112772,1399:113044,1404:116770,1484:117316,1491:119940,1532:128400,1713:131620,1791:132740,1816:133020,1828:133300,1833:135471,1840:141909,1976:142431,1983:159560,2217:164086,2275$0,0:360,11:864,20:1224,26:3651,44:7648,66:13900,137:14368,169:15148,182:17470,196:19120,220:20056,236:20704,246:22144,283:22504,289:27811,343:31710,391:34301,416:35060,429:39876,515:40636,550:40940,555:41928,599:45728,660:46108,666:46412,671:52983,700:54375,724:56632,745:56856,750:57136,756:57696,776:58760,804:59096,811:59936,841:62760,864:63480,878:64840,905:65320,912:73621,991:74615,1014:75183,1024:84300,1160:86424,1204:89941,1243:90289,1248:93856,1317:94552,1327:95596,1372:95944,1377:100724,1460:102196,1479:102404,1484:106296,1565:106888,1576:107184,1581:107998,1593:108960,1610:109404,1617:110884,1645:113252,1706:116878,1813:117618,1830:118432,1848:149870,2344:158690,2428:159026,2433:159446,2439:163646,2541:173312,2680:176032,2749:176644,2760:176916,2765:177664,2777:179910,2783:182780,2842:183480,2859:184880,2887:194019,2941:196756,2984:197412,2993:198068,3003:198642,3012:210372,3131:210742,3138:211038,3143:211334,3148:214570,3178:216310,3183:217390,3196:217930,3202:227081,3345:230872,3396:232086,3422
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barbara Boyd interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barbara Boyd's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barbara Boyd remembers her parents and grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barbara Boyd faces employment discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barbara Boyd reflects on her girlhood in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The young Barbara Boyd dreams of stardom

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barbara Boyd, a daddy's girl, describes her father's work

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barbara Boyd describes her school days in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barbara Boyd considers the black North Shore

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Barbara Boyd reminisces about her adolescent social life

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Barbara Boyd finds the South not as bad as she expected

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barbara Boyd remembers family outings to Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barbara Boyd discusses her childhood friend, Lorraine Hansberry

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barbara Boyd cites her parents as role models

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barbara Boyd reflects upon her high school graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barbara Boyd describes instances of racial exclusion

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barbara Boyd describes college life at The University of Illinois, Champaign

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barbara and Theodore 'Ted' Boyd begin their courtship

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barbara Boyd makes geographical and career moves

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Barbara Boyd gets an unexpected job opportunity with WRTV in Indianapolis

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Barbara Boyd describes early interactions with co-workers at WRTV in Indianapolis

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barbara Boyd, the newswoman, learns from her co-workers

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barbara Boyd, the newswoman, finds support in her family

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barbara Boyd recognizes her public influence

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barbara Boyd finds a lump in her breast

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barbara Boyd's breast cancer inspires a news story and other appearances

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barbara Boyd's broadcast career develops

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barbara Boyd describes her most interesting story, the Padanaram commune

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barbara Boyd revisits Daniel Wright's Padanaram commune

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barbara Boyd discusses a journalist's responsibilities

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barbara Boyd considers the role of women in the media

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barbara Boyd considers technology's effect on journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barbara Boyd describes how broadcast journalism evolved in her tenure

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barbara Boyd explains her signature hairstyle

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barbara Boyd details Indianapolis's development over four decades

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barbara Boyd expresses her triumphs and goals

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Barbara Boyd reflects on family legacies

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Barbara Boyd imagines her own legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Photo - Barbara Boyd on the cover of 'Indianapolis Monthly' magazine, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1991

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Photo - Illustration and biography of Barbara Boyd from 'Indiana's Trailblazing Women' engagement calendar for 2000

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Photo - Cover of 'Indiana's Trailblazing Women' engagement calendar, 2000

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Photo - Portrait of Barbara Boyd from 'Indiana's Trailblazing Women' engagement calendar for 2000

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Photo - Barbara Boyd at age sixteen at WGN radio's 'Rubin's Stars of Tomorrow' competition, Chicago, Illinois, 1945

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Photo - Barbara Boyd delivers the news with co-anchor Jack Reinhardt at WRTV, Channel 6, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1987

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Photo - Another view of Barbara Boyd delivering the news at WRTV, Channel 6, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1987

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Photo - Barbara Boyd at age three or four, ca. 1932-1933

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Photo - Barbara Boyd with her family at the Fall Creek YMCA, Indianapolis, Indiana, ca. 1961-1964

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Photo - Barbara Boyd and Cory Sevalle

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Photo - Barbara Boyd with Phillip Rhee, director and star of the movie 'Best of the Best 3: No Turning Back', 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Photo - Barbara Boyd's portrayal of a bus driver on the set of the movie, 'Best of the Best 3: No Turning Back', 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Photo - Barbara Boyd outside her trailer on the set of the movie, 'Best of the Best 3: No Turning Back', 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Photo - Barbara Boyd with the young actor, Jason, at the movie premiere of 'Best of the Best 3: No Turning Back', 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Photo - Barbara Boyd gets her makeup applied for her role in the movie 'Best of the Best 3: No Turning Back', 1995

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Photo - Barbara Boyd with her ninety-five year old mother, Alberta Andry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Photo - Barbara Boyd's father, Ernest Andry

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Photo - Barbara Boyd and her family at her 25th wedding anniversary

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Photo - Family portrait of Barbara Boyd and her family, ca. 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Photo - Barbara Boyd and Maggie Greeley, on the cover of 'Mature Lifestyles' magazine, Indianapolis, Indiana, ca. 1990s

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Photo - Portrait of a young Barbara Boyd, ca. 1950s

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Photo - Barbara Boyd at a golf outing with friends

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Photo - Barbara Boyd and her husband, Theodore Boyd at a benefit for the Aesculapian Club

Tape: 5 Story: 15 - Photo - Article about Barbara Boyd's recovery from breast cancer in the 'Indianapolis Star' newspaper, Indianapolis, Indiana, April 10, 1994

Tape: 5 Story: 16 - Photo - The plaque given to Barbara Boyd by the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana, June 24, 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 17 - Photo - Award presented to Barbara Boyd upon being inducted into the Indiana Journalism Hall of Fame, Indianapolis, Indiana, April 15, 2000

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
The young Barbara Boyd dreams of stardom
Barbara Boyd revisits Daniel Wright's Padanaram commune
Transcript
And what was the young Barbara Boyd, what type of child was she? I mean, we know--. You know, you talked about playing with your cousins, but what kind of child was she? Was she a dreamer? Was she precocious?$$I was precocious. I was a dreamer. And I always dreamed about being in the movies. I went to the movies every Saturday. That was my thing. After my chores were finished I would go to the movie. And I remember this one movie--. What was it? Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald, I've forgotten what it was. And I was on my way. And honey, the fare had gone up, to a dime. I don't think I had but seven cents or something and I was crushed because that's all I had, you know (laughs)! So I didn't go back home to get more money, but every Saturday I went to the movies. Bette Davis was my absolute favorite movie star. And of course I--. We were talking the other night and I said, "I bet you, today, you couldn't name all five or six great, you know, movie stars like Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Greer Garson, Ann Sheridan, Barbara Stanwyck, you know. Just--Olivia de Havilland, Joan Fontaine, Shirley Temple, you know. That you would really remember today." To me, those women are still great. I lived with them every Saturday. The John Garfields, the--you know. I just fantasized about being a movie star. And every opportunity I got--. We lived about a half a block from the post office and I'd go down there and I'd tap dance at night. And I had one of those poodle skirts, I never shall forget it. It was turquoise and it had a little poodle on it and I'd go down had my little tap dancing shoes because I took tap dancing lessons, you know. And I'd go down there and I'd do my little number and I'd twirl around and my skirt would go all out and the guys in the back, that worked in the back of the post office began to know who I was. And they'd say , "Here comes Barbara again, hey we can hear her out there tapping up!" Oh, I'd imagine I was Ginger Rogers and I'd-- (makes tapping noise). It was great (laughts)! To me--.$$That's cute. That's cute.$$Fantasizing.$$Well you know, its good to have a good imagination. I used to think I was going to be discovered too. It was cute. The limousine would drive up. But anyway--. So I can identify.$And I went back ten years later, "Padanaram Revisited." Hey, the coveralls are gone. The old beat up hat with the hole in it is gone. Daniel [Wright, commune leader] comes up and meets me in a Cadillac [automobile]. He's got on the corporate uniform with the blue jacket and the khaki pants and the Oxford [style] shirt. "Let me show you around my place," he says. They have their own school now. His son and daughter are graduates of IU [Indiana University] and they teach there--they have their own--teach there. They have their own little fire department. They have their own--they grow their own food. I think they even have their own electrical power from somewhere. Each--I think in October they have a big festival, where they make their candles. You know, make hand-crafted stuff and people come there and go through the camp. Now they have a place for the single men to stay and the single women and for the marrieds. And before, they had this one place and you had a cubicle. If you had a family of three, you all stayed in that room and that room was about that big, enough for a bed and a dresser maybe. Now everybody has their own quarters. So they had really it going--now they do--they not only do logging, but they make log homes. They have a place in Blooming--I think they have an office in Bloomington [Indiana]--at least they did the last time I did the story, they had had an office in Bloomington. So now they have big business. Then the next thing I look up, 'National Geographic' [magazine] had done a story on them. So, that was a very interesting story. What was really interesting is, that Daniel came to Indianapolis [Indiana] one day and he stopped by the station. So I said, "Come on, I want you to be on the noon show, we can do an interview." So I pulled up some of the tape from the previous show. And while we were sitting there, he had a hole in his coverall and he said, "Barbara, you ought to get a needle and thread and sew up Daniel's hole." I said, "Look here, Daniel, you ain't talking to one of your Padanaram women, I don't sew up my husband's clothes--his pants, you know." You know what he told me, he says, "You know what, for a colored woman, you're pretty intelligent" (laughs). I mean, you know, there's no changing somebody like that, you know?$$But see the black guy that was there, was there black women there?$$No.$$That's interesting.$$He was the only black person there.$$So what did you report back? I mean that must have been a report--.$$Well I called my friend and told her he was there. Whether she got in touch with him or he got in touch with him [sic, her], I don't know. But he knew me right off. We just grabbed one another and hugged one another. But that's the most interesting story that I've ever done. And it'a a little--and I tell you, I think one of the stories that I got the most calls on, and you would think it was a nothing little story. But it was a story about a guy who repaired cracks in your car window. This was a long time ago and everybody does it now. But then it was new. And I bet you, until almost to the time I left that station, I'd get at least one call every six or seven months. "You know that story you did back in 19--, do you still have that guy's number?" (imitates inquirer's voice) You know, unreal. I had just umpteen calls about the guy who could fix the cracks in your car window.